The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




William Madocks of Ruthin and Llai and Anne Puleston




Husband William Madocks of Ruthin and Llai

           Born: 
     Christened: 9 Aug 1686
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: David Madocks of Fron Yw (      -      )
         Mother: Ermin Puleston (      -      )


       Marriage: 20 Apr 1722 - Bangor, Gwynedd, Wales



Wife Anne Puleston

           Born: 
     Christened: 26 Oct 1682 - Bangor, Gwynedd, Wales
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: John Puleston (      -1722)
         Mother: Anne Alport of Overton, Cheshire (      -1715)




Children

Research Notes: Husband - William Madocks of Ruthin and Llai

Married his cousin Anne.

Source: Archaeologia Cambrensis, The Journal of the Cambrian Archaeological Association, Vol. VII. 5th Series (London, 1890), p. 124


Research Notes: Wife - Anne Puleston

Married her cousin William

Source: Archaeologia Cambrensis, The Journal of the Cambrian Archaeological Association, Vol. VII. 5th Series (London, 1890), p. 124


Gronwy ap Tudor and Gwerful verch Madog




Husband Gronwy ap Tudor

           Born: Abt 1275
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Dec 1331
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Gwerful verch Madog

           Born: Abt 1295
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Tudur ap Gronwy of Penmynydd

           Born: Abt 1320
     Christened: 
           Died: 1367
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mallt verch Madog (      -      )



Research Notes: Husband - Gronwy ap Tudor

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy


Research Notes: Wife - Gwerful verch Madog

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy


Research Notes: Child - Tudur ap Gronwy of Penmynydd

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy


Madog Fychan ap Madog of Trevor




Husband Madog Fychan ap Madog of Trevor

            AKA: Madoc Vaughan ap Madoc of Trevor
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Margred verch Madog Fychan

            AKA: Marrett ferch Madoc Vaughan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Llywelyn Ddu "the Black" ap Gruffydd (Abt 1300-      )



Research Notes: Husband - Madog Fychan ap Madog of Trevor

Source: Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII. (London, 1880), "The Tanat Pedigree", p. 122 - "Llewelyn Dd. 2nd son of Griffith. (The like.) = Marrett, dau. of Madoc Vaghan ap Madoc of Trevor (Party per sinister, er. and erminois, a lion ramp. or.)


Research Notes: Child - Margred verch Madog Fychan

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy

Source: Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII. (London, 1880), "The Tanat Pedigree", p. 122 - "Llewelyn Dd. 2nd son of Griffith. (The like.) = Marrett, dau. of Madoc Vaghan ap Madoc of Trevor (Party persinister, er. and erminois, a lion ramp. or.)


Gruffydd ap Madog ap Gruffudd Fychan of Rhuddallt and Elizabeth le Strange




Husband Gruffydd ap Madog ap Gruffudd Fychan of Rhuddallt

            AKA: Griffith ap Madoc Vychan of Ruddalt, Gryffydd ap Madoc Vychan Baron of Glyndyfrdwy and Lord of Rhuddalt, Gruffudd ap Madog ap Gruffudd Fychan
           Born: 23 Nov 1298
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1343
         Buried:  - Valle Crucis Abbey, Llantysilio, Denbighshire, Wales


         Father: Madog ap Gruffudd Fychan (      -1304)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 8 Jul 1304



Wife Elizabeth le Strange

            AKA: Elisabeth Lestrange
           Born: 1298
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1320
         Buried: 


         Father: John V le Strange of Knokyn (Bef 1254-Bef 1309)
         Mother: Maud de Walton (      -After 1309)




Children
1 M Gruffydd Fychan II ap Gruffydd ap Madog of Rhuddallt, Baron of Glyndyfrdwy

            AKA: Gruffydd Fychan II Lord of Glyndyfrdwy & Cynllaith Owain, Griffith Fychan Lord of Glyndwrdwy, co. Merioneth, Griffith Vychan ap Griffith ap Kuddall, Gruffydd Vychan
           Born: Bef 1330
     Christened: 
           Died: 1369
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elen verch Thomas ap Llewellyn Owen (Abt 1337-      )



Research Notes: Husband - Gruffydd ap Madog ap Gruffudd Fychan of Rhuddallt

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 249-33 (Elizabeth le Strange).

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p. 81

He is the great-great-great grandson of Gruffudd Maelor I. He is Madog's eldest son.

Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) - has b. 23 Nov 1298, d. aft 1343

Source: Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII, Issued by the Powys-Land Club for the Use of Its Members, London, 1880, p. 123 has "Griffith ap Madoc Vychan of Ruddalt, died Ao 1370, and was buried at Vale Crucis. (The like.)"


Research Notes: Wife - Elizabeth le Strange

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 249-33 has b. 1298.

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) has b. abt 1298.

Source: Also familysearch.org (Thyrle Stapley) has b. 1298, d. aft 1320.


Research Notes: Child - Gruffydd Fychan II ap Gruffydd ap Madog of Rhuddallt, Baron of Glyndyfrdwy

Baron of Glyndyfrdwy, Lord of Cynllaith Owain

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 249-34 - Gruffydd Fychan ap Gruffydd, of Rhuddallt, Baron of Glyndyfrdwy, Lord of Cynllaith Owain

Wikipedia (Gruffydd Fychan II):

Gruffydd Fychan II was Lord of Glyndyfrdwy and Lord of Cynllaith Owain c.1330 -1369 . He was also the hereditary prince of Powys Fadog . His genealogy is uncertain and several tables convey conflicting data. It has been thought that he was the son of Madog Crypl who died in 1304 . However, for him to inherit the throne then and to rule until 1369 seems unlikely. Other tables suggest his father was Gruffydd ap Madog Fychan a son of Madog Fychan .
Gruffydd Fychan II was married to Elen daughter of Thomas ap Llwelyn, of Iscoed and had issue

Source: Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII, Issued by the Powys-Land Club for the Use of Its Members, London, 1880, p. 123 has "Griffith Vychan ap Griffith ap Kuddall. (The like.)"


Iowerth ap Madog ap Howel ap Davydd




Husband Iowerth ap Madog ap Howel ap Davydd

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Madog ap Howel ap Davydd ap Tudor (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Gruffydd ap Iorwerth ap Madog

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Iowerth ap Madog ap Howel ap Davydd

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. VI (London, 1887), p. 202


Research Notes: Child - Gruffydd ap Iorwerth ap Madog

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. VI (London, 1887), p. 202


Tudor ap Madog ap Iarddur




Husband Tudor ap Madog ap Iarddur (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Tudor ap Madog ap Iarddur

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. VI (London, 1887), p. 202


Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog and Angharad verch Owain Gwynedd




Husband Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog 1

            AKA: Gruffudd Maelor II ap Madog ap Maredudd
           Born: Abt 1121
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1191
         Buried: 


         Father: Madog ap Maredudd ap Bleddyn Ruler of Powys (Abt 1091-1160) 1
         Mother: Susanna verch Gruffudd ap Cynan (Abt 1095-      ) 2


       Marriage: 



Wife Angharad verch Owain Gwynedd 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I Prince of Powys Fadog 3

           Born: Abt 1191
     Christened: 
           Died: 1236
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isota (      -      ) 4



Research Notes: Husband - Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog

Confirm that this is Gruffudd Maelor I, not some other Gruffudd

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p. 81


Research Notes: Child - Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I Prince of Powys Fadog

Confirm that his father was Gruffudd Maelor I. See History of Wales p. 124, 161

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p. 81

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. II (London, 1882), p. 174

Source at http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400 shows Isota as the mother of Gruffydd Maelor II ap Madoc. It also has Angharad verch Owain Gwynedd as the mother of Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor I.


Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog




Husband Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog 1

            AKA: Gruffudd Maelor II ap Madog ap Maredudd
           Born: Abt 1121
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1191
         Buried: 


         Father: Madog ap Maredudd ap Bleddyn Ruler of Powys (Abt 1091-1160) 1
         Mother: Susanna verch Gruffudd ap Cynan (Abt 1095-      ) 2


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Angharad verch Owain Gwynedd (      -      ) 3



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog

Confirm that this is Gruffudd Maelor I, not some other Gruffudd

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p. 81


Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd Prince of North Wales and Marared ferch Madog ap Maredudd




Husband Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd Prince of North Wales

            AKA: Iorwerth ap Owain Gwynedd Prince of North Wales, Iorwerth ap Owen Gwynedd Prince of North Wales
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1174
         Buried: 


         Father: Owain I Gwynedd Prince of North Wales (Abt 1100-1170) 5 6 7
         Mother: Gwladys verch Llywarch (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife Marared ferch Madog ap Maredudd

            AKA: Margaret verch Maredudd
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Madog ap Maredudd ap Bleddyn Ruler of Powys (Abt 1091-1160) 1
         Mother: Susanna ferch Gryffydd ap Cynan (      -      )




Children
1 M Llywelyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd




            AKA: Llewellyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn Fawr Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn I of Wales, Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
           Born: Abt 1173 - <Dolwyddelan, Conwy>, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Apr 1240 - Cistercian Abbey of Aberconwy, Wales
         Buried:  - Llanrwst Parish Church, Wales
         Spouse: Joan Princess of Gwynedd (Bef 1200-Between 1236/1237) 8 9 10
           Marr: 1205
         Spouse: Tangwystl verch Llywarch (Abt 1168-      ) 11 12 13
         Spouse: Crysten (      -      )
         Spouse: Gwenllian verch Ednyfed Vychan (      -      )



Research Notes: Husband - Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd Prince of North Wales

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p.80
and
Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great
and
Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 176B-26.


Research Notes: Wife - Marared ferch Madog ap Maredudd

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 176B-26 (Iorwerth Drwyndwn)

Source also: Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great

She was the sister of Gruffudd ap Madog ap Maredudd. Because her mother was a half-sister of Owain Gwynedd, her husband's father, she is a half first-cousin of her husband.


Research Notes: Child - Llywelyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 176B-27. "He had a number of mistresses, one of whom, Tangwystl, was the mother of [28. Gladys Dhu.]"

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p.80

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great :

Llywelyn the Great (Welsh Llywelyn Fawr...), full name Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, (c. 1173 - April 11 , 1240 ) was a Prince of Gwynedd in North Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. He is occasionally called Llywelyn I of Wales.[1] By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for forty years, and was one of only two Welsh rulers to be called 'the Great'. Llywelyn's main home and court throughout his reign was at Garth Celyn on the north coast of Gwynedd, between Bangor and Conwy, overlooking the port of Llanfaes. Throughout the thirteenth century, up to the Edwardian conquest, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn , was in effect the capital of Wales. (Garth Celyn is now known as Pen y Bryn , Bryn Llywelyn, Abergwyngregyn and parts of the medieval buildings still remain).

During Llywelyn's boyhood Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who had agreed to split the kingdom between them following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd , in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200, and made a treaty with King John of England the same year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's illegitimate daughter Joan , also known as Joanna, in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208 Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210 relations deteriorated and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all his lands east of the River Conwy, but was able to recover these lands the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216 he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor Henry III in 1218. During the next fifteen years Llywelyn was frequently involved in fighting with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several of the major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240, and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn .

Genealogy and early life
Llywelyn was born about 1173, the son of Iorwerth ap Owain and the grandson of Owain Gwynedd , who had been ruler of Gwynedd until his death in 1170. Llywelyn was a descendant of the senior line of Rhodri Mawr and therefore a member of the princely house of Aberffraw.[2] He was probably born at Dolwyddelan though he could not have been born in the present Dolwyddelan castle, which was built by Llywelyn himself. He may have been born in the old castle which occupied a rocky knoll on the valley floor.[3] Little is known about his father, Iorwerth Drwyndwn, who may have died when Llywelyn was an infant. There is no record of Iorwerth having taken part in the power struggle between some of Owain Gwynedd's other sons following Owain's death, although he was the eldest surviving son. There is a tradition that he was disabled or disfigured in some way that excluded him from power.[4]

By 1175 Gwynedd had been divided between two of Llywelyn's uncles. Dafydd ab Owain held the area east of the River Conwy and Rhodri ab Owain held the west. Dafydd and Rhodri were the sons of Owain by his second marriage to Cristin ferch Goronwy. This marriage was not considered valid by the church as Cristin was Owain's first cousin, a degree of relationship which according to Canon law prohibited marriage. Giraldus Cambrensis refers to Iorwerth Drwyndwn as the only legitimate son of Owain Gwynedd.[5] Following Iorwerth's death, Llywelyn was, at least in the eyes of the church, the legitimate claimant to the throne of Gwynedd.[6]
Llywelyn's mother was Marared, sometimes anglicized to Margaret, daughter of Madog ap Maredudd , prince of Powys . There is evidence that after Iorwerth's death Marared married into the Corbet family of Caux in Shropshire , and Llywelyn may have spent part of his boyhood there.[7]...

Marital problems 1230
Following his capture, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny decided to ally himself to Llywelyn, and a marriage was arranged between his daughter Isabella and Llywelyn's heir, Dafydd ap Llywelyn. At Easter 1230 William visited Llywelyn's court Garth Celyn , Aber Garth Celyn now known as Pen y Bryn , Abergwyngregyn . During this visit he was found in Llywelyn's chamber together with Llywelyn's wife Joan. On 2 May , De Braose was hanged in the marshland under Garth Celyn , the place now remembered as Gwern y Grog, Hanging Marsh, a deliberately humiliating execution for a nobleman, and Joan was placed under house arrest for a year. The Brut y Tywysogion chronicler commented:

" ... that year William de Breos the Younger, lord of Brycheiniog, was hanged by the lord Llywelyn in Gwynedd, after he had been caught in Llywelyn's chamber with the king of England's daughter, Llywelyn's wife.[42] " A letter from Llywelyn to William's wife, Eva de Braose, written shortly after the execution enquires whether she still wishes the marriage between Dafydd and Isabella to take place.[43] The marriage did go ahead, and the following year Joan was forgiven and restored to her position as princess.

Until 1230 Llywelyn had used the title princeps Norwalliæ 'Prince of North Wales', but from that year he changed his title to 'Prince of Aberffraw and Lord of Snowdon', possibly to underline his supremacy over the other Welsh princes.[44] He did not formally style himself 'Prince of Wales ' although as J.E. Lloyd comments "he had much of the power which such a title might imply".[45]...

Arrangements for the succession
In his later years Llywelyn devoted much effort to ensuring that his only legitimate son Dafydd would follow him as ruler of Gwynedd. Dafydd's older but illegitimate brother, Gruffydd , was excluded from the succession. This was a departure from Welsh custom, not as is often stated because the kingdom was not divided between Dafydd and Gruffydd but because Gruffydd was excluded from consideration as a potential heir owing to his illegitimacy. This was contrary to Welsh law which stipulated that illegitimate sons had equal rights with legitimate sons, provided they had been acknowledged by the father.[50]

In 1220 Llywelyn induced the minority government of King Henry to acknowledge Dafydd as his heir.[51] In 1222 he petitioned Pope Honorius III to have Dafydd's succession confirmed. The original petition has not been preserved but the Pope's reply refers to the "destestable custom ... in his land whereby the son of the handmaiden was equally heir with the son of the free woman and illegitimate sons obtained an inheritance as if they were legitimate". The Pope welcomed the fact that Llywelyn was abolishing this custom.[52] In 1226 Llywelyn persuaded the Pope to declare his wife Joan, Dafydd's mother, to be a legitimate daughter of King John, again in order to strengthen Dafydd's position, and in 1229 the English crown accepted Dafydd's homage for the lands he would inherit from his father.[53] In 1238 Llywelyn held a council at Strata Florida Abbey where the other Welsh princes swore fealty to Dafydd.[54] Llywelyn's original intention had been that they should do homage to Dafydd, but the king wrote to the other rulers forbidding them to do homage.[55]

Gruffydd was given an appanage in Meirionnydd and Ardudwy but his rule was said to be oppressive, and in 1221 Llywelyn stripped him of these territories.[56] In 1228 Llywelyn imprisoned him, and he was not released until 1234. On his release he was given part of Ll to rule. His performance this time was apparently more satisfactory and by 1238 he had been given the remainder of Ll and a substantial part of Powys.[57]

Death and the transfer of power
Joan died in 1237 and Llywelyn appears to have suffered a paralytic stroke the same year.[58] From this time on, his heir Dafydd took an increasing part in the rule of the principality. Dafydd deprived his brother Gruffydd of the lands given him by Llywelyn, and later seized him and his eldest son Owain and held them in Criccieth Castle . In 1240 the chronicler of Brut y Tywysogion records:

" ... the lord Llywelyn ap Iorwerth son of Owain Gwynedd, Prince of Wales, a second Achilles , died having taken on the habit of religion at Aberconwy, and was buried honourably.[59] "

Llywelyn died at the Cistercian abbey of Aberconwy , which he had founded, and was buried there. This abbey was later moved to Maenan near Llanrwst , and Llywelyn's stone coffin can now be seen in Llanrwst parish church. Among the poets who lamented his passing was Einion Wan:

"True lord of the land - how strange that today
He rules not o'er Gwynedd;
Lord of nought but the piled up stones of his tomb,
Of the seven-foot grave in which he lies."[60]

Dafydd succeeded Llywelyn as prince of Gwynedd, but King Henry was not prepared to allow him to inherit his father's position in the remainder of Wales. Dafydd was forced to agree to a treaty greatly restricting his power and was also obliged to hand his brother Gruffydd over to the king, who now had the option of using him against Dafydd. Gruffydd was killed attempting to escape from the Tower of London in 1244. This left the field clear for Dafydd, but Dafydd himself died without an heir in 1246 and was eventually succeeded by his nephew, Gruffydd's son, Llywelyn the Last ...

Children
The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children is uncertain. He was survived by nine children, two legitimate, one probably legitimate and six illegitimate. Elen ferch Llywelyn (c.1207-1253), his only certainly legitimate daughter, first married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester. This marriage was childless, and after John's death Elen married Sir Robert de Quincy , the brother of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester . Llywelyn's only legitimate son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c.1208-1246), married Isabella de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny , Lord of Abergavenny. William was the son of Reginald de Braose , who married another of Llywelyn's daughters. Dafydd and Isabella may have had one child together, Helen of Wales (1246-1295), but the marriage failed to produce a male heir.

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons.

The mother of most of Llywelyn's illegitimate children is known or assumed to have been Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch (c.1168-1198). Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c.1196-1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and is known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey . Their four sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffydd , who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death. Llywelyn had another son, Tegwared ap Llywelyn, by a woman known only as Crysten.
Marared ferch Llywelyn (c.1198-after 1263) married John de Braose of Gower, a nephew of Reginald de Braose, and after his death married Walter Clifford of Bronllys and Clifford. Other illegitimate daughters were Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn, who married William de Lacey, and Angharad ferch Llywelyn, who married Maelgwn Fychan. Susanna ferch Llywelyn was sent to England as a hostage in 1228, but no further details are known...

References

[edit ] Primary sources
Hoare, R.C., ed. 1908. Giraldus Cambrensis: The Itinerary through Wales; Description of Wales. Translated by R.C. Hoare. Everyman's Library. ISBN 0-460-00272-4
Jones, T., ed. 1941. Brut y Tywysogion: Peniarth MS. 20. University of Wales Press.
Pryce, H., ed. 2005. The Acts of Welsh rulers 1120-1283. University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-1897-5

[edit ] Secondary sources
Bartrum, P.C. 1966. Early Welsh Genealogical Tracts. University of Wales Press.
Carr, A. D. 1995. Medieval Wales. Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-54773-X
Davies, R. R. 1987. Conquest, Coexistence and Change: Wales 1063-1415 Clarendon Press, University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-19-821732-3
Lloyd, J. E. 1911. A History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest. Longmans, Green & Co..
Lynch, F. 1995. Gwynedd (A Guide to Ancient and Historic Wales series). HMSO. ISBN 0-11-701574-1
Maund, K. 2006. The Welsh Kings: Warriors, Warlords and Princes. Tempus. ISBN 0-7524-2973-6
Moore, D. 2005. The Welsh wars of independence: c.410-c.1415. Tempus. ISBN 0-7524-3321-0
Powicke, M. 1953. The Thirteenth Century 1216-1307 (The Oxford History of England). Clarendon Press.
Stephenson, D. 1984. The Governance of Gwynedd. University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-0850-3
Williams, G. A. 1964. "The Succession to Gwynedd, 1238-1247" Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies XX (1962-64) 393-413
Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700, lines: 27-27, 29A-27, 29A-28, 132C-29, 176B-27, 177-7, 184A-9, 236-7, 246-30, 254-28, 254-29, 260-31





Gruffydd ap Madog Ddû ap Rhirid




Husband Gruffydd ap Madog Ddû ap Rhirid

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Madog Ddû ap Rhirid ap Llywelyn (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Jevan ap Gruffydd of Englefield, Flintshire

            AKA: Ieuan ap Gruffydd ap Madog Ddû of Copa'r Goleuneu in Tegeingl
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Gruffydd ap Madog Ddû ap Rhirid

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. IV (London, 1884), p. 341


Research Notes: Child - Jevan ap Gruffydd of Englefield, Flintshire

Source: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales by Thomas Nicholas, Vol. I, London, 1872, p. 362


Sources


1. Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6396.

2. Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), p. 137.

3. Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6398.

4. Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400.

5. Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owain_Gwynedd.

6. Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), pp. 80, 121, 137.

7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176B-25.

8. Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_England.

9. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 29A-27.

10. Wikipedia.org, John of England; Llywelyn the Great.

11. Wikipedia.org, Llywelyn the Great.

12. Powys-Land Club, Collections Historical & Archæological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and Its Borders. (Vol. 13. London: Thomas Richards, 1880.), p. 121.

13. http://www.familysearch.org.


Sources


1 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6396.

2 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), p. 137.

3 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6398.

4 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400.

5 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owain_Gwynedd.

6 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), pp. 80, 121, 137.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176B-25.

8 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_England.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 29A-27.

10 Wikipedia.org, John of England; Llywelyn the Great.

11 Wikipedia.org, Llywelyn the Great.

12 Powys-Land Club, Collections Historical & Archæological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and Its Borders. (Vol. 13. London: Thomas Richards, 1880.), p. 121.

13 http://www.familysearch.org.


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