These pages represent the work of an amateur researcher and should not be used as the sole source by any other researcher. Few primary sources have been available. Corrections and contributions are encouraged and welcomed. -- Karen (Johnson) Fish

The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Arviragus Gweirgydd ap Cunobelin King of Siluria [Legendary] and Venissa [Legendary]




Husband Arviragus Gweirgydd ap Cunobelin King of Siluria [Legendary] 1 2 3 4

            AKA: Arvirargus, Aviragus, Caradog, Caratacus, Caratauc map Cinbelin map Teuhant, Gweirydd ap Cynfelyn
           Born: abt 0010
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0074
         Buried: 


         Father: Cunobelinus King of Britain (      -0040) 5 6
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Venissa [Legendary] 7

           Born: abt 0012
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Claudius Roman Emperor (0009 B.C.-0054) 8
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Meurig King of Siluria 9 10

            AKA: Marius King of Siluria, Meric King of Siluria, Marius Meurig ap Arviragus - King of Siluria
           Born: abt 0030
     Christened: 
           Died: 125
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Julia Victoria verch Prasutagus Princess of Iceni (      -      ) 11 12
         Spouse: Boudica Princess of Icenia (      -      )



Research Notes: Husband - Arviragus Gweirgydd ap Cunobelin King of Siluria [Legendary]

Legendary King of Britain, contemporary with Claudius and Vespasian.

Wikipedia (Caratacus).
"...a historical British chieftain of the Catuvellanuni tribe, who led the British resistance to the Roman conquest. He may correspond with the legendary Welsh character Caradog and the legendary British king Arvirargus."
------

From A History of Wales , p. 26:

"Cunobelinus died about AD 40 and his kingdom was inherited by his sons, Caratacus and Togodumnus. Their brother, Amminius, had been exiled by Cunobelinus, and he appealed to Rome to help him gain a share of his father's territories. Amminius's appeal, along with the complaints of the tribes which had suffered from the attacks of the Belgae, provided the Romans with an excuse to invade the island, although their real motive was their desire to seize the fertile lowlands...

"In May AD 43, Aulus Plautius sailed across the Channel with four legions and a host of auxiliary soldiers--forty thousand men in all. Within three months, it was considered that Rome's hold upon south-eastern Britain was secure enough to allow the emperor Claudius, the most inoffensive member of the complex Julio-Claudian family, to visit the new province and to make a ceremonial entry into Camulodunum (Colchester), the capital of the Catuvellauni, on an elephant...

"Roman power came under attack from the independent tribes living beyond [the Fosse Way]. Chief among them were the Silures of south-east Wales. They attacked the new province in AD 47 and 48 at the behest of Caratacus (the Caradog of Welsh tradition), who had fled to the territory of the Silures following the defeat of the Catuvellauni [in AD43]...

"In AD 49, a fort was erected for the Twentieth Legion near the place where the city of Gloucester would latyer be founded and it was linked with smaller forts at Usk, Clyro and other places, with the intention of putting pressure on the Silures. Caratacus continued his resistance among the Ordovices and it was in their territory, near Caersws perhaps, that he was defeated and his wife and children were captured in AD 51. Caratacus himself fled to the Brigantes, but he was yielded up to the Romans by their queen, Cartimandua. He was taken to Rome and there, according to Tacitus, he made a speech which has reounded down the ages.

"The resistance of the tribes of Wales did not come to an end with the capture of Caratacus. In AD 52, a legion--probably the twentieth--was defeated by the Silures..."

---
From Wikipedia - Arvirargus :

Arvirargus (or Arviragus) was a legendary, and possibly historical, British king of the 1st century AD. A shadowy historical Arviragus is known only from a cryptic reference in a satirical poem by Juvenal , in which a giant turbot presented to the Roman emperor Domitian (AD 81 - 96) is said to be an omen that "you will capture some king, or Arviragus will fall from his British chariot-pole".[1]

Geoffrey of Monmouth 's Historia Regum Britanniae (1136) presents a legendary Arviragus who is contemporary with the emperor Claudius (AD 41-54).[2][3] However, Geoffrey's work is highly romanticized and contains little trustworthy historical fact, rendering his account of Arvirargus suspect.

According to Geoffrey, Arvirargus is a son of the former king Kimbelinus . He succeeds to the throne of Britain after his elder brother, Guiderius , dies fighting the invading Romans under Claudius. Arviragus puts on his brother's armour and leads the army of the Britons against the Romans. When he learns that Claudius and his commander, Hamo , have fled into the woods, Arvirargus follows him until they reach the coast. The Britons kill Hamo as he tries to flee onto a ship and the place is named Southampton after him. Claudius is able to reassemble his troops elsewhere and he besieges Portchester until it falls to his forces.

Following Hamo's death, Arvirargus seeks refuge at Winchester , but Claudius follows him there with his army. The Britons break the siege and attack the Romans, but Claudius halts the attack and offers a treaty. In exchange for peace and tribute with Rome, Claudius offers Arvirargus his own daughter in marriage. They accept each other's terms and Arvirargus aids Claudius in subduing Orkney and other northern lands.

In the following spring, Arvirargus weds Claudius' daughter, Genvissa , and names the city of Gloucester after her father. Following the wedding, Claudius leaves Britain in the control of Arvirargus. In the years following Claudius' departure, Arvirargus rebuilds the cities that have been ruined and becomes feared by his neighbours. This causes him to halt his tribute to Rome , forcing Claudius to send Vespasian with an army to Britain. As Vespasian prepares to land, such a large British force stands ready that he flees to another port, Totnes , where he sets up camp.

Once a base is established, he marches to Exeter and besieges the city. Arvirargus meets him in battle there and the fight is stalemated. The following morning, Queen Genvissa mediates peace between the two foes. Vespasian returnes to Rome and Arvirargus rules the country peacefully for some years. When he finally dies, he is buried in Gloucester, the city he built with Claudius. He is succeeded by his son, Marius .

Geoffrey's legendary Arvirargus appears to correspond to some degree to the historical Caratacus , son of Cunobelinus , who, along with his brother Togodumnus , led the initial resistance to the Roman invasion of AD 43, and went on to be a thorn in Rome's side for nearly a decade after Togodumnus's death.[4] Welsh versions of Geoffrey's Historia call him Gweirydd and his brother Gwydr.[5]

Arvirargus is a character in William Shakespeare 's play Cymbeline . He and his brother Guiderius had been kidnapped in childhood by Belarius, a nobleman wrongly banished by Cymbeline, and brought up in secret in Wales, but are reunited with their father and sister Imogen in time for the Roman invasion.[6]


Research Notes: Wife - Venissa [Legendary]

Source http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873366 considers legendary.


William III Count of AngoulÍme and Vitapoi de Bezaume




Husband William III Count of AngoulÍme 13 14

            AKA: Guillaume d'AngoulÍme
           Born: Abt 1084
     Christened: 
           Died: 1120 - Deutz, (Cologne, Germany)
         Buried: 1120 - Saint-Heribert, Deutz, (Cologne, Germany)


         Father: Foulques "Taillefer" Comte d'AngoulÍme (      -1087) 15
         Mother: Condoha d'Eu (      -      ) 16


       Marriage: 1108

Events

ē Count of AngoulÍme: 1089-1118.




Wife Vitapoi de Bezaume 17 18

            AKA: Vitapoy de Benauges
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Guillaume Amanieu Vicomte de Bezaume (      -Bef 1103) 19
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme 20 21 22

            AKA: Wulgrin II Count of AngoulÍme and Ponce de la Marche, Bougrin Taillifer
           Born: Abt 1108 - AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Sep 1140 - Ch‚teau de Bouteville, Bouteville, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
         Buried:  - Saint-…parche, AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
         Spouse: Pontia de la Marche (      -      ) 23



Death Notes: Husband - William III Count of AngoulÍme

May have died in 1118.


Research Notes: Husband - William III Count of AngoulÍme

From Wikipedia - William III, Count of AngoulÍme :

William III of AngoulÍme was the twelfth count of AngoulÍme .
William III was a fifth generation descendant of Count Arnold I . He was born in 1084, the son of Count Fulk of AngoulÍme and the grandson of Geoffrey of AngoulÍme and Petronille De Archiac . William III's reign lasted from 1089 until 1118. In 1108 he married Vitapoy De Benauges . Their son, Wulgrin II of AngoulÍme , was born in 1108 and succeeded William III as the thirteenth count of AngoulÍme .


Research Notes: Wife - Vitapoi de Bezaume

From http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Vitapoi de Bezuaume .
Vitapoi's married to Guillaume V, comtť d'AngoulÍme is recorded in the Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensis which states "filia Amani seu Amaniei Gasconis . . . Vitapoi"


Birth Notes: Child - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have been born about 1089 in Angouleme.


Death Notes: Child - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have died on 16 Nov 1140 (burial date?).


Vladimir I of Kiev




Husband Vladimir I of Kiev 24 25




            AKA: Saint Vladimir of Kiev, Vladimir the Great, Saint Vladimir Svyatoslavich the Great
           Born: Abt 958


     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1015 - Berestovo, Berestove, Kiev, Ukraine
         Buried: 


         Father: Sviatoslav I of Kiev (Abt 0942-0972) 26
         Mother: Malusha (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Yaroslav I of Kiev




            AKA: Jarisleif "the Lame," Yaroslav I "the Wise" of Kiev
           Born: Abt 978
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Feb 1054 - Kiev, Ukraine
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden (Abt 1001-1050) 27 28
           Marr: 1019



Research Notes: Husband - Vladimir I of Kiev

From Wikipedia - Vladimir I of Kiev

Saint Vladimir Svyatoslavich the Great (c. 958 - 15 July 1015 , Berestovo ) was the grand prince of Kiev who converted to Christianity in 988, and proceeded to baptise the whole Kievan Rus . His name may be spelled in different ways: in Old East Slavic as Volodimir (), in modern Ukrainian as Volodymyr (), in Old Church Slavonic and modern Russian as Vladimir (), in Old Norse as Valdamarr and the modern Scandinavian languages as Valdemar.

Way to the throne

Vladimir was the youngest son of Sviatoslav I of Kiev by his housekeeper Malusha , described in the Norse sagas as a prophetess who lived to the age of 100 and was brought from her cave to the palace to predict the future. Malusha's brother Dobrynya was Vladimir's tutor and most trusted advisor. Hagiographic tradition of dubious authenticity also connects his childhood with the name of his grandmother, Olga Prekrasa , who was Christian and governed the capital during Sviatoslav's frequent military campaigns.

Transferring his capital to Preslavets in 969, Sviatoslav designated Vladimir ruler of Novgorod the Great but gave Kiev to his legitimate son Yaropolk . After Sviatoslav's death (972), a fratricidal war erupted (976) between Yaropolk and his younger brother Oleg , ruler of the Drevlians . In 977 Vladimir fled to his kinsmen Haakon Sigurdsson , ruler of Norway in Scandinavia , collecting as many of the Viking warriors as he could to assist him to recover Novgorod, and on his return the next year marched against Yaropolk.

On his way to Kiev he sent ambassadors to Rogvolod (Norse: Ragnvald), prince of Polotsk , to sue for the hand of his daughter Rogneda (Norse: Ragnhild). The well-born princess refused to affiance herself to the son of a bondswoman, but Vladimir attacked Polotsk, slew Rogvolod, and took Ragnhild by force. Actually, Polotsk was a key fortress on the way to Kiev, and the capture of Polotsk and Smolensk facilitated the taking of Kiev (980), where he slew Yaropolk by treachery, and was proclaimed konung , or kagan , of all Kievan Rus .

Years of pagan rule
In addition to his father's extensive domain, Vladimir continued to expand his territories. In 981 he conquered the Cherven cities, the modern Galicia ; in 983 he subdued the Yatvingians , whose territories lay between Lithuania and Poland ; in 985 he led a fleet along the central rivers of Russia to conquer the Bulgars of the Kama , planting numerous fortresses and colonies on his way.

Though Christianity had won many converts since Olga's rule, Vladimir had remained a thorough going pagan, taking eight hundred concubines (besides numerous wives) and erecting pagan statues and shrines to gods. It is argued that he attempted to reform Slavic paganism by establishing thunder-god Perun as a supreme deity.

Baptism of Rus

The Primary Chronicle reports that in the year 987 , as the result of a consultation with his boyars , Vladimir sent envoys to study the religions of the various neighboring nations whose representatives had been urging him to embrace their respective faiths. The result is amusingly described by the chronicler Nestor . Of the Muslim Bulgarians of the Volga the envoys reported there is no gladness among them; only sorrow and a great stench, and that their religion was undesirable due to its taboo against alcoholic beverages and pork ; supposedly, Vladimir said on that occasion: "Drinking is the joy of the Rus'." Russian sources also describe Vladimir consulting with Jewish envoys (who may or may not have been Khazars ), and questioning them about their religion but ultimately rejecting it, saying that their loss of Jerusalem was evidence of their having been abandoned by God . Ultimately Vladimir settled on Christianity . In the churches of the Germans his emissaries saw no beauty; but at Constantinople , where the full festival ritual of the Byzantine Church was set in motion to impress them, they found their ideal: "We no longer knew whether we were in heaven or on earth," they reported, describing a majestic Divine Liturgy in Hagia Sophia , "nor such beauty, and we know not how to tell of it." If Vladimir was impressed by this account of his envoys, he was yet more so by political gains of the Byzantine alliance.

In 988 , having taken the town of Chersonesos in Crimea , he boldly negotiated for the hand of the emperor Basil II 's sister, Anna. Never had a Greek imperial princess, and one "born-in-the-purple" at that, married a barbarian before, as matrimonial offers of French kings and German emperors had been peremptorily rejected. In short, to marry the 27-year-old princess off to a pagan Slav seemed impossible. Vladimir, however, was baptized at Cherson, taking the Christian name of Basil out of compliment to his imperial brother-in-law; the sacrament was followed by his wedding with Anna . Returning to Kiev in triumph, he destroyed pagan monuments and established many churches, starting with the splendid Church of the Tithes (989) and monasteries on Mt. Athos .

Arab sources, both Muslim and Christian, present a different story of Vladimir's conversion. Yahya of Antioch , al-Rudhrawari , al-Makin , al-Dimashki , and ibn al-Athir [1] all give essentially the same account. In 987, Bardas Sclerus and Bardas Phocas revolted against the Byzantine emperor Basil II . Both rebels briefly joined forces, but then Bardas Phocas proclaimed himself emperor on September 14 , 987 . Basil II turned to the Kievan Rus' for assistance, even though they were considered enemies at that time. Vladimir agreed, in exchange for a marital tie; he also agreed to accept Orthodox Christianity as his religion and bring his people to the new faith. When the wedding arrangements were settled, Vladimir dispatched 6,000 troops to the Byzantine Empire and they helped to put down the revolt.[2]


Christian reign
He now formed a great council out of his boyars, and set his twelve sons over his subject principalities. With his neighbors he lived at peace, the incursions of the Pechenegs alone disturbing his tranquillity. After Anna's death, he married again, most likely to a granddaughter of Otto the Great .
He died at Berestovo, near Kiev, while on his way to chastise the insolence of his son, Prince Yaroslav of Novgorod . The various parts of his dismembered body were distributed among his numerous sacred foundations and were venerated as relics . One of the largest Kievan cathedrals is dedicated to him. The University of Kiev was named after the man who both civilized and Christianized Kievan Rus. There is the Order of St. Vladimir in Russia and Saint Vladimir's Orthodox Theological Seminary in the United States . The Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate the feast day of St. Vladimir on 15 July .

His memory was also kept alive by innumerable Russian folk ballads and legends, which refer to him as Krasno Solnyshko, that is, the Fair Sun. With him the Varangian period of Eastern Slavic history ceases and the Christian period begins.

-------------

From Wikipedia - Family life and children of Vladimir I :

Until his baptism, Vladimir I of Kiev (c.958 -1015 ) was described by Thietmar of Merseburg as a great profligate (Latin : fornicator maximus). He had a few hundred concubines in Kiev and in the country residence of Berestovo . He also had official pagan wives, the most famous being Rogneda of Polotsk . His other wives are mentioned in the Primary Chronicle , with various children assigned to various wives in the different versions of the document. Hence, speculations abound.

Norse wife
Norse sagas mention that, while ruling in Novgorod in his early days, Vladimir had a Varangian wife named Olava or Allogia. This unusual name is probably a feminine form of Olaf . According to Snorri Sturluson the runaway Olaf Tryggvason was sheltered by Allogia in her house; she also paid a large fine for him.

Several authorities, notably Rydzevskaya ("Ancient Rus and Scandinavia in 9-14 cent.", 1978), hold that later skalds confused Vladimir's wife Olava with his grandmother and tutor Olga , with Allogia being the distorted form of Olga's name. Others postulate Olava was a real person and the mother of Vysheslav, the first of Vladimir's sons to reign in Novgorod, as behooves the eldest son and heir. On the other hand, there is no evidence that the tradition of sending the eldest son of Kievan monarch to Novgorod existed at such an early date.

Those scholars who believe that this early Norse wife was not fictitious, suppose that Vladimir could have married her during his famous exile in Scandinavia in the late 970s. They usually refer an account in Ingvars saga (in a part called Eymund's saga ) which tells that Eric VI of Sweden married his daughter to a 'konung of fjord lying to the East from Holmgard '. This prince may have been Vladimir the Great.

Polotsk wife
Main article: Rogneda of Polotsk
Rogneda of Polotsk is the best known of Vladimir's pagan wives, although her ancestry has fuelled the drollest speculations. See this article for extensive but tenuous arguments for her Yngling royal descent.
The Primary Chronicle mentions three of Rogneda's sons - Izyaslav of Polotsk (+1001), Vsevolod of Volhynia (+ca 995), and Yaroslav the Wise . Following an old Yngling tradition, Izyaslav inherited the lands of his maternal grandfather, i.e., Polotsk . According to the Kievan succession law, his progeny forfeited their rights to the Kievan throne, because their forefather had never ruled in Kiev supreme. They, however, retained the principality of Polotsk and formed a dynasty of local rulers, of which Vseslav the Sorcerer was the most notable.

Greek wife
During his unruly youth, Vladimir begot his eldest son, Sviatopolk , relations with whom would cloud his declining years. His mother was a Greek nun captured by Svyatoslav I in Bulgaria and married to his lawful heir Yaropolk I . Russian historian Vasily Tatischev , invariably erring in the matters of onomastics, gives her the fanciful Roman name of Julia. When Yaropolk was murdered by Vladimir's agents, the new sovereign raped his wife and she soon (some would say, too soon) gave birth to a child. Thus, Sviatopolk was probably the eldest of Vladimir's sons, although the issue of his parentage has been questioned and he has been known in the family as "the son of two fathers".

Bohemian wife
Vladimir apparently had a Czech wife, whose name is given by Vasily Tatishchev as Malfrida. Historians have gone to extremes in order to provide a political rationale behind such an alliance, as the Czech princes are assumed to have backed up Vladimir's brother Yaropolk rather than Vladimir. His children by these marriage were probably Svyatoslav of Smolensk, killed during the 1015 internecine war, and Mstislav of Chernigov . Some chronicles, however, report that Rogneda was Mstislav's mother.

Bulgarian wife
Another wife was a Bulgarian lady, whose name is given by Tatishchev as Adela. Historians have disagreed as to whether she came from Volga Bulgaria or from Bulgaria on the Danube . According to the Primary Chronicle , both Boris and Gleb were her children. This tradition, however, is viewed by most scholars as a product of later hagiographical tendency to merge the identity of both saints. Actually, they were of different age and their names point to different cultural traditions. Judging by his Oriental name, Boris could have been Adela's only offspring.

Anna Porphyrogeneta
Anna Porphyrogeneta, daughter of Emperor Romanos II and Theophano , was the only princess of the Makedones to have been married to a foreigner. The Byzantine emperors regarded the Franks and Russians as barbarians, refusing Hugues Capet 's proposals to marry Anna to his son Robert I , so the Baptism of Kievan Rus was a prerequisite for this marriage. Following the wedding, Vladimir is said to have divorced all his pagan wives, although this claim is disputed. Regarded by later Russians as a saint, Anna was interred with her husband in the Church of the Tithes .

Anna is not known to have had any children. Either her possible barrenness or the Byzantine house rule could account for this. Had she had any progeny, the prestigious and much sought imperial parentage would have certainly been advertised by her descendants. Hagiographic sources, contrary to the Primary Chronicle , posit Boris and Gleb as her offspring, on the understanding that holy brothers should have had a holy mother.

German wife
Anna is known to have predeceased Vladimir by four years. Thietmar of Merseburg , writing from contemporary accounts, mentions that Boleslaw I of Poland captured Vladimir's widow during his raid on Kiev in 1018 . The historians long had no clue as to identity of this wife. The emigre historian Nicholas Baumgarten, however, pointed to the controversial record of the "Genealogia Welforum" and the "Historia Welforum Weingartensis" that one daughter of Count Kuno von Oenningen (future Duke Konrad of Swabia ) by "filia Ottonis Magni imperatoris" (Otto the Great 's daughter; possibly Rechlinda Otona [Regelindis], claimed by some as illegitimate daughter and by others legitimate, born from his first marriage with Edith of Wessex) married "rex Rugorum" (king of Russia). He interpreted this evidence as pertaining to Vladimir's last wife.

It is believed that the only child of this alliance was Dobronega, or Maria, who married Casimir I of Poland between 1038 and 1042 . As her father Vladimir died about 25 years before that marriage and she was still young enough to bear at least five children, including two future Polish dukes (Boleslaw II of Poland , who later became a king, and Wladyslaw Herman ), it is thought probable that she was Vladimir's daughter by the last marriage.

Some sources claimed Agatha , the wife of Edward the Exile of England, was another daughter of this marriage and full-sister of Dobronegra. Their marriage took place by the same time of Dobronegra's wedding (the date of birth of her first child support this) and this maybe because was double wedding of both sisters. This can resolve the question about the conection between Agatha and the Holy Roman Empire claimed by several medieval sources.

Yaroslav's parentage
There is also a case for Yaroslav 's descent from Anna. According to this theory, Nestor the Chronicler deliberately represented Yaroslav as Rogneda's son, because he systematically removed all information concerning Kievan ties with Byzantium , spawning pro-Varangian bias (see Normanist theory for details). Proponents allege that Yaroslav's true age was falsified by Nestor, who attempted to represent him as 10 years older than he actually had been, in order to justify Yaroslav's seizure of the throne at the expense of his older brothers.

The Primary Chronicle , for instance, states that Yaroslav died at the age of 76 in 1054 (thus putting his birth at 978 ), while dating Vladimir's encounter and marriage to Yaroslav's purported mother, Rogneda, to 980 . Elsewhere, speaking about Yaroslav's rule in Novgorod (1016), Nestor says that Yaroslav was 28, thus putting his birth at 988 . The forensic analysis of Yaroslav's skeleton seems to have confirmed these suspicions, estimating Yaroslav's birth at ca. 988-990, after both the Baptism of Kievan Rus and Vladimir's divorce of Rogneda. Consequently, it is assumed that Yaroslav was either Vladimir's natural son born after the latter's baptism or his son by Anna.

Had Yaroslav an imperial Byzantine descent, he likely would not have stinted to advertise it. Some have seen the willingness of European kings to marry Yaroslav's daughters as an indication of this imperial descent. Subsequent Polish chroniclers and historians, in particular, were eager to view Yaroslav as Anna's son. Recent proponents envoke onomastic arguments, which have often proven decisive in the matters of medieval prosopography . It is curious that Yaroslav named his elder son Vladimir (after his own father) and his eldest daughter Anna (as if after his own mother). Also, there is a certain pattern in his sons having Slavic names (as Vladimir), and his daughters having Greek names only (as Anna). However, in the absence of better sources, Anna's maternity remains a pure speculation.

Obscure offspring
Vladimir had several children whose maternity cannot be established with certainty. These include two sons, Stanislav of Smolensk and Sudislav of Pskov, the latter outliving all of his siblings. There is also one daughter, named Predslava, who was captured by Boleslaw I in Kiev and taken with him to Poland as a concubine. Another daughter, Premyslava, is attested in numerous (though rather late) Hungarian sources as the wife of Duke Ladislaus, one of the early Arpadians .



Vratislav I Duke of Bohemia and Drahombira ze Stodor




Husband Vratislav I Duke of Bohemia 29

           Born: Abt 877 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Feb 921
         Buried: 


         Father: Borijov I Duke of Bohemia (Abt 0842-Abt 0894) 29
         Mother: Lidmila ze Psova (Abt 0853-0921) 30


       Marriage: 



Wife Drahombira ze Stodor 30

           Born: Abt 881 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 937
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Boleslav I Duke of Bohemia 29

           Born: Abt 900 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 967
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Bozena (Abt 0901-      ) 30




Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme and Pontia de la Marche




Husband Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme 20 21 22

            AKA: Wulgrin II Count of AngoulÍme and Ponce de la Marche, Bougrin Taillifer
           Born: Abt 1108 - AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Sep 1140 - Ch‚teau de Bouteville, Bouteville, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
         Buried:  - Saint-…parche, AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)


         Father: William III Count of AngoulÍme (Abt 1084-1120) 13 14
         Mother: Vitapoi de Bezaume (      -      ) 17 18


       Marriage: 

Events

ē Count of AngoulÍme: 1118-1140.




Wife Pontia de la Marche 23

            AKA: Pontia de la Marche
           Born:  - <La Marche, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger "the Poitevin" Montgomery (Abt 1058-Between 1122/1140) 31 32
         Mother: Almodis Countess of La Marche (Abt 1062-      ) 31




Children
1 M William IV Taillifer Count of AngoulÍme 33 34

            AKA: Guillaume "Taillifer" Comtť d'AngoulÍme
           Born:  - <AngoulÍme, Angoumois (Charente, France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Aug 1179 - Messina, Sicily
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Marguerite de Turenne (      -      ) 35
           Marr: Abt 1147



Birth Notes: Husband - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have been born about 1089 in Angouleme.


Death Notes: Husband - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have died on 16 Nov 1140 (burial date?).


Research Notes: Husband - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

From Wikipedia - Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme :

Wulgrin II (also Vulgrin or Bougrin), called Taillifer or Rudel, was the Count of AngoulÍme from 1120 to his death on 16 November 1140.[1] He was a son of Count William III and he married Pontia de la Marche, daughter of Roger the Poitevin and Almodis, the daughter of count Aldebert II of La Marche. They had only one son, William IV of AngoulÍme . After the death of his first wife, Wulgrin remarried to Amable de Ch‚tellerault and had three children: Fulk, Geoffrey "Martel" and an unnamed daughter.

He retook Blaye from William X of Aquitaine in 1127 and reconstructed the castle there in 1140.[2]

The troubadour Jaufrť Rudel may be possibly his son or his son-in-law.[2]


Waldemar Duke of Russia




Husband Waldemar Duke of Russia 36

           Born: Abt 995 - <Russia>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Arlogia 36

           Born: Abt 1015 - <Russia>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ragnvald Brusesson (Abt 1011-1046) 36
           Marr: Abt 1034 - <Russia>




Waleran I Count of Meulan and Oda de Conteville




Husband Waleran I Count of Meulan

           Born: Abt 990
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1069
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Count of Meulan (Abt 0965-      ) 37
         Mother: Alix de Vexin (Abt 0970-      ) 37


       Marriage: Abt 1017 - France



Wife Oda de Conteville 38 39

           Born: Abt 998 - Conteville, <(Eure)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Jean de Conteville Earl of Comyn, Sieur de Tonsburgh (Abt 0965-      ) 40 41 42
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Adeline of Meulan 37 39

            AKA: Adeliza Meulent
           Born: Abt 1014 - <Pont-Audemer, (Eure)>, Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1081
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Roger de Beaumont Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer (Abt 1015-1094) 37 39
           Marr: Abt 1048


2 M Hugh Count of Meulan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Waleran I Count of Meulan

Source: Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont (Waleran III) and Counts of Meulan (Waleran I)


Waltheof of Bamburgh




Husband Waltheof of Bamburgh 43 44

            AKA: Walroef, Waltheof I of Bamburgh
           Born: Abt 960
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Osulf I of Bamburgh (      -Bef 0963) 45
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Uchtred the Bold Earl of Northumbria 43 46 47

            AKA: Ughtred of Northumbria, Uhtred of Bamburgh, Uhtred Earl of Northumbria
           Born: Abt 971
     Christened: 
           Died: 1016
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ecgfrida (Abt 0973-      ) 43 48
         Spouse: ∆lfgifu (Abt 0997-      ) 49 50



Research Notes: Husband - Waltheof of Bamburgh

From Wikipedia - Waltheof of Bamburgh :

Waltheof was high-reeve or ealdorman of Bamburgh (fl. 994). He was the son of Osulf I . His name is Scandinavian and implies that he had Viking ancestors. It remained in his family when Earl Siward married his great-granddaughter and named his son Waltheof. This son of Siward became Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria . Nothing is known about Waltheof's period in office.


Death Notes: Child - Uchtred the Bold Earl of Northumbria

Assassinated by Thurbrand the Hold


Walther King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional]




Husband Walther King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 51 52

            AKA: Walter King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 215
     Christened: 
           Died: 306
         Buried: 


         Father: Clodius III King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] (Abt 0200-0298) 53 54
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Dagobert I King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 55 56

           Born: Abt 264
     Christened: 
           Died: 317
         Buried: 





Wambertus Duke of Moselle




Husband Wambertus Duke of Moselle 57

           Born: Abt 483
     Christened: 
           Died: 528
         Buried: 


         Father: Adalbertus Duke of Moselle (Abt 0457-0491) 58
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ausbertus Duke of Moselle 59

           Born: Abt 514
     Christened: 
           Died: 570
         Buried: 





Sources


1. Wikipedia.org, Arvirargus. Cit. Date: 11 Sep 2009.

2. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873365.

3. Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), p. 26.

4. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #111888.

5. Wikipedia.org, Cunobelinus. Cit. Date: 11 Sep 2009.

6. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105893 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

7. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873366.

8. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873367.

9. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140398 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

10. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873361.

11. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105899 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

12. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873362.

13. Wikipedia.org, William III, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 12 Sep 2009.

14. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/3455.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

15. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4539.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

16. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4563.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

17. Wikipedia.org, William III, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 13 Sep 2009.

18. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

19. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4708.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

20. Wikipedia.org, Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 12 Sep 2009.

21. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 153A-25 (Marguerite de Turenne).

22. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1121.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

23. Wikipedia.org, Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 13 Sep 2009.

24. Wikipedia.org, Vladimir I of Kiev.

25. Wikipedia.org, Family life and children of Vladimir I.

26. Wikipedia.org, Sviatoslav I of Kiev. Cit. Date: 19 Sep 2009.

27. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

28. Wikipedia.org, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

29. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 26 Jul 2009.

30. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 28 Jul 2009.

31. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 9 Aug 2009.

32. Wikipedia.org, Roger the Poitevin. Cit. Date: 13 Sep 2009.

33. Wikipedia.org, William IV of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 12 Sep 2009.

34. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1111.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

35. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1112.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

36. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 2 Aug 2009.

37. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 18 Jul 2009.

38. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593877461.

39. Wikipedia.org, Roger de Beaumont.

40. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #103113 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer). Cit. Date: 18 Jul 2009.

41. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874656.

42. Website - Genealogy, http://www.geni.com/people/Jean-de-Conteville/6000000007605652998. Cit. Date: 6 Jul 2013.

43. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 21 Jul 2009.

44. Wikipedia.org, Waltheof of Bamburgh.

45. Wikipedia.org, Osulf I of Bamburgh.

46. Wikipedia.org, Uhtred of Bamburgh.

47. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 34-20 (∆lfgifu).

48. Wikipedia.org, Ealdred, Earl of Bamburgh.

49. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176A-3 (Aelfgar).

50. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 17 Jul 2009.

51. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99027 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

52. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873351.

53. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99028 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

54. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873352.

55. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873350.

56. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99087 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

57. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875384.

58. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875368.

59. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875383.


Sources


1 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Arvirargus. Cit. Date: 11 Sep 2009.

2 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873365.

3 Davies, John, <i>A History of Wales.</i> (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), p. 26.

4 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #111888.

5 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Cunobelinus. Cit. Date: 11 Sep 2009.

6 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105893 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

7 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873366.

8 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873367.

9 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140398 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

10 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873361.

11 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105899 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

12 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873362.

13 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, William III, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 12 Sep 2009.

14 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/3455.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

15 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4539.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

16 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4563.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

17 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, William III, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 13 Sep 2009.

18 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

19 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4708.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

20 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 12 Sep 2009.

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 153A-25 (Marguerite de Turenne).

22 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1121.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

23 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 13 Sep 2009.

24 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Vladimir I of Kiev.

25 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Family life and children of Vladimir I.

26 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Sviatoslav I of Kiev. Cit. Date: 19 Sep 2009.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

28 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

29 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 26 Jul 2009.

30 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 28 Jul 2009.

31 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 9 Aug 2009.

32 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Roger the Poitevin. Cit. Date: 13 Sep 2009.

33 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, William IV of AngoulÍme. Cit. Date: 12 Sep 2009.

34 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1111.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

35 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1112.htm. Cit. Date: 29 Jun 2013.

36 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 2 Aug 2009.

37 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 18 Jul 2009.

38 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593877461.

39 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Roger de Beaumont.

40 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #103113 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer). Cit. Date: 18 Jul 2009.

41 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874656.

42 Website - Genealogy, http://www.geni.com/people/Jean-de-Conteville/6000000007605652998. Cit. Date: 6 Jul 2013.

43 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 21 Jul 2009.

44 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Waltheof of Bamburgh.

45 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Osulf I of Bamburgh.

46 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Uhtred of Bamburgh.

47 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 34-20 (∆lfgifu).

48 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Ealdred, Earl of Bamburgh.

49 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176A-3 (Aelfgar).

50 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 17 Jul 2009.

51 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99027 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

52 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873351.

53 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99028 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

54 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873352.

55 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873350.

56 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99087 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

57 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875384.

58 <i>http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi</i>. Rec. Date: 25 Aug 2001, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875368.

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