These pages represent the work of an amateur researcher and should not be used as the sole source by any other researcher. Few primary sources have been available. Corrections and contributions are encouraged and welcomed. -- Karen (Johnson) Fish

The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




John Merryman and Martha Livery




Husband John Merryman 1

           Born: Abt 1701
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Martha Livery 2 3

           Born: 1701
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Temperance Merryman 4 5

           Born: 13 Sep 1720
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Jan 1813
         Buried:  - Ridgely and Talbott Family Cemetery, Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States) 6
         Spouse: Edward Talbott of West River (1723-1797) 4 5 7 8 9
           Marr: 28 May 1745



Research Notes: Husband - John Merryman

Source: Baltimore: Its History and Its People by various contributors, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., New York, 1912, Vol. III p. 795 (from http://books.google.com):
"...of Clover Hill, Baltimore county, Maryland."
----
This may not be the John Merryman in the following list:

From the book Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774 by Henry C. Peden, Jr., Westminster, Maryland, 1989, pp. 13-16:

"AN INDEX OF SOME BALTIMORE RESIDENTS IN 1765

The following index was found in the Maryland Historical Society Library's Manuscript Division (MS. 1711) and, even though there is nothing to indicate what the purpose of the index, it was determined that those listed were Baltimore residents circa 1765. This determination was made from the compiler's familiarity with Baltimore families prior to the Revolution and also because this index was found with the remnants of a Baltimore Debt Book for 1765 and 1766. This is not an index to the debt book because the highest page number in the book is 109 while the highest page number in the index is 58. The index is, nonetheless, a 'finding list' for early Baltimore."
[Among those listed are:]

Nicholas Clagett
Nathan Dorsey
Leakin Dorsey
Joshua Lynch
William Lynch
John Merryman
Joseph Merryman
Samuel Merryman
John C. Owings.
James Richard
Christopher Randall & Bond
Larkin Randall
Ecan Thomas
Frederick Thomas
Edward Talbott
George Wells
John Wells
Joseph Wells
Thomas Wells
John Worthington
Thomas Worthington (Baltimore Town)
William Worthington
Charles Worthington


Burial Notes: Child - Temperance Merryman

In Memory of Temperance, wife of Edward Talbott, Born Sep. 13, 1720; Died Jan 5. 1813.


Ralph de Mortimer Lord Mortimer of Wigmore and Gwladys "Ddu" verch Llewellyn




Husband Ralph de Mortimer Lord Mortimer of Wigmore 10 11

           Born: Abt 1190 - <Wigmore, Herefordshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Aug 1246 - Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
         Buried:  - Wigmore, Herefordshire, England


         Father: Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore (Bef 1153-1214) 11 12 13
         Mother: Isabel de Ferrieres (Abt 1172-Bef 1252) 11 14


       Marriage: 1230



Wife Gwladys "Ddu" verch Llewellyn 11 15

            AKA: Gladys Dhu, Gwladus Ddu
           Born: Abt 1206 - Caernarvonshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 1251 - Windsor, Berkshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Llywelyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd (Abt 1173-1240)
         Mother: Joan Princess of Gwynedd (Bef 1200-Between 1236/1237) 16 17 18



   Other Spouse: Reynold de Braose (Abt 1178-1228) 19 20 - Bef 1221 - Wales


Children
1 M Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore, 1st Baron Mortimer 11 21 22

           Born: Abt 1231 - Cwmaron Castle, Radnorshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Oct 1282 - Kingsland, Herefordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maud de Braose (1224-Bef 1301) 11 23 24
           Marr: 1247



Research Notes: Husband - Ralph de Mortimer Lord Mortimer of Wigmore

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132C-29 and 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu)


Research Notes: Wife - Gwladys "Ddu" verch Llewellyn

Widow of Reynold de Braose

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great :

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons.


Birth Notes: Child - Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore, 1st Baron Mortimer

FamilySearch has b. 1221, Cwmaron Castle, Radnorshire, Wales


Major General Abraham Wood and Margaret Elizabeth Llewellyn




Husband Major General Abraham Wood 25

           Born: 14 Aug 1610 - St. Mary, Bury, Lancashire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Aug 1681 - Malvern Hills, Henrico, Virginia
         Buried: 


         Father: Francis Wood (1582-1618) 25
         Mother: Marie Chadwick (1588-1635) 25


       Marriage: 



Wife Margaret Elizabeth Llewellyn 25

           Born: 1620 - Chelmsford, Essex, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1664 - Henrico, Virginia, (United States)
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Captain Daniel Llewellyn (1600-1663) 25
         Mother: Ann Price Hallum Baker (1604-1666) 25




Children
1 F Mary Sarah Elizabeth Wood 25

           Born: 1631 - Henrico, Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 1678 - Henrico, Virginia, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: George Archer (1630-1675) 25




Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion of Caer Einion




Husband Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion of Caer Einion

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Llewelyn ab Einion ab Celynin of Llwydiarth (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Bedo ap Jenkin ap Llewellyn

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M David ap Jenkin ap Llewellyn

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 M Gruffydd ab Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion of Caer Einion

From the book Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, Edited by Thomas Allen Glenn at the request of Howard Reifsnyder, privately printed, Philadelphia, 1902, provided by http://books.google.com, pp. 44-45:

"Hugh ap John, who died before 1588, was the son of John ap Meredith y Bedo ap David ap Jenkin ap Llewelyn ap Einion, of Llwydiarth, in the parish of Meifod, in Montgomeryshire. Hugh ap John, of Tal y Llyn, married Catharine, daughter of Rhys ap David.

John ap Meredith, of Tal y Llyn, married Gwenllian, daughter of Ednyfed ap David (living 6 Henry VIII, 1514), son of David ap Howell (Juror in an Inquisition held at D˘lgelly, 35 HGenry VI, 1456-7), son of Howell ap Einion (living 7 Henry V, 1415, and then one of the heirs to a wele of free land which had belonged to Llewelyn ap Tudor), son of Einion ap David (named in the extent of Henry V, 1419, but then dead), son of David ap Peredyr (Gethin) (named in said extent, but then dead), son of Peredyr (Gethin) ap Llewelyn ap Tudor, Lord of Talybont, temp. Edward I; descended from Ednowain ap Bradwen, as above [see footnote 4]."

Footnote 4: "Arch. Camb. 1 ser., vol 3, 208, 258, 261, &c. Records of Caernarvon, Extent Merioneth."

From p. 47:
"[John ap Howell aka John ap Howell G˘ch] was the son of Howell G˘ch, of Gadfa, ap Meredith ap Bedo ap Jenkin, of Caer Einion [see footnote 3, p. 47], and he married Sibill, daughter (seventh child) of Hugh Gwyn, Esquire, of Peniarth, Caernarvonshire, by Jane, daughter of Owen ap Hugh, of Bodeon, Anglesey [see footnote 5, p. 47], and sister unto Sir Hugh Owen, Barrister-at-Law and Recorder of Caermarthen, ancestor to the Owens, Baronets, of Orielton, Pembrokeshire. Hugh Gwyn [see footnote 6, p. 47] was High Sheriff of Caernarvonshire from 2 December 1599-1600, and was commissioned one of the Justices of the Peace for that county, 11 May, 1611."
-------
Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, Vol. 6, by J. Y. W. Lloyd, London, 1887, p. 113 (from Lewys Dwnn, vol. ii, p. 277).


Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion of Caer Einion




Husband Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion of Caer Einion

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Llewelyn ab Einion ab Celynin of Llwydiarth (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Jenkin ab Llewellyn ab Einion of Caer Einion

From the book Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, Edited by Thomas Allen Glenn at the request of Howard Reifsnyder, privately printed, Philadelphia, 1902, provided by http://books.google.com, pp. 44-45:

"Hugh ap John, who died before 1588, was the son of John ap Meredith y Bedo ap David ap Jenkin ap Llewelyn ap Einion, of Llwydiarth, in the parish of Meifod, in Montgomeryshire. Hugh ap John, of Tal y Llyn, married Catharine, daughter of Rhys ap David.

John ap Meredith, of Tal y Llyn, married Gwenllian, daughter of Ednyfed ap David (living 6 Henry VIII, 1514), son of David ap Howell (Juror in an Inquisition held at D˘lgelly, 35 HGenry VI, 1456-7), son of Howell ap Einion (living 7 Henry V, 1415, and then one of the heirs to a wele of free land which had belonged to Llewelyn ap Tudor), son of Einion ap David (named in the extent of Henry V, 1419, but then dead), son of David ap Peredyr (Gethin) (named in said extent, but then dead), son of Peredyr (Gethin) ap Llewelyn ap Tudor, Lord of Talybont, temp. Edward I; descended from Ednowain ap Bradwen, as above [see footnote 4]."

Footnote 4: "Arch. Camb. 1 ser., vol 3, 208, 258, 261, &c. Records of Caernarvon, Extent Merioneth."

From p. 47:
"[John ap Howell aka John ap Howell G˘ch] was the son of Howell G˘ch, of Gadfa, ap Meredith ap Bedo ap Jenkin, of Caer Einion [see footnote 3, p. 47], and he married Sibill, daughter (seventh child) of Hugh Gwyn, Esquire, of Peniarth, Caernarvonshire, by Jane, daughter of Owen ap Hugh, of Bodeon, Anglesey [see footnote 5, p. 47], and sister unto Sir Hugh Owen, Barrister-at-Law and Recorder of Caermarthen, ancestor to the Owens, Baronets, of Orielton, Pembrokeshire. Hugh Gwyn [see footnote 6, p. 47] was High Sheriff of Caernarvonshire from 2 December 1599-1600, and was commissioned one of the Justices of the Peace for that county, 11 May, 1611."
-------
Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, Vol. 6, by J. Y. W. Lloyd, London, 1887, p. 113 (from Lewys Dwnn, vol. ii, p. 277).


Griffith ap Llewelyn Sheriff of Merionethshire




Husband Griffith ap Llewelyn Sheriff of Merionethshire 26 27

            AKA: Gruffydd ap Llewellyn ap Cynrig
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Llewelln ap Cynrig ap Osbern Wyddel of Cors y Gedol (      -      ) 26 27
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Einion ap Griffith of Cors y Gedol, Merionethshire 26 27 28

            AKA: Einion ap Gruffudd of Cors y Gedol, Merioneth, Einion ap Gruffydd of Corsygedol, Merioneth
           Born: Bef 1382 - <Cors y Gedol, Talybont, Merionethshire (Gwynedd)>, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died:  - <Cors y Gedol, Talybont, Merionethshire (Gwynedd)>, Wales
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Griffith ap Llewelyn Sheriff of Merionethshire

From Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, p. 43:

"[Einon ap Griffith was the] son of Griffith ap Llewelyn, Sheriff of Merionethshire, 46 Edward III and 15 Richard II, son of Llewelyn ap Kenric, of Cors y Gedol, son of Osborn, surnamed 'Wyddel' (the Irishman), who settled in Wales in 13th Century, and who was assessed in the parish of Llanaber, 1293."


Ievan ap Llewelyn




Husband Ievan ap Llewelyn 29 30

            AKA: Ieuan ab Llywelyn ab Ieuan Lloyd Fychan of Pwll Dyfach
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Llewelyn ap Ievan Lloyd Fychan of Pwll Dyfach in Pembrokeshire (      -      ) 29 30
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ievan Lloyd Fychan ap Ievan 29 30

            AKA: Ieuan Lloyd Fychan ab Ieuan ab Llywelyn
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Ievan ap Llewelyn

From the book Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, Edited by Thomas Allen Glenn at the request of Howard Reifsnyder, privately printed, Philadelphia, 1902, provided by http://books.google.com, p. 40:

"[Ednyfed ap Aron] married Llowry, daughter of Ievan Lloyd Fychan ap Ievan ap Llewelyn ap Ievan Lloyd Fychan, of Pwll Dyfach, in Pembrokeshire, descended from Cadifor ap Dyfnwall, Lord of Castle Howell, in Caermarthenshire."



Llewelyn Vychan ap Llewelyn and Leuky verch Llewelyn ap Einion




Husband Llewelyn Vychan ap Llewelyn 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Llewelyn "the Terrible" ap Tudor Lord of Talybont, Merionethshire (Bef 1283-Bef 1343) 32 33
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Leuky verch Llewelyn ap Einion

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Llewelyn ab Einion ab Celynin of Llwydiarth (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children

Research Notes: Husband - Llewelyn Vychan ap Llewelyn

From the book Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, Edited by Thomas Allen Glenn at the request of Howard Reifsnyder, privately printed, Philadelphia, 1902, provided by http://books.google.com, p. 38:

"Llewelyn Vychan [son of Llewelyn ap Tudor], m. Leuky, dau. Llewelyn ap Einion.
4. Peredyr Gethin (the terrible), from whom descended Gwenllian, wife of John ap Meredith, of Tal y Llyn (daughter of Ednyfed ap David), and grandmother of Mary, wife of David ap Howell; of whom later on."


Research Notes: Wife - Leuky verch Llewelyn ap Einion

Source:: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, edited by Thomas Allen Glenn (Philadelphia, 1902), provided by http://books.google.com, p. 38.



Meurig ap Llewelyn of Bodorgan and Margaret verch Rowland ap Howell of Caer Geilwg




Husband Meurig ap Llewelyn of Bodorgan 34 35 36 37

            AKA: Meirig ap Llywelyn of Bodorgan, Meyrick Ap Llywelyn of Bodorgan


           Born: Bef 1451 - Bodorgan, Llangadwaladr, Anglesey, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Nov 1538
         Buried: 


         Father: Llywelyn ap Heilyn of Bodorgan (Cir 1400-      ) 38 39 40
         Mother: Angharad verch Gwilym ap Gruffydd (      -      ) 39


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Margaret ferch Ieuan Fychan ap Ieuan (      -      ) 34



Wife Margaret verch Rowland ap Howell of Caer Geilwg

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rowland ap Howell ap Gruffydd of Caer Geilwg (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children

Research Notes: Husband - Meurig ap Llewelyn of Bodorgan

Archives Network Wales - Bodorgan Manuscripts (University of Wales Bangor GB0222 BOD):

"The Meyricks are descended from Cadfael, lord of Cedewain in Powys, but it was in the Tudor period that they first came into prominence. Llywelyn ap Heilyn fought under Henry Tudor [1457-1509; later King Henry VII] at the battle of Bosworth [22 Aug 1485]; his son Meyrick [ap Llywelyn] served under Henry VIII [1491-1547], was promoted to be captain of the bodyguard, and was given the Crown Lease of the manor of Aberffraw. In the late sixteenth century trouble erupted between Richard Meyrick II (d. 1596) and Hugh Owen of Bodeon concerning part of the Aberffraw manor lands. The Bodorgan estate was crushed by the cost of the litigation, and by 1590 a substantial portion had been sold to discharge Meyrick's debts. Richard Meyrick III (d. 1644) was the first of the family to be appointed sheriff of Anglesey. It was Owen Meyrick (1682-1760) who was the real founder of the later fortunes of the family. He was the second son of William Meyrick (1644-1717), and grandson of Richard Meyrick IV (d.1669). He was a keen supervisor of his estates and set it on a strong foundation. He looked after it ceaselessly and carefully, and considerably enlarged its boundaries. In the parliamentary election of 1708 for the county of Anglesey, he very seriously and almost successfully challenged the supremacy of the Bulkeleys and, although unsuccessful on this occasion, effectively challenged the Bulkeley supremacy on the island. For some years he did represent the county in Parliament (1715-1722). He was also High Sheriff in 1706, and Custos Rotulorum of Anglesey from 1715 till his death in 1759. Interestingly, he also commissioned Lewis Morris, the most famous of the three Morris brothers, to make a survey of the Bodorgan lands. Owen Meyrick was succeeded by his son Owen Meyrick (1705-1770), who married a wealthy heiress, the daughter of John Putland of London. His grandson, Owen Putland Meyrick (1752-1825) was also equally fortunate in his marriage to Clara, daughter and heiress to Richard Garth of Morden, Surrrey. The estate acquired additional wealth through the marriage of the latter's daughter and co-heiress, Clara, to Augustus Elliot Fuller of Ashdowne House, Sussex. Their son Owen Augustus Fuller (1804-1876) adopted the name Meyrick when he inherited the Bodorgan estate on the death of his grandfather.

In the course of time three other branches of the family were established at Gwyddelwern, Merioneth, at Cefn Coch, Llanfechell, co. Anglesey and at Monkton in Pembrokeshire. The strongest of these was the last, of which the founder was Rowland Meyrick (1505-1566), second son of Meurig ap Llywelyn and brother of Richard Meyrick I.

------

From Welsh Biography Online (http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-MEYR-BOD-1485.html) :

"MEYRICK family, Bodorgan , Anglesey . This family is descended from Cadafael, lord of Cedewain in Powys, but it was in the Tudor period that it first came into prominence. LLEWELYN AP HEILYN fought under Henry Tudor at the battle of Bosworth; his son MEURIG AP LLEWELYN served under Henry VIII, was promoted to be captain of the bodyguard, and was given the Crown Lease of the manor of Aberffraw."


Research Notes: Wife - Margaret verch Rowland ap Howell of Caer Geilwg

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. VI (London, 1887), p. 202, has "Margaret, d. of Rowland ab Howel of Caer Geilwg, ab Gruffydd ab Iorwerth ab Madog ab Howel ab Davydd ab Tudor ab Madog ab Iarddur." Gives her as the mother of Meirig's children:
- Richard ab Meirig of Bodorgan (m. Jane, d of Llywelyn ab Rhys ab Llywelyn ab Hwlkyn of Bodychen, ab Howel ab Iorwerth Ddű of Prysaddved)
- Rowland, Bishop of Bangor
- Reignallt Meirig
- John Meirig
- Edmund Meirig, ancestor of the Meyricks of Ucheldrev.


Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn ap Hywel




Husband Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn ap Hywel 41 42

            AKA: Davy Gam
           Born: Abt 1380 - <Breconshire>, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Oct 1415 - Azincourt, (Pas-de-Calais), France
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam 43

            AKA: Gwladys "the Star of Abergavenny" verch Dafydd Gam, Gwladys verch Davy Gam
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir Roger Vaughan (      -1415) 44
         Spouse: Sir William ap Thomas of Ragland Castle, Monmouthshire (      -1445) 41 45



Death Notes: Husband - Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn ap Hywel

Died in Battle of Agincourt fighting for Henry V.


Research Notes: Husband - Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn ap Hywel

From Wikipedia - Dafydd Gam :

Dafydd ap Llewelyn ap Hywel (c. 1380 - October 25 , 1415 ), better known as Dafydd Gam or Davy Gam, was a Welsh medieval nobleman , a prominent opponent of Owain Glyndwr , who died at the Battle of Agincourt fighting for Henry V . The name "Gam" is taken from a Welsh word for "lame/deformed" and stories that concern him give him a characteristic squint which may have led to his nickname 'gam' (from which derivation 'gammy' comes, as in 'gammy leg'). It is possible that he may have lost an eye. Regarded as a traitor, (Crooked David), by some Welshmen, he is regarded as a hero by others, his reputation has waxed and waned with his enemy Glynd and his ally King Henry V.

Biography
Dafydd Gam was a member of one of the most prominent Welsh families in Breconshire . His recent pedigree was 'Dafydd Gam ap Llywelyn ap Hywel Fychan ap Hywel ap Einion Sais', but beyond that the family claimed an ancient Welsh lineage going back to the Kings of Brycheiniog . Dafydd Gam was the grandson of Hywel Fychan, who held the manor of Parc Llettis near Llanover in Monmouthshire near Abergavenny , and fourth in descent from Einion Sais who held a castle at Pen Pont on the River Usk near Brecon and who had served at both the Battle of Crecy and the Battle of Poitiers . Their power base had developed mainly as consistently loyal supporters of the de Bohun family who were both earls of Hereford and Lords of Brecon from the thirteenth century onwards. Dafydd Gam's father, Llywelyn ap Hywel , purchased the estate of Penywaun near Brecon and Dafydd is thought to have been born there. His family was described as "a striking example of a native family that flourished under the rule of an English aristocratic family."[1] Under Llywelyn ap Hywel, the family's traditional loyalty was transferred to the new Lord of Brecon, Henry Bolingbroke , who had married Mary de Bohun in the 1380s. Some say Dafydd was previously in service to Henry's father John of Gaunt and, having killed a rival in Brecon High Street, had to leave Wales temporarily.[2] Dafydd Gam was certainly being paid the substantial annuity of 40 marks by Henry's estate in 1399, even before Bolingbroke became King, and later he and his brothers were described as King's esquires.[1] It seems likely they were prominent partisans of Henry in South East Wales as he gathered support for his overthrow of Richard II around 1399.

When the Owain Glyndwr rebellion broke out in 1400, the family's traditional loyalty to their liege lord remained unshaken and they played a leading role in opposition to the rebellion in the area. Their lands in and around Brecon became a target for Glynd attacks, and were extensively damaged as early as 1402-1403. The Scottish chronicler Walter Bower names Dafydd as a leader in the crushing defeat of Glynd men at the Battle of Pwll Melyn near Usk on 5 May 1405 .[1] After the battle, 300 of Glynd men were executed and his son, Gruffudd ab Owain Glyndwr , was captured. Gam's local knowledge might well have played a part in the Crown's victory here and in other battles like that at Grosmont around the same time, and may have won over local Welshmen to fight against Glyndwr. The family's loyalty was rewarded with the gift of some of the rebels' estates in Cardiganshire . In 1412 Dafydd Gam was captured by Glyndwr's men and estimates of the amount paid as his ransom recorded at the time, range from 200 to 700 marks, a large amount. That it was paid directly and speedily from the King's estates in Wales indicates the esteem in which Gam was held by Henry.[1] Glyndwr had made Gam swear an oath to never bear arms against him again or oppose him in any other way. On his release Gam told King Henry of Glyndwr's whereabouts and attacked Glyndwr's men. Glyndwr had Gam's Brecon estates attacked and burned in retaliation and his Brecon house was razed.

Agincourt
Given King Henry V 's leadership in the campaign against Glyndwr, Dafydd would have known the new King crowned in 1413 personally, and perhaps even fought alongside him. Records show that Dafydd Gam served with three foot archers in the Battle of Agincourt campaign. His death in the battle was a fact noted in several contemporary chronicles.[1] There is much controversy about whether Gam was knighted at the battle. His example shows that Welshmen continued to fight in the English army, even after the Glyndwr rebellion.

Stories of Gam's exploits at Battle of Agincourt in which he saved Henry V's life, and that he was knighted either posthumously or as he was dying on the field of victory at Agincourt by King Henry V as a result, are not vouched for in contemporary sources and have thus been discounted by many historians.[1][3] According to the legend the intervention occurred during the counter-charge of John I, Duke of Alenšon , which certainly is historical, leading to the wounding of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester , and Henry fighting hand-to-hand in the late stage of the battle. The King was hard pressed and the Duke of Alenšon supposedly cut an ornament from Henry's crown with a sword blow. Then a group of Welsh knights in the King's bodyguard led by Dafydd Gam intervened to save Henry's life, only for some to be killed in doing so, including Dafydd himself, and his son in law Sir Roger Vaughan. One of those supposedly involved in this exploit was Sir William ap Thomas who survived the battle. Some accounts claim Dafydd slew the Duke of Alencon himself. This story was being frequently told by the Tudor period in histories of the campaign and by the descendants of those involved and was widely accepted as the truth at that time. Although both Gam and Vaughan did die in the battle. the exact circumstances of their death are unknown. Gam's reputation was still very much alive in nineteenth-century Wales. George Borrow said of him: "where he achieved that glory which will for ever bloom, dying, covered with wounds, on the field of Agincourt after saving the life of the king, to whom in the dreadest and most critical moment of the fight he stuck closer than a brother."[4] Juliet Baker, while not accepting the rest of the legend, states in her authoritative history of Agincourt that "Llewelyn was knighted on the field, only to fall in the battle." She says Dafydd's Welsh comrade, and posthumous son-in-law, Sir William ap Thomas may have been knighted at Agincourt.[5]

Descendants
Some of Dafydd's descendants, who adopted the surname 'Games' to mark their connection to him, remained one of the most powerful families in the Breconshire area till Stuart times.[6] They were noted for their support for Welsh bards. His beautiful daughter Gwladys ferch Dafydd Gam , the 'Star of Abergavenny', made two good marriages, the first to Sir Roger Vaughan , who also died at Agincourt. Her second was to Sir William ap Thomas of Raglan Castle who survived the battle. Her son became the extremely powerful William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423-1469) and took the surname Herbert, later to become one of the most well known names in the nobility. All these noble connections ensured Dafydd Gam's name remained a celebrated one.

Legacy
Like his opponent Glynd Gam has gained a sheen of legend and many stories about him are late oral traditions, folklore and family legends which may be unreliable. Chief amongst them is the tale that he tried to assassinate Glynd at his parliament at Machynlleth in 1404. The still standing Royal House in that town is where, according to local lore, he was imprisoned when the attempt failed. The legends differ on his fate after the attempt failed some state Owain in a generous gesture let Gam go soon after the Parliament, despite Gam's refusal to submit, a decision he was later to regret. Others claim he was imprisoned for years, but given Gam's seeming participation in the Battle of Pwll Melyn in 1405 they certainly cannot be true. The stories concering his rivalry with Glynd include satirical englyn in Welsh supposedly composed by Glyndywr himself on his rival after burning his house to the ground. These stories also contain descriptions of Gam recorded by George Borrow : "He was small of stature and deformed in person, though possessed of great strength. He was very sensitive of injury, though quite as alive to kindness; a thorough-going enemy and a thorough-going friend."[2] Whatever the truth of these tales there seems no doubt that Glynd and his men, and popular tradition, regarded Dafydd as one of the chief enemies of the rebellion. Gam is a key character in John Cowper Powys 's novel Owen Glendower.

The stories certainly testify to Dafydd Gam's position as typifying the loyal and valiant Welshman by the Tudor period. He is better known in England as "Davy Gam," by which name he is mentioned briefly in Shakespeare's Henry V (4.8.102) as the last name in the short list of the fallen read out to King Henry. He may have made an even larger contribution to the play for as the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography states Dafydd: "may indeed, as has been suggested, be the model for Shakespeare's Fluellen , the archetypal Welshman."[1] This theory making Dafydd Gam one of the sources for the play has long been discussed, as early as 1812 it was said "There can be little doubt but that Shakspeare, in his burlesque character of Fluellen, intended David Gam."[7][8][5]

Fluellen: "If your Majesty is remembered of it, the Welshmen did good service in a garden where leeks did grow, wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps, which your Majesty knows, to this hour is an honourable badge of the service, and I do believe, your Majesty takes no scorn to wear the leek upon Saint Tavy's day". King Henry: "I wear it for a memorable honour; for I am Welsh, you know, good countryman".

Shakespeare captures the local Monmouthshire dialect (still readily to be heard in the town of Monmouth and the hill villages of Trellech and Catbrook ) with its glottal sounds.

Monmouthshire Traditions
According to local legend one of Gam's homes was a moated manor house [1] at Llantilio Crossenny , near Abergavenny in Monmouthshire (where just the moat remains today [2] , at Hen Gwrt near the modern-day village). There is a legend or story that persists in this part of Monmouthshire that Davy Gam, and all his children had a turn in their eye making them cross-eyed and that if they all linked hands they could reach from the church door to Hen Gwrt. Dafydd Gam is commemorated in a stained glass window , of unknown date, at Llantilio Crossenny church, in the north wall. The inscription is in Latin and the transcription reads 'David Gam, golden haired knight, Lord of the manor of Llantilio Crossenny, killed on the field of Agincourt 1415'.


Sources


1. FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3M6N-915. Cit. Date: 11 Aug 2013.

2. FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3M6N-91R. Cit. Date: 11 Aug 2013.

3. Baltimore: Its History and Its People (Vol. 3. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912.), p. 795. Cit. Date: 11 Aug 2013.

4. Baltimore: Its History and Its People (Vol. 3. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912.), p. 795.

5. Ridgely, Helen W, Historic Graves of Maryland and the District of Columbia (New York: The Grafton Press, 1908.), p. 129.

6. www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2189719&GRid=15826130&. Cit. Date: 20 Sep 2006.

7. Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 530.

8. Peden, Henry C., Jr, Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774. (Westminster, MD: Family Line Publications, 1989.).

9. Peden, Henry C., Jr, Revolutionary Patriots of Anne Arundel County Maryland (Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, 2006.), p. 194.

10. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-29, 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu).

11. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 9 Aug 2009.

12. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-28.

13. Wikipedia.org, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore.

14. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-28 (Roger de Mortimer).

15. Wikipedia.org, Llywelyn the Great. Cit. Date: 9 Aug 2009.

16. Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_England.

17. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 29A-27.

18. Wikipedia.org, John of England; Llywelyn the Great.

19. http://www.familysearch.org, Cit. Date: 25 Jul 2009.

20. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu).

21. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 28-29, 176B-29.

22. Wikipedia.org, Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer.

23. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 67-29.

24. Wikipedia.org, Maud de Braose, Baroness Wigmore. Cit. Date: 1 Sep 2009.

25. Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=12756572739. Cit. Date: 19 Jun 2013.

26. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 251-36.

27. Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 43.

28. Wikipedia.org, High Sheriff of Carnarvonshire.

29. Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 102.

30. Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 40.

31. Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 38.

32. Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 101.

33. Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), pp. 37-38.

34. Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg43.htm#944.

35. Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog (Vol. 6. London: Whiting & Co., 1887.).

36. Website:, Archives Network Wales - Bodorgan Manuscripts.

37. Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, Dictionary of Welsh Biography (National Library of Wales. 2007. Welsh Biography Online. <http://wbo.llgc.org.uk/en/index.html> ), http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-MEYR-BOD-1485.html.

38. Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg43.htm#947.

39. Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog (Vol. 6. London: Whiting & Co., 1887.), p. 202.

40. Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, Dictionary of Welsh Biography (National Library of Wales. 2007. Welsh Biography Online. <http://wbo.llgc.org.uk/en/index.html> ), ttp://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-MEYR-BOD-1485.html.

41. Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), p. 340.

42. Wikipedia.org, Dafydd Gam.

43. Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.).

44. Wikipedia.org, Dafydd Gan.

45. Wikipedia.org, William ap Thomas.


Sources


1 <i>FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File</i> (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3M6N-915. Cit. Date: 11 Aug 2013.

2 <i>FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File</i> (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3M6N-91R. Cit. Date: 11 Aug 2013.

3 <i>Baltimore: Its History and Its People</i> (Vol. 3. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912.), p. 795. Cit. Date: 11 Aug 2013.

4 <i>Baltimore: Its History and Its People</i> (Vol. 3. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912.), p. 795.

5 Ridgely, Helen W, <i>Historic Graves of Maryland and the District of Columbia</i> (New York: The Grafton Press, 1908.), p. 129.

6 <i>www.findagrave.com</i>, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2189719&GRid=15826130&. Cit. Date: 20 Sep 2006.

7 Warfield, J. D, <i>The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland.</i> (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 530.

8 Peden, Henry C., Jr, <i>Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774.</i> (Westminster, MD: Family Line Publications, 1989.).

9 Peden, Henry C., Jr, <i>Revolutionary Patriots of Anne Arundel County Maryland</i> (Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, 2006.), p. 194.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-29, 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu).

11 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 9 Aug 2009.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-28.

13 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-28 (Roger de Mortimer).

15 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Llywelyn the Great. Cit. Date: 9 Aug 2009.

16 Davies, John, <i>A History of Wales.</i> (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_England.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 29A-27.

18 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, John of England; Llywelyn the Great.

19 <i>http://www.familysearch.org</i>, Cit. Date: 25 Jul 2009.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu).

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 28-29, 176B-29.

22 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer.

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 67-29.

24 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Maud de Braose, Baroness Wigmore. Cit. Date: 1 Sep 2009.

25 Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=12756572739. Cit. Date: 19 Jun 2013.

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700</i> (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 251-36.

27 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, <i>Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry.</i> (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 43.

28 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, High Sheriff of Carnarvonshire.

29 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, <i>The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd.</i> (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 102.

30 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, <i>Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry.</i> (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 40.

31 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, <i>Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry.</i> (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 38.

32 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, <i>The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd.</i> (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 101.

33 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, <i>Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry.</i> (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), pp. 37-38.

34 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg43.htm#944.

35 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, <i>The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog</i> (Vol. 6. London: Whiting & Co., 1887.).

36 Website:, Archives Network Wales - Bodorgan Manuscripts.

37 Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, <i>Dictionary of Welsh Biography</i> (National Library of Wales. 2007. <u>Welsh Biography Online</u>. <http://wbo.llgc.org.uk/en/index.html> ), http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-MEYR-BOD-1485.html.

38 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg43.htm#947.

39 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, <i>The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog</i> (Vol. 6. London: Whiting & Co., 1887.), p. 202.

40 Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, <i>Dictionary of Welsh Biography</i> (National Library of Wales. 2007. <u>Welsh Biography Online</u>. <http://wbo.llgc.org.uk/en/index.html> ), ttp://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-MEYR-BOD-1485.html.

41 Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, <i>The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families</i> (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), p. 340.

42 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Dafydd Gam.

43 Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, <i>The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families</i> (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.).

44 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, Dafydd Gan.

45 <i>Wikipedia.org</i>, William ap Thomas.


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