The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




William Vaux and Maud Lucy




Husband William Vaux 1

           Born: 1410 - Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Dec 1460 - <Bedfordshire>, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Maud Lucy 1

            AKA: Maude Lucy
           Born: 1409 - Wapenham, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1435 - England
         Buried: 


         Father: Walter Lucy (1379-1444) 1 2
         Mother: Alienor Le Arcedekne (1383-1447) 1




Children
1 M William Vaux 1

           Born: 1435 - Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 May 1471 - Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Catherine Penistone (1440-1509) 1



Death Notes: Child - William Vaux

Died at the Battle of Tewkesbury.


Sir Reginald de Lucy and Margaret De Mowbray




Husband Sir Reginald de Lucy 3 4

            AKA: Reginald De Lucy, Reynold de Lucy
           Born: Bef 1360 - Cublington, Buckinghamshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Nov 1437 - Dallington, Northamptonshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Geoffrey De Lucy (Abt 1323-1400) 5
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Margaret De Mowbray 3

           Born: Abt 1362 - Epworth, Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1401
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Walter Lucy 1 2

            AKA: Walter De Lucy
           Born: 1379 - Wapenham, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Oct 1444 - Hereford, Hererfordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alienor Le Arcedekne (1383-1447) 1
           Marr: by May 1385



Research Notes: Husband - Sir Reginald de Lucy

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=11221959&id=P95474922 :
REYNOLD LUCY, son and heir, was aged 40 and more at his father's death, and a knight already in 1387. He married, before February 1378/9, Margaret, whose parentage is not known. He died 9 November 1437. [Complete Peerage VIII:261...


Research Notes: Wife - Margaret De Mowbray

Note from http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jan2010&id=P95475097:
"Kal. Jul. [1 July] 1369. At Heywod. To Reginald de Lucy, son of Sir Geoffrey de Lucy, and Margaret, daughter of Sir John de Moubrey, to be married in the chapel within Bretteby [Bretby] Castle [co. Derby]" [Reference: Lichfield Episcopal Registers, Register of [Bishop] Robert de Stretton, published in William Salt Archaeological Society, n.s., 8 (1905): 47].
As indicated by the license quoted above, the bride's name was Margaret Mowbray, daughter of Sir John de Mowbray. Due to the name, chronology and place of marriage, Margaret Mowbray can be readily identified as a hitherto unknown daughter of Sir John de Mowbray, 4th Lord Mowbray, by his wife, Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Lord Segrave, of Bretby Castle, co. Derby.
In this case, the place of marriage is significant as Bretby Castle was one of the holdings of the Segrave family and fell to Mowbray family on the marriage of Elizabeth Segrave to John de Mowbray, 4th Lord Mowbray. This was presumably one of the Segrave family's principal residences, as Elizabeth's father, John de Segrave, prepared his will in 1352 at Bretby [Reference: Complete Peerage, 11 (1949): 609]. I assume this license was missed by Lucy and Mowbray researchers as the Lucy family was seated principally at Northampton, whereas the Mowbray family's chief holdings were in cos. Lincoln and York. One would not expect to look in Derbyshire for a marriage license for this couple.
The newly discovered Margaret Mowbray gives the immigrants, Robert Abell, Richard More and John Oxenbridge an all new descent from King Edward I plus many other interesting connections.


Research Notes: Child - Walter Lucy

Webpage http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jan2010&id=P95475092 quotes Complete Peerage:
WALTER LUCY, son and heir, was aged 40 and (much] more when he succeeded his father. His marriage made him a landowner in the West of England; as early as 1415 he was a commissioner in the marches of Wales, and later justice of the peace, and commisioner on several occasions in Hereford, Salop, and Worcs. In 1416 he was a knight, though it was as plain Walter Lucy, of Richard's Castle, that he had protection on going to the French war, January 1419/20, in the company of the Earl of March.
He married, in or before May 1385, Eleanor, elder daughter and coheir of Sir Warin ARCEDEKNE, by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John TALBOT, of Richard's Castle. He died 4 October 1444. His widow died 20 July 1447. [Complete Peerage VIII:261-2]


Sir Thomas Russell and < > Ludlow




Husband Sir Thomas Russell 6

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife < > Ludlow

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir John Ludlow (      -      ) 6
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Jennet Russell 6

            AKA: Jennet Trussell
           Born: 1414
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eustace Whitney (1410-Abt 1468) 6




Sir John Ludlow




Husband Sir John Ludlow 6

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
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           Died: 
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Children
1 F < > Ludlow

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir Thomas Russell (      -      ) 6




Lungren and Nancy Wallace




Husband Lungren (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Nancy Wallace (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Donald Clare Wallace Jr. (1924-2008)
         Mother: Elizabeth Ann Wailes (1925-2013)




Children


John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey and Alice de Lusignan




Husband John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey 7 8 9 10

           Born: 1231 - Surrey, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Dec 1304 - Kennington, Middlesex, England
         Buried:  - Lewes, Surrey, England


         Father: William de Warenne 6th Earl of Surrey (Abt 1174-1240)
         Mother: Maud Marshal (Abt 1192-1248) 11 12 13


       Marriage: Aug 1247

Events

• Lord of Bromfield (Wrexham): 7 Oct 1282.

• Lord of Yale: 1282.

• Granted: Castle of Dinas Bran, 7 Oct 1282.

• Constructed: Castle Leonis (Holt Castle), Between 1282 and 1304, Villa Leonis (Holt), (Wrexham), Wales.




Wife Alice de Lusignan 14

            AKA: Alfais de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Feb 1256
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême (Between 1183/1195-1249) 15 16 17
         Mother: Isabella of Angoulême (Abt 1186-1246)



   Other Spouse: Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford (1243-1295) 13 18 19 - 2 Feb 1253


Children
1 F Eleanor de Warenne

           Born: 1251
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir Henry de Percy (Abt 1235-1272)
           Marr: 8 Sep 1268 - York, Yorkshire, England


2 M Sir William de Warenne Earl of Surrey 20 21

           Born: Feb 1256 - Surrey, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Dec 1286 - Croyden, Middlesex, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Joan de Vere (Abt 1258-1293) 22 23
           Marr: Abt 1285


3 M John de Warenne 9

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872173 :

Name Suffix: Earl of Surrey
REFN: 1019
6th Earl of Surrey (1240-1304); styled Earl of Sussex (1282); warden of Scotland (1296-1297). A ward of Henry III of England after his father's death in 1240, John supported the King against his rebellious barons in 1258. He aided the barons from about 1260 to 1263, but rejoined Henry and fought for him at Lewes in 1264 (see RIN # 669). The King was captured during the battle and John fled to France. He returned to England with the future Edward I in 1265, and freed Henry at the battle of Evesham (see RIN # 3867). In 1282 he assumed the title of Earl of Sussex but his claim was uncertain. He joined Edward I's invasion of Scotland in 1296, took Dunbar castle in April that year and became warden of Scotland in August. On 11 September 1297 his troops were routed by William Wallace at Stirling Bridge, but the following year he helped Edward defeat Wallace at Falkirk.

!Chronciles of the Age of Chivalry: 142, 144
-------
From http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm (Holt Castle) :
Following the defeat of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, the last independent Prince of Wales in 1282, Edward I gave John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, the lordship of Bromfield and Yale. To secure his newly gained lands, John built Holt Castle, also known as Lion's Castle, to control a nearby strategic ford across the River Dee. John de Warenne's successor, also John, was leader of the English forces in Scotland. In 1296 he defeated the Red Comyn and the Scottish forces at the Battle of Dunbar and deposed the Scottish King John Balliol. Edward I made de Warenne Regent of Scotland. It was a job that only brought him trouble. William Wallace led a revolt and defeated de Warenne and the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge on September 11th 1296. De Warenne was forced to flee the field of battle and make his excuses to Edward I "Longshanks".
--------
From History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, 1881, Vol. I, p. 389:
"John, Earl of Warren and Surrey, acquired the lordships of Maelor Gymraeg (Bromfield), Chirk, and Iâl, by assassinating the two infant Princes of Powys, Madog and Llywelyn, in 1281."


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor de Warenne

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 153A-30


Death Notes: Child - Sir William de Warenne Earl of Surrey

Killed in a tournament


Research Notes: Child - Sir William de Warenne Earl of Surrey

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871749:
"William was the hier to the Earldom of Surrey, but died before his father; having been killed in a tournament at Croyden 'ambushed and cruelly slain by his rivals'. William was knighted at Winchester in 1285."


Research Notes: Child - John de Warenne

From http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm :

John de Warenne's successor, also John, was leader of the English forces in Scotland. In 1296 he defeated the Red Comyn and the Scottish forces at the Battle of Dunbar and deposed the Scottish King John Balliol. Edward I made de Warenne Regent of Scotland. It was a job that only brought him trouble. William Wallace led a revolt and defeated de Warenne and the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge on September 11th 1296. De Warenne was forced to flee the field of battle and make his excuses to Edward I "Longshanks".


Hugh I "Venator" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan




Husband Hugh I "Venator" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan

            AKA: Hugh I "the Hunter" de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugh II "Carus" de Lusignan




            AKA: Hugh II "the Kind" de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 967
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Hugh I "Venator" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan

From Wikipedia - Hugh I of Lusignan :

Hugh I (fl. early tenth century ), called Venator (Latin for the Hunter), was the first Lord of Lusignan . He is mentioned in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent. It has been hypothesised that he was the huntsman of the Count of Poitou or the Bishop of Poitiers on the basis of his epithet . He was succeeded by his son, Hugh II Carus , who built the Castle of Lusignan.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.


Research Notes: Child - Hugh II "Carus" de Lusignan

Source: Wikipedia - Hugh II of Lusignan :

Hugh II (d. 967 ), called Carus (Latin for the Kind), was the second Lord of Lusignan , the son and successor of Hugh I Venator . According to the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent, he built the castle at Lusignan. Hugh III Albus , who emerges from historical obscurity in the next generation, was probably his son.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.




Hugh II "Carus" de Lusignan




Husband Hugh II "Carus" de Lusignan




            AKA: Hugh II "the Kind" de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 967
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh I "Venator" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugh III "Albus" de Lusignan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Hugh II "Carus" de Lusignan

Source: Wikipedia - Hugh II of Lusignan :

Hugh II (d. 967 ), called Carus (Latin for the Kind), was the second Lord of Lusignan , the son and successor of Hugh I Venator . According to the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent, he built the castle at Lusignan. Hugh III Albus , who emerges from historical obscurity in the next generation, was probably his son.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.



Research Notes: Child - Hugh III "Albus" de Lusignan

From Wikipedia - Hugh III of Lusignan :

Hugh III (fl. late tenth century ), called Albus, was the third Lord of Lusignan , probably the son and successor of Hugh II . He confirmed the donation by one of his vassals of the church of Mezeaux to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien and himself granted the abbey the woodland and the public road between Lusignan and Poitiers . He may have been intimate with the comital court of Poitou , for the Duchess Emma, wife of William IV of Aquitaine , imposed a tax on the abbey of Saint-Maixent and gave him the proceeds. His own wife was Arsendis, whom he married in 967, and he was succeeded by his son Hugh Brunus , not the last of that name in the family.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.


Hugh III "Albus" de Lusignan




Husband Hugh III "Albus" de Lusignan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh II "Carus" de Lusignan (      -0967)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugh IV "Brunus" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan




            AKA: Hugh IV "the Brown" de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1025 and 1032
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Auliarde de Thouars (      -      )



Research Notes: Husband - Hugh III "Albus" de Lusignan

From Wikipedia - Hugh III of Lusignan :

Hugh III (fl. late tenth century ), called Albus, was the third Lord of Lusignan , probably the son and successor of Hugh II . He confirmed the donation by one of his vassals of the church of Mezeaux to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien and himself granted the abbey the woodland and the public road between Lusignan and Poitiers . He may have been intimate with the comital court of Poitou , for the Duchess Emma, wife of William IV of Aquitaine , imposed a tax on the abbey of Saint-Maixent and gave him the proceeds. His own wife was Arsendis, whom he married in 967, and he was succeeded by his son Hugh Brunus , not the last of that name in the family.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.


Research Notes: Child - Hugh IV "Brunus" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

From Wikipedia - Hugh IV of Lusignan :

Hugh IV (c.1026 ), called Brunus (Latin for the Brown), was the fourth Lord of Lusignan . He was the son of Hugh III Albus and Arsendis. He was a turbulent baron, who brought his family out of obscurity and on their way to prominence in European and eventually even Middle Eastern affairs.
Hugh spent many years in war with the Viscounts of Thouars over a fief he claimed was rightfully his. Peace was obtained briefly by Hugh's marriage to Audéarde or Aldiarde, the daughter of the Viscount Ralph . As a dowry, Hugh received the castle of Mouzeuil . Hugh already held the castle of Lusignan , built by his grandfather Hugh Carus , and that of Couhé , built by the duke of Aquitaine . When Ralph, died, however, his successor Geoffrey retook Mouzeuil.
Hugh also engaged in a long war with Aimery I, lord of Rancon , who seized Civray , a fief of Bernard I of La Marche . By alliance with Duke William V of Aquitaine , Hugh and Bernard retook Civray and Hugh held it as a fief, though he lost it soon after. Nevertheless, he continued his war with Aimery.
When the Viscounty of Châtellerault fell vacant, Hugh asked the duke for it, but was put off with empty promises. Hugh waged war with the duke until the latter granted him the fief of Vivonne , which had once belonged to his uncle Joscelin. William later deprived Hugh of the proceeds of the tax on Saint-Maixent which his mother Emma, wife of William IV of Aquitaine , had granted Hugh's father.
On 6 March 1025 , Hugh exchanged lands with the abbey of Saint-Hilaire of Poitiers in order to found a monastery for his soul. The duke obtained two charters from King Robert II confirming this monastic establishment and another at Couhé. Hugh and the Poitevin bishop Isembart then sent letters to Pope John XIX to beg exemption for his monasteries from all authority save that of Nouaillé . Said exemption was granted.
At his monastery of Notre-Dame de Lusignan, a monkish chronicler wrote the Conventum inter Guillelmum ducem Aquitaniae et Hugonem Chiliarchum celebrating Hugh's warmaking. According to the Conventum, Hugh died a year after his final agreement with the duke, probably in 1026 or thereabouts. He left two sons by Audéarde: Hugh V , who succeeded him, and Rorgo.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.


Hugh IV "Brunus" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan and Auliarde de Thouars




Husband Hugh IV "Brunus" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan




            AKA: Hugh IV "the Brown" de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1025 and 1032
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh III "Albus" de Lusignan (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Auliarde de Thouars

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Raoul I Viscount de Thouars (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Hugh V "the Pious" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan 24 25 26

            AKA: Hugh V "le Pieux" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Oct 1060
         Buried:  - Cathedral of Barcelona, Spain
         Spouse: Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges (Abt 1000-1071) 13 27 28
           Marr: Abt 1038



Research Notes: Husband - Hugh IV "Brunus" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

From Wikipedia - Hugh IV of Lusignan :

Hugh IV (c.1026 ), called Brunus (Latin for the Brown), was the fourth Lord of Lusignan . He was the son of Hugh III Albus and Arsendis. He was a turbulent baron, who brought his family out of obscurity and on their way to prominence in European and eventually even Middle Eastern affairs.
Hugh spent many years in war with the Viscounts of Thouars over a fief he claimed was rightfully his. Peace was obtained briefly by Hugh's marriage to Audéarde or Aldiarde, the daughter of the Viscount Ralph . As a dowry, Hugh received the castle of Mouzeuil . Hugh already held the castle of Lusignan , built by his grandfather Hugh Carus , and that of Couhé , built by the duke of Aquitaine . When Ralph, died, however, his successor Geoffrey retook Mouzeuil.
Hugh also engaged in a long war with Aimery I, lord of Rancon , who seized Civray , a fief of Bernard I of La Marche . By alliance with Duke William V of Aquitaine , Hugh and Bernard retook Civray and Hugh held it as a fief, though he lost it soon after. Nevertheless, he continued his war with Aimery.
When the Viscounty of Châtellerault fell vacant, Hugh asked the duke for it, but was put off with empty promises. Hugh waged war with the duke until the latter granted him the fief of Vivonne , which had once belonged to his uncle Joscelin. William later deprived Hugh of the proceeds of the tax on Saint-Maixent which his mother Emma, wife of William IV of Aquitaine , had granted Hugh's father.
On 6 March 1025 , Hugh exchanged lands with the abbey of Saint-Hilaire of Poitiers in order to found a monastery for his soul. The duke obtained two charters from King Robert II confirming this monastic establishment and another at Couhé. Hugh and the Poitevin bishop Isembart then sent letters to Pope John XIX to beg exemption for his monasteries from all authority save that of Nouaillé . Said exemption was granted.
At his monastery of Notre-Dame de Lusignan, a monkish chronicler wrote the Conventum inter Guillelmum ducem Aquitaniae et Hugonem Chiliarchum celebrating Hugh's warmaking. According to the Conventum, Hugh died a year after his final agreement with the duke, probably in 1026 or thereabouts. He left two sons by Audéarde: Hugh V , who succeeded him, and Rorgo.

Sources
Painter, Sidney . "The Lords of Lusignan in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. " Speculum, Vol. 32, No. 1. (Jan., 1957), pp 27-47.


Research Notes: Wife - Auliarde de Thouars

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan)


Death Notes: Child - Hugh V "the Pious" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan

Died in battle


Research Notes: Child - Hugh V "the Pious" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan

First husband of Almodis de la Marche.

From Wikipedia - Hugh V of Lusignan :

Hugh V (died 8 October 1060 ), called the Fair or the Pious, was the fifth Lord of Lusignan and Lord of Couhé . He succeeded his father, Hugh IV , sometime around 1026 .

He and his brother Rorgo confirmed charters for the abbeys of Saint-Maixent and Saint-Cyprien and that of Nouaillé . He married Almodis (990 or c. 1020 - murdered October 16 , 1071 ), daughter of Bernard I, Count of La Marche , through which future counts would claim La Marche . Almodis bore Hugh two sons and one daughter: Hugh VI of Lusignan and Jordan de Lusignan, and Mélisende de Lusignan (b. bef. 1055 ), married before 1074 to Simon I "l'Archevêque", Vidame de Parthenay. He then repudiated her on the basis of consanguinity and she married Pons of Toulouse . When Duke William VIII of Aquitaine , Hugh's suzerain, was at war with William IV of Toulouse , Almodis persuaded Hugh to join her son's side. The duke besieged Lusignan and when Hugh tried to sortie for provisions, he was slain at the gate. He was succeeded by his eldest son, also named Hugh.


Sources


1. Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=12982886923.

2. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jan2010&id=P95475092.

3. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jan2010&id=P95475097.

4. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=11221959&id=P95474922.

5. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=11221959&id=P95474928.

6. Website:, http://wiki.whitneygen.org/wrg/index.php/.

7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 83-27.

8. Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872173.

9. Website:, http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm.

10. Cambrian Archæological Association, Archæologia Cambrensis, the Journal of the Cambrian Archæological Association. (Vol. 7, 6th series. London: Chas. J. Clark, 1907.), pp. 8-9.

11. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 69-28, 76-28, 83-27 (William de Warenne).

12. Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

13. http://www.familysearch.org.

14. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 153-29, 153A-29, 83-28 (John de Warenne).

15. Wikipedia.org, Hugh X of Lusignan.

16. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 275-27.

17. Wikipedia.org, Isabella of Angoulême.

18. Wikipedia.org, Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford.

19. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-30.

20. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 83-29.

21. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871749.

22. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 60-30.

23. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871750.

24. Wikipedia.org, Hugh V of Lusignan.

25. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21.

26. Wikipedia.org, County of La Marche.

27. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

28. Wikipedia.org, Almodis de la Marche.


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3 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jan2010&id=P95475097.

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6 Website:, http://wiki.whitneygen.org/wrg/index.php/.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 83-27.

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9 Website:, http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm.

10 Cambrian Archæological Association, Archæologia Cambrensis, the Journal of the Cambrian Archæological Association. (Vol. 7, 6th series. London: Chas. J. Clark, 1907.), pp. 8-9.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 69-28, 76-28, 83-27 (William de Warenne).

12 Wikipedia.org, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

13 http://www.familysearch.org.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 153-29, 153A-29, 83-28 (John de Warenne).

15 Wikipedia.org, Hugh X of Lusignan.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 275-27.

17 Wikipedia.org, Isabella of Angoulême.

18 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-30.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 83-29.

21 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871749.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 60-30.

23 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871750.

24 Wikipedia.org, Hugh V of Lusignan.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21.

26 Wikipedia.org, County of La Marche.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

28 Wikipedia.org, Almodis de la Marche.


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