The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




James Beall and Anne Marie Calvert




Husband James Beall

           Born: 1603 - Largo, Fifeshire, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 May 1646 - Largo, Fifeshire, Scotland
         Buried: 


         Father: Alexander Beall (1565-1612)
         Mother: Margaret Ramsey (1569-1605)


       Marriage: 1623 - St. Andrew's, Fifeshire, Scotland



Wife Anne Marie Calvert

           Born: 1603 - Largo, Ligensheim, Fifeshire, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 May 1646 - St. Andrew's, Fifeshire, Scotland
         Buried: 


         Father: 
         Mother: Margaret Cubie (1557-      )




Children
1 M Colonel Ninian Beale 1 2

            AKA: Nivin Beale, Colonel Ninian Beall "the Covenanter"
           Born: 1625 - Dumbarton, Fifeshire, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jan 1717 - Prince George's Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ruth Polly Moore (Between 1648/1652-1707)
           Marr: 1668 - Calvert, Maryland, (United States)



Research Notes: Husband - James Beall

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kygengirl1&id=P2168830595


Research Notes: Wife - Anne Marie Calvert

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kygengirl1&id=P2168830594


Research Notes: Child - Colonel Ninian Beale

May not have been Rachel Beall's father. Not well documented. Researchers may be jumping to conclusions.

------
From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, pp. 101-103:

THE BEALE FAMILY

A Scottish family, with a ringing bell as its coat of arms, was early represented in our province.
The leader was a famous officer, Colonel Ninian Beale, born in Fifeshire, or near Edinburgh, about 1625. Having fought, in 1650, against Cromwell at Dunbar, he was captured and transported to Calvert County, Maryland.
This same immigrant was called the "Covenanter," whose zeal caused him in some way, to be mixed up with the killing of a Bishop Montgomery, in an effort to keep Episcopacy out of Scotland.
He came, in 1655, and located in Calvert County. Intelligent and of a strong character, he at once became a leader in the contests of that period.
He was with Colonel Coursey and Colonel William Stephens, "When they sent Captain Beale before them to find Captain Brandt." Information being delivered into his lordship's hands by Captain Ninian Beale, it was ordered to be entered in the Council book; and by his lordship's special command, power be given to Captain Ninian Beale, of Calvert County, to press man and horse anytime, upon urgent occasion, to give his lordship intelligence." ordered, also, at the same time, "that six men in arms, under Captain Ninian Beale, be commanded out to continue ranging between the head of the Patuxent, up to the Susquehanna, forth for discovery of the Indian enemy." Captain Beale, in 1689, signed the Declaration of Remonstrance, in which it was declared, that "All rumors of an Indian invasion, supported by Catholics, were found to be false."
For Captain Beale's services he was granted an estate that extended over several counties. He surveyed near the National Capitol, and upon one of his surveys, a number of Presbyterian families were induced to settle. One of his tracts was the "Rock of Dumbarton." Geoirgetown stands upon this survey. There was another one at Bennings, and still another at Collington, Prince George County. Here was located Ninian Beale, Jr., the testator of 1710, who named only two children, Mary and Samuel. His sister, Jane, daughter of colonel Ninian and Ruth Moore, married Colonel Archibald Edmonson, whose daughter, Ruth Edmondson, married Rev. John Orme, who married Elizabeth Johns, whose daughter, Charlotte Orme, becaue Mrs. Daniel Douglass. Colonel Ninian died, 1717, age ninety-three years.



Thomas Stimpson and Rachel Beard




Husband Thomas Stimpson 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Rachel Beard 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard Beard of South River (      -      ) 3
         Mother: Rachel (      -      ) 3




Children
1 F Comfort Stimpson

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Col. John Dorsey [son of Joshua] (Abt 1688-After 1735) 4 5



Research Notes: Child - Comfort Stimpson

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/d13479.htm#P13479


Abe L. Peters and Lillie Bearn




Husband Abe L. Peters (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Lillie Bearn (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Wendel J. Peters 6

           Born: 13 Sep 1924 - Cumberland, Wisconsin, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: May 1993
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dorothy Maude Johnson (1926-1984) 6 7
           Marr: 20 Oct 1945 - <Burbank>, Los Angeles, California, United States 8
         Spouse: Gloria Bond (living)



Death Notes: Child - Wendel J. Peters

Per DeWayne Johnson 1/10/07, died after a fall from a hospital bed.
Died before 1 June 1993, date of a note from Charlotte Peters thanking DeWayne & Lorna Johnson for their flowers at Wendell's memorial service.


Hugh de Morville and Beatrice de Beauchamp




Husband Hugh de Morville 9

           Born: Abt 1105 - <Burgh-by-Sands, Cumberland, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1162
         Buried: 


         Father: Simon de Morville (Abt 1079-      ) 9
         Mother: Ada de Engayne (Abt 1081-      ) 9


       Marriage: 



Wife Beatrice de Beauchamp 9

           Born: Abt 1107 - <Bedfordshire, England>
     Christened: 
           Died:  - England
         Buried: 


         Father: Payne de Beauchamp (Abt 1118-1157) 9
         Mother: Rohese de Vere (Abt 1103-1166) 9 10




Children
1 M Richard de Morville of Lauder in Lauderdale 9 11

           Born: Abt 1143 - <Burgh-by-Sands, Cumberland, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1189
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Avice de Lancaster (Abt 1155-1191) 9 11




Guy de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni




Husband Guy de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick 9 12 13

           Born: 1272 - <Elmley Castle, Elmley>, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Aug 1315 - Warwick, Warwickshire, England
         Buried:  - Bordesley Abbey, [near Redditch], Worcestershire, England


         Father: William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick (Abt 1237-1298) 9 12
         Mother: Maud FitzGeoffrey (Abt 1237-1301) 9 14 15


       Marriage: 10 Aug 1315 - Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England



Wife Alice de Toeni 9

           Born: 1284 - <Flamsted, Hertfordshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Jan 1324
         Buried: 


         Father: Ralph de Toeni (Abt 1255-Bef 1295) 9
         Mother: Mary (      -      ) 9




Children
1 M Thomas de Beauchamp 9

           Born: 14 Feb 1314 - <Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Nov 1369 - Calais, (Pas-de-Calais), France
         Buried:  - Saint Mary's, Warwick, Warwickshire, England





Hugues de Beauchamp and Adeliza de Taillebois




Husband Hugues de Beauchamp 9

           Born: Abt 1087 - Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1141
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 1112 - Bedfordshire, England



Wife Adeliza de Taillebois 9

           Born: Abt 1092 - Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rolf Taillebois (Abt 1019-      ) 9
         Mother: Azeline (Abt 1020-      ) 9




Children
1 M Payne de Beauchamp 9

            AKA: Peganus de Beauchamp
           Born: Abt 1118 - <Hereford, Buckshire, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1157
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Rohese de Vere (Abt 1103-1166) 9 10


2 M Walter de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire 9

           Born: Abt 1120 - Elmley Castle, Elmley, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Emmeline D'Abitot (Abt 1076-      ) 9
           Marr: Abt 1129 - Worcester, Worcestershire, England




Sir Thomas Penyston and Isabel Beauchamp




Husband Sir Thomas Penyston 16

            AKA: Sir Thomas Peniston
           Born: 1360 - Buckinghamshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir George Peniston Lord of Beckhamefield (Abt 1370-      ) 16 17
         Mother: Margaret Harpenden (      -      ) 16


       Marriage: 



Wife Isabel Beauchamp 16

           Born: 1360 - Holt, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir John de Beauchamp Baron Kidderminster, Justice of North Wales (Abt 1319-1388) 16 18
         Mother: Joan FitzWith (1322-1384) 16 19




Children
1 M Sir John Penyston 16

            AKA: Sir John Peniston
           Born: Abt 1385 - <Chesham Bois>, Buckinghamshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1390 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elinor Chesham (1394-1427) 16




William Blount of Belton, Rutland and Isabella de Beauchamp




Husband William Blount of Belton, Rutland 9

           Born:  - England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 1261



Wife Isabella de Beauchamp 9 20 21

            AKA: Isabel de Beauchamp
           Born: Abt 1252 - <Warwick>, Warwickshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 30 May 1306 - Elmley Castle, Worchestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick (Abt 1237-1298) 9 12
         Mother: Maud FitzGeoffrey (Abt 1237-1301) 9 14 15



   Other Spouse: Sir Patrick de Chaworth 5th Baron of Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly (Abt 1260-1283) 22 23 - Bef 1281

   Other Spouse: Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester (1260-1326) 9 24 25 - 1286


Children

Research Notes: Wife - Isabella de Beauchamp

FamilySearch lists 4 husbands:
William Blount of Belton, Rutland, England, m. abt 1261
Patrick de Chaworth, m. abt 1281
Hugh le Despencer, m. bef 1286
Henry Lovet

From Wikipedia - Isabella de Beauchamp :

Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Lady Despenser (died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She married twice; firstly to Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth . Her second husband was Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester , by whom she had four children, including Hugh the younger Despenser .[1] Her second husband and eldest son were both executed in 1326 by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March , and his mistress, Isabella of France , Queen-consort of King Edward II . The couple were de facto rulers of England at the time. Isabella de Beauchamp had been dead for over twenty years at the time of their executions.

Family
Isabella was born on an unknown date in Warwickshire , England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn . She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni , by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit. Her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod .

Marriages and children
Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire , South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:

Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster , by whom she had seven children.
Following Patrick's death in 1286, Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire , assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.[2]
That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks .[2] He was created Lord Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Isabella Lady Despenser.
Together Hugh and Isabella had four children:[3]
Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare , by whom he had issue.
Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John de Hastings, Lord Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, Lord Monthermer .
Philip le Despenser (died 1313), married as her first husband Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.
Isabella died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II , were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Isabella was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.


Sir Patrick de Chaworth 5th Baron of Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly and Isabella de Beauchamp




Husband Sir Patrick de Chaworth 5th Baron of Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly 22 23

           Born: Abt 1260
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Jul 1283 - <Kidwelly>, Carmarthenshire, Wales
         Buried: 


         Father: Patrick de Chaworth of Kempsford (      -1258)
         Mother: Hawise de London (      -1273)


       Marriage: Bef 1281



Wife Isabella de Beauchamp 9 20 21

            AKA: Isabel de Beauchamp
           Born: Abt 1252 - <Warwick>, Warwickshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 30 May 1306 - Elmley Castle, Worchestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick (Abt 1237-1298) 9 12
         Mother: Maud FitzGeoffrey (Abt 1237-1301) 9 14 15



   Other Spouse: William Blount of Belton, Rutland (      -      ) 9 - Abt 1261

   Other Spouse: Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester (1260-1326) 9 24 25 - 1286


Children
1 F Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester 23 26 27

            AKA: Matilda de Chaworth, Maud Chaworth
           Born: 2 Feb 1282 - <Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire>, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 3 Dec 1322
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester (Abt 1281-1345) 28 29
           Marr: Bef 2 Mar 1297 - Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales



Research Notes: Husband - Sir Patrick de Chaworth 5th Baron of Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008.


Research Notes: Wife - Isabella de Beauchamp

FamilySearch lists 4 husbands:
William Blount of Belton, Rutland, England, m. abt 1261
Patrick de Chaworth, m. abt 1281
Hugh le Despencer, m. bef 1286
Henry Lovet

From Wikipedia - Isabella de Beauchamp :

Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Lady Despenser (died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She married twice; firstly to Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth . Her second husband was Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester , by whom she had four children, including Hugh the younger Despenser .[1] Her second husband and eldest son were both executed in 1326 by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March , and his mistress, Isabella of France , Queen-consort of King Edward II . The couple were de facto rulers of England at the time. Isabella de Beauchamp had been dead for over twenty years at the time of their executions.

Family
Isabella was born on an unknown date in Warwickshire , England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn . She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni , by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit. Her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod .

Marriages and children
Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire , South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:

Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster , by whom she had seven children.
Following Patrick's death in 1286, Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire , assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.[2]
That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks .[2] He was created Lord Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Isabella Lady Despenser.
Together Hugh and Isabella had four children:[3]
Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare , by whom he had issue.
Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John de Hastings, Lord Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, Lord Monthermer .
Philip le Despenser (died 1313), married as her first husband Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.
Isabella died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II , were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Isabella was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.


Research Notes: Child - Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester

From Wikipedia - Maud Chaworth :

Maud de Chaworth (2 February 1282 - 1322), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child of Patrick de Chaworth . Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster , by whom she had seven children. Although the exact date of her death is unknown, it is estimated that she must have died sometime before 3 December 1322.

Parents
Maud was the daughter and only child of Sir Patrick de Chaworth ,Lord of Kidwelly, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and Isabella de Beauchamp . Her maternal grandfather was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick . Her father, Patrick de Chaworth died on 7 July 1283. He was thought to be 30 years old. Approximately, three years later, in 1286, Isabella de Beauchamp married Hugh Despenser the Elder and had two sons and four daughters by him. This made Maud the half-sister of Hugh the younger Despenser . Her mother, Isabella de Beauchamp, died in 1306.

Childhood
When her father died, Maud was only a year old and his death left her a wealthy heiress. However, because she was an infant, she became a ward of Eleanor of Castile , Queen consort of King Edward I of England . Upon Queen Eleanor's death in 1290, her husband, King Edward I, granted Maud's marriage to his brother Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster on 30 December 1292.
Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster , Earl of Leicester was the son of Eleanor of Provence and Henry III of England . He first married Aveline de Forz, Countess of Albemarle, in 1269. Later, in Paris on 3 February 1276, he married Blanche of Artois who is niece of Louis IX and Queen of Navarre by association with her first marriage. Blanche and Edmund had four children together, one of whom was Henry Plantagenet, who would later become 3rd Earl of Leicester and Maud Chaworth's husband.

[edit ] Marriage and Children
Although sources say that Edmund was married to Maud, it has been suggested that Maud was betrothed to Edmund and his son Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster [1] together, to ensure that she married into the family even if Edmund were to die. Therefore, when Edmund did pass away, Henry and Maud were bonded in holy matrimony sometime before 2 March 1297. Henry was supposedly born between the years 1280 and 1281, making him somewhat older than Maud, but not by much since they were either fourteen or fifteen-years-old.
Since Maud inherited her father's property, Henry also acquired this property through the rights of marriage. Some of that property was of the following: Hampshire, Glamorgan, Wiltshire, and Carmarthenshire. Henry was the nephew to the King of England, as well as being closely associated with the French royal family line. Henry's half-sister Jeanne (or Juana) was given the title Queen of Navarre in her own right, and married Philip IV of France. Not only that, but Henry was the uncle of King Edward II 's Queen Isabella and of three Kings of France. He was also the younger brother of Thomas (Earl of Lancaster) and first cousin of Edward II.
Maud is very often described as the "Countess of Leicester" or "Countess of Lancaster" but she never bore the titles as she died before her husband received them. Henry was only named "Earl of Leicester" in 1324 and "Earl of Lancaster" in 1327, both after her death. Henry never remarried and died on 22 September 1345 when he would have been in his mid-sixties. All but one of his seven children with Maud outlived him.
Maud and Henry had seven children:
Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster , (about 1310-1361); Maud's only son Henry was usually called Henry of Grosmont to distinguish him from his father. He was one of the great, well known and respected men of the fourteenth century. He took after his father and was well educated, literate, pious, a soldier and a diplomat. Henry produced his own memoir "Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines" which was completed in 1354. At one point, Henry of Grosmont was considered to be the richest man in England aside from the Prince of Wales. He was emerging as a political figure in his own right within England: he was knighted and represented his father in parliament. It was in the same year that he married his wife, Isabella, daughter of Henry, Lord Beaumont. His daughter Blanche was betrothed and eventually married to the son of Edward III, John of Gaunt. In 1361, Henry was killed by a new outbreak of the Black Death, leaving John of Gaunt his inheritance and eventually his title through his daughter Blanche.[2]
Blanche of Lancaster , (about 1302/05-1380); Maud's eldest daughter was probably born between 1302 and 1305, and was named after her father's mother Blanche of Artois . Around 9 October 1316, she married Thomas Wake , the second baron of Liddell. Blanch was about forty-five when Thomas died and lived as a widow for more than thirty years. She was one of the executers of her brother Henry's will when he died in 1361. Blanche outlived all her siblings, dying shortly before 12 July 1380 in her mid to late seventies. Born in the reign of Edward I, she survived all the way into the reign of his great grandson Richard II.
Maud of Lancaster, (about 1310-1345)There is some discrepancy as to when Maud died. Another possible date of her death is 1377[3]
married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster in 1327. They bore one child, Elizabeth de Burgh who was born 6 July 1332. Eleven months after the birth of their child, Earl William was murdered at "Le Ford" in Belfast, apparently by some of his own men. The countess Maud fled to England with her baby and stayed with the royal family. In 1337, Maud of Lancaster managed to ensure that the Justiciar of Ireland was forbidden to pardon her husband's killers. She fought for her dower rights and exerted some influence there. She remarried in 1344 to Ralph Ufford and returned to Ireland where she had another daughter, Maud. After her second husband fell ill in 1346, she again returned to England. Maud of Lancaster died on May 5, 1345/77.
Joan of Lancaster , (about 1312-1345); married between February 28 and June 4, 1327 to John, Lord Mowbray . John's father was horribly executed for reasons unknown and young John was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with his mother Alice de Braose, until late 1326. A large part of his inheritance was granted to Hugh Despenser the Younger, who was his future wife's uncle; however he was set free in 1327 before the marriage. Joan of Lancaster probably died in her early thirties, sometime before August 1344.
Isabel of Lancaster, Prioress of Ambresbury, (about 1317-after 1347); often said to be born in 1317 as one of the youngest daughters of Maud and Henry. Her life is somewhat obscure, going on pilgrimages and spending a lot of time alone. She spent a great deal of time outside the cloister on non-spiritual matters. Her father had given her quite a bit of property which she administered herself. She owned hunting dogs and had personal servants. She used her family connections to secure privileges and concessions.[4]
Eleanor of Lancaster , (1318- Sept. 1372); married John Beaumont between September and November 1330. Eleanor bore John a son, Henry, who married Margaret de Vere, a sister of Elizabeth and Thomas de Vere, Earl of Oxford. John Beaumont was killed in a jousting tournament in Northampton on 14 April 1342. Eleanor then became mistress of the Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel , who happened to be married to her first cousin Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger. Richard obtained a divorce from the Pope and married Eleanor on 5 February 1345 in the presence of Edward III. They had five children together, three sons and two daughters. Eleanor died on 11 January 1372.
Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320-1362); married Henry, Lord Percy before September 4, 1334 who fought at the battle of Crecy in 1346, and served in Gascony under the command of his brother in law Henry of Grosmont. Their son was Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland . Mary of Lancaster died on 1 September 1362, the year after her brother Henry.


Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester and Isabella de Beauchamp




Husband Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester 9 24 25

            AKA: Hugh "the Elder" le Despenser Sir
           Born: 1 Mar 1260
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Oct 1326 - Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh le Despencer 1st Baron le Despencer (Bef 1223-1265) 9 30
         Mother: Aline Bassett Countess of Norfolk (Abt 1241-Bef 1281)


       Marriage: 1286

Events

• Baron le Despenser: 1265-1326.

• Justice in Eyre: sourth of the Trent, 1296-1307.

• Justice in Eyre: south of the Trent, 1307-1311.

• Justice in Eyre: south of the Trent, 1312-1314.

• Lord Wardens of the Cinque Ports: 1320.

• Earl of Winchester: 1322-1326.

• Justice in Eyre: south of the Trent, 1324-1326.




Wife Isabella de Beauchamp 9 20 21

            AKA: Isabel de Beauchamp
           Born: Abt 1252 - <Warwick>, Warwickshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 30 May 1306 - Elmley Castle, Worchestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick (Abt 1237-1298) 9 12
         Mother: Maud FitzGeoffrey (Abt 1237-1301) 9 14 15



   Other Spouse: William Blount of Belton, Rutland (      -      ) 9 - Abt 1261

   Other Spouse: Sir Patrick de Chaworth 5th Baron of Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly (Abt 1260-1283) 22 23 - Bef 1281


Children
1 M Sir Hugh le Despenser Baron Despenser 9 31 32

            AKA: Hugh "the Younger" le Despenser Baron Despenser
           Born: 1286
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Nov 1326 - Hereford, Herefordshire, England
         Buried: After 15 Dec 1330 - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
         Spouse: Eleanor de Clare (1292-1337) 9 33 34
           Marr: After 14 Jun 1306


2 M Sir Edward Despenser 35

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Sep 1342
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Husband - Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester

FamilySearch has Of, Winchester, Hampshire, England Or Louchborough, Leicestershire, England


Death Notes: Husband - Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester

Hanged


Research Notes: Husband - Sir Hugh le Despenser 1st Earl of Winchester

3rd husband of Isabella de Beauchamp.

From Wikipedia - Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester :

Hugh le Despenser (1262 - October 27 , 1326 ), sometimes referred to as "the elder Despenser", was for a time the chief adviser to King Edward II of England .
He was the son of Hugh le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer (or Despenser), and Aliva Basset, sole daughter and heiress of Philip Basset . His father was killed at Evesham when Hugh was just a boy, but Hugh's patrimony was saved through the influence of his maternal grandfather (who had been loyal to the king).[1]

He married Isabel de Beauchamp, daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn.

He was created a baron by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295. He was one of the few barons to remain loyal to Edward during the controversy regarding Piers Gaveston . Despenser became Edward's loyal servant and chief administrator after Gaveston was executed in 1312, but the jealousy of other barons - and, more importantly, his own corruption and unjust behaviour - led to his being exiled along with his son Hugh Despenser the younger in 1321, when Edmund de Woodstoke replaced him as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

Edward found it difficult to manage without them, and recalled them to England a year later, an action which enraged the queen, Isabella , the more so when Despenser was created Earl of Winchester . When Isabella and her lover, Roger Mortimer , led a rebellion against the king, both Despensers were captured and executed. Queen Isabella interceded for him, but his enemies, notably Roger Mortimer and Henry, Earl of Lancaster, insisted that he should face trial and execution. The elder Despenser was hanged at Bristol on October 27, 1326.

References
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 72-31, 74-31, 74A-31, 93A-29
Fryde, Natalie (1979). The tyranny and fall of Edward II, 1321-1326. ISBN 0521548063 .
Karau, Björn: Günstlinge am Hof Edwards II. von England - Aufstieg und Fall der Despensers, MA-Thesis, Kiel 1999. (Free Download: )
Hunt, William (1888). "Hugh Despenser". Dictionary of National Biography 14.


Research Notes: Wife - Isabella de Beauchamp

FamilySearch lists 4 husbands:
William Blount of Belton, Rutland, England, m. abt 1261
Patrick de Chaworth, m. abt 1281
Hugh le Despencer, m. bef 1286
Henry Lovet

From Wikipedia - Isabella de Beauchamp :

Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Lady Despenser (died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She married twice; firstly to Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth . Her second husband was Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester , by whom she had four children, including Hugh the younger Despenser .[1] Her second husband and eldest son were both executed in 1326 by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March , and his mistress, Isabella of France , Queen-consort of King Edward II . The couple were de facto rulers of England at the time. Isabella de Beauchamp had been dead for over twenty years at the time of their executions.

Family
Isabella was born on an unknown date in Warwickshire , England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn . She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni , by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit. Her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod .

Marriages and children
Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire , South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:

Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster , by whom she had seven children.
Following Patrick's death in 1286, Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire , assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.[2]
That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks .[2] He was created Lord Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Isabella Lady Despenser.
Together Hugh and Isabella had four children:[3]
Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare , by whom he had issue.
Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John de Hastings, Lord Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, Lord Monthermer .
Philip le Despenser (died 1313), married as her first husband Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.
Isabella died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II , were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Isabella was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.


Death Notes: Child - Sir Hugh le Despenser Baron Despenser

Hanged and quartered for teason


Research Notes: Child - Sir Hugh le Despenser Baron Despenser

From Wikipedia - Hugh Despenser the Younger :

Hugh Despenser, 1st Lord Despenser (1286 - 24 November 1326 , sometimes referred to as "the younger Despenser", was the son and heir of Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester , by Isabel Beauchamp, daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick .

Background
He was knight of Hanley Castle , Worcestershire , King's Chamberlain , Constable of Odiham Castle , Keeper of the castle and town of Portchester , Keeper of the castle, town and barton of Bristol and, in Wales , Keeper of the castle and town of Dryslwyn , and the region of Cantref Mawr , Carmarthenshire . Also in Wales , he was Keeper of the castles, manor, and lands of Brecknock , Hay , Cantref Selyf, etc., in County Brecon , and, in England of Huntington , Herefordshire . He was given Wallingford Castle although this had previously been given to Queen Isabella for life.

Marriage
In May 1306 Hugh was knighted, and that summer he married Eleanor de Clare , daughter of Gilbert de Clare , 9th Lord of Clare and 7th Earl of Hertford and Joan of Acre . Eleanor's grandfather, Edward I , owed Hugh's father vast sums of money, and the marriage was intended as a payment of these debts. When Eleanor's brother was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn , she unexpectedly became one of the three co-heiresses to the rich Gloucester earldom, and in her right Hugh inherited Glamorgan and other properties. In just a few short years Hugh went from a landless knight to one of the wealthiest magnates in the kingdom.
Eleanor was also the niece of the new king, Edward II of England , and this connection brought Hugh closer to the English royal court. He joined the baronial opposition to Piers Gaveston , the king's favourite , and Hugh's brother-in-law, as Gaveston was married to Eleanor's sister. Eager for power and wealth, Hugh seized Tonbridge Castle in 1315. In 1318 he murdered Llywelyn Bren , a Welsh hostage in his custody.

Eleanor and Hugh had nine children:
Hugh le Despenser III (1308-1349)
Gilbert le Despenser , (1309- 1381).
Edward le Despenser , (1310 - 1342), soldier, killed at the siege of Vannes [1]; father of Edward II le Despenser , Knight of the Garter
John le Despenser , (1311 - June 1366).
Isabel le Despenser, Countess of Arundel (1312-1356), married Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel
Eleanor le Despenser , (c. 1315 - 1351), nun at Sempringham Priory
Joan le Despenser , (c. 1317 - 1384), nun at Shaftesbury Abbey
Margaret le Despenser , (c. 1319 - 1337, nun at Whatton Priory
Elizabeth le Despenser , born 1325, died July 13 , 1389 , married Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley .

Political Manoeuvrings
Hugh became royal chamberlain in 1318. As a royal courtier , Hugh manoeuvred into the affections of King Edward, displacing the previous favourite, Roger d'Amory . This was much to the dismay of the baronage as they saw him both taking their rightful places at court and being a worse version of Gaveston. By 1320 his greed was running free. Hugh seized the Welsh lands of his wife's inheritance, ignoring the claims of his two brothers-in-law. He forced Alice de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln , to give up her lands, cheated his sister-in-law Elizabeth de Clare out of Gower and Usk , and allegedly had Lady Baret's arms and legs broken until she went insane. He also supposedly vowed to be revenged on Roger Mortimer because Mortimer's grandfather had murdered Hugh's grandfather, and once stated (though probably in jest) that he regretted he could not control the wind. By 1321 he had earned many enemies in every stratum of society, from Queen Isabella to the barons to the common people. There was even a bizarre plot to kill Hugh by sticking pins in a wax likeness of him.

Finally the barons prevailed upon King Edward and forced Hugh and his father into exile in 1321. His father fled to Bordeaux , and Hugh became a pirate in the English Channel , "a sea monster, lying in wait for merchants as they crossed his path". Following the exile of the Despensers, the barons who opposed them fell out among themselves. The following year, King Edward took advantage of these divisions to secure the defeat and execution of the Earl of Lancaster, and the surrender of Roger Mortimer, the Despensers' chief opponents. The pair returned and King Edward quickly reinstated Hugh as royal favourite. His time in exile had done nothing to quell his greed, his rashness, or his ruthlessness. The time from the Despensers' return from exile until the end of Edward II's reign was a time of uncertainty in England. With the main baronial opposition leaderless and weak, having been defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge , and Edward willing to let them do as they pleased, the Despensers were left unchecked. They grew rich from their administration and corruption. This period is sometimes referred to as the "Tyranny". This maladministration caused hostile feeling for them and, by proxy, Edward II. Hugh repeatedly pressed King Edward to execute Mortimer, who had been held prisoner in the Tower of London, following his surrender. However, Mortimer escaped from the Tower and fled to France.

Relationship with Edward and Isabella
Queen Isabella had a special dislike for the man. Various historians have suggested, and it is commonly believed, that he and Edward had an ongoing sexual relationship. (Froissart states "he was a sodomite, even it is said, with the King.") Some speculate it was this relationship that caused the Queen's dislike of him.[citation needed ] Others, noting that her hatred for him was far greater than for any other favourite of her husband, suggest that his behaviour towards herself and the nation served to excite her particular disgust. Alison Weir , in her 2005 book, Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England, speculates that he had raped Isabella and that was the source of her hatred. While Isabella was in France to negotiate between her husband and the French king, she formed a liaison with Roger Mortimer and began planning an invasion. Hugh supposedly tried to bribe French courtiers to assassinate Isabella, sending barrels of silver as payment. Roger Mortimer and the Queen invaded England in October 1326. Their forces only numbered about 1,500 mercenaries to begin with, but the majority of the nobility rallied to them throughout October and November. By contrast, very few people were prepared to fight for Edward II, mainly because of the hatred which the Despensers had aroused. The Despensers fled West with the King, with a sizable sum from the treasury. The escape was unsuccessful. Separated from the elder Despenser, the King and the younger Hugh were deserted by most of their followers, and were captured near Neath in mid-November. King Edward was placed in captivity and later deposed. Hugh the father (the elder Despenser) was hanged at Bristol on 27 October 1326, and Hugh the son was brought to trial.

Trial and Execution
Hugh tried to starve himself before his trial, but face trial he did on 24 November 1326 , in Hereford , before Mortimer and the Queen. He was judged a traitor and a thief, and sentenced to public execution by hanging, as a thief, and drawing and quartering , as a traitor. Additionally, he was sentenced to be disembowelled for having procured discord between the King and Queen, and to be beheaded, for returning to England after having been banished. Treason had also been the grounds for Gaveston's execution; the belief was that these men had misled the King rather than the King himself being guilty of folly. Immediately after the trial, he was dragged behind four horses to his place of execution, where a great fire was lit. He was stripped naked, and biblical verses denouncing arrogance and evil were written on his skin. He was then hanged from a gallows 50 ft (15 m) high, but cut down before he could choke to death, and was tied to a ladder, in full view of the crowd. The executioner climbed up beside him, and sliced off his penis and testicles which were burnt before him, while he was still alive and conscious; (although castration was not formally part of the sentence imposed on Despenser, it was typically practised on convicted traitors). Subsequently, the executioner slit open his abdomen, and slowly pulled out, and cut out, his entrails and, finally, his heart, which were likewise thrown into the fire. The executioner would have sought to keep him alive as long as possible, while disembowelling him. The burning of his entrails would, in all likelihood, have been the last sight that he witnessed. Just before he died, it is recorded that he let out a "ghastly inhuman howl," much to the delight and merriment of the spectators. Finally, his corpse was beheaded, his body cut into four pieces, and his head was mounted on the gates of London. Mortimer and Isabella feasted with their chief supporters, as they watched the execution...

After his death, his widow asked to be given the body so she could bury it at the family's Gloucestershire estate, but only the head, a thigh bone and a few vertebrae were returned to her.[2]




Sources


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3. Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 59.

4. Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 175.

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7. Johnson, DeWayne B. and Lorna Wallace Johnson, Johnson/Wallace Family Tree.

8. FamilySearch Historical Files (www.familysearch.org), "California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K8KS-8PF : accessed 24 May 2016), Wendel James Peters and Dorothy Maude Johnson, 20 Oct 1945; citing Los Angeles, California, United Sta.

9. http://www.familysearch.org.

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12. Wikipedia.org, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

13. Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 135.

14. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.).

15. Wikipedia.org, Maud FitzJohn; John FitzGeoffrey.

16. Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=12982912974.

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20. Wikipedia.org, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester & William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

21. Wikipedia.org, Isabella de Beauchamp.

22. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 72-31 (Isabel de Beauchamp).

23. Wikipedia.org, Maud Chaworth.

24. Wikipedia.org, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester.

25. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-31 (Isabel de Beauchamp).

26. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 72-32, 17-29 (Henry "of Lancaster").

27. Website:, Chaworth Family Genealogy by Albert Douglass Hart, Jr ("Our Folk").

28. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 17-29.

29. Wikipedia.org, Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.

30. Wikipedia.org, Hugh le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer.

31. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-32, 8-30 (Eleanor de Clare).

32. Wikipedia.org, Hugh Despenser the Younger.

33. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 8-30.

34. Wikipedia.org, Eleanor de Clare.

35. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-33.


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2 Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), pp. 101-103.

3 Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 59.

4 Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 175.

5 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/d13479.htm#P13479.

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7 Johnson, DeWayne B. and Lorna Wallace Johnson, Johnson/Wallace Family Tree.

8 FamilySearch Historical Files (www.familysearch.org), "California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K8KS-8PF : accessed 24 May 2016), Wendel James Peters and Dorothy Maude Johnson, 20 Oct 1945; citing Los Angeles, California, United Sta.

9 http://www.familysearch.org.

10 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326322730.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-25 (Roland).

12 Wikipedia.org, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

13 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 135.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.).

15 Wikipedia.org, Maud FitzJohn; John FitzGeoffrey.

16 Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=12982912974.

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21 Wikipedia.org, Isabella de Beauchamp.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 72-31 (Isabel de Beauchamp).

23 Wikipedia.org, Maud Chaworth.

24 Wikipedia.org, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-31 (Isabel de Beauchamp).

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 72-32, 17-29 (Henry "of Lancaster").

27 Website:, Chaworth Family Genealogy by Albert Douglass Hart, Jr ("Our Folk").

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 17-29.

29 Wikipedia.org, Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.

30 Wikipedia.org, Hugh le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-32, 8-30 (Eleanor de Clare).

32 Wikipedia.org, Hugh Despenser the Younger.

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 8-30.

34 Wikipedia.org, Eleanor de Clare.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-33.


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