The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Renaud II Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis and Clémence de Bar-le-Duc Countess of Dammartin




Husband Renaud II Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis 1 2 3

            AKA: Renaud de Clermont
           Born: Abt 1108 - Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (Clermont), (Oise), Picardy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1162
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (Abt 1030-1101) 4 5 6
         Mother: Marguerite de Rameru (Between 1045/1050-Abt 1110) 6 7 8


       Marriage: Abt 1140



Wife Clémence de Bar-le-Duc Countess of Dammartin 1 9

            AKA: Clemence de Bar
           Born: Abt 1110 - <Dammartin (Dammartin-en-Goële), (Seine-et-Marne)>, Île-de-France, France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 20 Jan 1183
         Buried: 


         Father: Renaud I Count of Mousson, Count of Bar-le-Duc (Abt 1077-1149) 1 10
         Mother: Gisele of Vaudémont (Abt 1090-After 1141) 1 11



   Other Spouse: Renaud de Clermont (      -      ) 2

Events

• Living: 1183.


Children
1 F Mathilda of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin 1 12 13

            AKA: Mabilie of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin, Mahaut de Ponthieu, Maud of Clermont, Ponthieu & Dammartin, Maude de Clermont, Mathilde de Clermont
           Born: Abt 1138 - <Ponthieu>, (Picardy), France
     Christened: 
           Died: After Oct 1200
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alberic II Count of Dammartin (Abt 1135-1200) 1 14
         Spouse: Alberic II de Dammartin (      -      ) 15




Research Notes: Husband - Renaud II Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis

Second husband of Clémence de Bar-le-Duc. Fathered at least 7 children. 1 2 3


Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr King of Seisyllwg and Rheingar




Husband Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr King of Seisyllwg 16 17

           Born: Cir 827 - Deheubarth, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 910 18
         Buried: 


         Father: Rhodri Mawr ap Merfyn King of Gwynedd & Powys & Seisyllwg (0789-0878) 1 19 20 21
         Mother: Angharad ferch Gwgon ap Meurig (Abt 0811-      ) 20 22


       Marriage: 



Wife Rheingar 16

           Born: Cir 865 - Carmarthenshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hywel Dda King of Deheubarth 17 23 24




            AKA: Howel Dda King of Deheubarth, Howell Dha King of South Wales, Hywel the Good, Hywel ap Cadell ap Rhodri, Hywel ap Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr King of Deheubarth
           Born: Cir 880 - Dinefwr Castle, Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 950
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elen ferch Llywarch (Abt 0885-0943)




Research Notes: Husband - Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr King of Seisyllwg

From A History of Wales, p. 83:

"According to Asser, the rulers of Dyfed and Brycheiniog feared the pwer of the sons of Rhodri, while the rulers of Gwent and Glywysing were threated by Aethelred, earl of Mercia. When Alfred came to the throne in 871, the whole of England, apart from the southern rim of Wessex, was in the hands of the Danes but, as a result of his successes against them, Alfred came to enjoy great power and renown. Asser states that the smaller rulers of Wales asked him for his patronage and that Anarawd ap Rhodri, king of Gwynedd and Poweys, followed their example, abandoning his alliance with the Danish kingdom of York. It is likely that his brother Cade3ll, ruler of Seisyllwg, did the same, and thus the king of Wessex became overlord of the whole of Wales. .. The recognition by Welsh rulers that the king of England had claims upon them would be a central fact in the subsequent political history of Wales." 16 17


Research Notes: Child - Hywel Dda King of Deheubarth

Lawgiver of Cambria

From A History of Wales, p. 83:

"If the intention of the rulers of Dyfed and Brycheiniog in seeking the patronage of Alfred was to remain free from the clutches of the house of Rhodri, they failed. About 904, Llywarch ap Hyfaidd, king of Dyfed, died; his kingdom came into the possession of Hywel ap Cadell ap Rhodri, the ruler of Seisyllwg and the husband of Elen, Llywarch's daughter. It would appear that Hywel also took possession of Brycheiniog, for its royal line ends with Tewdwr ap Griffri, who died about 930. The enlarged kingdom came to be known as Deheubarth, a unit of central importance in the history of Wales during the following four centuries.

"...Deheubarth was united with the territories of Idwal ab Anarawd ap Rhodri--Gwynedd and Powys--in 942, and Hywel died in 950 (or perhaps 949) the ruler of a kingdom which extended from Prestatyn to Pembroke."
--------
From Wikipedia - Hywel Dda :
Hywel Dda (c. 880 - 950), (English : Hywel the Good;, sometimes anglicized to Howell the Good) was a well-thought-of king[1] of Deheubarth in south-west Wales , who, using his cunning, eventually came to rule Wales from Prestatyn to Pembroke .[2] As a descendant of Rhodri Mawr through his father Cadell , Hywel was a member of the Dinefwr branch of the dynasty and is also named Hywel ap Cadell. He was recorded as King of the Britons in the Annales Cambriae and the Annals of Ulster .

He is remembered as one of the most responsible native Welsh rulers of all time. His name is particularly linked with the development of the Welsh laws , generally known as the Laws of Hywel Dda. The latter part of his name ('Dda' or 'Good') refers to the fact that his laws were just and good. The historian Dafydd Jenkins sees in them compassion rather than punishment, plenty of common sense and a sense of respect towards women.[1]

Hywel Dda was certainly a well-educated man, even by modern standards, having a good knowledge of Welsh, Latin, and English.[1]

In April 2008 a merger of Pembrokeshire & Derwen, Ceredigion and Mid Wales, and Carmarthenshire NHS Trusts was named the Hywel Dda NHS Trust in his honour.


Biography
Hywel was born at around 880, the younger son of Cadell , himself the son of Rhodri the Great . In 905, Cadell, having conquered Dyfed , gave it to his son to rule on his behalf. Hywel was able to consolidate his position by marrying Elen, whose father Llywarch ap Hyfaidd had ruled Dyfed until his death. Following his father's death in 909, he acquired a share of Seisyllwg , and on his brother's death in 920, he merged Dyfed and Seisyllwg, creating for himself a new kingdom, which became known as Deheubarth . Following the death of his cousin Idwal Foel in 942, he also seized the Kingdom of Gwynedd .

Accomplishments
Peace with Wessex
Hywel's reign was a violent one, and he achieved an understanding with Athelstan of England . Athelstan and Hywel ruled part of Wales jointly. Such was the relationship between the neighbouring countries that Hywel was able to mint his own coinage in the English city of Chester . He was the first Welsh ruler to produce coinage for at least a thousand years, since the coinage of his Celtic predecessors. His study of legal systems and his pilgrimage to Rome in 928 combined to enable him to formulate advanced ideas about law. A comparative study of law and lawmaking at the time reveals a deep concern for law and its documentation throughout Europe and also the Islamic world, the Cordoba Islamic Law translation schools being a fine example, from Greek to Arabic to Latin. The Hywel 'Law' book was written partly in Latin, about laws of court, law of country and the law of justices.

Opinions vary as to the motives for Hywel's close association with the court of Athelstan. J.E. Lloyd claimed Hywel was an admirer of Wessex [3], while D.P. Kirby suggests that it may have been the action of a pragmatist who recognized the realities of power in mid-10th century Britain.[4] It is notable that he gave one of his sons an Anglo-Saxon name, Edwin. His policies with regard to England were evidently not to the taste of all his subjects. Athelstan and Hywel had similar interests. They both developed a coinage; they both had a kingdom; both were attributed a Law book. Hywel was aware of the greater power and acceded to it.

A Welsh language poem entitled Armes Prydein , considered by Sir Ifor Williams to have been written in Deheubarth during Hywel's reign, called for the Welsh to join a confederation of all the non-English peoples of Britain and Ireland to fight the Saxons. The poem may be linked to the alliance of Norse and Celtic kingdoms which challenged Athelstan at the Battle of Brunanburh in 937.[citation needed ] No Welsh forces joined this alliance, and this may well have been because of the influence of Hywel.[citation needed ] On the other hand neither did he send troops to support Athelstan.
Welsh Law
The conference held at Whitland circa 945, was an assembly in which Welsh law was codified and set down in writing for posterity. According to tradition, much of the work was done by the celebrated clerk, Blegywryd. Following Hywel's death, his kingdom was soon split into three. Gwynedd was reclaimed by the sons of Idwal Foel, while Deheubarth was divided between Hywel's sons. However, his legacy endured in the form of his laws, which remained in active use throughout Wales until the conquest and were not abolished by the English Parliament until the 16th century. A surviving copy of a Latin text of the Law (ms Peniarth 28) is held at The National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth and can be seen online.[1] More than 30 manuscripts were recently selected for a discussion of the "Law" of Hywel, by a Welsh professor of Medieval studies, Hywel Emanuel. Only five of them were considered to be of sufficient antiquity, dating back to the 13thC or earlier, to merit serious attention. Three of them were in Latin and two in Welsh. 17 23 24



Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Private
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Gurgustius :

Gurgustius (Welsh : Gorust) was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth . He was the son of King Rivallo and was succeeded by Sisillius I . 26 27


Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Private
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Private

King of the Britons, reigned about 20 years. Contemporary with Elijah.

From Wikipedia - Bladud :

Bladud or Blaiddyd[a] was a legendary king of the Britons , for whose existence there is no historical evidence. He is first mentioned in Geoffrey of Monmouth 's Historia Regum Britanniae , which describes him as the son of King Rud Hud Hudibras , and the tenth ruler in line from the first King, Brutus . This idea may have been based on a misinterpreted scrap of Welsh genealogy. The Welsh form of the name is given as Blaiddyd in manuscripts of the Brut Tysilio (Welsh translations of Geoffrey's Historia).[1] In the text he is said to have founded the city of Bath .

The tale of Bladud was later embellished by other authors. In its final form Bladud was sent by his father to be educated in the liberal arts at Athens . After his father's death he returned, with four philosophers, and founded a university at Stamford in Lincolnshire , which flourished until it was suppressed by Saint Augustine of Canterbury on account of heresies which were taught there. Supposedly he ruled for twenty years from 863 BC or perhaps 500 BC, in which time he built Kaerbadum or Caervaddon (Bath ), creating the hot springs there by the use of magic. He dedicated the city to the goddess Athena or Minerva , and in honour of her lit undying fires, whose flames turned to balls of stone as they grew low, with new ones springing up in their stead: an embellishment of an account from the fourth-century writer Solinus of the use of local coal on the altars of her temple.

He is said to have founded the city because while he was at Athens he contracted leprosy , and when he returned home he was imprisoned as a result, but escaped and went far off to go into hiding. He found employment as a swineherd at Swainswick , about two miles from the later site of Bath , and noticed that his pigs would go into an alder-moor in cold weather and return covered in black mud. He found that the mud was warm, and that they did it to enjoy the heat. He also noticed that the pigs which did this did not suffer from skin diseases as others did, and on trying the mud bath himself found that he was cured of his leprosy. He was then restored to his position as heir-apparent to his father, and founded Bath so that others might also benefit as he had done.


The tale claims that he also encouraged the practice of necromancy , or divination through the spirits of the dead. Through this practice, he is said to have constructed wings for himself and to have tried to fly to (or from) the temple of Apollo in Trinovantum (London) or Troja Nova (New Troy), but to have been killed when he hit a wall, or to have fallen and been dashed to pieces or broken his neck. He was supposedly buried at New Troy and succeeded by his son, Leir . Eighteenth century Bath architect John Wood, the Elder wrote about Bladud, and put forth the fanciful suggestion that he should be identified with Abaris the Hyperborean , the healer known from Classical Greek sources.[4] 30 31




Rhys of Plâs yn Rhiwlas




Husband Rhys of Plâs yn Rhiwlas

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Robert ap Rhys of Plâs yn Rhiwlas

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Rhys of Plâs yn Rhiwlas

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, Vol. 6, by J. Y. W. Lloyd, London, 1887, p. 115 (Google Books)


Research Notes: Child - Robert ap Rhys of Plâs yn Rhiwlas

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, Vol. 6, by J. Y. W. Lloyd, London, 1887, p. 115 (Google Books)


Rhys




Husband Rhys (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children


Rhys-Gloff Lord of Cymcydmaen




Husband Rhys-Gloff Lord of Cymcydmaen

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rhys-Vaughn Lord of Yestradtywy (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Madoc ap Rhys-Gloff

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Rhys-Gloff Lord of Cymcydmaen

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Research Notes: Child - Madoc ap Rhys-Gloff

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Rhys-Mechyllt of Llandovery Castle




Husband Rhys-Mechyllt of Llandovery Castle

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rhys Gwyg ap Rhys Lord of Yestradtywy (      -      )
         Mother: Joan de Clare (1184-      ) 32 33


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Rhys-Vaughn Lord of Yestradtywy

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Rhys-Mechyllt of Llandovery Castle

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Research Notes: Child - Rhys-Vaughn Lord of Yestradtywy

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Rhys-Vaughn Lord of Yestradtywy




Husband Rhys-Vaughn Lord of Yestradtywy

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rhys-Mechyllt of Llandovery Castle (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Rhys-Gloff Lord of Cymcydmaen

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Rhys-Vaughn Lord of Yestradtywy

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Research Notes: Child - Rhys-Gloff Lord of Cymcydmaen

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Richard and Jane Bigod




Husband Richard 34

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Jane Bigod 34

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Roger FitzRichard 1st Lord of Warkworth, Northumberland 34

           Born: Abt 1140
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1177
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alice de Vere of Essex (Bef 1141-After 1185) 35 36




Research Notes: Child - Roger FitzRichard 1st Lord of Warkworth, Northumberland

Second husband of Adelicia de Vere. 34


Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org.

2 Wikipedia.org, Marie, Countess of Ponthieu.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144-25 (Clemence de Bar-le-Duc).

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-23 (Margaret de Rameru), 144-25 (Clémence de Bar-le-Duc).

5 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019614.htm.

6 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-23, 144-25 (Clémence de Bar-le-Duc).

8 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019615.htm.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144-25.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144-24.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144-24 (Reinald I).

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144-26, 152-26 (Albri de Luzarches).

13 Wikipedia.org, Simon of Dammartin; Marie, Countess of Ponthieu.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144-26 (Matilda of Clermont), 152-26.

15 Wikipedia.org, Simon of Dammartin.

16 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg58.htm#1159.

17 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), p. 83.

18 Ingram, James, translator, The Annales Cambriae 447-954 (The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. London: Everyman Press, 1912.), 909 King Cadell son of Rhodri dies.

19 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), pp. 78-79.

20 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg58.htm#1160.

21 Wikipedia.org, Rhodri the Great.

22 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), pp. 80-81.

23 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg58.htm#1158.

24 Wikipedia.org, Hywel Dda.

25 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105929 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

26 Wikipedia.org, Gurgustius; List of legendary kings of Britain.

27 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105928 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28 Wikipedia.org, Rud Hud Hudibras; List of legendary kings of Britain.

29 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105915 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

30 Wikipedia.org, Bladud; List of legendary kings of Britain.

31 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105916 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

32 Wikipedia.org, Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford.

33 Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), P. 281.

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246D-26 (Adelicia de Vere).

35 Wikipedia.org, Aubrey de Vere II.

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246D-26.


Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 27 Sep 2016 with Legacy 8.0 from Millennia