The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Reccared I Visigothic King of Hispania and Chlodosind Princess of Austrasia




Husband Reccared I Visigothic King of Hispania 1 2 3

            AKA: Recared King of the Visigoths
           Born: Abt 544 - Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: Jun 601
         Buried: 


         Father: Liuvigild King of the Visigoths (Abt 0519-0586) 4 5
         Mother: Theodosia of Cartagena (Abt 0525-      )


       Marriage: 



Wife Chlodosind Princess of Austrasia 6 7

            AKA: Chodoswintha Princess of Austrasia, Clodoswindis
           Born: Abt 550 - Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Sigebert I of Austrasia (0535-Between 0575/0579)
         Mother: Brunhilda of Austrasia (Abt 0543-0613) 8 9 10




Children
1 M Suintila Visigothic King of Hispania

            AKA: Swinthila King of the Visigoths
           Born: Abt 585 - Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 633
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theodora Princess of the Visigoths (Abt 0601-      )



2 M Liuva II King of the Visigoths

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Reccared I Visigothic King of Hispania

From Wikipedia - Reccared I :

Reccared (or Recared) I (586-601) was Visigothic King of Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula ). His reign marked a climactic shift in history, with the king's renunciation of traditional Arianism in favor of Catholic Christianity in 587.

Reccared was the younger son of King Liuvigild by his first wife. Like his father, Reccared had his capital at Toledo . The Visigothic kings and nobles were traditionally Arian Christians , while the Hispano-Roman population were Trinitarian Catholics . The Catholic bishop Leander of Seville was instrumental in converting the elder son and heir of Liuvigild, Hermenegild , to Trinitarian Christianity. Leander supported him in a war of rebellion and was exiled for his role.

When King Liuvigild died, within a few weeks of April 21, 586, St. Leander was swift to return to Toledo. The new king had been associated with his father in ruling the kingdom and was acclaimed king by the Visigothic nobles without opposition. Guided by his Merovingian kinship connections and by his Arian stepmother Goiswinth , he sent ambassadors to greet her grandson Childebert II and to his uncle Guntram , the Frankish king of Burgundy , proposing peace and a defensive alliance. Guntram refused to see them.

In January 587 , Reccared renounced Arianism for Catholicism , the single great event of his reign and the turning point for Visigothic Hispania . Most Arian nobles and ecclesiastics followed his example, certainly those around him at Toledo, but there were Arian uprisings, notably in Septimania , his northernmost province, beyond the Pyrenees , where the leader of opposition was the Arian bishop Athaloc , who had the reputation among his Catholic enemies of being virtually a second Arius . Among the secular leaders of the Septimanian insurrection, the counts Granista and Wildigern appealed to Guntram of Burgundy, who saw his opportunity and sent his dux Desiderius. Reccared's army defeated the Arian insurgents and their Catholic allies with great slaughter, Desiderius himself being slain...

The information for the rest of Reccared's reign is scanty. St. Isidore of Seville , bishop Leander's brother, praises his peaceful government, clemency, and generosity: standard encomia. He returned various properties, even some privates ones, that had been confiscated by his father, and founded many churches and monasteries. St. Gregory the Great , writing to Reccared in Aug. 599 (Epp. ix. 61, 121), extols him for embracing the true faith and inducing his people to do so, and notably for refusing the bribes offered by Jews to procure the repeal of a law against them. He sends him a piece of the True Cross , some fragments of the chains of St. Peter , and some hairs of St. John the Baptist .

Reccared was succeeded by his youthful son Liuva II .

Notes
^ St. Isidore, Historia Gothorum.
^ Aloysius Ziegler, Church and State in Visigothic Spain (Washington) 1930: "Ziegler unhesitatingly characterizes the kings. as 'fanatically zealous'" (Bacharach 1973:11.
^ Notably Bernard S. Bachrach , in Early Medieval Jewish Policy in Western Europe (University of Minnesota Press) 1977; see also Bacharach, "A Reassessment of Visigothic Jewish Policy, 589-711", The American Historical Review 78.1 (February 1973), pp. 11-34.
^ Solomon Katz, The Jews in the Visigothic and Frankish Kingdoms of Gaul and Spain (Harvard University Press) 1937 gives the broad background.
^ Bacharach 1973:15.
^ Thompson, The Goths in Spain (Oxford University Press) 1969:112. 1 2 3


Research Notes: Child - Suintila Visigothic King of Hispania

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #105749 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer) has name as Swinthila, King of the Visigoths, b. abt 564, d. 633.

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593876475 has name as Suintilo, b. abt 585 in Spain, d. 631.

From Wikipedia - Suintila :

From 621 to 631 , Suintila (or Swinthila, Svinthila, d. 633) was Visigothic King of Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula ) . There was a new peace in the Kingdom of the Visigoths. As a direct result, by 624 , the king was able to retake those lands that had been under the control of Byzantium .
On the linguistic front, it was around Suintila's time that a secondary form of the word Hispania was growing in usage: Spania , from which the modern name of Spain originated.[1] According to St. Isidore of Seville , who died in 636 , it was with the Visigothic domination of Hispania that the idea of a peninsular unity was sought, and the phrase mater Spania ("mother Hispania") was first spoken. Up to that date it had been the word Hispania that designated all of the peninsula's lands. In Historia Gothorum, Suintila appears as the first king of totius Spaniae. In De laude Spaniae ("About Hispania's Pride") the country is dealt with as a Gothic nation.



Chrodoald of the Lombards and Chlodosindis




Husband Chrodoald of the Lombards 11 12 13

            AKA: Adaloald
           Born: Abt 575 - Bavaria, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 624
         Buried: 


         Father: Agilulf King of the Lombards (Abt 0547-0616) 14 15
         Mother: Theudelinde of Bavaria, Queen of the Lombards (0546-0625) 16 17


       Marriage: 



Wife Chlodosindis 18 19

           Born: Abt 577
     Christened: 
           Died: After 587
         Buried: 


         Father: Gisulf (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Fara of Bavaria 20 21

            AKA: Fara Princess of the Lombards
           Born: Abt 600 - Bavaria, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 641
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theodo IV Duke of Bavaria (      -Abt 0680) 19 22




Research Notes: Husband - Chrodoald of the Lombards

From Wikipedia - Arnulf of Metz :

Chlothachar later made his son Dagobert I king of Austrasia and he ruled with the help of his advisor Arnulf. Not satisfied with his position, as a bishop he was involved in the murder of Chrodoald in 624 , an important leader of the Frankish Agilolfings -family and a protégé of Dagobert.
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Wikipedia - Agilofings lists him:
Agilolfings in Austrasia
Chrodoald, nobleman at Dagobert I 's court, killed in 624
Fara, opponent to Sigebert III 11 12 13



Research Notes: Wife - Chlodosindis

According to Wikipedia (Theodo of Bavaria), the mother of Fara of Bavaria was Daughter of Gisulf (b. 577). Gisulf is the name of several figures in the political history of Italy (thus not helpful). This may or may not be the same person as Chlodosindis, although the discrepancy in name of the grandparents makes it likely that Chlodosindis in incorrect.

Apparently a different woman from the daughter of Brunhilda & Sigebert. 18 19


Death Notes: Child - Fara of Bavaria

Sam Geer has d. 641.
Wikipedia has d. 643 or 655


Research Notes: Child - Fara of Bavaria

Not the same person as Burgundofara (Saint Fara) in Wikipedia.

According to Wikipedia (Theodo of Bavaria), the mother of Fara of Bavaria was Daughter of Gisulf (b. 577). Gisulf is the name of several figures in the political history of Italy (thus not helpful). This may or may not be the same person as Chlodosindis, although the discrepancy in name of the grandparents makes it likely that Chlodosindis in incorrect.


Wikipedia - Agilofings :
Agilolfings in Austrasia
Chrodoald, nobleman at Dagobert I 's court, killed in 624
Fara, opponent to Sigebert III 20 21




Neleus [Mythological] and Chloris [Mythological]




Husband Neleus [Mythological] 23

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Chloris [Mythological] 24

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Pero [Mythological] 25

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Bias of Argos [Mythological] (      -      ) 26




Research Notes: Husband - Neleus [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Neleus :

Neleus was the son of Poseidon and Tyro , brother of Pelias . Tyro was married to Cretheus (with whom she had one son, Aeson ) but loved Enipeus , a river god. She pursued Enipeus, who refused her advances. One day, Poseidon , filled with lust for Tyro, disguised himself as Enipeus and from their union was born Pelias and Neleus, twin boys. Tyro exposed her sons on a mountain and they were raised by a maid. When they reached adulthood, Pelias and Neleus found Tyro and killed her stepmother, Sidero , for having mistreated her. Sidero hid in a temple to Hera but Pelias killed her anyway, causing Hera's undying hatred of Pelias. Neleus and Pelias fought for the crown, and Neleus was banished to Messenia , becoming King of Pylos . Heracles later asked Neleus to cleanse him of a blood-debt and was refused. Heracles killed Neleus and his sons, including Alastor but excluding Nestor .[1] With Chloris , Neleus was the father of Pero , Alastor and Nestor. 23


Research Notes: Wife - Chloris [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Chloris :

There are many stories in Greek mythology about figures named Chloris ("Khloris" or from "Khloros" or meaning "greenish-yellow," "pale green," "pale," "pallid" or "fresh"). Some clearly refer to different characters; other stories may refer to the same Chloris, but disagree on details.

Chloris (Nymph)
Chloris was a Nymph associated with spring, flowers and new growth. Her Roman equivalent was the goddess Flora . She was abducted by (and later married) Zephyr , the god of the west wind.

Chloris (Meliboea)
Meliboea was one of Niobe and Amphion 's fourteen children (the Niobids ), and the only one (or one of two) spared when Artemis and Apollo killed the Niobids in retribution for Niobe's insult to their mother Leto , bragging that she had many children and Leto had only two. Meliboea was so frightened by the ordeal, she turned permanently pale, changing her name to Chloris ("pale one"). This Chloris is referred to in Homer 's Odyssey (book 11, lines 281-296).

She was later to marry to Neleus and become queen in Pylos . They had several sons including Nestor , Alastor and Chromius and a daughter Pero . Chloris also had a son, Poriclymenus while married to Neleus, though by some accounts Poriclymenus's father was Poseidon (who was himself Neleus's father). Poseidon gave Poriclymenus the ability to transform into any animal. Other children include Taurus , Asterius , Pylaon , Deimachus , Eurybius , Phrasius , Eurymenes , Evagoras and Epilaus .[citation needed ]

Odysseus is said to have encountered Chloris on his journey to Hades (Homer 's Odyssey , 11, 281).

Chloris (Mother of Mopsus)
Chloris married the seer Ampyx (son of Elatus ), with whom she had a child Mopsus who also became a renowned seer and would later join the Argonauts . 24


Research Notes: Child - Pero [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Pero :

In Greek mythology , Pero was a daughter of Neleus and Chloris , and the wife of her cousin Bias . Her sons included Areius , Leodocus , and Talaus . The story of Pero is mentioned in Book XI of Homer's Odyssey . Pero's beauty attracted many suitors, but Neleus, her father, refused to give his daughter to any man unless he could raid the cattle of Iphicles from Phylace . In this version of the story, an unnamed seer volunteers to undertake the task. The cowherds capture him and keep him for a year, until he makes a prophesy.

In the Odyssey [1], the story is told by the seer Theoklymenos about his ancestor Melampous . Melampous was a wealthy man from Pylos , but he left Pylos fleeing Neleus who held his possessions by force for a year. During that year, Melampous was held prisoner in the house of Phylakos because of the daughter of Neleus, Pero, and an ate sent by the Erinys. Melampous escaped death and drove the cattle back to Pylos. He took Pero home as a wife for his brother.

According to Pherecydes Melampous overhears two woodworms saying that a beam in the ceiling of his prison is about to collapse. He asks the guards to carry him out, and as they step outside, the ceiling collapses, killing another female guard who treated Melampous badly. One of the surviving guards informs Phylakos and Phylakos tells Iphiklos. The two agree to give Melampous the sought after cattle if Melampous can cure Iphiklos' inability to beget children. Melampous makes the appropriate sacrifices to Zeus and asks the birds to whom he distributes portions of the sacrifice for help. The birds bring Melampous a vulture who tells him that Phylakos chased Iphiklos with a knife, presumably because Iphiklos had seen Phylakos do something mischievous. Phylakos, upon failing to catch Iphiklos, planted the knife in a wild pear tree and the bark grew over it. Melampous retrieved the knife and mixed the rust from the knife with wine. Iphiklos drank the wine for 10 days. Eventually a child, Podarkes, is born and the cattle are given to Melampous, who takes the cattle to Neleus as the bride price for Pero. He gives Pero to Bias to wed.

Apollodoros also tells the same story but with some additions. According to Apollodoros, Amythaon is married to his brother Pheres' daughter, Eidomene. Melampous and Bias are their sons. Melampous comes to have the ability to understand the speech of animals through saving the young of some snakes a servant killed. The snake licked his ear giving him the ability to understand animals. In Pero's story, the cattle belong to the father Phylakos and not Iphiklos. The incident that disallows Iphiklos from having children resulted from Iphiklos seeing Phylakos gelding rams and so Phylakos chases Iphiklos with a knife.[2][3] 25


Sir Michael le Fleming and Christian of Stainton




Husband Sir Michael le Fleming 27

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1186 - Lancashire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Michael le Fleming (      -      ) 28
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Christian of Stainton 29

            AKA: Christian de Stainton
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Gilbert de Lancaster Lord of Stainton (      -Bef 1220) 30
         Mother: 




Children
1 M William le Fleming 31

           Born: Abt 1150 - Aldingham, Lancashire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1203 - Lancashire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ada of Workington (Abt 1160-      ) 32



2 M Anselm le Fleming 33

           Born:  - Stainton, Doncaster, West Riding, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1217 - Cumberland, England
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Sir Michael le Fleming

From http://cybergata.com/roots/2227.htm : 27


Robert de Harington and Christiana




Husband Robert de Harington 34

           Born:  - <Harington, Cumberland>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Osulf of Flemingby (      -      ) 35
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Christiana 34

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thomas de Harington 36

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Robert de Harington

From http://cybergata.com/roots/4231.htm :
Robert de Harington in Cumberland was called Robertus de Hafrinctuna in a grant to the Priory of St. Bee of a church and two hides of land. His wife, Christiana was mentioned as his advisor in the grant.
~Medieval Ancestors . . ., pgs. 131


According to Carl Boyer in his book, Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell, the pedigree that begins with Osulf of Flemingby to Sir Robert de Harington is taken from Ian Grimble's The Harington Family. Grimble says the Plea Roll of 1277 contains a pedigree of Sir Robert's descent from Osulf which confirmed the evidence of the Register at St. Bee's [Dungdale's Monasticon]. This evidence was part of a suit against the Abbot of Holm Culton concerning Sir Robert's claim to the manor of Flemingby, but Robert had to vacant all but 380 acres of the manor.
~Medieval Ancestors . . ., pgs. 131-132 34


Chrodobertus and Doda




Husband Chrodobertus 37

            AKA: Chrodobertus II, Robert II
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Lantbertus (      -Abt 0650) 38
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Doda 39

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Lantbertus II Count in Neustria and Austrasia 40 41

            AKA: Lambert II Count in Neustria and Austrasia
           Born: Abt 672
     Christened: 
           Died: by 741
         Buried: 





Chrodobertus




Husband Chrodobertus 42

            AKA: Robert
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Charibert (      -Bef 0638) 43
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Noble in Neustria:




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Lantbertus 38

            AKA: Lambert, Lamtbertus
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 650
         Buried: 





Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne and Chroma of the Burgundians




Husband Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne 44 45 46

            AKA: Chlodoric "the Parricide," Clothaire I "the Patricide" King of Cologne
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 509
         Buried: 


         Father: Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne (Bef 0460-Abt 0509) 47 48
         Mother: Vultrogothe Princess of Orleans (      -      ) 49


       Marriage: 



Wife Chroma of the Burgundians 50

           Born:  - <Burgundy, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Chilperic II King of the Burgundians (Abt 0450-0493) 51 52
         Mother: Agrippine de Bourgogne (      -      ) 53




Children
1 M Munderic of Vitry-en-Perthois 54 55

            AKA: Muderic of the Franks - Lord of Vire-en-P
           Born: Abt 505 - Cologne, (Westphalia), Germania (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 532
         Buried: 



2 F Blithilda Princess of Cologne 56 57

            AKA: Bilichilde
           Born: Between 508 and 513 - Paris, (Île-de-France, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 580
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ansbertus of Moselle, Senator of Rome (Abt 0500-      ) 58 59




Death Notes: Husband - Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne

Murdered by agents of his kinsman, Clovis I, King of the Salic Franks.


Research Notes: Husband - Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne

Killed his own father in 509, at the instigation of Clovis I, King of the Salic Franks, 481-511.

From Wikipedia - Chlodoric the Parricide :

Chlodoric (or Chloderic) the Patricide (died c. 509) murdered his own father, Sigobert the Lame , in order to take his kingdom. Chlodoric acted upon the instigation of Clovis I a rival king of the Salian Franks . After Sigobert's death Clovis then accused Chlodoric of the murder and had him killed in his turn for the crime. In this way Clovis became king of Sigobert's and Chlodoric's people.

Gregory suggest that Chlodoric was murdered in the same campaign that also killed the Frankish King Chararic . Before, Clovis had killed King Ragnachar and his brothers. After all these murders Gregory tells us that Clovis lamented that he had no family left anymore, implying that amongst his own casualties were close relatives. 44 45 46


Research Notes: Child - Munderic of Vitry-en-Perthois

From Ancestral Roots, line 190-5 (Munderic), "very young in 509, when his father was murdered; revolted against Thierry I, who killed him." 54 55


Research Notes: Child - Blithilda Princess of Cologne

Ancestral Roots, line 180-6 (Ansbertus), says "m. perh. Bilichilde, whose ancestry is unproven." 56 57



Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks and Chunsina




Husband Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks 60 61 62

            AKA: Chlothar I King of Soissons, King of the Franks, Lothair I King of Soissons
           Born: 497 - Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Nov 561
         Buried:  - Abbey of Saint-Medard, Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France


         Father: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 63 64 65
         Mother: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 66 67 68 69


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Guntheuc (      -      ) - Abt 524

   Other Spouse: Radegund (      -      )

   Other Spouse: Ingund (Abt 0500-      ) 70 71

   Other Spouse: Arnégonde (Abt 0515-0573) 72 73 74



Wife Chunsina 75

            AKA: Chunsine
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Chram 76

            AKA: Chramn
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 561
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks

Succeeded Clovis I in Soissons.
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From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Upon [the death of Clovis I], the kingdom was split among his four sons:

Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561

Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.

Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

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From Wikipedia - Chlothar I :

Chlothar I (or Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 497 - 561 ), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks , was one of the four sons of Clovis . He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département , Picardie , France ).

On the death of his father in 511 , he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons , which he made his capital; the cities of Laon , Noyon , Cambrai , and Maastricht ; and the lower course of the Meuse River . But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer 's children in 524 , and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers . He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534 , obtained Grenoble , Die , and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange , Carpentras , and Gap . In 531 , he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542 , with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain . On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555 , Clotaire annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany , made expeditions into Saxony , and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany , where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin , and died shortly afterwards.

Family
Clotaire's first marriage was to Guntheuc , widow of his own brother Chlodomer, sometime around 524. They had no children.
His second marriage, which occurred around 532 , was to Radegund , daughter of Bertachar , King of Thuringia , whom he and his brother Theuderic defeated. She was later canonized . They had no children.
His third and most successful marriage was to Ingund , by whom he had five sons and two daughters:
Gunthar, predeceased father
Childeric, predeceased father
Charibert , King of Paris
Guntram , King of Burgundy
Sigebert , King of Austrasia
Chlothsind , married Alboin , King of the Lombards

His next marriage was to a sister of Ingund, Aregund , with whom he had a son:
Chilperic , King of Soissons
His last wife was Chunsina (or Chunsine), with whom he had one son:
Chram , who became his father's enemy and predeceased him 60 61 62


Research Notes: Wife - Chunsina

5th wife of Chlothar I. 75


Research Notes: Child - Chram

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar I
From Wikipedia - Chram :

Chram or Chramn (French: Chramn or Chramne, meaning Raven in Old Frankish )[1] (died 561 ) was a son of Chlothar I and his fifth wife, Chunsina .[2].

Chram rose in rebellion against his father Chlothar, a king of the Franks , on several occasions. Following one of these rebellions, he fled with his wife and children to the court of Chanao, the ruler of Brittany , pursued by his father. Chlotar gave battle to the combined forces of Chanao and Chram, and his army was successful; the Breton leader was killed, and Chram, delayed in making his escape by sea because of his concern for his family's safety, was captured. Chlothar gave orders that they should be burned, but Chram was strangled before being placed in a cottage,[3] which was subsequently burned. Chlothar reportedly died of remorse later that year. 76


Henry of Essex, Lord of Rayleigh and Haughley and Cicely




Husband Henry of Essex, Lord of Rayleigh and Haughley

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert FitzSuein of Essex (      -      ) 77
         Mother: Gunnor Bigod (      -      ) 77


       Marriage: 



Wife Cicely

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Agnes of Essex

           Born: Abt 1151
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1206
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Aubrey III de Vere 1st Earl of Oxford and Count of Guînes (Abt 1115-1194) 78
           Marr: 1162 or 1163




Research Notes: Husband - Henry of Essex, Lord of Rayleigh and Haughley

Source: Wikipedia - Agnes of Essex

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 246-26 (Aubrey de Vere)


Research Notes: Wife - Cicely

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 246-26 (Aubrey de Vere)


Research Notes: Child - Agnes of Essex

3rd wife of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford.

From Wikipedia - Aubrey de Vere III :

[Earl Aubrey's] attempt to divorce his third wife, Agnes of Essex , was a celebrated marriage case that Agnes appealed successfully to Pope Alexander III . In 1153 he was present with King Stephen 's army at the siege of Wallingford and attested at the Treaty of Wallingford , finally signed at Westminster . Two of his sons by Agnes, Aubrey IV and Robert, became earls of Oxford. Robert, the third earl, was one of the 25 rebel barons who were to hold King John to the terms of Magna Carta .
----------
From Wikipedia - Agnes of Essex :

Agnes of Essex, countess of Oxford (c. 1151 - c. 1206 ) was the daughter of Henry of Essex and his second wife. She was betrothed at age three to Geoffrey de Vere, brother of the first earl of Oxford . Raised by the Veres, she later rejected the match with Geoffrey and by 1163 had married his brother Aubrey de Vere III , the earl, as his third wife. After her father's disgrace and forfeiture of lands and offices in that year, the earl sought to have his marriage annulled. Agnes fought the action. On May 9 , 1166 , she appealed her case from the court of the bishop of London to the pope (the archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket , being in exile at the time). While the case was pending in Rome, the earl kept Agnes confined, for which the bishop of London reprimanded Aubrey. Pope Alexander III ruled in her favor, thus establishing the right and requirement of consent by females in betrothal and the sacrament of marriage. The couple may have co-operated in the founding of a Benedictine nunnery near their castle at Hedingham, Essex . Having survived her husband, Countess Agnes paid the crown for the right to remain unmarried and died sometime in or after 1206.

Many have followed the mistake of antiquarians in believing the third wife of earl Aubrey to have been named Lucia. A woman of this name was prioress of the nunnery at Castle Hedingham . On Lucia's death, a mortuary or roll was carried to many religious houses in the region requesting prayers, and in the preface of that document Lucia is called the foundress of the priory. As the countess presumably cooperated with her husband in the founding of the house, the erroneous assumption was made that the prioress was in fact the earl's widow.

Children
Agnes bore her husband four sons and a daughter, including two future earls of Oxford: Aubrey IV and Robert I . Her daughter Alice married 1) Ernulf de Kemesech, 2) John, constable of Chester.


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