The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Marcomir Duke of the East Franks and < > [Daughter of Boaz]




Husband Marcomir Duke of the East Franks 1 2 3

            AKA: Marcomer Dux of the East Franks, Marcomeres Duke of the East Franks
           Born: Abt 347 - <Alemannia (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 404
         Buried: 


         Father: Clodius IV Duke of the East Franks (Abt 0324-0389) 4 5
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 369

Events

• Invaded: the Roman Empire, 388.




Wife < > [Daughter of Boaz] 6

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Boaz (Abt 0305-      ) 7
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Pharamond King of the Franks [Legendary] 8 9 10

            AKA: Faramund King of the Franks [Legendary]
           Born: Abt 369 - <Gallica Belgica (Belgium)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 428
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Argotta Princess of the Salian Franks (Abt 0376-      ) 11 12
           Marr: Abt 394




Research Notes: Husband - Marcomir Duke of the East Franks

From Wikipedia - Marcomer :

Marcomer (Marcomeres, Marchomer, Marchomir) was a Frankish leader (dux) in the late 4th century who invaded the Roman Empire in the year 388, when the usurper and leader of the whole of Roman Gaul , Magnus Maximus was surrounded in Aquileia by Theodosius I .

The invasion is documented by Gregory of Tours who cited the now lost work of Sulpicius Alexander . According to this account Marcomer, Sunno and Genobaud invaded the Roman provinces Germania and Belgia in Gaul. They broke through the limes , killed many people, destroyed the most fruitful lands and made the city Köln panic. After this raid the main body of the Franks moved back over the Rhine with their booty. Some of the Franks remained in the Belgian woods. When the Roman generals Magnus Maximus , Nanninus and Quintinus heard the news in Trier , they attacked those remaining Frankish forces and killed many of them. After this engagement Quintinus crossed the Rhine to punish the Franks in their own country, however his army was surrounded and beaten. Some Roman soldiers drowned in the marshes, others were killed by Franks, few made it back to their Empire.

Nanninus and Quintinus were replaced by Charietto and Syrus , who were again confronted by an attack of unindentified Franks.

Later, after the fall of Magnus Maximus, Marcomer and Sunno held a short meeting about the recent attacks with the Frank Arbogastes , who was a general (magister militum) in the Roman army. The Franks delivered hostages as usual, and Arbogastes returned to his winter quarters in Trier.

A couple of years later when Arbogastes had seized power and the West Roman army was nearly completely in the hands of Frankish mercenaries, he crossed the Rhine with a Roman army into Germania, because he hated his own kin. Marcomer was seen as leader with Chatti and Ampsivarii but the two did not engage.

Later we hear from the poet Claudian that Marcomer was arrested by Romans and banned to a villa in Tuscany. His brother Sunno crossed the Rhine and tried to settle himself as leader of the band of Marchomir, however he was killed by his own people.

According to the later Liber Historiae Francorum , Marcomer tried to unite the Franks after the death of Sunno. He proposed that the Franks should live under one king and proposed his own son Pharamond (whose earliest mention is in this work, and who is considered mythological by scholars) for the kingship. This source does not relate whether Marcomer succeeded, but from other later sources that recall the account of Liber Historiae Francorum, the impression may be gained that Pharamond was regarded as the first king of the Franks. However, modern scholars, such as Edward James, do not accept this account in the Liber Historiae Francorum as historical, because Marcomer is called the son of the Trojan king Priam , which is an obvious impossibility. Another difficulty with this account is that earlier sources such as Gregory of Tours make it crystal clear that a century after Marcomer there were still many Frankish kings, ruling over portions or separate tribes - indeed, it has been proposed that the word "ruler" may be more appropriate than "king", as there was at that time no one ruler over all the Frankish people. Clovis I , according to Gregory of Tours, had several other rulers or kings killed in order to manipulate control and increase his territory, and through his machinations dethroned other leaders such as the Frankish counts of Triër, but even he was not the single Frankish king, for tribes as the Thuringii , Chamavi and Bructeri continued their own structures. After Clovis' death, his empire was divided again amongst his sons who ruled simultaneously over different areas. 1 2 3


Research Notes: Child - Pharamond King of the Franks [Legendary]

Legendary father of Clodio, part of a fictitious descent from the Trojans.

FamilySearch.org (Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer) has b. in Westphalia, Germany. Has title as King of the Salic Franks, and gives his father as Marcomir, Duke of the East Franks + a daughter of Boaz. This parentage is legendary and likely untrue.

--------------

From Wikipedia - Pharamond :

Pharamond or Faramund is a legendary early king of the Franks first referred to in the anonymous 8th century Carolingian text Liber Historiae Francorum , also known as the Gesta regnum Francorum. In this work, which is customarily dated to 727, the anonymous author begins by writing of a mythical Trojan origin for the Franks . The emphasis of the Liber was upon "construct[ing] a specific past for a particular group of people."[1]

The story is told of the election of the first Frankish king.[2] It says that after the death of Sunno , his brother Marcomer , leader of the Ampsivarii and Chatti , proposed to the Franks that they should have one single king, contrary to their tradition. The Liber adds that Pharamond, named as Marchomir's son, was chosen as this first king (thus beginning the tradition of long-haired kings of the Franks), and then states that when he died, his son Chlodio was raised up as the next king. The work says no more of him.

Because there is no reference in any source prior to this work[3] to this figure named Pharamond, who is placed prior to Chlodio (that is, before ca. 428), scholars consider him a legendary rather than historical figure.[4] As a matter of fact in several sources, for example Gregory of Tours , multiple kings are attested to rule simultaneously in later times. It is thus a dubious matter to assume that, even had Pharamond existed, he was ever recognized as sole king. The first king of the Franks who may have been close to this position was Clovis I , but after his death his empire was divided again amongst his sons who ruled again simultaneously.

The myth of Pharamond has led to new legends and romances in later times. In past times this has led to attempts to falsely write Pharamond into Prosper Tiro [5]. Martin Bouquet at a much later date invented an entire history of Pharamond.[1] 8 9 10


William Jackson "Captain" Fish and < > [Shawnee Woman]




Husband William Jackson "Captain" Fish 13 14

            AKA: Paschal Fish Sr, William Jackson
           Born: Abt 1760
     Christened: 
           Died: Late Oct 1833
         Buried: 


         Father: Chief Black Fish (1725-1779)
         Mother: Watmeme (1730-1797)




         Father: <Joseph > Jackson (      -      )
         Mother: < > [Shawnee Woman] (      -      )


       Marriage: Abt 1789

   Other Spouse: Elizabeth Bishop (      -      ) - Abt 1780

   Other Spouse: Polly Rogers (1782-1848/1849) 15 - Abt 1798

Events

• Adopted: by Black Fish (Shawnee), Bef 1778.

• Legislation: Indian Removal Act passed by Congress, 28 May 1830.

• Moved: to Missouri, 1828.




Wife < > [Shawnee Woman]

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Arch Fish

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M Isaac Fish 16

            AKA: Isaac Jackson Fish, Isaac Jackson
           Born: <1828>
     Christened: 
           Died: <26 Aug 1891> - <Oklahoma>, United States
         Buried:  - <Secondine or Armstrong Cemetery, Nowata County, Oklahoma>, United States



3 M Andrew Fish

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



4 M Jesse Fish

            AKA: Jesse Jackson Fish, Jesse Jackson
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Husband - William Jackson "Captain" Fish

http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html has b. abt 1760


Death Notes: Husband - William Jackson "Captain" Fish

www.wyandot.org/emigrant.htm has late October, 1833.
http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html has d. 1833
Another source states that he died at the Shawnee Mission in 1834. Burial?


Research Notes: Husband - William Jackson "Captain" Fish

May have been 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware (see below).
--------------
From text accompanying a photograph from the Smithsonian Institution archives:

"[Leander] Jackson Fish's father [Paschal Fish] was half Shawnee, one eighth Miami and one sixteenth Delaware. "
----------
If the math is correct and Paschal Fish's mother was 100% Shawnee, then his father [William Jackson] was probably 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware. On the other hand, if Paschal Fish's mother was Polly Rogers, either Polly was 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware with William Jackson Fish identifying himself as Shawnee, or Polly was 100% Shawnee and William Jackson Fish was 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware.

---------
From Historic Shawnee Names of the 1700s - http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html

"Fish aka William Jackson - Adopted-white born about 1760-died 1833 - adopted son of Black Fish before 1778, raiding Ohio River valley 1788, Little Turtle War, move to MO 1828, husband 1st about 1780 of Elizabeth Bishop-white, 2nd about 1789 of Shawnee Woman, 3rd 1798 of Polly Rogers-1/2 Shawnee Metis (granddaughter of Black Fish), father with Shawnee Woman of Arch/90, Pascal/92, Isaac/94, Andrew/95, Jesse/96-all 1/2 Shawnee Metis, no children of record with Elizabeth, with Polly of Elizabeth Nakease/98, John/99, William Jr/1800-all 1/4th Shawnee Metis"

See notes under Joseph Jackson. It is unlikely that the Joseph Jackson captured by the Shawnee with Daniel Boone in 1778 was this William Jackson's father since records show this William adopted by the Shawnee before that Joseph was captured.

---------------------

See KHC, vol. 9, pp. 166,167. Historian Rodney Staab of Shawnee Mission, Kansas, has furnished me with an excellent account of Chief Fish written by Fern Long. Her information conflicts somewhat with other sources, but it should not be missed by anyone doing research on the Jackson/Fish family. According to her 1978 article on Chief Fish, she agrees that [William Jackson Fish] was captured as a youth and raised by the Shawnees in the band of Lewis Rogers whose daughter he married. Paschal Fish was "a large-framed man" who "also acquired the Indian ways seeming to be totally Indian." but at the same time, she says "these Shawnees had associated with white people for generations and desired a settled life with homes, schools, churches, ___and agriculture."

----------------
From Kansas State Historical Society
Letter 13 Jan 1831 from Richard W. Cummins, U.S. Ind. Agt., Delaware & Shawnee Agency to William Clark, S.I.A., St. Louis:
"Chiefs of Fish's or Jackson's band of Shawnees have agreed to allow a school to be started. Revd. Mr. McAllister & Thomas Johnson hope to have school in operation early in spring." 13 14


Research Notes: Child - Isaac Fish

An Isaac Fish is buried in Armstrong Cemetery or Secondine Cemetery (the same place?) in Nowata County, Oklahoma. That may be "our" Isaac. 16


Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy and < > [Daughter of Duke Bernard]




Husband Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy 17 18

           Born: Apr 773
     Christened: 12 Apr 781 - Rome, (Italy)
           Died: 8 Jul 810 - Milan, Italy
         Buried: 


         Father: Charlemagne King of France, Holy Roman Emperor (0747-0814) 19 20 21 22
         Mother: Hildegard of Vinzgouw (Abt 0758-0783) 23 24 25 26


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Bertha (      -      ) - Bef 800

Events

• Baptized: by Pope Adrian I, 12 Apr 781, Rome, (Italy).

• King of Italy: 781-810.

• Consecrated: King of Lombardy, 15 Apr 781.




Wife < > [Daughter of Duke Bernard] 27

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Duke Bernard (      -      ) 27
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Bernard King of Italy 28 29

           Born: 797 - Vermand, Picardy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Apr 818 - Milan, Italy
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Cunigunde (      -Abt 0835) 30




Christening Notes: Husband - Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy

Baptized at Rome, 12 Apr. 781, by Pope Adrian I


Research Notes: Husband - Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-14

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) has b. Apr 777.

Wikipedia has b. April 773.

From Wikipedia - Pepin of Italy :

Pepin (April 773 - 8 July 810 ) was the son of Charlemagne and king of Italy (781 -810) under the authority of his father.

Pepin was the third son of Charlemagne , and the second with his wife Hildegard . He was born Carloman, but when his brother Pepin the Hunchback betrayed their father, the royal name Pepin passed to him. He was made king of Italy after his father's conquest of the Lombards , in 781, and crowned by Pope Hadrian I with the Iron Crown of Lombardy .

He was active as ruler of Italy and worked to expand the Frankish empire. In 791 , he marched a Lombard army into the Drava valley and ravaged Pannonia , while his father marched along the Danube into Avar territory. Charlemagne left the campaigning to deal with a Saxon revolt in 792 . Pepin and Duke Eric of Friuli continued, however, to assault the Avars' ring-shaped strongholds. The great Ring of the Avars, their capital fortress, was taken twice. The booty was sent to Charlemagne in Aachen and redistributed to all his followers and even to foreign rulers, including King Offa of Mercia .

His activities included a long, but unsuccessful siege of Venice in 810. The siege lasted six months and Pepin's army was ravaged by the diseases of the local swamps and was forced to withdraw. A few months later Pepin died.
He married Bertha, daughter of William of Gellone , count of Toulouse , and had five daughters with her (Adelaide , married Lambert I of Nantes ; Atala; Gundrada; Bertha; and Tetrada), all of whom but the eldest were born between 800 and Pepin's death and died before their grandfather's death in 814 . Pepin also had an illegitimate son Bernard . Pepin was expected to inherit a third of his father's empire, but he predeceased him. The Italian crown passed on to his son Bernard, but the empire went to Pepin's younger brother Louis the Pious . 17 18


Research Notes: Child - Bernard King of Italy

Natural son of Pepin, probably by a daughter of Duke Bernard.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-15

Also Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

From Wikipedia - Bernard of Italy :

Bernard (b. 797 , Vermandois , Normandy ; d. 17 April 818 , Milan , Lombardy ) was the King of Italy from 810 to 818. He plotted against his uncle, Emperor Louis the Pious , when the latter's Ordinatio Imperii made Bernard a vassal of his cousin Lothair . When his plot was discovered, Louis had him blinded, a procedure which killed him.

Life
Bernard was the illegitimate son of King Pepin of Italy , the second legitimate son of the Emperor Charlemagne . In 810, Pepin died from an illness contracted at a siege of Venice; although Bernard was illegitimate, Charlemagne allowed him to inherit Italy. Bernard married Cunigunda of Laon in 813. They had one son, Pepin, Count of Vermandois .
Prior to 817, Bernard was a trusted agent of his grandfather, and of his uncle. His rights in Italy were respected, and he was used as an intermediary to manage events in his sphere of influence - for example, when in 815 Louis the Pious received reports that some Roman nobles had conspired to murder Pope Leo III, and that he had responded by butchering the ringleaders, Bernard was sent to investigate the matter.
A change came in 817, when Louis the Pious drew up an Ordinatio Imperii, detailing the future of the Frankish Empire. Under this, the bulk of the Frankish territory went to Louis' eldest son, Lothair; Bernard received no further territory, and although his Kingship of Italy was confirmed, he would be a vassal of Lothair. This was, it was later alleged, the work of the Empress, Ermengarde , who wished Bernard to be displaced in favour of her own sons. Resenting Louis' actions, Bernard began plotting with a group of magnates: Eggideo, Reginhard, and Reginhar, the last being the grandson of a Thuringian rebel against Charlemagne, Hardrad. Anshelm, Bishop of Milan and Theodulf, Bishop of Orléans , were also accused of being involved: there is no evidence either to support or contradict this in the case of Theodulf, whilst the case for Anshelm is murkier.[1][2]
Bernard's main complaint was the notion of his being a vassal of Lothair. In practical terms, his actual position had not been altered at all by the terms of the decree, and he could safely have continued to rule under such a system. Nonetheless, "partly true" reports came to Louis the Pious that his nephew was planning to set up an 'unlawful' - i.e. independent - regime in Italy.[3]
Louis the Pious reacted swiftly to the plot, marching south to Chalon. Bernard and his associates were taken by surprise; Bernard travelled to Chalon in an attempt to negotiate terms, but he and the ringleaders were forced to surrender to him. Louis had them taken to Aix-la-Chapelle, where they were tried and condemned to death. Louis 'mercifully' commuted their sentences to blinding, which would neutralise Bernard as a threat without actually killing him; however, the process of blinding (carried out by means of pressing a red-hot stiletto to the eyeballs) proved so traumatic that Bernard died in agony two days after the procedure was carried out. At the same time, Louis also had his half-brothers Drogo, Hugh and Theoderic tonsured and confined to monasteries, to prevent other Carolingian off-shoots challenging the main line. He also treated those guilty or suspected of conspiring with Bernard treated harshly: Theodulf of Orleans was gaoled, and died soon afterwards; the lay conspirators were blinded, the clerics deposed and imprisoned; all lost lands and honours. [4][5][6]

Legacy
His Kingdom of Italy was reabsorbed into the Frankish empire, and soon after bestowed upon Louis' eldest son Lothair. In 822, Louis made a display of public penance at Attigny , where he confessed before all the court to having sinfully slain his nephew; he also welcomed his half-brothers back into his favour. These actions possibly stemmed from guilt over his part in Bernard's death. It has been argued by some historians that his behaviour left him open to clerical domination, and reduced his prestige and respect amongst the Frankish nobility.[7] Others, however, point out that Bernard's plot had been a serious threat to the stability of the kingdom, and the reaction no less a threat; Louis' display of penance, then, "was a well-judged gesture to restore harmony and re-establish his authority."[8]

References
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ Riche, Pierre, The Carolingians, p. 148
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ Riche, Pierre, The Carolingians, p. 148
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The New Cambridge History, 700-900
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The New Cambridge History, 700-900

Sources
McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
Riche, Pierre, The Carolingians
McKitterick, Rosamond, The New Cambridge History, 700-900 28 29


Alan Lord of Galloway and < >




Husband Alan Lord of Galloway 31

            AKA: Alan de Galloway
           Born: Abt 1186 - <Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1234
         Buried:  - Abbey of Dundrennan, Kirkcudbright, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland


         Father: Roland Lord of Galloway (Abt 1164-1200) 31 32
         Mother: Elena de Morville (Abt 1172-1217) 31 33


       Marriage: 1228

   Other Spouse: Helen de L'Isle (Abt 1174-Abt 1212) 31 34 - Abt 1205 - Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland

   Other Spouse: Margaret of Huntingdon (      -1201) 35 - 1209

Events

• Constable of Scotland: 1215-1234.

• Named: in the Magna Charta.




Wife < > 36

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh de Lacy Earl of Ulster (      -1243) 37
         Mother: 




Children

Research Notes: Husband - Alan Lord of Galloway

Per Ancestral Roots, "A descendant of the English and Scottish Kings." 31


Research Notes: Wife - < >

A daughter of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster. 36


Henry of Burgundy and < > [Not Sibylle of Barcelona]




Husband Henry of Burgundy 31 38 39

            AKA: Henri Comte de Bourgogne
           Born: Abt 1035 - <Bourgogne, (Champagne), (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1071
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert "the Old" Duke of Burgundy (Abt 1011-1076) 40 41
         Mother: Hélie (1016-1055) 42


       Marriage: 

Events

• "Le damoiseau de Bourgogne":




Wife < > [Not Sibylle of Barcelona]

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugh I Duke of Burgundy

           Born: 1057
     Christened: 
           Died: 1093
         Buried: 



2 M Eudes I Duke of Burgundy 43 44

            AKA: Eudes I "the Red" of Burgundy, Eudes I Borel of Burgundy
           Born: Abt 1058 - <Bourgogne, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Mar 1103 - Cilicia, Armenia (Turkey)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sibylle of Burgundy-Ivrea (      -After 1103) 45
           Marr: 1080
         Spouse: Mathilda of Burgundy (Abt 1062-1093) 46
           Marr: France



3 M Robert Bishop of Langres

           Born: 1059
     Christened: 
           Died: 1111
         Buried: 



4 F Beatrice of Burgundy 47

           Born: Abt 1063
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1110
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Guy III de Vignory Seigneur de Vignory (      -1125/1126) 48
           Marr: After 1082



5 M Reginald Abbot of St. Pierre

           Born: 1065
     Christened: 
           Died: 1092
         Buried: 



6 M Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal 31 49 50




            AKA: Henri of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henrique of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henry I de Bourgogne, Henry I Count of Portugal
           Born: 1069 - <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Nov 1112
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theresa of Leon and Castile (Abt 1070-1130) 31
           Marr: 1093



7 F Helie

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Henry of Burgundy

Ancestral Roots has d. 27 Jan. 1066/7 and d. 27 Jan.1066/1074. Wikipedia has d. abt. 1071.


Research Notes: Husband - Henry of Burgundy

His wife was NOT named Sibylle of Barcelona, daughter of Berenger Ramon I, according to Wikipedia.

From Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy :

Henry of Burgundy (1035 - c. 1071 ) was the son and heir of Robert I , duke of Burgundy . He died shortly before his father and failed to succeed in Burgundy. The name of his wife is unknown (that it was Sibil has been discredited) as is her origin, although a connection to the Counts of Barcelona has been hypothesized. Their children were:
Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy (1057-1093)
Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy (1058-1103)
Robert, bishop of Langres (1059-1111)
Helie, a nun (b. 1061)
Beatrice (b. 1063), married Guy I, count of Vignory
Reginald, abbot of St Pierre (1065-1092)
Henry, Count of Portugal (1066-1112), who became a vassal of León and ruler of the county of Portugal in 1093; his son would be Afonso Henriques , first king of Portugal 31 38 39


Research Notes: Child - Hugh I Duke of Burgundy

Source: Wikipedia (Henry of Burgundy)


Research Notes: Child - Eudes I Duke of Burgundy

From Wikipedia - Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy :

Eudes I, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058-23 March 1103 ) was Duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Eudes was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I . He became the duke following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Eudes married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy .

They had:
Florine of Burgundy 1083-1097
Helie of Burgundy 1080-1141 wife of Bertrand of Toulouse and William III of Ponthieu
Hugh II of Burgundy
Henry d.1131

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness, Eadmer , biographer of Anselm of Canterbury . While Saint Anselm was progressing through Eudes's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately allowed the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.

He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101 . 43 44


Research Notes: Child - Robert Bishop of Langres

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy


Research Notes: Child - Reginald Abbot of St. Pierre

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy


Research Notes: Child - Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal

From Wikipedia - Henry, Count of Portugal :

Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal (1066 -1112 ) was Count of Portugal from 1093 to his death. He was the son of Henry of Burgundy , heir of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy , and brother of Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy and Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . His name is Henri in modern French , Henricus in Latin , Enrique in modern Spanish and Henrique in modern Portuguese . He was a distant cousin of Raymond of Burgundy and Pope Callistus II .
As a younger son, Henry had little chances of acquiring fortune and titles by inheritance, thus he joined the Reconquista against the Moors in the Iberian Peninsula . He helped king Alfonso VI of Castile and León conquer modern Galicia and the north of Portugal and in reward he married Alfonso's daughter Theresa, Countess of Portugal in 1093 , receiving the County of Portugal , then a fiefdom of the Kingdom of León , as a dowry .

From Teresa, Henry had three sons and three daughters. The only son to survive childhood was Afonso Henriques , who became the second Count of Portugal in 1112. However, the young man Afonso was energetic and expanded his dominions at the expense of Muslims . In 1139 , he declared himself King of Portugal after reneging the subjugation to León, in open confrontation with his mother. Two daughters also survived childhood, Urraca and Sancha. Urraca Henriques married a Bermudo Peres de Trava, Count of Trastamara. Sancha Henriques married a nobleman, Sancho Nunes de Celanova. 31 49 50


Research Notes: Child - Helie

A nun.

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy


Godefried Duke of Alemania and < > [Daughter of Theodo V]




Husband Godefried Duke of Alemania 51 52 53

            AKA: Godefroy Duke of Allemania, Godofroy (Godofreid) of Allemania, Gotefrid Duke of Alamannia, Gotfrid Duke of Alemannia, Gottfried Duke of Allemania
           Born: Abt 659
     Christened: 
           Died: 709
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 

Events

• Became: Duke of Alemania, 687.




Wife < > [Daughter of Theodo V] 54 55

            AKA: Daughter of Theudon II - Duke of Bavaria
           Born: Abt 660 - <Bavaria, (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Theodo V Duke of Bavaria (Abt 0625-0716) 54 56
         Mother: Regintrude of Austrasia (      -      ) 54 57




Children
1 M Houching Count in Alemania 58 59

            AKA: Houchi, Hug Count in Allemania, Huocin, Nebi Huoching (Theobold) - Duke of Allemania, Theobold Duke of Allemani
           Born: Abt 675 - <Alemannia (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 727
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Godefried Duke of Alemania

From Ancestral Roots, line 182-1, "GODEFRIED, Duke of Alemania (or, of the Alamans) 687-709, d. 709."

From Wikipedia - Theodo of Bavaria :

[Theodo of Bavaria] married Regintrude of Austrasia , daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude . They had the following:
Daughter of Theodo , married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia

From Wikipedia - Gotfrid :

Gotfrid, Gotefrid, or Gottfried (Latin : Gotfridus or Cotefredus; died 709) was the Duke of Alemannia in the late seventh century and until his death. He was of the house of the Agilolfing , which was the dominant ruling family in Bavaria .

In a document dated to the year 700 in Cannstatt , Gotfrid at the request of a priest named Magulfus donated the castle of Biberburg to the monastery of Saint Gall .

Gotfrid fought a war over his de facto independence with the mayor of the palace Pepin of Heristal . The war was unfinished when Gotfrid died in 709. His sons, Lantfrid and Theudebald , had the support of Pepin and succeeded him.

Gotfrid married a daughter of Theodo of Bavaria and his third son, Odilo , later ruled in Bavaria. From his son Huoching (Huocin, Houchi, or Hug) came the later stock of the Ahalolfings . His daughter Regarde married Hildeprand of Spoleto , and he left a youngest son named Liutfrid. 51 52 53



Research Notes: Wife - < > [Daughter of Theodo V]

From Wikipedia - Theodo of Bavaria :

Marriage and issue
He married Regintrude of Austrasia , daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude . They had the following:
Daughter of Theodo , married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia
He also married Folchiade of Salzeburg . They had the following:
Theodbert
Grimoald
Theobald 54 55


Alexander Darcy of Little Malden, Essex and < > of Little Malden, Essex




Husband Alexander Darcy of Little Malden, Essex 31

           Born: Abt 1242
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Michael Darcy of Little Malden, Essex (Abt 1218-      ) 31
         Mother: < > (Abt 1220-      ) 31


       Marriage: Abt 1265



Wife < > of Little Malden, Essex 31

           Born: Abt 1244
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Norman Darcy of Little Malden, Essex 31

           Born: Abt 1266
     Christened: 
           Died: 1296 - Manor Great Yeldham, Halstead, Essex, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: < > D'Amory of Little Malden, Essex (Abt 1270-      ) 31
           Marr: Abt 1274





< > Princess of the Visigoths




Husband

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife < > Princess of the Visigoths 60

           Born: Abt 375
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Alaric I King of the Visigoths (Abt 0370-0410) 61
         Mother: < > Princess of the Visigoths (      -      ) 62




Children
1 M Theodoric I of the Visigoths 63

           Born: Abt 395 - Pannonia (Hungary)
     Christened: 
           Died: 451
         Buried: 





Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths and < > of Moesia [Concubine of Theodoric]




Husband Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths 64 65

            AKA: Theodoric "the Great" King of the Ostrogoths
           Born: Abt 454 - Pannonia (Hungary)
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Aug 526 - Ravenna, (Italy)


         Buried: 


         Father: Theodemir King of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0430-0474)
         Mother: Erelieva Queen of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0434-      ) 66 67


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Audefleda Meroving Princess of the Franks (Abt 0452-0535) 68 - 493

Events

• King of the Ostrogoths: 471-526.

• Ruler of Italy: 493-526.

• Regent of the Visigoths: 511-526.

• Viceroy: of the (Eastern) Roman Empire.




Wife < > of Moesia [Concubine of Theodoric] 65

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Theodegotha 69

            AKA: Theodegotho
           Born: Abt 473
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alaric II King of the Visigoths (Abt 0470-0507) 70 71
           Marr: 494



2 F Ostrogotha 65 72

            AKA: Arevagni Princess of the Ostrogoths
           Born: Abt 475
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sigismund of Burgundy (      -0524) 73
           Marr: 494 or 496




Research Notes: Husband - Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths

Raised as a hostage in Constantinople.

From Wikipedia - Theodoric the Great :
Theodoric the Great (Gothic : Þiudareiks; Latin : Fl Theodoricus; Greek : (Thev'ðerichos, ??v'ð?rixos ); Old English : Þ; German : Dietrich von Bern ; Old Norse : Þjóðrekr, Þiðrek; 454 - August 30 , 526 ), was king of the Ostrogoths (471-526),[1] ruler of Italy (493-526), regent of the Visigoths (511-526), and a viceroy of the (Eastern) Roman Empire. He became a hero of Germanic legend.

Youth

The man who ruled under the name of Theodoric was born in 454 on the banks of the Neusiedler See near Carnuntum , a year after the Ostrogoths had thrown off nearly a century of domination by the Huns . The son of the King Theodemir and Erelieva , Theodoric went to Constantinople as a young boy, as a hostage to secure the Ostrogoths' compliance with a treaty Theodemir had concluded with the Byzantine Emperor Leo .

He lived at the court of Constantinople for many years and learned a great deal about Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he became the Gothic ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized "barbarian people", as Oriental kingdoms used to call tribes living on the European continent, what is presently known as Western Europe [Armenian historian Movses Khorenatsi] . Treated with favor by the Emperors Leo I and Zeno , he became magister militum (Master of Soldiers) in 483, and one year later he became consul . Afterwards, he returned to live among the Ostrogoths when he was 31 years old and became their king in 488.

Reign

At the time, the Ostrogoths were settled in Byzantine territory as foederati (allies) of the Romans, but were becoming restless and increasingly difficult for Zeno to manage. Not long after Theodoric became king, the two men worked out an arrangement beneficial to both sides. The Ostrogoths needed a place to live, and Zeno was having serious problems with Odoacer , the King of Italy who had overthrown the Western Roman Empire in 476. Ostensibly a viceroy for Zeno, Odoacer was menacing Byzantine territory and not respecting the rights of Roman citizens in Italy. At Zeno's encouragement, Theodoric invaded Odoacer's kingdom.

Theodoric came with his army to Italy in 488, where he won the battles of Isonzo and Verona in 489 and at the Adda in 490. In 493 he took Ravenna . On February 2, 493, Theodoric and Odoacer signed a treaty that assured both parties would rule over Italy. A banquet was organised in order to celebrate this treaty. It was at this banquet that Theodoric, after making a toast, killed Odoacer with his own hands.

Like Odoacer, Theodoric was ostensibly only a viceroy for the emperor in Constantinople. In reality, he was able to avoid imperial supervision, and dealings between the emperor and Theodoric were as equals. Unlike Odoacer, however, Theodoric respected the agreement he had made and allowed Roman citizens within his kingdom to be subject to Roman law and the Roman judicial system. The Goths, meanwhile, lived under their own laws and customs. In 519, when a mob had burned down the synagogues of Ravenna, Theodoric ordered the town to rebuild them at its own expense.

Theodoric the Great sought alliances with, or hegemony over, the other Germanic kingdoms in the west. He allied with the Franks by his marriage to Audofleda , sister of Clovis I , and married his own female relatives to princes or kings of the Visigoths , Vandals and Burgundian . He stopped the Vandals from raiding his territories by threatening the weak Vandal king Thrasamund with invasion, and sent a guard of 5,000 troops with his sister Amalfrida when she married Thrasamund in 500. For much of his reign, Theodoric was the de facto king of the Visigoths as well, becoming regent for the infant Visigothic king, his grandson Amalric , following the defeat of Alaric II by the Franks under Clovis in 507. The Franks were able to wrest control of Aquitaine from the Visigoths, but otherwise, Theodoric was able to defeat their incursions.

Thedoric's achievements began to unravel even before his death. He had married his daughter Amalasuntha to the Visigoth Eutharic , but Eutharic died in 522 or 523, so no lasting dynastic connection of Ostrogoths and Visigoths was established. In 522, the Catholic Burgundian king Sigismund killed his own son, Theodoric's grandson, Sergeric. Theodoric retaliated by invading, probably in 523, annexing the southern part of the Burgundian kingdom. The rest was ruled Sigismund's Arian brother Godomar , under Gothic protection against the Franks who had captured Sigismund. This brought the territory ruled by Theodoric to its height (see map), but in 523 or 524 the new Catholic Vandal king Hilderic imprisoned Amalfrida, and killed her Gothic guard. Theodoric was planning an expedition to restore his power over the Vandal kingdom when he died in 526.

Family and Issue
Theodoric was married once.

He had a concubine in Moesia , name unknown, and had two daughters:
Theodegotha (ca. 473 - ?). In 494, she was married to Alaric II as a part of her father's alliance with the Visigoths.
Ostrogotha or Arevagni (ca. 475 - ?). In 494 or 496, she was married to the king Sigismund of Burgundy as a part of her father's alliance with the Burgundians.

Married to Audofleda in 493 and had one daughter:
Amalasuntha , Queen of the Goths. She was married to Eutharic and had two children: Athalaric and Matasuentha (the latter being married to Witiges first, then, after Witiges' death, married to Germanus Justinus , neither had children). Any hope for a reconciliation between the Goths and the Romans in the person of a Gotho-Roman Emperor from this family lineage was shattered.

After his death in Ravenna in 526, Theodoric was succeeded by his grandson Athalaric . Athalaric was at first represented by his mother Amalasuntha, who was a regent queen from 526 until 534. The kingdom of the Ostrogoths, however, began to wane and was conquered by Justinian I starting in 535 and finally ending in 553 with the Battle of Mons Lactarius ." 64 65


Research Notes: Wife - < > of Moesia [Concubine of Theodoric]

From Wikipedia - Theodoric the Great :

Theodoric was married once.

He had a concubine in Moesia , name unknown, and had two daughters:
Theodegotha (ca. 473 - ?). In 494, she was married to Alaric II as a part of her father's alliance with the Visigoths.
Ostrogotha or Arevagni (ca. 475 - ?). In 494 or 496, she was married to the king Sigismund of Burgundy as a part of her father's alliance with the Burgundians.

Married to Audofleda in 493 and had one daughter:
Amalasuntha , Queen of the Goths. She was married to Eutharic and had two children: Athalaric and Matasuentha (the latter being married to Witiges first, then, after Witiges' death, married to Germanus Justinus , neither had children). Any hope for a reconciliation between the Goths and the Romans in the person of a Gotho-Roman Emperor from this family lineage was shattered. 65


Research Notes: Child - Theodegotha

69


Birth Notes: Child - Ostrogotha

Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodoric_the_great


Research Notes: Child - Ostrogotha

From Wikipedia - Theodoric the Great :

Theodoric was married once.

He had a concubine in Moesia , name unknown, and had two daughters:
Theodegotha (ca. 473 - ?). In 494, she was married to Alaric II as a part of her father's alliance with the Visigoths.
Ostrogotha or Arevagni (ca. 475 - ?). In 494 or 496, she was married to the king Sigismund of Burgundy as a part of her father's alliance with the Burgundians.

Married to Audofleda in 493 and had one daughter:
Amalasuntha , Queen of the Goths. She was married to Eutharic and had two children: Athalaric and Matasuentha (the latter being married to Witiges first, then, after Witiges' death, married to Germanus Justinus , neither had children). Any hope for a reconciliation between the Goths and the Romans in the person of a Gotho-Roman Emperor from this family lineage was shattered. 65 72


William Jacob Maness and < >




Husband William Jacob Maness 74 75 76 77 78

            AKA: William Jacob Manes, William Manus Sr.
           Born: Abt 1715 - Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1787 - Moore Co., North Carolina, (United States)
         Buried: 


         Father: John Maness (Abt 1655-1729) 79 80 81 82
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Emigrated: from Scotland to America, Abt 1747.

• Moved: by 1755, North Carolina, (United States).

• Living: 1755, Orange, North Carolina, (United States).

• Moved: Abt 1765, Cumberland, (Moore), North Carolina, (United States).

• Tax List: 1767, Cumberland, (Moore), North Carolina, (United States).

• Oath of Allegiance: to the State, Jul 1779, New Bern, Craven, North Carolina, (United States).

• Tax List: 1783, Wake (Moore), North Carolina, United States.




Wife < > 83

           Born: 1718 - Orange, North Carolina, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Henry Maness 84 85

           Born: 1737 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 1830 - Moore Co., North Carolina, United States
         Buried: 



2 M William Jacob Maness II 86 87 88 89

            AKA: Billy Manes, William Jacob Manes II, William Manis, William Manus Jr.
           Born: 1738 - Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1832 - Moore Co., North Carolina, United States


         Buried:  - Maness Family Cemetery, Robbins, Moore, North Carolina, United States 90
         Spouse: Keziah Brooks (Abt 1740-      ) 91



3 M Ambrose Maness 92 93

           Born: 1740 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



4 M Arthur Maness 94 95

           Born: 1744 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



5 M Isaac Maness 96 97

           Born: 1746 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: <1775> - [near Erect], (Randolph), North Carolina, (United States)
         Buried: 



6 M John Smith Maness 98 99

           Born: 1749 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



7 F Lydia Maness 100 101

           Born: 1752 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



8 M Nathan Maness 102 103

           Born: 1756 - Bedford Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Husband - William Jacob Maness

May have been born in Kildonan, Isle of Arran, Scotland or in Kildonan, Highland, Scotland.


Death Notes: Husband - William Jacob Maness

May have died in Orange County, North Carolina.


Research Notes: Husband - William Jacob Maness

From - http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pbmaness&id=I6516 (quoted by Dennis Mannes):
"William Maness, Sr. and Jr. arrived in Colonial America (Pennsyvania) shortly after the Battle of Culloden, 1745 (ca. 1747) sailing aboard the ship "Hope's End," out of Kildonan, Isle of Arran, Scotland, though the ship's name is still in dispute. From there, they migrated to present-day Moore County, North Carolina." Source: Greg Maness

"Some of our "cousins" have argued that William Maness I could not be the son of John Maness because John is recorded as serving as J.o.P. in North Carolina in 1711 and William was born in Kildonan in 1715. Maybe . . . maybe not. However, I have always put forward the one possibilty that COULD confirm John is the father of William. It is generally held in our records (and I guess we can never confirm beyond the shadow of a doubt, but . . .) that John was born in Kildonan in 1655 . . . William in Kildonan in 1715. My contention is that John (even at an advanced age of approx. 60), being a proud member of Clan Gunn, returned to Scotland for the first Jacobite uprising in 1714/15. While there, William I was born and there are other records that indicate that William I and his father arrived together in America. It may or may not be true, but I haven't heard a better explanation of how someone living here in 1711 could have a son born in Scotland in 1715! Unfortunately, the Kildonan Parish church records burned around the time of the second Jacobite uprising (1745 -- Bonnie Prince Charlie and all that good stuff . . .) and after the Maness boys had left). We'll never know, but doesn't that make for something interesting to ponder???" Source: Greg Maness 74 75 76 77 78


Birth Notes: Child - William Jacob Maness II

May have been born in Kildonan, Isle of Arran, Scotland or in Kildonan, Highland, Scotland.
Other sources have Pennsylvania or Bedfored County, Virginia. Hwever, either of these is unlinkely since he is recorded as emigrating on the shop "Hope's End" between 1747 and 1749.

A William Nathan Maness was born in Pennsylvania about 1738 (info from Sons of the American Revolution application).


Burial Notes: Child - William Jacob Maness II

The Maness Family Cemetery is near Pleasant Hill Church, Moore County, North Carolina, north of Robbins off the Robbins-High Falls Road.


Research Notes: Child - William Jacob Maness II

Served in the Revolutionary War on the side of the Americans.

From Ancestry of Paul Bailey Maness (author Dennis Manness) - http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pbmaness&id=I6515 :

He "migrated to NC about 1765 by wagon train, which stopped at the site of Smyrna Methodist Church north of Robbinson Grassy Creek. He settled near Bear Creek, in what was then Cumberland County, and owned 200 acres of land near Carter's Mill- April 27th, 1767. By May 4th, 1769 owned another 100 acres in what is now Robbins. He later bought more land, owning a total of about 600 acres. His occupation was = Farmer. He enlisted on July 28, 1775 as a private, First Battallion of the North Carolina Line( Col. Thomas Clark's Battallion), part of the Continental Army. This was a dangerous move , as most of the populationof Moore County were Scots, who were loyal to the British King.He was one of only about a half dozen local men who volunteered to fight for the American cause. He appears to have fought in northern campaigns and in the guerilla fighting that continued until 1783. Military records show his last pay period to include Feb. 1, 1785, which would indicate that he was one of the few men who stayed on "in readiness" as a peacekeeper. The 1790 Census shows him to have six sons and seven or eight daughters. Some of these children may have been adopted or the children of other family members. After the war, William served as Township Constable. He died in 1832 at the age of 94, and is buried north of Robbins off the Robbins-High Falls Rd. in the Maness Family Cemetary near Pleasant Hill Church (Moore County, NC)" Source: James Peterson.

"... I will tell you that the senior William MANESS first appeared in the Moore County area comes from ABSTRACTS OF MINUTES OF THE COURT OF PLEAS AND QUARTER SESSIONS OF CUMBERLAND CO., NC, Oct. 1755-Jan. 1779. On page 175, "May 21, 1765, Wm. MANUS (sic) is appointed constable in Capt. Cheney's District." This William is believed to have been William Jr. Also on the only surviving Tax List for Cumberland County for the period 1754-1776 is for the year 1767. On this list appeared William MINUS (Maness) and William MINUS Jr. We also find another mention of a William MANESS, Sr. was in a Land Grant from the Governor of NC in the year 1772. 100 acres of land was granted to Simeon Hart on Bear Creek in Moore County, adjoining the 100 acres grant to William MANESS..etc. A later 1783 tax list for Cumberland County, also contains a William MINUS Sr. William MINUS Jr. Wm Maness did not leave a will, but his administration of his estate was granted to Wm. MANIS (sic). Assumed to be Wm. Jr. a Geo. Glascock was his security, in the amt. of 50 pounds. These two Maness' came from Pensylvania to NC in the mid 1760's." Source: Juanita Kesler

"*Oath prescribed by Act of Assembly passed at Newbern, May 10th 1777, entitled an Act for the Security of the State. *The Highlander's Oath: I, do swear and as I shall answer to God at the great day of Judgment, I have not, nor shall have in my possession any gun, pistol or arm whatsoever, and never use tartan plaid of any other part of the Highland garb; and if I do so may I be cursed in my undertakings, family and property; may I never see my wife and children, father, mother, or relation; may I be killed in battle as a coward and lie without Christian burial, in a strange land, far from the graves of my forefathers and kindred. May all this come across me if I break my oath. 1778 - The following were listed as signing the Oath of Allegiance to the State: George Eason, Robert Gilles, Gilbert Eccles, George Meek, Adam Stewart and Charles Leitch. 1778 - The following took the Oath in July Court: James Burnside, Archibald Simson, Sion Horn, Duncan Buie, Alex. Spiers, John White, Phillip Raiford and Arch. Henry. 1779 - The following took the Oath in January Court: James Emmet, Cornelious Lofton, George McKay and Daniel Monroe. 1779? - The following took the Oath in July Court: Silvanus Wilson, Philemon Hodges, William Thomson, Thomas Kees, William Lee, Bartholomew Dunn, William Dunn, William Manus, John McIntire, Samuel Campbell, Duncan McNeill, James Cooper, Jacob Matthews and Arch. Curry. At April Court [year?] Angus McDugal took the Oath." Source: Bill Mele

"During the Revolution he served with Col. Thomas Clark's 1st NC Battalion, having enlisted 7/28/1773. Records show that he served through most, or all, of the Revolution. Army accounts indicate that he was paid 9/1/1784 and 1785." Source: Charles "Ken" Maness
------------
From findagrave.com -

Maness Cemetery
Also buried:
Garner Maness 1806-1863
Katie Maness 1814-1890
Issac Maness 1810-1841
Betsy Maness 1812-1875
Emma Maness 1846-1895
Henry Maness 1828-1830
Noah Maness 1860-1861 86 87 88 89


Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99022 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

2 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873346.

3 Wikipedia.org, Marcomer.

4 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99023 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

5 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873347.

6 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316476 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

7 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316483 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

8 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99021 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

9 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873345.

10 Wikipedia.org, Pharamond.

11 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875190.

12 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105872 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

13 Website:, http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html.

14 Museum or other archive, Smithsonian Institution archives.

15 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kearns_family_2&id=I5812.

16 www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=fish&GSbyrel=in&GSdyrel=in&GSst=38&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GSsr=41&GRid=44438384&df=all&.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-14.

18 Wikipedia.org, Pepin of Italy.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 50-13, 140-13, 190-13.

20 Wikipedia.org, Charlemagne.

21 Wikipedia.org, Rhenish Hesse.

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91438 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 182-5, 140-13 (Charlemagne), 148-13 (Charlemagne), 190-13 (Charlemagne).

24 Wikipedia.org, Hildegard of Vinzgouw.

25 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

26 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91440 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-14 (Pepin).

28 Wikipedia.org, Bernard of Italy.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-15.

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-15 (Bernard).

31 http://www.familysearch.org.

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-25.

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-25 (Roland).

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-26 (Alan).

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 97-26, 38-26 (Alan).

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-26 (Alan.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 28-26 (Alan).

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-23, 108-23.

39 Wikipedia.org, Henry of Burgundy.

40 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-22, 113-22.

41 Wikipedia.org, Robert I, Duke of Burgundy.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-22 (Robert the Old), 113-22 (Robert the Old).

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-24.

44 Wikipedia.org, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy.

45 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-24 (Eudes I).

46 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dunova73&id=I3619.

47 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 71B-25.

48 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 71C-26, 71B-25 (Beatrice of Burgundy), 71A-26 (Roger I de Join ville).

49 Wikipedia.org, Henry, Count of Portugal.

50 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-24.

51 Wikipedia.org, Gotfrid; Theodo of Bavaria.

52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 182-1.

53 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #308134 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

54 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria.

55 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #9898 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

56 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98935 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

57 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98936 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

58 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 812-2.

59 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98929 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

60 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319842 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

61 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319843 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

62 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319844 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

63 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319841 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

64 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105823 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

65 Wikipedia.org, Theodoric the Great.

66 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #308141 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

67 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875428.

68 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105822 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

69 Wikipedia.org, Amalaric; Theodoric the Great.

70 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316460.

71 Wikipedia.org, Alaric II; Amalaric.

72 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316459 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

73 Wikipedia.org, Sigismund of Burgundy; Gundobad.

74 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #139 Pin #1667717.

75 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3197139216.

76 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pbmaness&id=I6516.

77 Website:, http://www.ncgenweb.us/cumberland/oath.htm.

78 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), Generation 2.

79 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #139 Pin #1667725.

80 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #104 Pin #462730.

81 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), p. 1.

82 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pbmaness&id=I6517.

83 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243828.

84 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243832.

85 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. iv.

86 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #139 Pin #1667716.

87 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3197130831.

88 Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, http://genforum.genealogy.com/maness/messages/461.html.

89 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. v. & 4.

90 www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2206606&GRid=17909404&.

91 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 4.

92 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243836.

93 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. x. & 6.

94 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243838.

95 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. vi.

96 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243841.

97 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. i. & 3.

98 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243843.

99 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. viii.

100 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243846.

101 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. ii.

102 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=foxbonham&id=P3253243848.

103 <Loyd, Linda D.>, Descendants of John Maness (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/o/y/Linda-D-Loyd/PDFGENE6.pdf), 2. iii.


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