The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire and Isabel Bigod




Husband Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire 1 2

           Born: Abt 1202
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Dec 1230
         Buried: 


         Father: Walter de Lacy Lord of Meath, Ireland & Weobley, Herefordshire (Abt 1172-1241) 2 3 4
         Mother: Margeret de Braose (Abt 1177-1200) 4 5


       Marriage: 1225

Events

• and of Trim and Weobley:




Wife Isabel Bigod 2 6

           Born: Abt 1212 - Thetford, Norfolk, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1250
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh Bigod 3rd Earl of Norfolk (Abt 1182-1225) 4 7 8
         Mother: Maud Marshal (Abt 1192-1248) 4 8 9



   Other Spouse: John FitzGeoffrey of Fambridge, Essex (Abt 1215-1258) 4 10 - Bef 12 Apr 1234


Children
1 F Maud de Lacy 11

           Born: 1230 - Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Apr 1304 - Trim Castle, Meath, Ireland
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Geoffrey de Geneville Seigneur de Vaucouleurs, Lord of Trim (Abt 1226-1314)
           Marr: 1252


2 M Walter de Lacy

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1241
         Buried: 



3 F Margery de Lacy 2

           Born: 1228 - Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire
     Christened: 
           Died: 1256
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire

First husband of Isabel Bigod.


Research Notes: Wife - Isabel Bigod

From Wikipedia - Isabel Bigod :

Isabel Bigod (c.1212- 1250), was an English noblewoman, the only daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk .[1] She was the wife of Gilbert de Lacy, of Ewyas Lacy, and John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere.

Family
Isabel was born in Thetford, Norfolk in about 1212, the only daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, a Magna Carta surety, and Maud Marshal (1192- 27 March 1248). Her paternal grandparents were Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, a former mistress of King Henry II of England . Her maternal grandparents were William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke . She had four brothers including Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk and Hugh Bigod . She also had two younger half-siblings John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey and Isabelle de Warenne, by her mother's second marriage to William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey . Isabel's father had died in 1225.

Marriages and children
In 1225, the year of her father's death, Isabel married her first husband, Gilbert de Lacy , of Ewyas Lacy (c.1202- 25 December 1230). He was the son of Walter de Lacy , Lord of Trim Castle and Ludlow Castle , and Margaret de Braose. Gilbert and Isabel's chief residence was Ewyas Lacy in Herefordshire ; however, they spent the last two years of their marriage on his father's estates in Ireland , where their youngest child, Maud was born, and Gilbert would shortly afterwards die. Together they had three children:[2]

Walter de Lacy (died early 1241) Margery de Lacy (1228, Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire- 1256), married before 14 May 1244 John de Verdun, Lord of Westmeath by whom she had issue. Maud de Lacy (1230, Dublin , Ireland[3]- 11 April 1304 Trim Castle, Ireland), married firstly Pierre de Geneve, by whom she had issue; in 1252, she married secondly Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville , Seigneur de Vaucouleurs, by whom she had two sons, Geoffrey de Geneville, and Sir Piers de Geneville , father of Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville .

Gilbert died on 25 December 1230 at Trim Castle, in County Meath, Ireland leaving Isabel a widow at the age of eighteen with three small children. Sometime before 12 April 1234, Isabel married her second husband, John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland . The marriage produced six children:[4][5]
Richard FitzJohn of Shere (died 1297, married Emma
John FitzJohn of Shere (died 1275), married Margery Basset
Maud FitzJohn (died 16/18 April 1301), married firstly Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire; she married secondly William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick , by whom she had issue.
Aveline FitzJohn (died c.20 May 1274), married Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster , by whom she had issue including Richard Og de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster .
Joan FitzJohn (died 4 April 1303), married Theobald le Botiller (1242- 1285 of Thurles , Nenagh , by whom she had issue. Joan and Theobald were the ancestors of the Butler Earls of Ormond .
Isabel FitzJohn, married Robert de Vispont, Lord of Westmoreland by whom she had two daughters.
In early 1241, Isabel's eldest son by her first husband died. Upon the death of her former father-in-law, Walter de Lacy shortly afterwards on 24 February, the vast de Lacy estates and lordships were passed down to Margery and Maud, her daughters by Gilbert. Their marriages were personally arranged by King Henry III to ensure that the estates they inherited were retained in the hands of trusted servants of the Crown.[6]
Isabel Bigod died in 1250. She was about thirty-eight years old. Her second husband John died eight years later.


Research Notes: Child - Maud de Lacy

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 71A-30 (Geoffrey de Geneville)

From Wikipedia - Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville :
Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville (1230- 11 April 1304) was a Norman -Irish noblewoman and wealthy heiress who upon the death of her grandfather, Walter de Lacy , Lord of Trim and Ludlow inherited half his estates. The lordships of Trim and Ludlow passed to her second husband Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville by right of his marriage to her; although she helped to rule and administer the estates in an equal partnership. She is sometimes referred to as Matilda de Lacy.[1]

Family

Maud was born in Dublin , Ireland in 1230, the youngest child of Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy and Isabel Bigod . Her paternal grandparents were Walter de Lacy and Margaret de Braose, daughter of Maud de Braose who was walled up alive by King John of England . Her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal.[2] She had an elder brother, Walter and sister Margery. On 25 December 1230, the year of her birth, Maud's father died, leaving her mother a widow at the age of eighteen. Less than four years later on 12 April 1234, her mother married again; he was John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere in Surrey , England, and Justiciar of Ireland . Maud had six younger half-siblings from her mother's second marriage to John.
In early 1241, Maud's brother Walter died. He was in his early teens. When their grandfather Walter de Lacy died shortly afterwards on 24 February, Maud and her sister, Margery inherited his vast estates and lordships in Ireland, Herefordshire, and the Welsh Marches . Maud and Margery both received a moiety of Ewyas Lacy in Herefordshire, and a share of the lordship with the taxes and revenues that attached to it.[3]

Marriages and children

On an unknown date, Maud married her first husband Pierre de Genève, son of Humbert, Count of Genève, and a relative of Eleanor of Provence . He was one of the "Savoyards" who had arrived in England in the retinue of Queen Eleanor when she married King Henry III . The marriage produced a son and a daughter whose names were not recorded.[4] Pierre died in 1249, and sometime before 8 August 1252, Maud married her second husband, another "Savoyard", Geoffrey de Geneville, Seigneur of Vaucouleurs, son of Simon de Joinville and Beatrix d'Auxonne. Both Maud's marriages and the marriage of her sister, Margery[5] were personally arranged by King Henry III to ensure that the estates they inherited from their grandfather were retained in the hands of those known to be trusted servants of the Crown.[6]
The king granted Geoffrey and Maud, and their heirs rights in the land of Meath held by her grandfather, Walter de Lacy by charter dated 8 August 1252.[7]. On 18 September 1254, the king granted them all the liberties and free customs in Meath which her grandfather had held; and they might issue their own writs in Meath according to the law and custom of Ireland. On 21 September 1252, they had livery of Trim Castle and a moiety of forty marcates of lands as the inheritance of Maud.[8] They made Trim Castle their chief residence. Maud and Geoffrey jointly ruled and administered their estates together in an equal partnership. They later donated property to Dore Abbey .
Maud's husband was a loyal supporter and favourite of Prince Edward who would in 1272 reign as King Edward I of England . Geoffrey fought with the Prince against Simon de Monfort at the Battle of Evesham , and it was at Ludlow Castle that Prince Edward was sheltered following his escape in May 1265 from Montfortian captivity.[9] Geoffrey was appointed Justiciar of Ireland by his friend and patron, the new king, Edward I in September 1273, a post he held until June 1276; however, he had little success against the Irish of Leinster .[10] He was created 1st Baron Geneville shortly before he was first summoned to Parliament as Baron Geneville on 6 February 1299.
Together Geoffrey and Maud had at least two children:[11]
Geoffrey de Geneville (died 1283)
Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim and Ludlow (1256- shortly before June 1292), who in his turn married in 1283 Jeanne of Lusignan , by whom he had three daughters, including Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville .
In 1283, Maud gave all her lands in England and Wales to Piers, her second eldest son by Geoffrey. These included Ludlow Castle in Shropshire, and Walterstone Manor as well as all the knights' fees which she had held in England.[12]That same year, her son Geoffrey died.
Maud was described as independent-minded, and she usually accompanied her husband on his numerous travels abroad, which included Rome where he was sent on a mission to Pope Nicholas IV in 1290. She was aged sixty at the time. Maud was highly protective of her properties, and always ready to enter into litigation at the slightest threat to her lands or privileges whether posed by family members, the Church or the Dublin administration.[13]
Maud died at Trim Castle on 11 April 1304 at the age of seventy-four. Her husband Geoffrey died ten years later, and his estates and lordships were inherited by their granddaughter Joan de Geneville who succeeded as the 2nd Baroness Geneville on 21 October 1314. Their son Piers had died in 1292, leaving Joan as heiress-apparent. She was the wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March , by whom she had twelve children.




John FitzGeoffrey of Fambridge, Essex and Isabel Bigod




Husband John FitzGeoffrey of Fambridge, Essex 4 10

            AKA: John Fitz Geoffrey Justiciar of Ireland
           Born: Abt 1215 - Shere, Surrey, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Nov 1258
         Buried: 


         Father: Geoffrey FitzPeter 1st Earl of Essex (Abt 1162-1213) 12 13
         Mother: Aveline de Clare (1164-1225) 14 15


       Marriage: Bef 12 Apr 1234

Events

• Lord of Shere:

• Justiciar of Ireland: 1245-1256.




Wife Isabel Bigod 2 6

           Born: Abt 1212 - Thetford, Norfolk, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1250
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh Bigod 3rd Earl of Norfolk (Abt 1182-1225) 4 7 8
         Mother: Maud Marshal (Abt 1192-1248) 4 8 9



   Other Spouse: Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire (Abt 1202-1230) 1 2 - 1225


Children
1 F Maud FitzGeoffrey 4 16 17

            AKA: Maud FitzJohn
           Born: Abt 1237 - Shere, Surrey, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Apr 1301 - <Grey Friars>, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 7 May 1301 - Grey Friars, Worcestershire, England
         Spouse: Gerard de Furnivalle Lord of Hallamshire (      -1261)
         Spouse: William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick (Abt 1237-1298) 4 18
           Marr: Bef 1270 - Worcestershire, England


2 M John Fitz John of Shere

            AKA: John FitzJohn of Shere
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1275
         Buried: 



3 M Richard FitzJohn of Shere

            AKA: Richard Fitz John of Shere
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1297
         Buried: 



4 F Isabel FitzGeoffrey 19

            AKA: Isabel FitzJohn
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



5 F Aveline FitzGeoffrey

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1274
         Buried: 



6 F Joan FitzJohn 20

            AKA: Joan FitzGeoffrey, Joan Fitz John
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 May 1303
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theobald Butler (Abt 1242-1285) 21
           Marr: Abt 1268



Research Notes: Husband - John FitzGeoffrey of Fambridge, Essex

Second husband of Isabel Bigod.

From Wikipedia - John Fitzgeoffrey :

John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland B. 1205 ? in Shere, Surrey - D. November 23 , 1258 . He was the son of Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, daughter of Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford & his wife Maud de Saint-Hilaire. He was Justiciar of Ireland. He was not entitled to succeed his half-brother as Earl of Essex in 1227, the Earldom having devolved from his father's first wife. He was the second husband to Isabel Bigod, daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk & his wife Maud Marshal of Pembroke. They had six children, one being Maud who married William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick .

Children
Note: The males took the FitzJohn surname ("fitz " mean "son of").
1. John FitzJohn of Shere (?-1275). m Margary, daughter of Philip Basset of Wycombe (?-1271).
2. Richard FitzJohn of Shere (?-1297). Lord FitzJohn 1290 . m as her first husband, Emma (?-1332).
3. Maud (? - 16/18 Apr 1301 ). Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?-1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick , son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire & his wife Isabel Mauduit.
4. Isabel m Robert de Vespont, Lord of Westmoreland (?-1264).
5. Aveline (?-1274) m Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (?-1271).
6. Joan (?-1303) m Theobald le Botiller of Thurles, Nenagh (?-1285).


Research Notes: Wife - Isabel Bigod

From Wikipedia - Isabel Bigod :

Isabel Bigod (c.1212- 1250), was an English noblewoman, the only daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk .[1] She was the wife of Gilbert de Lacy, of Ewyas Lacy, and John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere.

Family
Isabel was born in Thetford, Norfolk in about 1212, the only daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, a Magna Carta surety, and Maud Marshal (1192- 27 March 1248). Her paternal grandparents were Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, a former mistress of King Henry II of England . Her maternal grandparents were William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke . She had four brothers including Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk and Hugh Bigod . She also had two younger half-siblings John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey and Isabelle de Warenne, by her mother's second marriage to William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey . Isabel's father had died in 1225.

Marriages and children
In 1225, the year of her father's death, Isabel married her first husband, Gilbert de Lacy , of Ewyas Lacy (c.1202- 25 December 1230). He was the son of Walter de Lacy , Lord of Trim Castle and Ludlow Castle , and Margaret de Braose. Gilbert and Isabel's chief residence was Ewyas Lacy in Herefordshire ; however, they spent the last two years of their marriage on his father's estates in Ireland , where their youngest child, Maud was born, and Gilbert would shortly afterwards die. Together they had three children:[2]

Walter de Lacy (died early 1241) Margery de Lacy (1228, Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire- 1256), married before 14 May 1244 John de Verdun, Lord of Westmeath by whom she had issue. Maud de Lacy (1230, Dublin , Ireland[3]- 11 April 1304 Trim Castle, Ireland), married firstly Pierre de Geneve, by whom she had issue; in 1252, she married secondly Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville , Seigneur de Vaucouleurs, by whom she had two sons, Geoffrey de Geneville, and Sir Piers de Geneville , father of Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville .

Gilbert died on 25 December 1230 at Trim Castle, in County Meath, Ireland leaving Isabel a widow at the age of eighteen with three small children. Sometime before 12 April 1234, Isabel married her second husband, John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland . The marriage produced six children:[4][5]
Richard FitzJohn of Shere (died 1297, married Emma
John FitzJohn of Shere (died 1275), married Margery Basset
Maud FitzJohn (died 16/18 April 1301), married firstly Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire; she married secondly William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick , by whom she had issue.
Aveline FitzJohn (died c.20 May 1274), married Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster , by whom she had issue including Richard Og de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster .
Joan FitzJohn (died 4 April 1303), married Theobald le Botiller (1242- 1285 of Thurles , Nenagh , by whom she had issue. Joan and Theobald were the ancestors of the Butler Earls of Ormond .
Isabel FitzJohn, married Robert de Vispont, Lord of Westmoreland by whom she had two daughters.
In early 1241, Isabel's eldest son by her first husband died. Upon the death of her former father-in-law, Walter de Lacy shortly afterwards on 24 February, the vast de Lacy estates and lordships were passed down to Margery and Maud, her daughters by Gilbert. Their marriages were personally arranged by King Henry III to ensure that the estates they inherited were retained in the hands of trusted servants of the Crown.[6]
Isabel Bigod died in 1250. She was about thirty-eight years old. Her second husband John died eight years later.


Burial Notes: Child - Maud FitzGeoffrey

House of the Friars Minor, Worcester, Worcestershire, England.


Research Notes: Child - Maud FitzGeoffrey

Eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey

Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey has d. 16/18 Apr 1301. Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?-1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire & his wife Isabel Mauduit.

From Wikipedia - Maud FitzJohn :

Maud FitzJohn, Countess of Warwick (died 16/18 April 1301), was an English noblewoman and the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere. Her second husband was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick , a celebrated soldier. Through her daughter, Isabella , Maud was the maternal grandmother of Hugh the younger Despenser , the unpopular favourite of King Edward II of England , who was executed in 1326.

Family
Maud was born in Shere, Surrey, England on an unknown date, the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland , and Isabel Bigod , a descendant of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster . Maud had two brothers, Richard FitzJohn of Shere and John FitzJohn of Shere, and three younger sisters, Aveline FitzJohn, Joan FitzJohn, and Isabel FitzJohn. She also had a half-brother, Walter de Lacy, and two half-sisters, Margery de Lacy, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville , from her mother's first marriage to Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy. The chronicle of Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire names Matilda uxor Guidono comitis Warwici as the eldest daughter of Johanni Fitz-Geffrey and Isabella Bygod.[1] Her paternal grandparents were Geoffrey Fitzpeter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare. Her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal .

Marriages and children
Maud married her first husband, Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord Hallamshire on an unknown date. Sometime after his death in 1261, Maud married her second husband, the celebrated soldier, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Upon their marriage, Maud was styled as Countess of Warwick.
Together William and Maud had at least two children:[2]
Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (1270/1271- 28 July 1315), on 28 February 1310, he married as her second husband, heiress Alice de Toeni , by whom he had seven children.

Isabella de Beauchamp (died before 30 May 1306), married firstly in 1281 Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth ; she married secondly in 1286, Hugh le Despenser, Lord Despenser by whom she had four children including Hugh Despenser the younger, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II, who was executed in 1326, shortly after his father.
Maud died between 16 and 18 April 1301. She was buried at the house of the Friars Minor in Worcester .


Research Notes: Child - John Fitz John of Shere

Source: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey


Research Notes: Child - Richard FitzJohn of Shere

Source: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey


Research Notes: Child - Isabel FitzGeoffrey

Source: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey


Research Notes: Child - Aveline FitzGeoffrey

Source: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey


Research Notes: Child - Joan FitzJohn

Source: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey


John Gernon and Isabel Bigod




Husband John Gernon 22

           Born: 1295 - Rycote, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Jan 1382 - Rycote, Oxfordshire, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Isabel Bigod 22

           Born: 1310 - Lees Manor, Essex, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1330 - Doncaster, Yorkshire, England
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Elizabeth Gernon 22

           Born: 1325 - Lavington, Wiltshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1372 - Rycote, Oxfordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John De Rycote (1330-1379) 22




William d'Aubigny Pincerna of Buckenham Castle and Maud Bigod




Husband William d'Aubigny Pincerna of Buckenham Castle 23

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Maud Bigod 24

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger Bigot 1st Earl of Norfolk (      -1107)
         Mother: Adeliza de Tosny (      -      ) 25




Children
1 M William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel 26 27

            AKA: William d' Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel
           Born: Abt 1109
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Sep 1176
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adeliza of Louvain (Abt 1103-1151) 28
           Marr: 1138



Research Notes: Husband - William d'Aubigny Pincerna of Buckenham Castle

Master Butler of the Royal household


Death Notes: Child - William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel

Ancestral Roots has 12 Oct 1176. That may be burial date.


Research Notes: Child - William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel

1st Earl of Arundel, 1141-1176

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-25 (Adeliza of Louvain)

From Wikipedia - William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel :

William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (c. 1109 - September 25 , 1176 ) was son of William d'Aubigny Pincerna (Master Butler of the Royal household) of Buckenham Castle and Maud Bigod , daughter of Roger Bigod .


Marriage to the King's Widow
The younger William was an important member of Henry I of England 's household. After Henry's death he married the widow Queen consort Adeliza in 1138, and became Lord of Arundel in her right.

Titles
He was loyal to Stephen of England , who made him first Earl of Lincoln and then Earl of Arundel (more precisely, Earl of Sussex ).
In 1143 as Earl of Lincoln he made two charters confirming a donation of land around Arundel in Sussex to the abbey of Affligem in Brabant (representing his wife Adeliza of Louvain ), with William's brother Olivier present.

Mediator
He fought loyally for King Stephen , but in 1153 helped arrange the truce between Stephen and Henry Plantagenet , known as the Treaty of Wallingford , which brought an end to The Anarchy .
When the latter ascended the throne as Henry II , he confirmed William's Earldom and gave him direct possession of Arundel Castle (instead of the possession in right of his wife he had previously had). She had died in 1151. He remained loyal to the king during the 1173 revolt of Henry the Young King , and helped defeat the rebellion.

Issue
He and Adeliza were parents to William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel and grandparents to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel .

Sources
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 1-22, 18A-22, 139-26, 194-25, 149-26.
Remfry, P.M., Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649 (ISBN 1-899376-28-3 )


Robert Bigod




Husband Robert Bigod 4

           Born: Abt 1015 - <Avranches, (Manche), Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1071
         Buried: 


         Father: Toustien le Goz Viscomte d'Hiemes (Abt 0989-After 1040) 4 29
         Mother: Judith de Montanolier (Abt 0994-      ) 4 29


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Roger Bigod 4

            AKA: Robert Bigod
           Born: Abt 1035 - <St. Sauveur, Normandy>, France
     Christened:  - Malitot, Loges, Chanon, Normandy, France
           Died: 
         Buried: 





Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice de Tosny




Husband Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk 4 25 30

            AKA: Roger Bigot 1st Earl of Norfolk
           Born: Abt 1060
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Sep 1107 - Egersham, Norfolk, England
         Buried:  - Thetford Abbey, Norfolk, England


         Father: Roger Bigod (Abt 1035-      ) 4
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Bef 1103

Events

• Founded: Abbey of Whetford in Norfolk, 1103.

• Sheriff of Norfolk:




Wife Alice de Tosny 4 25 30

            AKA: Adeliza Grentemaisnil, Adelisa de Toeni, Adeliza de Toni
           Born: Abt 1064 - <St. Sauveur, Normandy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1135
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert de Stafford (Abt 1036-1088) 4
         Mother: Adelisa de Savona (Abt 1035-Bef 1088) 4 31




Children
1 M Hugh Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk 4 30 32

           Born: 1095 - <Belvoir Castle>, Leicestershire, England
     Christened:  - Framlingham, Suffolk, England
           Died: Bef 1 Mar 1177 - Palestine
         Buried:  - Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England
         Spouse: Juliana de Vere (Abt 1116-Abt 1199) 4 33
           Marr: Bef 1140 - <England>


2 M William Bigod

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Nov 1120 - Coast near Barfleur, Normandy, France
         Buried: 




Burial Notes: Husband - Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

Magna Charta Barons, p. 77, states that he is buried in the abbey of Whetford in Norfolk. Same in FamilySearch. Another source has Norwich.


Research Notes: Husband - Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia - Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk :

Roger Bigot (died 1107) was a Norman knight who came to England in the Norman Conquest . He held great power in East Anglia , and five of his descendants were Earl of Norfolk . He was also known as Roger Bigod, but as a witness to the Charter of Liberties of Henry I of England he appears as Roger Bigot.

Biography
Roger came from a fairly obscure family of poor knights in Normandy . Robert le Bigot, certainly a relation of Roger's, possibly his father, acquired an important position in the household of William, Duke of Normandy (later William I of England ), due, the story goes, to his disclosure to the duke of a plot by the duke's cousin William Werlenc .[1]
Both Roger and Robert may have fought at the Battle of Hastings , and afterwards they were rewarded with a substantial estate in East Anglia . The Domesday Book lists Roger as holding six lordships in Essex , 117 in Suffolk and 187 in Norfolk .
Bigot's base was in Thetford, Norfolk where he founded a priory later donated to the great monastery at Cluny. In 1101 he further consolidated his power when Henry I granted him licence to build a castle at Framlingham , which became the family seat of power until their downfall in 1307. Another of his castles was Bungay Castle , also in Suffolk . Both these were improved by successive generations.
In 1069 he, along with Robert Malet and Ralph de Gael (the then Earl of Norfolk), defeated Sweyn Estrithson (Sweyn II) of Denmark near Ipswich . After Ralph de Gael's fall in 1074, Roger was appointed Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and acquired many of the dispossessed earl's estates. For this reason he is sometimes counted as Earl of Norfolk, but he probably was never actually created earl. He acquired further estates through his influence in local law courts.
In the Rebellion of 1088 he joined other Anglo-Norman barons against William II , who, it was hoped, was to be deposed in favour of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy. He seems to have lost his lands after the rebellion had failed, but got them back again.
In 1100, Robert Bigot was one of the King's witnesses recorded on the Charter of Liberties, an important precursor to the Magna Carta of 1215.
In 1101 there was another attempt to bring in Robert of Normandy by unseating Henry I, but this time Roger Bigot stayed loyal to Henry.
He died on 9 September 1107 and is buried in Norwich . Upon his death there was a dispute between the Bishop of Norwich , Herbet Losinga , and the monks at Thetford Priory , founded by Bigot. The monks claimed that Roger's body, along with those of his family and successors, was due to them as part of the foundation charter of the priory (as was common practice at the time). The issue was apparently resolved when the Bishop of Norwich stole the body in the middle of the night and dragged it back to Norwich.
For some time he was thought to have two wives, Adelaide/Adeliza and Alice de Tosny. It is now believed these were the same woman, Adeliza(Alice) de Tosny(Toeni,Toeny) . She was the sister and coheiress of William de Tosny , Lord of Belvoir .
He was succeeded by his eldest son, William Bigot, and, after he drowned in the sinking of the White Ship , by his second son, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk , who later became Earl of Norfolk. He also had 3 daughters: Gunnor, who married Robert, Lord of Rayleigh; Cecily, who married William d'Aubigny "Brito" ; and Maud, who married William d'Aubigny "Pincerna" , and was mother to William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel .


From Magna Charta Barons, p. 77:
Roger Bigod, or le Bigot, a feudal Baron, the first of this great famikly that settled in England, was in the Conqueror's time possessed of six lordships in Essex and one hundred and seventeen in Suffolk. Adhering to the party that took up arms against William Rufus, he fortified the castle of Norwich, and wasted the country around. At the accession of Henry I., being a witness of the king's laws and stanch in his interests, he obtained gifts of land from the crown, and was lord high steward in right of his wife. In 1103 he and his wife founded the abbey of Whetford, in Norfolk, where he was buried in 1107, 7 Henry I. He m. before 1103, Adeliza, or Alice, who survived him, daughter of Hugh Grentemaisnil, lord of Hinckley, Ashby-Legers, County Northampton, lord high steward of England, d. s. p. m. 1098, by his wife Adelhyde, d. 1091, daughter of the Count de Beaumont, and had: Hugh Bigod, second son...


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

Second son of Roger Bigod.

From Wikipedia - Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk :

Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (1095 - 1177) was born in Belvoir Castle , Leicestershire , England .
He was the second son of Roger Bigod (also known as Roger Bigot) (d. 1107), Sheriff of Norfolk, who founded the Bigod name in England. Hugh Bigod became a controversial figure in history, known for his frequent switching of loyalties and hasty reactions towards measures of authority.

Early years
Hugh inherited large estates in East Anglia on the death of his brother William, who perished without issue in the sinking of the White Ship on November 26, 1120. He succeeded his aunt Albreda - and by extension, her eldest brother Berengar - as heir both to Berengar's tenancy-in-chief in Lincolnshire and the Norman lands of Robert de Tosny of Belvoirwas . He became Constable of Norwich Castle and Governor of the City of Norwich in 1122. He enjoyed the favour of Henry I .

During King Stephen's reign
At first a supporter of Stephen of Blois during this king's struggle with the empress Matilda . His initiation in history was on the death of Henry I in 1135, when Maud expected to succeed to the throne of England, but her cousin, Stephen of Blois usurped the throne, breaking an oath he had previously made to defend her rights. It was Bigod who claimed that Henry I (Maud's father, and Stephen's uncle) intended for Stephen to become king at the expense of the empress. Civil War resulted when in 1139 Maud could command the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm. Maud's greatest triumph came in Feb. 1141, when her forces defeated and captured King Stephen; he was made a prisoner and effectively deposed. Her advantage lasted only until July of that year, and she released Stephen in Dec. In 1147, Maud was finally forced to return to France , following the death of Robert of Gloucester , her strongest supporter and half-brother.

King Stephen had initially kept his followers together, but in 1136 Stephen was stricken with sickness. A lethargy fastened on him and the report of his death was quickly spread abroad. A rising of the turbulent barons necessarily followed, and Bigod was the first to take up arms. He seized and held Norwich ; but Stephen, quickly recovering laid siege to the city and Hugh was compelled to surrender. Acting with unusual clemency, Stephen spared the rebel, who for a short time remained faithful. In 1140 the Earl is said to have declared for the empress, yet early in the next year he is in the ranks of Stephen's army fighting in the disastrous First Battle of Lincoln , after which the Earl deserted him and assumed a position of armed neutrality during the civil war, sometimes called 'General Anarchy' .
Later, the disagreement between King Stephen and Archbishop Theobald in 1148 created yet another scenario for Hugh Bigod to come forward; this time, he sided with the archbishop , and received him in his Castle of Framlingham , but joined with others in achieving a reconciliation.

Rise of King Henry II
Five years later, in 1153, when Henry , Duke of Normandy , soon to be King Henry II (r. 1154-89), landed in England to assert his claim to the throne, Bigod vested his interests with the rising power, and held out in Ipswich against Stephen's forces, while Henry II, on the other side, laid siege to Stamford . Both places fell. In the critical state of his fortunes Stephen was in no position to punish the rebel. Negotiations were also going on between the two parties, and Hugh again eluded retaliation.

On Henry II's accession in December 1154, Bigod at once received confirmation of the possession of his earldom and stewardship by charter issued apparently in January of the next year. The first years of the new reign were spent in restoring order to the shattered kingdom, and in breaking the power of the independent barons, which had grown out of control during King Stephen's reign.
It was not before long that Bigod became agitated under the rule of law initiated by Henry. He grew restless with measures such as the scutage , a fee paid by vassals in lieu of military service, which became the central feature of Henry II's military system of operation by 1159. The Earl showed signs of resistance, but was at once put down. In 1157 Henry II marched into the eastern counties and received the earl's submission.

After this incident Hugh Bigod makes no significant appearances in the chronicles for some time; he is named among those who had been excommunicated by Becket, in consequence of his retention of lands belonging to the monastery of Pentney in Norfolk .

The revolt of 1173

In 1173 the young crowned prince Henry (also known as Henry the Young King ), raised a revolt against his father, Henry II . This gave Hugh Bigod, yet another chance for rebellion, along with the league of the English barons with the kings of France and Scotland in his favour. He at once became a leader in the cause, perhaps eager to revive the feudal power, which Henry II had curtailed. In addition to the fact that the inevitable conflict, as far as England was concerned, centered round his possessions. The custody of Norwich Castle was promised by the young prince as his reward.

The king's energy and good fortune were equal to the occasion. While he held in check his rebel vassals in France, the loyal barons in England defeated his enemies there. Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (d.1190) landed at Walton , in Suffolk , on September 29, 1173 and marched to Framlingham , joining forces with Hugh. Together they besieged and took the castle of Hagenet in Suffolk on October 13, held by Randal de Broc for the crown. But the Earl of Leicester was defeated and taken prisoner setting out from Framlingham at Fornham, St. Genevieve, near Bury St Edmunds , Suffolk by the justiciar , Richard de Luci and other barons. These, then turned their arms against Earl Hugh, not strong enough to fight, he opened negotiations with his assailants. It is said he bought them off, and at the same time secured a safe passage home for the Flemings in his service.

Final days
Though defeated and compelled to surrender his castles, Bigod kept his lands and his earldom, and lived at peace with Henry II until his death reportedly in 1177, in Palestine .

It should be noted, however, that on March 1st 1177, his son Roger Bigod appealed to the king on a dispute with his stepmother. Hugh being dead at this time, the date of his death is fixed 'ante caput jejunii', (i.e. before March 9th). If, then, he died in Palestine, his death must have taken place in the preceding year, 1176, to allow time for the arrival of the news in England . Henry II took advantage of Roger's appeal to seize upon the late Earl's treasure. He possessed vast estates, which he inherited, and was also the recipient of the third penny levied in the county of Norfolk.

Marriage and family
He married twice.
Before 1140 he married Juliane de Vere (died c.1199) probably born in Essex , England . She was the daughter of Aubrey de Vere II and Adeliza de Clare, the daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Clare . Their marriage was dissolved before 1168. Their son:
Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk (b. c. 1144-1221).
His second wife was Gundreda Warwick (c.1135-1200), daughter of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick . They had two children:
Hugh Bigod (b. 1156)
William Hugh Bigod (b.1168)


Death Notes: Child - William Bigod

Drowned in the sinking of the White Ship.


Roger Bigod




Husband Roger Bigod 4

            AKA: Robert Bigod
           Born: Abt 1035 - <St. Sauveur, Normandy>, France
     Christened:  - Malitot, Loges, Chanon, Normandy, France
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Bigod (Abt 1015-1071) 4
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk 4 25 30

            AKA: Roger Bigot 1st Earl of Norfolk
           Born: Abt 1060
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Sep 1107 - Egersham, Norfolk, England
         Buried:  - Thetford Abbey, Norfolk, England
         Spouse: Alice de Tosny (Abt 1064-After 1135) 4 25 30
           Marr: Bef 1103



Burial Notes: Child - Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

Magna Charta Barons, p. 77, states that he is buried in the abbey of Whetford in Norfolk. Same in FamilySearch. Another source has Norwich.


Research Notes: Child - Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia - Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk :

Roger Bigot (died 1107) was a Norman knight who came to England in the Norman Conquest . He held great power in East Anglia , and five of his descendants were Earl of Norfolk . He was also known as Roger Bigod, but as a witness to the Charter of Liberties of Henry I of England he appears as Roger Bigot.

Biography
Roger came from a fairly obscure family of poor knights in Normandy . Robert le Bigot, certainly a relation of Roger's, possibly his father, acquired an important position in the household of William, Duke of Normandy (later William I of England ), due, the story goes, to his disclosure to the duke of a plot by the duke's cousin William Werlenc .[1]
Both Roger and Robert may have fought at the Battle of Hastings , and afterwards they were rewarded with a substantial estate in East Anglia . The Domesday Book lists Roger as holding six lordships in Essex , 117 in Suffolk and 187 in Norfolk .
Bigot's base was in Thetford, Norfolk where he founded a priory later donated to the great monastery at Cluny. In 1101 he further consolidated his power when Henry I granted him licence to build a castle at Framlingham , which became the family seat of power until their downfall in 1307. Another of his castles was Bungay Castle , also in Suffolk . Both these were improved by successive generations.
In 1069 he, along with Robert Malet and Ralph de Gael (the then Earl of Norfolk), defeated Sweyn Estrithson (Sweyn II) of Denmark near Ipswich . After Ralph de Gael's fall in 1074, Roger was appointed Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and acquired many of the dispossessed earl's estates. For this reason he is sometimes counted as Earl of Norfolk, but he probably was never actually created earl. He acquired further estates through his influence in local law courts.
In the Rebellion of 1088 he joined other Anglo-Norman barons against William II , who, it was hoped, was to be deposed in favour of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy. He seems to have lost his lands after the rebellion had failed, but got them back again.
In 1100, Robert Bigot was one of the King's witnesses recorded on the Charter of Liberties, an important precursor to the Magna Carta of 1215.
In 1101 there was another attempt to bring in Robert of Normandy by unseating Henry I, but this time Roger Bigot stayed loyal to Henry.
He died on 9 September 1107 and is buried in Norwich . Upon his death there was a dispute between the Bishop of Norwich , Herbet Losinga , and the monks at Thetford Priory , founded by Bigot. The monks claimed that Roger's body, along with those of his family and successors, was due to them as part of the foundation charter of the priory (as was common practice at the time). The issue was apparently resolved when the Bishop of Norwich stole the body in the middle of the night and dragged it back to Norwich.
For some time he was thought to have two wives, Adelaide/Adeliza and Alice de Tosny. It is now believed these were the same woman, Adeliza(Alice) de Tosny(Toeni,Toeny) . She was the sister and coheiress of William de Tosny , Lord of Belvoir .
He was succeeded by his eldest son, William Bigot, and, after he drowned in the sinking of the White Ship , by his second son, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk , who later became Earl of Norfolk. He also had 3 daughters: Gunnor, who married Robert, Lord of Rayleigh; Cecily, who married William d'Aubigny "Brito" ; and Maud, who married William d'Aubigny "Pincerna" , and was mother to William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel .


From Magna Charta Barons, p. 77:
Roger Bigod, or le Bigot, a feudal Baron, the first of this great famikly that settled in England, was in the Conqueror's time possessed of six lordships in Essex and one hundred and seventeen in Suffolk. Adhering to the party that took up arms against William Rufus, he fortified the castle of Norwich, and wasted the country around. At the accession of Henry I., being a witness of the king's laws and stanch in his interests, he obtained gifts of land from the crown, and was lord high steward in right of his wife. In 1103 he and his wife founded the abbey of Whetford, in Norfolk, where he was buried in 1107, 7 Henry I. He m. before 1103, Adeliza, or Alice, who survived him, daughter of Hugh Grentemaisnil, lord of Hinckley, Ashby-Legers, County Northampton, lord high steward of England, d. s. p. m. 1098, by his wife Adelhyde, d. 1091, daughter of the Count de Beaumont, and had: Hugh Bigod, second son...


Roger Bigod Baron le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny




Husband Roger Bigod Baron le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk 4 34 35 36

            AKA: Roger le Bigod 2nd Earl of Norfolk
           Born: Abt 1144 - <Norfolk, Norfolk>, England
     Christened:  - Framlingham, Suffolk, England
           Died: Bef 2 Aug 1221 - Thetford, Norfolk, England
         Buried:  - Thetford, Norfolk, England


         Father: Hugh Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk (1095-Bef 1177) 4 30 32
         Mother: Juliana de Vere (Abt 1116-Abt 1199) 4 33


       Marriage: Dec 1181

Events

• Lord High Steward of England:

• 2nd Earl of Norfolk: 1189.

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

• Excommunicated: by the Pope, Dec 1215.




Wife Ida de Tosny 34 35

            AKA: Ida de Toesny
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England (1132-1189)


Children
1 M Hugh Bigod 3rd Earl of Norfolk 4 7 8

            AKA: Hugh le Bigod 3rd Earl of Norfolk
           Born: Abt 1182 - <Thetford, Norfolk>, England
     Christened:  - Norfolk, Norfolk, England
           Died: Feb 1225 - England
         Buried: 18 Feb 1225 - Thetford Church, Thetford, Norfolk, England
         Spouse: Maud Marshal (Abt 1192-1248) 4 8 9
           Marr: Between 1206 and 1207



Research Notes: Husband - Roger Bigod Baron le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia - Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk :

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 - 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II . Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar .

In most of the years of the reign of King John , the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John 's assent to Magna Carta , and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181 Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:
Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal
William Bigod
Ralph Bigod
Roger Bigod
Margery, married William de Hastings
Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]
Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV ,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity , for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

From Magna Charta Barons, pp. 78-79:
Roger Bigod, eldest son, who succeeded as second Earl of Norfolk, and was reconstituted in his earldom and the office of lord high steward by Richard I. upon his accession, by charter dated November 27, 1189, and also obtained at this time restitution of some manors his father had forfeited, with grants of others, and the confirmation of all demesnes he held. He was appointed, 1189, by King Richard one of the ambassadors from him to Philip of France, for obtaining aid towards the recovery of the Holy Land. Upon the return of King Richard from his captivity in Germany, the Earl assisted at a great council held by the king at Nottingham, 1194, and at this monarch's second coronation his lordship was one of the four earls that had the honor of carrying the silken canopy over the monarch's head.

In 1200 the Earl of Norfolk was sent by King John as one of his messengers to summon William, King of Scotland, to do homage to him in Parliament at Lincoln, and subsequently attended King John into Poictou, and on his return was won over to their cause by the Barons and became one of the strongest advocates of the Charter of Liberty, and was elected one of the Sureties for the observance of this great instrument, for which he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. He d. 5 Henry III., 1220-21, having had issue by is wife Isabella, daughter of Hameline Plantagenet, d. 1202, fifth Earl of Surrey, in right of his wife, m. 1163-4, Isabella, d. 1199, widow of William de Blois, d. s. p. 1160, a natural son of King Stephen (Hameline Pantagenet, b. before 1151, was a natural son of Geoffrey, Count of Anjou), and daughter and heiress of William, third Earl of Warren and Surrey, d. s. p. m. 1148 (by his wife Alice, or Adela de Talvas, or Talvace, d. 1174, daughter of William Count of Alençon and Ponthieu, by his second wife, Alix, widow of Bertrand, Count de Tripoli, and daughter of Eudes, Duke of Burgundy, a crusader, d. 1102, a great-grandson of Robert the Pious, King of France), son of William, second Earl of Warren and Surrey, and his wife Isabel, or Elizabeth de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh the Great, son of Henry I., King of France:
Hugh Bigod, third Earl of Norfolk.
William Bigod, m. Margaret, daughter of Robert de Sutton
Thomas Bigod.
Margery, wife of William de Hastings. Issue.
Adeliza, wife of Alberic de Vere, Earl of Oxford; d.s.p.
Mary, wife of Ralph Fitz-Robert, of Middlehams.


Research Notes: Wife - Ida de Tosny

From Wikipedia - Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk :

Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury ) (b c. 1176 -March 7 , 1226 ). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Bigod 3rd Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia - Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk :

Hugh Bigod (c. 1182 - 1225) was the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk , and for a short time the 3rd earl of Norfolk .

In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John . He succeeded to his father's estates (including Framlingham Castle ) in 1221 but died in his early forties in 1225.

In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh was married to Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248 ), daughter of Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke . Together they had the following children:

Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk , born c. 1209. Died childless.
Hugh Bigod (1211-1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
Isabel Bigod (born c. 1212), married to John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere. Had issue, including Joan FitzGeoffrey who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descend the Irish Earls of Ormond .
Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)

Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters [Morris, HBII 2], but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.
Very soon after Hugh's death, Maud married William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey


Ralph FitzRandolph and Margery Bigot




Husband Ralph FitzRandolph 4

           Born: Abt 1180 - <Middleham>, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Margery Bigot 4

           Born: Abt 1184 - <Middleham>, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ralph FitzRandolph 4

           Born: Abt 1206 - <Middleham>, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Anastasia Percy (Abt 1216-      ) 4




Roger Bigot 1st Earl of Norfolk and Adeliza de Tosny




Husband Roger Bigot 1st Earl of Norfolk

            AKA: Roger Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Sep 1107
         Buried:  - Norwich, Norfolk, England
       Marriage: 



Wife Adeliza de Tosny 25

            AKA: Adelaide de Tosny, Alice de Tosny
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Maud Bigod 24

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William d'Aubigny Pincerna of Buckenham Castle (      -      ) 23


2 M William Bigot 37

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Nov 1120
         Buried: 



3 M Hugh Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

           Born: 1095 - Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1177 - Palestine
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Roger Bigot 1st Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia - Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk :

Roger Bigot (died 1107) was a Norman knight who came to England in the Norman Conquest . He held great power in East Anglia , and five of his descendants were Earl of Norfolk . He was also known as Roger Bigod, but as a witness to the Charter of Liberties of Henry I of England he appears as Roger Bigot.

Biography
Roger came from a fairly obscure family of poor knights in Normandy . Robert le Bigot, certainly a relation of Roger's, possibly his father, acquired an important position in the household of William, Duke of Normandy (later William I of England ), due, the story goes, to his disclosure to the duke of a plot by the duke's cousin William Werlenc .[1]
Both Roger and Robert may have fought at the Battle of Hastings , and afterwards they were rewarded with a substantial estate in East Anglia . The Domesday Book lists Roger as holding six lordships in Essex , 117 in Suffolk and 187 in Norfolk .
Bigot's base was in Thetford, Norfolk where he founded a priory later donated to the great monastery at Cluny. In 1101 he further consolidated his power when Henry I granted him licence to build a castle at Framlingham , which became the family seat of power until their downfall in 1307. Another of his castles was Bungay Castle , also in Suffolk . Both these were improved by successive generations.
In 1069 he, along with Robert Malet and Ralph de Gael (the then Earl of Norfolk), defeated Sweyn Estrithson (Sweyn II) of Denmark near Ipswich . After Ralph de Gael's fall in 1074, Roger was appointed Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and acquired many of the dispossessed earl's estates. For this reason he is sometimes counted as Earl of Norfolk, but he probably was never actually created earl. He acquired further estates through his influence in local law courts.
In the Rebellion of 1088 he joined other Anglo-Norman barons against William II , who, it was hoped, was to be deposed in favour of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy. He seems to have lost his lands after the rebellion had failed, but got them back again.
In 1100, Robert Bigot was one of the King's witnesses recorded on the Charter of Liberties, an important precursor to the Magna Carta of 1215.
In 1101 there was another attempt to bring in Robert of Normandy by unseating Henry I, but this time Roger Bigot stayed loyal to Henry.
He died on 9 September 1107 and is buried in Norwich . Upon his death there was a dispute between the Bishop of Norwich , Herbet Losinga , and the monks at Thetford Priory , founded by Bigot. The monks claimed that Roger's body, along with those of his family and successors, was due to them as part of the foundation charter of the priory (as was common practice at the time). The issue was apparently resolved when the Bishop of Norwich stole the body in the middle of the night and dragged it back to Norwich.
For some time he was thought to have two wives, Adelaide/Adeliza and Alice de Tosny. It is now believed these were the same woman, Adeliza(Alice) de Tosny(Toeni,Toeny) . She was the sister and coheiress of William de Tosny , Lord of Belvoir .
He was succeeded by his eldest son, William Bigot, and, after he drowned in the sinking of the White Ship , by his second son, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk , who later became Earl of Norfolk. He also had 3 daughters: Gunnor, who married Robert, Lord of Rayleigh; Cecily, who married William d'Aubigny "Brito" ; and Maud, who married William d'Aubigny "Pincerna" , and was mother to William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel .


Death Notes: Child - William Bigot

Drowned in the sinking of the White Ship.


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Bigod 1st Earl of Norfolk

More available in Wikipedia - Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk


Sources


1. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177A-8, 71A-30 (Geoffrey de Geneville).

2. Wikipedia.org, Isabel Bigod.

3. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177A-7 (Margaret de Braose).

4. http://www.familysearch.org.

5. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177A-7.

6. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 70-29, 71-29, 177A-8 (Gilbert de Lacy).

7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 69-28 (Maud Marshal), 70-28 (Maud Marshal), 177A-8 (Gilbert de Lacy).

8. Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

9. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 69-28, 76-28, 83-27 (William de Warenne).

10. Wikipedia.org, John Fitzgeoffrey.

11. Wikipedia.org, Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville.

12. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-27 (Aveline de Clare), 97-27 (Henry de Bohun).

13. Wikipedia.org, Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex.

14. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-27, 246C-27.

15. Wikipedia.org, John FitzGeoffrey; Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford.

16. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.).

17. Wikipedia.org, Maud FitzJohn; John FitzGeoffrey.

18. Wikipedia.org, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

19. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 82-30.

20. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 73-30.

21. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 73-30 (Joan Fitz John).

22. Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=13886631722.

23. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (his son).

24. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (her son).

25. Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

26. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

27. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25 (Adeliza of Louvain).

28. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25.

29. Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

30. Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 77.

31. Wikipedia.org, Robert de Stafford.

32. Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

33. Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk; Aubrey de Vere II.

34. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 69-28 (Maud Marshal).

35. Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk.

36. Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), pp. 78-79.

37. Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (his father).


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177A-8, 71A-30 (Geoffrey de Geneville).

2 Wikipedia.org, Isabel Bigod.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177A-7 (Margaret de Braose).

4 http://www.familysearch.org.

5 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177A-7.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 70-29, 71-29, 177A-8 (Gilbert de Lacy).

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 69-28 (Maud Marshal), 70-28 (Maud Marshal), 177A-8 (Gilbert de Lacy).

8 Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 69-28, 76-28, 83-27 (William de Warenne).

10 Wikipedia.org, John Fitzgeoffrey.

11 Wikipedia.org, Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-27 (Aveline de Clare), 97-27 (Henry de Bohun).

13 Wikipedia.org, Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-27, 246C-27.

15 Wikipedia.org, John FitzGeoffrey; Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.).

17 Wikipedia.org, Maud FitzJohn; John FitzGeoffrey.

18 Wikipedia.org, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 82-30.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 73-30.

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 73-30 (Joan Fitz John).

22 Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=13886631722.

23 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (his son).

24 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (her son).

25 Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

26 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25 (Adeliza of Louvain).

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25.

29 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

30 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 77.

31 Wikipedia.org, Robert de Stafford.

32 Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

33 Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk; Aubrey de Vere II.

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 69-28 (Maud Marshal).

35 Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk.

36 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), pp. 78-79.

37 Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (his father).


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