The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and Alice de Lusignan




Husband Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford 1 2 3

            AKA: Gilbert "the Red" de Clare 9th Earl of Clare
           Born: 2 Sep 1243 - Christchurch, Hampshire (Dorset), England
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Dec 1295 - Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Buried: 22 Dec 1295 - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England


         Father: Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare (1222-1262) 4 5 6
         Mother: Maud de Lacy Countess of Lincoln (1223-Bef 1289) 7 8 9


       Marriage: 2 Feb 1253

   Other Spouse: Joan of Acre (1272-1307) 10 11 - Abt 30 Apr 1290 - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England

Events

• 3rd Earl of Gloucester:

• 7th Earl of Hertford:

• Knighted: 14 May 1264.




Wife Alice de Lusignan 12

            AKA: Alfais de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Feb 1256
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême (Between 1183/1195-1249) 13 14 15
         Mother: Isabella of Angoulême (Abt 1186-1246)



   Other Spouse: John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey (1231-1304) 16 17 18 19 - Aug 1247


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford

First husband of Joan of Acre.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford :

Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243 , at Christchurch , Hampshire - 7 December 1295 ) was a powerful English noble. Also known as "Red" Gilbert de Clare, probably because of his hair colour.

Lineage
Gilbert de Clare was the son of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, and Maud de Lacy , Countess of Lincoln , daughter of John de Lacy and Margaret de Quincy . Gilbert inherited his father's estates in 1262. He took on the titles, including Lord of Glamorgan , from 1263.

Being under age at his father's death, he was made a ward of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford .

Massacre of the Jews at Canterbury
In April 1264, Gilbert de Clare led the massacre of the Jews at Canterbury [1], as Simon de Montfort had done in Leicester .

Gilbert de Clare's castles of Kingston and Tonbridge were taken by the King, Henry III . However, the King allowed de Clare's Countess Alice de Lusignan , who was in the latter, to go free because she was his niece; but on 12 May de Clare and de Montfort were denounced as traitors.

The Battle of Lewes
Two days later, just before the Battle of Lewes , on 14 May , Simon de Montfort knighted the Earl and his brother Thomas. The Earl commanded the second line of the battle and took the King prisoner, having hamstrung his horse. As Prince Edward had also been captured, Montfort and the Earl were now supreme and de Montfort in effect de facto King of England.

Excommunication
On 20 October 1264 , de Gilbert and his associates were excommunicated by Guy Foulques , and his lands placed under an interdict .

In the following month, by which time they had obtained possession of Gloucester and Bristol , the Earl was proclaimed to be a rebel. However at this point he changed sides as he fell out with de Montfort and the Earl, in order to prevent de Montfort's escape, destroyed ships at the port of Bristol and the bridge over the River Severn at Gloucester .

Having changed sides, de Clare shared the Prince's victory at Kenilworth on 16 July , and in the Battle of Evesham , 4 August , in which de Montfort was slain, he commanded the second division and contributed largely to the victory.

On 24 June 1268 he took the Cross at Northampton in repentance and contrition for his past misdeeds.

Activities as a Marcher Lord
In October 1265, as a reward for supporting Prince Edward, Gilbert was given the castle and title of Abergavenny and honour and castle of Brecknock .

At Michaelmas his disputes with Llewelyn the Last were submitted to arbitration, but without a final settlement. Meanwhile he was building Caerphilly Castle into a fortress. At the end of the year 1268 he refused to obey the King's summons to attend parliament, alleging that, owing to the constant inroads of Llewelyn the Last , his Welsh estates needed his presence for their defence.

At the death of Henry III , 16 November 1272 , the Earl took the lead in swearing fealty to Edward I , who was then in Sicily on his return from the Crusade . The next day, with the Archbishop of York , he entered London and proclaimed peace to all, Christians and Jews , and for the first time, secured the acknowledgment of the right of the King's eldest son to succeed to the throne immediately.

Thereafter he was joint Guardian of England, during the King's absence, and on the new King's arrival in England, in August 1274, entertained him at Tonbridge Castle .

The Welsh war in 1282
During Llywelyn the Last 's Welsh rebellion in 1282, de Clare insisted on leading an attack into southern Wales. King Edward thus made de Clare the commander of the southern army invading Wales. However de Clare's army faced disaster after being heavily defeated at the Battle of Llandeilo Fawr . Following this defeat, de Clare was relieved of his position as the southern commander and was replaced by William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (who's son had died during the battle).

Marriage and succession
Gilbert's first marriage was to Alice de Lusignan , also known as Alice de Valence, the daughter of Hugh XI of Lusignan and of the family that had now succeeded the Marshal family to the title of the Earl of Pembroke in the person of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke. They were married in 1253, when Gilbert was ten-years-old. She was of high birth, being a niece of King Henry , but the marriage floundered.

Gilbert and Alice separated in 1267; allegedly, Alice's affections lay with her cousin, Prince Edward . Previous to this, Gilbert and Alice had produced two daughters:
Isabel de Clare (10 March 1262 -1333), married (1) Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick ; (2) Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley
Joan de Clare (1264-after 1302), married (1) Duncan Macduff, 7th Earl of Fife ; (2) Gervase Avenel
After his marriage to Alice de Lusignan was finally annulled in 1285, Gilbert was to be married to Joan of Acre , a daughter of King Edward I of England and his first wife Eleanor of Castile . King Edward sought to bind de Clare, and his assets, more closely to the Crown by this means. By the provisions of the marriage contract, their joint possessions and de Clare's extensive lands could only be inherited by a direct descendant, i.e. close to the Crown, and if the marriage proved childless the lands would pass to any children Joan may have by further marriage.

On 3 July 1290 the Earl gave a great banquet at Clerkenwell to celebrate his marriage of 30 April 1290 with Joan of Acre (1272 - 23 April 1307 ). The delay was in getting the Pope to facilitate and agree the arrangement.

Thereafter Gilbert and Joan are said to have taken the Cross and set out for the Holy Land , but in September he signed the Barons' letter to the Pope, and on 2 November surrendered to the King his claim to the advowson of the Bishopric of Llandaff .

Gilbert and Joan had one son - his successor Gilbert, Earl of Gloucester (1291-1314) who was killed at Bannockburn, and 3 daughters: Eleanor (1292-1337) who married firstly Hugh Despencer (The Younger, favourite of her uncle Edward II)-he was executed in 1326, and she married secondly William de la Zouche; Margaret (1293-1342) who married firstly Piers Gaveston (executed in 1312) and then Hugh Audeley; and the youngest Elizabeth de Clare (16 Sep 1295 -04 Nov 1360), who married John de Burgh , 30th Sept 1308, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England, then Theobald of Verdun in 1316, and finally Roger Damory in 1317. Each marriage was brief, produced one child (a son by the 1st, daughters by the 2nd and 3rd), and left her a widow.

Private Marcher War
In the next year, 1291, he quarrelled with the Earl of Hereford , Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford , grandson of his onetime guardian, about the Lordship of Brecknock , where de Bohun accused de Clare of building a castle on his land culminated in a private war between them. Although it was a given right for Marcher Lords to wage private war the King tested this right in this case, first calling them before a court of their Marcher peers, then realising the outcome would be coloured by their likely avoidance of prejudicing one of their greatest rights they were both called before the superior court, the Kings own. At this both were imprisoned by the King, both sentenced to having their lands forfeit for life and de Clare, the Earl of Gloucester , as the aggressor, was fined 10,000 marks, and the Earl of Hereford 1,000 marks.

They were released almost immediately and both of their lands completely restored to them - however they had both been taught a very public lesson and their prestige diminished and the King's authority shown for all.

Death & Burial
He died at Monmouth Castle on 7 December 1295 , and was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey , on the left side of his grandfather Gilbert de Clare .
His extensive lands were enjoyed by his surviving wife Joan of Acre until her death in 1307. Gilbert and Joan had a descendant named Ursula Hildyard of Yorkshire, who in 1596 married (Sir) Richard Jackson of Killingwoldgraves, near Beverley in the East Riding. Jackson died in 1610 and was interred at Bishop Burton. In 1613, James posthumously awarded a coat of arms and a knighthood to Richard for meretorious military service in the Lowlands of Scotland.


Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester and Isabel Marshal




Husband Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester 5 20 21

           Born: Abt 1180 - Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Oct 1230 - Penros, Brittany, France
         Buried:  - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England


         Father: Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare (Abt 1153-1218) 22 23 24
         Mother: Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester (Abt 1160-1225) 24 25


       Marriage: 9 Oct 1217

Events

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

• 5th Earl of Hertford: 1217-1230.

• Earl of Gloucester: 1217-1230.




Wife Isabel Marshal 26 27

            AKA: Isabel Marshall
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Jan 1240 - Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke (Abt 1146-1219) 3 28 29
         Mother: Isabel de Clare (Abt 1172-1220) 3 30




Children
1 F Agnes de Clare 21

           Born: 1218
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 F Amice de Clare 21

           Born: 1220
     Christened: 
           Died: 1287
         Buried: 



3 M Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare 4 5 6

           Born: 4 Aug 1222
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1262 - Asbenfield, Waltham, Kent, England
         Buried:  - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
         Spouse: Maud de Lacy Countess of Lincoln (1223-Bef 1289) 7 8 9
           Marr: 25 Jan 1238


4 F Isabel de Clare 21

            AKA: Isabella of Gloucester and Hertford, Isobel de Clare
           Born: 2 Nov 1226
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Jul 1264
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Robert de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale (Abt 1215-1295) 31 32
           Marr: 12 May 1240


5 M William de Clare 21

           Born: 1228
     Christened: 
           Died: 1258
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester

7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford :

Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford (1180 - October 25 , 1230 ) was the son of Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford , from whom he inherited the Clare estates, from his mother, Amice Fitz William, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers .

In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War , fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal , whose daughter Isabel he later married.

In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal , in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Magna Carta by Henry III . In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam , who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany , but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne to Tewkesbury . His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans . His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

Hertford had six children by his wife Isabel , née Marshal:[1]
Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
Amice de Clare (1220-1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon
Richard de Clare (1222-1262)
Isabel de Clare (1226-1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale
William de Clare (1228-1258)
Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229)


Research Notes: Wife - Isabel Marshal

Co-heiress of Sir William Marshal.


Research Notes: Child - Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare

From Magna Charta Barons, pp. 83-84:
Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester [was] in his minority at the death of his father, and his wardship was granted to the celebrated Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, Justiciary of England, whose daughter Margaret, to the great displeasure of King Henry III., he afterwards clandestinely married, but from whom he was probably divorced, as the king married him the next year to Maud, daughter of John de Lacie, Earl of Lincoln, in consideration whereof the Earl of Lincoln paid to the crown five thousand marks and remitted a debt of two thousand more. This Richard de Clare was a very distinguished personage in the reign of Henry III., and was one of the noblemen present in Westminster Hall, 40 Henry III., when Boniface, Archbishop of Canterbury, pronounced a solemn curse from the altar against all those who should thenceforth violate the Magna Charta.

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From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford :

Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford (August 4 , 1222 - July 15 , 1262 ) was son of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and Isabel Marshall , daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, the 17-year-old daughter of Strongbow .

A year after he became of age, he was in an expedition against the Welsh . Through his mother he inherited a fifth part of the Marshall estates, including Kilkenny and other lordships in Ireland . In 1232 Richard was secretly married to Margaret (Megotta) de Burgh, daughter of Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret of Scotland . Both bride and groom were aged about ten. Megotta died in November 1237. Before she had even died, the earl of Lincoln offered 5,000 marks to King Henry to secure Richard for his own daughter. This offer was accepted, and Richard was married secondly, on or before 25 January 1238, to Maud de Lacy , daughter of the Surety John de Lacy and Margaret Quincy .

He joined in the Barons' letter to the Pope in 1246 against the exactions of the Curia in England. He was among those in opposition to the King's half-brothers, who in 1247 visited England , where they were very unpopular, but afterwards he was reconciled to them.

On April 1248, he had letters of protection for going over seas on a pilgrimage . At Christmas 1248, he kept his Court with great splendor on the Welsh border. In the next year he went on a pilgrimage to St. Edmund at Pontigny , returning in June. In 1252 he observed Easter at Tewkesbury , and then went across the seas to restore the honor of his brother William, who had been badly worsted in a tournament and had lost all his arms and horses. The Earl is said to have succeeded in recovering all, and to have returned home with great credit, and in September he was present at the Round Table tournament at Walden.

In August 1252/3 the King crossed over to Gascony with his army, and to his great indignation the Earl refused to accompany him and went to Ireland instead. In August 1255 he and John Maunsel were sent to Edinburgh by the King to find out the truth regarding reports which had reached the King that his son-in-law, Alexander , King of Scotland , was being coerced by Robert de Roos and John Baliol . If possible, they were to bring the young King and Queen to him. The Earl and his companion, pretending to be the two of Roos's knights, obtained entry to Edinburgh Castle , and gradually introduced their attendants, so that they had a force sufficient for their defense. They gained access to the Scottish Queen, who made her complaints to them that she and her husband had been kept apart. They threatened Roos with dire punishments, so that he promised to go to the King.

Meanwhile the Scottish magnates, indignant at their castle of Edinburgh's being in English hands, proposed to besiege it, but they desisted when they found they would be besieging their King and Queen. The King of Scotland apparently traveled South with the Earl, for on 24 September they were with King Henry III at Newminster, Northumberland . In July 1258 he fell ill, being poisoned with his brother William, as it was supposed, by his steward, Walter de Scotenay. He recovered but his brother died.

Richard died at John de Griol's manor of Asbenfield in Waltham, near Canterbury , 15 July 1262 , it being rumored that he had been poisoned at the table of Piers of Savoy . On the following Monday he was carried to Canterbury where a mass for the dead was sung, after which his body was taken to the canon's church at Tonbridge and interred in the choir. Thence it was taken to Tewkesbury Abbey and buried 28 July 1262, with great solemnity in the presence of two bishops and eight abbots in the presbytery at his father's right hand. Richard's own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.


Research Notes: Child - Isabel de Clare

Mother of Robert the Bruce (Robert de Brus, 6th Lord of Annandale).

From Wikipedia - Isabella of Gloucester and Hertford :

Isabella of Gloucester and Hertford (2 November 1226- 10 July 1264), was the daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Isabel Marshal . She is also known as Isabel de Clare...

Family
Isabella's maternal grandparents were William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke . Isabella's paternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and Amice FitzRobert . [1]
Isabella was the four of six children, her brother was Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford . Her sister, Amice de Clare married Baldwin de Redvers, 6th Earl of Devon and was mother of Baldwin de Redvers, 7th Earl of Devon and Isabella de Fortibus, Countess of Devon .

Marriage
Isabella married on 12 May 1240 [2] to Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale , Isabella brought to him, the village of Ripe, in Sussex . Her husband was a candidate to become King of Scotland , after the death of the young Margaret, Maid of Norway . Her husband did not however succeed, Robert's rival, John Balliol was elected King of Scotland in 1292. [3]
Robert and Isabella had at least three children:
1. Isabella Bruce (b. 1249 - c1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney . He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk , July 22 , 1298 , and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway . In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth . He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington , county Durham.[4]
2. Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253 - 1304)
3. Constance Bruce (b. 1251), married Sir William Scot de Calverley and had daughter, Clarissa Scott (m. Sir John Fairfax)

John Balliol's time as King of Scotland did not last long, he died in 1314. Isabella's grandson, Robert the Bruce became King of Scotland . Isabella did not however get to see this day, she died in 1264, aged thirty seven. Her husband married a second time, to Christina de Ireby , this marriage produced at least one daughter, Christina.




Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare




Husband Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke 3 28 29

            AKA: Guillaume le Maréchal, William the Marshal, William the Marshal, William Marshall 1st Earl of Pembroke
           Born: Abt 1146
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 May 1219 - Caversham, England
         Buried: May 1219 - Round Chapel Of Knight's Temple, London, Middlesex, England


         Father: John "the Marshall" FitzGilbert (Abt 1105-Abt 1165) 3 33 34
         Mother: Sibyl of Salisbury (Abt 1139-      ) 3 33


       Marriage: Aug 1189 - London, England

Events

• Protector of England:




Wife Isabel de Clare 3 30

           Born: Abt 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 1220 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
         Buried:  - Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales


         Father: Richard "Strongbow" de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130-1176) 35
         Mother: Aoife MacMurrough (1145-1188) 36




Children
1 F Isabel Marshal 26 27

            AKA: Isabel Marshall
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Jan 1240 - Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester (Abt 1180-1230) 5 20 21
           Marr: 9 Oct 1217


2 F Sibyl Marshal 3 37

           Born: 1209 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
     Christened: 1209 - St. David's, Pembrokeshire, Wales
           Died: 27 Apr 1245
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir William de Ferrers 5th Earl of Derby (Abt 1193-1254) 3 38 39
           Marr: by 14 may 1219 - <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>


3 F Maud Marshal 3 40 41

            AKA: Matilda Marshall
           Born: Abt 1192 - <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>
     Christened: Sep 1201
           Died: 27 Mar 1248
         Buried:  - Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Spouse: Hugh Bigod 3rd Earl of Norfolk (Abt 1182-1225) 3 41 42
           Marr: Between 1206 and 1207
         Spouse: William de Warenne 6th Earl of Surrey (Abt 1174-1240)
           Marr: 13 Oct 1225


4 F Eve Marshal 3 43 44




            AKA: Eva Marshall, Eve Marshall
           Born: Abt 1194 - Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1246 - England
         Buried:  - Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Spouse: William de Braose , 6th Lord de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny (Abt 1204-1230) 3 45 46 47
           Marr: 2 May 1230 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales



Research Notes: Husband - Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke

From <i>Ancestral Roots</i>, Line 66-27:
"3rd Earl of Pembroke, Marshal of England, Protector, Regent of the Kingdom, 1216-1219, son of John Fitz Gilbert (styled John the Marshal) (son of Gilbert Marshal), by his 2nd wife, Sibyl of Salisbury, dau. of Walter of Salisbury, d. 1147, of Chitterne, co. Wilts, sheriff of Wiltshire, founder of Bradenstock Priory."

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From Wikipedia - William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke :


William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Guillaume le Maréchal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman. He has been described as the "greatest knight that ever lived" (Stephen Langton ). He served four kings - Henry II , Richard the Lionheart , John and Henry III - and rose from obscurity to become a regent of England and one of the most powerful men in Europe. Before him, the hereditary title of "Lord Marshal " designated a sort of head of household security for the king of England; by the time he died, people throughout Europe (not just England) referred to him simply as "the Marshal".

Early life
In 1152, when William was probably about six years old, his father John Marshal switched sides in the civil war between King Stephen and Empress Matilda . According to one chronicler, when King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle , Stephen used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept a promise to surrender the castle. John broke his word, and when Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or watch as he hanged William in front of the castle, John replied that he go ahead, for "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to hang young William.

Knight-Errant
As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. As a youth he was sent to Normandy to serve in the household of William de Tancarville , where he began his training to become a knight. Through William de Tancarville, he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick , Earl of Salisbury . In 1168 William's uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy of Lusignan . William was injured and captured in the same battle, but was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine , who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery. He had been knighted in 1167 and soon found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments . At that time tournaments were dangerous, often deadly, staged battles, not the jousting contests that would come later, and money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents. His record is legendary: he supposedly fought in 500 such bouts in his life and never lost once.

Royal favour
Upon his return William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father through the many rebellions of his remaining sons (Richard , Geoffrey , and John ). In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. After Henry's death, he was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was not foolish enough to exclude a man whose legend, and power, just kept growing.

In August 1189, when he was 43, King Richard arranged for him to marry the second-richest heiress in England, Isabel de Clare (1172-1240), the 17-year-old daughter of Strongbow . Her father had been Earl of Pembroke , and this title was granted to William, along with large estates in England, Wales , Normandy and Ireland. The marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and though every one of them survived into adulthood, their family line went no further (see below). William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle .

William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of Prince John when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp , from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon the prince. Richard forgave Marshal his first error of judgement, and allowed him to succeed his brother, John Marshal, in the hereditary marshalship , and on his death-bed designated him as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.

King John and Magna Carta
William supported King John when he became king in 1199, but they had a falling out when William paid homage to King Philip II of France for his Norman lands. William left for Leinster in 1207 and stayed in Ireland until 1212, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[1]. In 1212 he was summoned to fight in the Welsh wars. Despite these differences, it was William on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede who dealt with the barons who made King John agree to the Magna Carta , and he was one of the few English noblemen to remain loyal to the royal side through the First Barons' War . It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne.

On 11 November 1216, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War ) to serve as both regent of the 9 year old King Henry III , and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. He was criticized for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the key-notes of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons. Without his presence England might not have survived the disastrous reign of John; where the French and the rebels would not trust the English king's word, they would trust William.

Death and legacy

William Marshal's health finally failed him in February 1219. In March 1219 he realized that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Oxfordshire, near Reading , where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the papal legate, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh ), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his effigy can still be seen.

After his death, his eldest son, also named William, commissioned a biography of his father to be written called L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal . This book, written so soon after his death, has preserved (and probably enhanced) the legend of William Marshal for posterity. While his knightly achievements may be debatable, there is no doubt of his impact on the history and politics of England, from his stalwart defence of the realm to his support of the Magna Carta.


Lineage of William Marshal & Isabel de Clare


William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190 - 6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Betun, daughter of Earl of Albemarle ; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet , daughter of King John I of England . They had no children.
Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191 - 16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
Mahelt Marshal (1194 - 27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk , they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey , they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197 - 27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland , youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland
Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan .
Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 - November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester . No children.
Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 - 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford ; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201 - 27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby - they had seven daughters.
Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.
Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298)
Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun, an ancestor of American pioneer Daniel Boone .
Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh .
Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:
Lady Eva Marshal (c. 1204 - 1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny - from whom was descended Queen Jane Seymour
Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn . She died childless.
Maud de Braose (1224 -1301 , in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore .
Eleanor de Braose (1226 -1251 ). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Humphrey de Bohun.
Eve de Braose (1227 - 28 July 1255 ), married William de Cantelou.
Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208 - 22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford . They had no children.
Joan Marshal (1210 - 1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
Joan de Munchensi (1230 - September 20, 1307) married William of Valence , the fourth son of King John 's widow, Isabella of Angoulême , and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan , Count of La Marche . Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I 's uncle.

The Fate of the Marshal Family
During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk , and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence , the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi ; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke .


Research Notes: Wife - Isabel de Clare

Heiress of Pembroke, Leinster, Bienfate and Orbec

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 66-27


Research Notes: Child - Isabel Marshal

Co-heiress of Sir William Marshal.


Death Notes: Child - Maud Marshal

Ancestral Roots also has d. Apr 1248.


Research Notes: Child - Maud Marshal

2nd wife of William de Warenne. Widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk.


Research Notes: Child - Eve Marshal

From Wikipedia - Eva Marshal :

Eva Marshal, Baroness Abergavenny (1203 -1246 ) was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman and the wife of the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny . She was the granddaughter of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster .

She held de Braose lands and castles in her own right following the public hanging of her husband by the orders of Llywelyn the Great , Prince of Wales .

Family
Lady Eva was born in 1203, in Pembroke Castle , Pembrokeshire , Wales, the fifth daughter[1] and tenth child of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke . Her paternal grandparents were John Marshal and Sibyl of Salisbury. Her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke , known to history as Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster .

Lady Eva was the youngest of ten children, having had five older brothers and four older sisters. Eva and her sisters were described as being handsome, high-spirited girls.[2]

Sometime before 1221, she married Marcher lord William de Braose, who in June 1228 became the 10th Baron Abergavenny, and by whom she had four daughters. William was the son of Reginald de Braose and his first wife Grecia de Briwere. He was much hated by the Welsh who called him Gwilym Ddu or Black William.

List of children
Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn . She died childless.
Maud de Braose (1224 -1301 , in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore , by whom she had issue, including Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Isabella Mortimer, Countess of Arundel.
Eve de Braose (1227- 28 July 1255), married William de Cantelou, by whom she had issue.
Eleanor de Braose (c.1228-1251 ). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Humphrey de Bohun. They had two sons, Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Gilbert de Bohun, and one daughter, Alianore de Bohun. All three children married and had issue. Eleanor was buried in Llanthony Priory.

Widowhood
Eva's husband, Baron Abergavenny was publicly hanged by Llywelyn the Great , Prince of Wales on 2 May 1230 after being discovered in the Prince's bedchamber together with his wife Joan, Lady of Wales . Shortly afterwards, Eva's eldest daughter Isabella married the Prince's son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn, as their marriage contract had been signed prior to Baron Abergavenny's death.

Following her husband's execution, Eva held de Braose lands and castles in her own right. She is listed as holder of Totnes in 1230, which she held until her death. It is recorded on the Close Rolls (1234-1237) that Eva was granted 12 marks by King Henry III of England to strengthen Hay Castle . She had gained custody of Hay as part of her dower .

She died in 1246 at the age of forty-three. Eva was the direct ancestress of Anne Boleyn , Mary Boleyn , and Jane Seymour ; and she has numerous descendants in the 21st century.


Rhys Gwyg ap Rhys Lord of Yestradtywy and Joan de Clare




Husband Rhys Gwyg ap Rhys Lord of Yestradtywy

            AKA: Rhys-Gryd Lord of Yestradtywy
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rhys ap Gruffudd ap Rhys Tewdwr Justice of South Wales (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Joan de Clare 24 48

           Born: 1184 - Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare (Abt 1153-1218) 22 23 24
         Mother: Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester (Abt 1160-1225) 24 25




Children
1 M Rhys-Mechyllt of Llandovery Castle

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Rhys Gwyg ap Rhys Lord of Yestradtywy

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia, 1912. From that book, p. 281:
"RHY-GRYD, feudal lord of Yestradywy. He m. Lady Joan, daughter of Richard de Clare*, fourth Earl of Hertford, &c., one of the celebrated twenty-five Sureties for the Magna Charta, 1215,..."

From: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, pp. 130-131:
"In Deheubarth [about 1194], Rhys ap Gruffudd was troubled by the waywardness of his sons, and the agreement between Rhys and the king of England came to an end when Henry II was succeeded by his son, Richard I, in 1189. Rhys died in 1197. His heir was his eldest son, Gruffudd, whom Chronica de Wallia referred to in 1200 as prince, the last of the rulers of Deheubarth to be given that title. Gruffudd was challenged by his brothers, Maelgwn and Rhys Gryg in particular, and following his death in 1201 the authority of his son, Rhys Ieuanc, was restricted to Cantref Mawr, the region between the rivers Tywi and Teifi. In the struggles in Deheubarth, Maelgwn received the support of John who became king of England on the death of his brother, Richard, in 1199. John had direct interests in Wals, for, through his marriage with the heiress of Glamorgan, he was lord of the greatest of the Marcher Lordships. In 1199, John bestowed Ceredigion and Emlyn on Maelgwn through royal grant.."


Research Notes: Child - Rhys-Mechyllt of Llandovery Castle

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 281.


Gilbert d' Umfreville Earl of Angus and Margaret de Clare




Husband Gilbert d' Umfreville Earl of Angus 49

           Born: 1244
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 13 Oct 1307
         Buried: 


         Father: Gilbert d' Umfreville (      -      ) 49
         Mother: Maud (      -      )


       Marriage: 1289



Wife Margaret de Clare 50 51 52 53

           Born: Abt 1 Apr 1287 - Bunratty Castle, Thomond, Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 22 Oct 1333 and 8 Jan 1334
         Buried: 


         Father: Thomas de Clare Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal (Abt 1245-1287) 54 55
         Mother: Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly (Abt 1263-1300) 55 56



   Other Spouse: Bartholomew de Badlesmere of Badlesmere & Chilham Castle, Kent (Abt 1275-1322) 51 57 58 - Bef 30 Jun 1308


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Gilbert d' Umfreville Earl of Angus

1st husband of Margaret de Clare.


Research Notes: Wife - Margaret de Clare

Youngest of 4 children.

"Heiress to her nephew Thomas de Clare, son of Richard de Clare, 2nd son of Thomas and Juliane... She was therefore sister to Richard, 2nd son, and to Thomas, 1st son..." -- Ancestral Roots, Line 54-32.

Also www.thepeerage.com
------
From Wikipedia - Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere :

Margaret de Clare (c.1 April 1287 - 22 October 1333/ 3 January 1334) was a Norman -Irish noblewoman and the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere .[1]In 1321, she was arrested and imprisoned in the Tower of London for refusing Isabella of France , Queen consort of King Edward II , admittance to Leeds Castle of which her husband, Lord Badlesmere, was castellan .

Family
Margaret was born at Bunratty Castle in Thomond , Ireland on or about 1 April 1287, the youngest child of Thomas de Clare , Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly . Her paternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy . Her maternal grandparents were Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly and Maud de Prendergast (born 17 March 1243), daughter of Gerald de Prendergast and a de Burgh daughter whose first name is not known. Margaret's maternal ancestors included Brian Boru , Dermot McMurrough , and Maud de Braose .

Margaret had an elder sister, Maud and two brothers, Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare , who was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea in 1318, and Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond.[2]

On 29 August 1287, when she was almost five months of age, her father died. Her mother married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel sometime afterwards.

Margaret was co-heiress to her nephew Thomas de Clare, son of her brother Richard, by which she inherited the manors of Plashes in Standon, Hertfordshire and lands in Thomond, Limerick and Cork in 1321 upon the death of Thomas.[3]

Marriages
Before 1303, she married firstly, Gilbert de Umfraville, son of Gilbert de Umphraville, Earl of Angus, and Elizabeth Comyn. Upon their marriage, the Earl of Angus granted Gilbert and Margaret the manors of Hambleton and Market Overton. When Gilbert died childless, sometime before 1307, the manors passed to Margaret.
Sometime before 30 June 1308, she married secondly, Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere ,(1275 -14 April 1322 ) an English baron and Governor of Bristol Castle, by whom she had five children.[4] She was styled as Lady Badlesmere on 26 October 1309 , and henceforth known by that title.[5]

Leeds Castle
Lord Badlesmere was appointed castellan of the Royal Castle of Leeds in Kent , by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster , Regent of King Edward II . In October 1321, the queen consort Isabella of France went on a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas at Canterbury . She decided to break her journey by stopping at Leeds Castle, which was given to her as part of her dowry[6] Bartholomew was away at the time leaving Margaret in charge of the castle. Due to her dislike of Isabella as well as her own belligerent character, she refused the Queen admittance, and subsequently ordered her archers to fire upon Queen Isabella when she approached the outer barbican . When King Edward heard of the treatment meted out to his consort by Margaret, he sent an expeditionary force to the castle. After a successful assault of the castle, with the King's troops using ballistas , the defenders surrendered, and Margaret was seized and sent to the Tower of London .[7]
As a result of Margaret's arrest, Lord Badlesmere joined Lancaster's rebellion and fought in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322. He was arrested and afterward hanged for treason on 14 April 1322. Margaret remained imprisoned in the Tower until 3 November 1322.[2] She was released from the Tower, due to the successful mediation, on her behalf, of her son-in-law William de Ros. She retired to the convent house of the Minorite Sisters, outside Aldgate .[8]

In 1328, her son Giles obtained a reversal of his father's attainder and succeeded to the barony as the 2nd Baron Badlesmere.
Margaret died between 22 October 1333 and 3 January 1334.[9]

List of children
Margery de Badlesmere (1308/1309- 18 October 1363), married before 25 November 1316, William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake. (c.1290- 3 February 1343[10]), by whom she had six children.
Maud de Badlesmere (1310- 24 May 1366), married firstly Robert FitzPayn, and secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford . By her second marriage, Maud had seven children.
Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313- 8 June 1356), married firstly Sir Edmund Mortimer , and secondly, William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton . Both marriages produced children.
Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere (18 October 1314 - 7 June 1338 , married Elizabeth Montagu, by whom he had four daughters.
Margaret de Badlesmere (born 1315), married John Tiptoft, 2nd Lord Tiptoft, by whom she had one son, Robert Tiptoft.



Richard "Strongbow" de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke and Aoife MacMurrough




Husband Richard "Strongbow" de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke 35

            AKA: Strongbow de Clare
           Born: 1130 - Tonbridge, Kent, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Apr 1176 - Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 29 Aug 1170 - Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford

Events

• Lord of Leinster:

• Justiciar of Ireland:




Wife Aoife MacMurrough 36

            AKA: Aoife of Leinster, Aoife ni Diarmait, Eva MacMurrough
           Born: 1145 - Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1188
         Buried: 


         Father: Dermot King of Leinster (Abt 1111-1171) 3
         Mother: More O'Toole (Abt 1114-1191) 3




Children
1 F Isabel de Clare 3 30

           Born: Abt 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 1220 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
         Buried:  - Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Spouse: Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke (Abt 1146-1219) 3 28 29
           Marr: Aug 1189 - London, England



Research Notes: Husband - Richard "Strongbow" de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke

From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke :

Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Leinster, Justiciar of Ireland (1130 - 20 April 1176 ), known as Strongbow, was a Cambro-Norman lord notable for his leading role in the Norman invasion of Ireland .

He was the son of Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. His father Gilbert died when Richard was about eighteen years old, and he inherited the title Earl of Pembroke , but it was probably not recognized at Henry II's coronation[1]

Ireland
In 1168 Dermot MacMurrough ( Turlain Mac Murchada), King of Leinster, driven out of his kingdom by Rory O'Connor (Irish Tairrdelbach mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair), High King of Ireland with the help of Tiernan O'Rourke (Irish Tigernán Ua Ruairc), came to solicit help from Henry II .

He was pointed in the direction of Richard and other Marcher barons and knights by King Henry, who was always looking to extend his power in Ireland . Diarmuid secured the services of Richard, promising him the hand of his daughter Aoife and the succession to Leinster. An army was assembled that included Welsh archers. The army, under Raymond le Gros , took Wexford , Waterford and Dublin in 1169 and 1170, and Strongbow joined them in August 1170. The day after the capture of Waterford, he married MacMorrough's daughter, Aoife of Leinster .

The success was bittersweet, as King Henry, concerned that his barons would become too powerful and independent overseas, ordered all the troops to return by Easter 1171. However, in May of that year, Diarmuid died, and Strongbow claimed the kingship of Leinster in the right of his wife. The old King's death was the signal of a general rising, and Richard barely managed to keep Roderick out of Dublin . Immediately afterwards, Richard hurried to England to solicit help from Henry II, and in return surrendered to him all his lands and castles. Henry invaded in October 1172, staying six months and putting his own men into nearly all the important places, and assumed the title Lord of Ireland . Richard kept only Kildare , and found himself again largely disenfranchised.

In 1173, Henry's sons rose against him in Normandy , and Richard went to France with the King[citation needed ]. As a reward for his service he was reinstated in Leinster and made governor of Ireland[citation needed ], where he faced near-constant rebellion. In 1174, he advanced into Connaught and was severely defeated, but Raymond le Gros, his chief general, re-established his supremacy in Leinster[citation needed ]. After another rebellion, in 1176, Raymond took Limerick for Richard, but just at this moment of triumph, Strongbow died of an infection in his foot.[citation needed ]

Legacy
Strongbow was the statesman, whereas Raymond was the soldier, of the conquest. He is vividly described by Giraldus Cambrensis as a tall and fair man, of pleasing appearance, modest in his bearing, delicate in features, of a low voice, but sage in council and the idol of his soldiers. He was buried in Dublin's Christ Church Cathedral where his alleged effigy can be viewed. Strongbow's original tomb-effigy was destroyed when the roof of the Cathedral collapsed in the 16th century. The one that is on display now actually bears the coat of arms of the Earls of Kildare and dates from c.15th century.
He left a young son Gilbert who died in 1185 while still a minor, and a daughter Isabel. King Henry II promised Isabel in marriage to William the Marshal together with her father's lands and title. Strongbow's widow, Aoife, lived on to 1188, when she is last found in a charter.

Richard also held the title of Lord Marshal of England .



Birth Notes: Wife - Aoife MacMurrough

FamilySearch has b. abt 1141.


Death Notes: Wife - Aoife MacMurrough

FamilySearch has d. 1177


Research Notes: Wife - Aoife MacMurrough

From Wikipedia - Eva MacMurrough :

Aoife MacMurrough (1145 - 1188, Irish : Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known as Aoife of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish : Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster , and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).[1] On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke , better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford . She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage .

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster . Under Irish Brehon law , the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish : Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare the first son she named after her late father, Dermott MacMurrough, King of Leinster .

A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle , with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."


Research Notes: Child - Isabel de Clare

Heiress of Pembroke, Leinster, Bienfate and Orbec

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 66-27


Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare and Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester




Husband Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare 22 23 24

           Born: Abt 1153 - Tonbridge Castle, Tonbridge, Kent, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Dec 1218 - Oxfordshire, England
         Buried:  - Clare or Tunbridge Priory


         Father: Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford (1116-1173) 3 59 60 61
         Mother: Maud de St. Hilary (1132-1193) 3 62 63


       Marriage: Abt 1180

Events

• Magna Charta Surety: 1215.

• 4th Earl of Hertford: 1173-1218.

• x:




Wife Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester 24 25

            AKA: Amica FitzRobert, Amice FitzRobert Countess of Gloucester
           Born: Abt 1160
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Jan 1225
         Buried: 


         Father: William FitzRobert 2nd Earl of Gloucester (Abt 1128-1183)
         Mother: Hawise de Beaumont of Leicester (      -1197)




Children
1 F Isabel de Clare 24

           Born: 1178
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester 5 20 21

           Born: Abt 1180 - Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Oct 1230 - Penros, Brittany, France
         Buried:  - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
         Spouse: Isabel Marshal (      -1240) 26 27
           Marr: 9 Oct 1217


3 F Maud de Clare 64

            AKA: Matilda de Clare
           Born: 1184 - Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1213
         Buried: 



4 M Richard de Clare 24

           Born: 1184 - Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Mar 1228 - London, England
         Buried: 



5 F Joan de Clare 24 48

           Born: 1184 - Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Rhys Gwyg ap Rhys Lord of Yestradtywy (      -      )



Death Notes: Husband - Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare

Ancestral Roots has. d. 28 Nov 1217. Magna Charta Barons & Wikipedia have 30 Dec 1218.


Research Notes: Husband - Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare

4th Earl of Hertford, 6th Earl of Clare, Earl of Gloucester.

Sources are fairly certain that this is the Richard de Clare who was a Magna Charta Surety.

----------
From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford :

Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford (c.1153[1] - December 30 , 1218 ) was the son of Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary. More commonly known as the Earl of Clare, he had the moiety of the Giffard estates from his ancestor Rohese. He was present at the coronation of King Richard I at Westminster , 3 September 1189 , and King John on 27 May 1199 . He was also present at the homeage of King William of Scotland at Lincoln.
He married (c. 1172) Amice FitzRobert, Countess of Gloucester (c. 1160-1220), second daughter, and co-heiress, of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester , and Hawise de Beaumont.

He sided with the Barons against King John , even though he had previously sworn peace with the King at Northampton , and his castle of Tonbridge was taken. He played a leading part in the negotiations for Magna Carta , being one of the twenty five Barons appointed as guardians. On 9 November 1215 , he was one of the commissioners on the part of the Barons to negotiate the peace with the King. In 1215, his lands in counties Cambridge , Norfolk , Suffolk and Essex were granted to Robert de Betun . He and his son were among the Barons rxcommunicated by the Pope in 1215. Sometime before 1198 Earl Richard and his wife Amice were ordered to separate by the Pope on grounds of consanguinity . They separated for a time because of this order but apparently they reconciled their marriage with the Pope later on.

His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.


Death Notes: Wife - Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester

Ancestral Roots has. d. 1 Jan 1224/1225. Wikipedia has d. 1220.


Research Notes: Wife - Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester

Second daughter and co-heiress of William FitzRobert.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-27


Research Notes: Child - Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester

7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford :

Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford (1180 - October 25 , 1230 ) was the son of Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford , from whom he inherited the Clare estates, from his mother, Amice Fitz William, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers .

In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War , fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal , whose daughter Isabel he later married.

In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal , in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Magna Carta by Henry III . In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam , who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany , but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne to Tewkesbury . His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans . His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

Hertford had six children by his wife Isabel , née Marshal:[1]
Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
Amice de Clare (1220-1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon
Richard de Clare (1222-1262)
Isabel de Clare (1226-1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale
William de Clare (1228-1258)
Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229)


Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare and Maud de Lacy Countess of Lincoln




Husband Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare 4 5 6

           Born: 4 Aug 1222
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1262 - Asbenfield, Waltham, Kent, England
         Buried:  - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England


         Father: Sir Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester (Abt 1180-1230) 5 20 21
         Mother: Isabel Marshal (      -1240) 26 27


       Marriage: 25 Jan 1238

Events

• 6th Earl of Hertford:

• 2nd Earl of Gloucester:




Wife Maud de Lacy Countess of Lincoln 7 8 9

           Born: 25 Jan 1223
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 10 Mar 1289
         Buried: 


         Father: John de Lacy 1st Earl of Lincoln (1192-1240) 65 66 67
         Mother: Margaret de Quincy (Abt 1209-1266) 68 69




Children
1 M Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford 1 2 3

            AKA: Gilbert "the Red" de Clare 9th Earl of Clare
           Born: 2 Sep 1243 - Christchurch, Hampshire (Dorset), England
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Dec 1295 - Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Buried: 22 Dec 1295 - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
         Spouse: Joan of Acre (1272-1307) 10 11
           Marr: Abt 30 Apr 1290 - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England
         Spouse: Alice de Lusignan (      -1256) 12
           Marr: 2 Feb 1253


2 M Thomas de Clare Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal 54 55




           Born: Abt 1245
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Aug 1287
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly (Abt 1263-1300) 55 56
           Marr: Feb 1275



Research Notes: Husband - Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare

From Magna Charta Barons, pp. 83-84:
Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester [was] in his minority at the death of his father, and his wardship was granted to the celebrated Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, Justiciary of England, whose daughter Margaret, to the great displeasure of King Henry III., he afterwards clandestinely married, but from whom he was probably divorced, as the king married him the next year to Maud, daughter of John de Lacie, Earl of Lincoln, in consideration whereof the Earl of Lincoln paid to the crown five thousand marks and remitted a debt of two thousand more. This Richard de Clare was a very distinguished personage in the reign of Henry III., and was one of the noblemen present in Westminster Hall, 40 Henry III., when Boniface, Archbishop of Canterbury, pronounced a solemn curse from the altar against all those who should thenceforth violate the Magna Charta.

-----------

From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford :

Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford (August 4 , 1222 - July 15 , 1262 ) was son of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and Isabel Marshall , daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, the 17-year-old daughter of Strongbow .

A year after he became of age, he was in an expedition against the Welsh . Through his mother he inherited a fifth part of the Marshall estates, including Kilkenny and other lordships in Ireland . In 1232 Richard was secretly married to Margaret (Megotta) de Burgh, daughter of Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret of Scotland . Both bride and groom were aged about ten. Megotta died in November 1237. Before she had even died, the earl of Lincoln offered 5,000 marks to King Henry to secure Richard for his own daughter. This offer was accepted, and Richard was married secondly, on or before 25 January 1238, to Maud de Lacy , daughter of the Surety John de Lacy and Margaret Quincy .

He joined in the Barons' letter to the Pope in 1246 against the exactions of the Curia in England. He was among those in opposition to the King's half-brothers, who in 1247 visited England , where they were very unpopular, but afterwards he was reconciled to them.

On April 1248, he had letters of protection for going over seas on a pilgrimage . At Christmas 1248, he kept his Court with great splendor on the Welsh border. In the next year he went on a pilgrimage to St. Edmund at Pontigny , returning in June. In 1252 he observed Easter at Tewkesbury , and then went across the seas to restore the honor of his brother William, who had been badly worsted in a tournament and had lost all his arms and horses. The Earl is said to have succeeded in recovering all, and to have returned home with great credit, and in September he was present at the Round Table tournament at Walden.

In August 1252/3 the King crossed over to Gascony with his army, and to his great indignation the Earl refused to accompany him and went to Ireland instead. In August 1255 he and John Maunsel were sent to Edinburgh by the King to find out the truth regarding reports which had reached the King that his son-in-law, Alexander , King of Scotland , was being coerced by Robert de Roos and John Baliol . If possible, they were to bring the young King and Queen to him. The Earl and his companion, pretending to be the two of Roos's knights, obtained entry to Edinburgh Castle , and gradually introduced their attendants, so that they had a force sufficient for their defense. They gained access to the Scottish Queen, who made her complaints to them that she and her husband had been kept apart. They threatened Roos with dire punishments, so that he promised to go to the King.

Meanwhile the Scottish magnates, indignant at their castle of Edinburgh's being in English hands, proposed to besiege it, but they desisted when they found they would be besieging their King and Queen. The King of Scotland apparently traveled South with the Earl, for on 24 September they were with King Henry III at Newminster, Northumberland . In July 1258 he fell ill, being poisoned with his brother William, as it was supposed, by his steward, Walter de Scotenay. He recovered but his brother died.

Richard died at John de Griol's manor of Asbenfield in Waltham, near Canterbury , 15 July 1262 , it being rumored that he had been poisoned at the table of Piers of Savoy . On the following Monday he was carried to Canterbury where a mass for the dead was sung, after which his body was taken to the canon's church at Tonbridge and interred in the choir. Thence it was taken to Tewkesbury Abbey and buried 28 July 1262, with great solemnity in the presence of two bishops and eight abbots in the presbytery at his father's right hand. Richard's own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.


Research Notes: Wife - Maud de Lacy Countess of Lincoln

Eldest daughter of John de Lacy. "The most litigious woman of the 13th century."

From Wikipedia - Maud de Lacy :
Maud de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln, Countess of Hertford and Gloucester (25 January 1223- 1287/10 March 1289), was an English noblewoman, being the eldest child of John de Lacy, 1st Earl of Lincoln , and the wife of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford , 2nd Earl of Gloucester. Her son was Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford , 3rd Earl of Gloucester, a powerful noble during the reigns of kings Henry III of England and Edward I .


Family
Maud was born on 25 January 1223 in Lincoln , Lincolnshire , England, the eldest child of John de Lacy, 1st Earl of Lincoln, a Magna Carta Surety, and Margaret de Quincy (1206- 30 March 1266). Maud had a younger brother Edmund de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln who married in 1247 Alasia of Saluzzo, by whom he had three children.

Maud was styled as the Countess of Lincoln, however, she never held that title suo jure .

Her paternal grandparents were Roger de Lacy and Maud de Clare. Her maternal grandparents were Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln.[1]

Maud and her mother, Margaret were never close; in point of fact, relations between the two women were described as strained. Throughout Maud's marriage, the only interactions between Maud and her mother were on a financial level, pertaining to the substantial Marshal family property Margaret owned and controlled due to the latter's second marriage on 6 January 1242 to Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (1196- 24 November 1245) almost two years after the death of Maud's father, John de Lacy in 1240.[2] Margaret married her third husband, Richard of Wiltshire before 7 June 1252.


Marriage and children
On 25 January 1238 which was her fifteenth birthday, Maud married Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, and 2nd Earl of Gloucester, son of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford , 1st Earl of Gloucester, and Isabel Marshal . Maud was his second wife; his first marriage, which was made clandestinely, to Megotta de Burgh had been annulled. Maud's parents paid King Henry III the enormous sum of 5,000 pounds to obtain his agreement to the marriage. The King supplied her dowry which consisted of the castle of Usk , the manor of Clere, as well as other lands and manors.[2]

Together Richard and Maud had seven children:[3]
Isabel de Clare (1240- 1271), married as his second wife, William VII of Montferrat , by whom she had one daughter, Margherita.
Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford , 3rd Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243- 7 December 1295), married firstly Alice de Lusignan of Angouleme by whom he had two daughters; he married secondly Joan of Acre , by whom he had issue.
Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond (1245- 29 August 1287), married as her first husband Juliana FitzGerald , daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly and Maud de Prendergast, by whom he had issue including Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare and Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere .
Bovo de Clare, Chancellor of Llandaff (21 July 1248- 1294)
Margaret de Clare (1250- 1312/1313), married Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall . Their marriage was childless.
Rohese de Clare (17 October 1252- after 1316), married Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray , by whom she had issue.
Eglantine de Clare (1257-1257)


Death of Richard de Clare
On 15 July 1262, her husband died near Canterbury . Maud designed and commissioned a magnificent tomb for him at Tewkesbury Abbey where he was buried. She also donated the manor of Sydinghowe to the priory of Legh, Devonshire for the soul of Richard, formerly her husband, earl of Gloucester and Hertford by charter dated to 1280.[3] Their eldest son Gilbert succeeded Richard as the 7th Earl of Hertford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester. Maud carefully arranged the marriages of her daughters; however, the King owned her sons' marriage rights.[2] She was involved in numerous lawsuits and litigations with her tenants and neighbours, as a result she was known as the most litigious woman in the 13th century.[2]

Maud herself died sometime between 1287 and 10 March 1289. Her numerous descendants included Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard , both Queens consort of Henry VIII ; and the Dukes of Norfolk .

***********
From Magna Charta Barons, p. 103:
"Maud, wife of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester. John, Earl of Lincoln, was promised the marriage of his eldest daughter to Richard de Clare, in the event of the king not marrying him to a daughter of the Earl of March, and for this grant he engaged to pay five thousand marks. This agreement, having been made without the consent of the Barons, excited considerable dissatisfaction, especially in the elder de Clare."


Notes: Marriage

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f48/a0024834.htm has m. 2 Feb 1238


Research Notes: Child - Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford

First husband of Joan of Acre.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford :

Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243 , at Christchurch , Hampshire - 7 December 1295 ) was a powerful English noble. Also known as "Red" Gilbert de Clare, probably because of his hair colour.

Lineage
Gilbert de Clare was the son of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, and Maud de Lacy , Countess of Lincoln , daughter of John de Lacy and Margaret de Quincy . Gilbert inherited his father's estates in 1262. He took on the titles, including Lord of Glamorgan , from 1263.

Being under age at his father's death, he was made a ward of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford .

Massacre of the Jews at Canterbury
In April 1264, Gilbert de Clare led the massacre of the Jews at Canterbury [1], as Simon de Montfort had done in Leicester .

Gilbert de Clare's castles of Kingston and Tonbridge were taken by the King, Henry III . However, the King allowed de Clare's Countess Alice de Lusignan , who was in the latter, to go free because she was his niece; but on 12 May de Clare and de Montfort were denounced as traitors.

The Battle of Lewes
Two days later, just before the Battle of Lewes , on 14 May , Simon de Montfort knighted the Earl and his brother Thomas. The Earl commanded the second line of the battle and took the King prisoner, having hamstrung his horse. As Prince Edward had also been captured, Montfort and the Earl were now supreme and de Montfort in effect de facto King of England.

Excommunication
On 20 October 1264 , de Gilbert and his associates were excommunicated by Guy Foulques , and his lands placed under an interdict .

In the following month, by which time they had obtained possession of Gloucester and Bristol , the Earl was proclaimed to be a rebel. However at this point he changed sides as he fell out with de Montfort and the Earl, in order to prevent de Montfort's escape, destroyed ships at the port of Bristol and the bridge over the River Severn at Gloucester .

Having changed sides, de Clare shared the Prince's victory at Kenilworth on 16 July , and in the Battle of Evesham , 4 August , in which de Montfort was slain, he commanded the second division and contributed largely to the victory.

On 24 June 1268 he took the Cross at Northampton in repentance and contrition for his past misdeeds.

Activities as a Marcher Lord
In October 1265, as a reward for supporting Prince Edward, Gilbert was given the castle and title of Abergavenny and honour and castle of Brecknock .

At Michaelmas his disputes with Llewelyn the Last were submitted to arbitration, but without a final settlement. Meanwhile he was building Caerphilly Castle into a fortress. At the end of the year 1268 he refused to obey the King's summons to attend parliament, alleging that, owing to the constant inroads of Llewelyn the Last , his Welsh estates needed his presence for their defence.

At the death of Henry III , 16 November 1272 , the Earl took the lead in swearing fealty to Edward I , who was then in Sicily on his return from the Crusade . The next day, with the Archbishop of York , he entered London and proclaimed peace to all, Christians and Jews , and for the first time, secured the acknowledgment of the right of the King's eldest son to succeed to the throne immediately.

Thereafter he was joint Guardian of England, during the King's absence, and on the new King's arrival in England, in August 1274, entertained him at Tonbridge Castle .

The Welsh war in 1282
During Llywelyn the Last 's Welsh rebellion in 1282, de Clare insisted on leading an attack into southern Wales. King Edward thus made de Clare the commander of the southern army invading Wales. However de Clare's army faced disaster after being heavily defeated at the Battle of Llandeilo Fawr . Following this defeat, de Clare was relieved of his position as the southern commander and was replaced by William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (who's son had died during the battle).

Marriage and succession
Gilbert's first marriage was to Alice de Lusignan , also known as Alice de Valence, the daughter of Hugh XI of Lusignan and of the family that had now succeeded the Marshal family to the title of the Earl of Pembroke in the person of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke. They were married in 1253, when Gilbert was ten-years-old. She was of high birth, being a niece of King Henry , but the marriage floundered.

Gilbert and Alice separated in 1267; allegedly, Alice's affections lay with her cousin, Prince Edward . Previous to this, Gilbert and Alice had produced two daughters:
Isabel de Clare (10 March 1262 -1333), married (1) Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick ; (2) Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley
Joan de Clare (1264-after 1302), married (1) Duncan Macduff, 7th Earl of Fife ; (2) Gervase Avenel
After his marriage to Alice de Lusignan was finally annulled in 1285, Gilbert was to be married to Joan of Acre , a daughter of King Edward I of England and his first wife Eleanor of Castile . King Edward sought to bind de Clare, and his assets, more closely to the Crown by this means. By the provisions of the marriage contract, their joint possessions and de Clare's extensive lands could only be inherited by a direct descendant, i.e. close to the Crown, and if the marriage proved childless the lands would pass to any children Joan may have by further marriage.

On 3 July 1290 the Earl gave a great banquet at Clerkenwell to celebrate his marriage of 30 April 1290 with Joan of Acre (1272 - 23 April 1307 ). The delay was in getting the Pope to facilitate and agree the arrangement.

Thereafter Gilbert and Joan are said to have taken the Cross and set out for the Holy Land , but in September he signed the Barons' letter to the Pope, and on 2 November surrendered to the King his claim to the advowson of the Bishopric of Llandaff .

Gilbert and Joan had one son - his successor Gilbert, Earl of Gloucester (1291-1314) who was killed at Bannockburn, and 3 daughters: Eleanor (1292-1337) who married firstly Hugh Despencer (The Younger, favourite of her uncle Edward II)-he was executed in 1326, and she married secondly William de la Zouche; Margaret (1293-1342) who married firstly Piers Gaveston (executed in 1312) and then Hugh Audeley; and the youngest Elizabeth de Clare (16 Sep 1295 -04 Nov 1360), who married John de Burgh , 30th Sept 1308, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England, then Theobald of Verdun in 1316, and finally Roger Damory in 1317. Each marriage was brief, produced one child (a son by the 1st, daughters by the 2nd and 3rd), and left her a widow.

Private Marcher War
In the next year, 1291, he quarrelled with the Earl of Hereford , Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford , grandson of his onetime guardian, about the Lordship of Brecknock , where de Bohun accused de Clare of building a castle on his land culminated in a private war between them. Although it was a given right for Marcher Lords to wage private war the King tested this right in this case, first calling them before a court of their Marcher peers, then realising the outcome would be coloured by their likely avoidance of prejudicing one of their greatest rights they were both called before the superior court, the Kings own. At this both were imprisoned by the King, both sentenced to having their lands forfeit for life and de Clare, the Earl of Gloucester , as the aggressor, was fined 10,000 marks, and the Earl of Hereford 1,000 marks.

They were released almost immediately and both of their lands completely restored to them - however they had both been taught a very public lesson and their prestige diminished and the King's authority shown for all.

Death & Burial
He died at Monmouth Castle on 7 December 1295 , and was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey , on the left side of his grandfather Gilbert de Clare .
His extensive lands were enjoyed by his surviving wife Joan of Acre until her death in 1307. Gilbert and Joan had a descendant named Ursula Hildyard of Yorkshire, who in 1596 married (Sir) Richard Jackson of Killingwoldgraves, near Beverley in the East Riding. Jackson died in 1610 and was interred at Bishop Burton. In 1613, James posthumously awarded a coat of arms and a knighthood to Richard for meretorious military service in the Lowlands of Scotland.


Death Notes: Child - Thomas de Clare Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal

Another source has d. Feb 1288.


Research Notes: Child - Thomas de Clare Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal

2nd son of Maud de Lacy and Sir Richard de Clare. First husband of Juliana FitzGerald.

From Wikipedia - Juliana FitzGerald :

In February 1275, at the age of about twelve years, Juliana married her first husband, Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal. He was the second eldest son of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford , 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy . Thomas was a friend of King Edward I of England , with whom he went on a Crusade . He held many important posts including the Office of Governor of Colchester Castle (1266), Governor of the City of London (1273). He was also the commander of the English forces in Munster , Ireland , and in 1276, he was granted the lordship of Thomond . He was born in 1245, which made him about eighteen years older than Juliana.

Juliana and her husband Thomas resided at Bunratty Castle , which Thomas constructed in stone replacing the earlier wooden structure. Together Thomas and Juliana had four children:[3]
Maud de Clare (1276- 1326/27), married firstly on 3 November 1295 Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford , by whom she had issue; she married secondly after 1314 Robert de Welle.
Richard de Clare, Steward of Forest of Essex , 1st Lord Clare (1278- 10 May 1318 at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea ), married a woman by the name of Joan by whom he fathered one son, Thomas.
Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond (3 February 1281- 1307)
Margaret de Clare (c.1 April 1287- 22 October 1333/3 January 1334), married firstly in 1303 Gilbert de Umfraville; she married secondly before 30 June 1308 Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere , by whom she had four daughters and one son.

Life at Bunratty Castle was marked by unrest and strife as civil war was waged between rival factions of the powerful O'Brien clan. In 1277, Juliana's husband had his former ally Brian Ruad , the deposed King of Thomond, hanged for treason at Bunratty.[4]
Thomas died on 29 August 1287.


Richard FitzGilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Hertford and Adelize de Gernon




Husband Richard FitzGilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Hertford 3 61 70 71

            AKA: Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford and Earl of Clare, Richard FitzGilbert de Clare Lord of Clare, Suffolk, Richard Fitz Gilbert Lord of Clare, Suffolk
           Born: Between 1084 and 1090 - <Hertford, Hertfordshire>, England
     Christened:  - Clare, Suffolk, England
           Died: 15 Apr 1136 - [near Abergavenny], Monmouthshire, England
         Buried:  - Gloucester


         Father: Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare (Abt 1065-Abt 1115) 3 72 73 74
         Mother: Adelaide de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (Abt 1058-      ) 61 75 76


       Marriage: Abt 1116

Events

• Lord of Clare, Suffolk:




Wife Adelize de Gernon 3 71 77

            AKA: Alice de Gernon, Alicia de Gernon, Adeliza de Meschines, Alice de Meschines
           Born: Abt 1094 - <Hertford, Hertfordshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1128
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulf le Meschin 3rd Earl of Chester (Abt 1070-1129) 3 61 78 79 80
         Mother: Lucy of Bolingbroke (Abt 1070-Abt 1136) 3 81 82




Children
1 F Alice de Clare 3 61

            AKA: Adeliza de Clare de Tunbridge, Alice de Tunbridge
           Born: Abt 1102 - <Tonbridge, Kent>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1148 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William de Percy 4th Baron Percy (Abt 1088-Abt 1175) 3 83
           Marr: 1136 - Tunbridge, Kent, England
         Spouse: Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd ap Cynan (      -      )


2 M Gilbert de Clare 84

           Born: 1115 - Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1153
         Buried: 



3 M Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford 3 59 60 61

           Born: 1116 - <Tonbridge Castle, Tonbridge>, Kent, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1173 - Oxfordshire, England
         Buried:  - Eynsham Priory, Oxfordshire, England
         Spouse: Maud de St. Hilary (1132-1193) 3 62 63
           Marr: Abt 1150



Death Notes: Husband - Richard FitzGilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Hertford

Slain by the Welsh near Abergavenny


Research Notes: Husband - Richard FitzGilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Hertford

From thepeerage.com:
Richard FitzGilbert was also known as Richard de Clare.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Lord of Clare [feudal baron] circa 1117.1 He is supposed to have been created Earl of Hertford by King Stephen I (or by King Henry I), but Cokayne states that there is no grounds for this belief.1 He founded the Priory of Tonbridge.1 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

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From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 1st Earl of Hertford :

Lineage
Richard FitzGilbert de Clare. 1st Earl of Hertford (1094-15 April 1136 ) was the son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Alice de Claremont also known as Adeliza de Claremont .
He founded the priory of Tonbridge .

Welsh revolt
Richard held the Lordship of Ceredigion in Wales . A Welsh revolt against Norman rule had begun in south Wales where, on 1 January 1136 the Welsh won a victory over the local Norman forces between Loughor and Swansea .


Ambush & death
Richard had been away from his lordship in the early part of the year. Returning to the borders of Wales in April, he ignored warnings of the danger and pressed on toward Ceredigion with only a small force. He had not gone far when he was ambushed and killed by the men of Gwent under Iorwerth ab Owain and his brother Morgan, grandsons of Caradog ap Gruffydd , in a woody tract called "the ill-way of Coed Grano", near Llanthony Abbey , north of Abergavenny .

Spur for Welsh invasion
The news of Richard's death induced Owain Gwynedd , son of Gruffydd ap Cynan , king of Gwynedd to invade his Lordship. In alliance with Gruffydd ap Rhys of Deheubarth , he won a crushing victory over the Normans at the Battle of Crug Mawr , just outside Cardigan . The town of Cardigan was taken and burnt, and Richard's widow, Adelize, took refuge in Cardigan Castle , which was successfully defended by Robert fitz Martin . She was rescued by Miles of Gloucester who led an expedition to bring her to safety in England .


Birth Notes: Wife - Adelize de Gernon

Wikipedia has b. abt 1102


Research Notes: Child - Gilbert de Clare

First son of Richard de Clare. Died without issue and succeeded by his brother Roger de Clare .


Research Notes: Child - Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford

Second son of Richard de Clare. First husband of Maud de Saint-Hilaire.

From thepeerage.com:
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Hertford [E., c. 1138] in 1152.4 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

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From Wikipedia - Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford :

Roger de Clare was a son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon. He succeeded to the earldom when his brother Gilbert died without issue. In 1164 he assisted with the Constitutions of Clarendon . From his munificence to the Church and his numerous acts of piety, Roger was called the "Good Earl of Hertford". He married (c. 1150) Maud de St. Hilary (1132 -24 December 1193 ), daughter of James de St. Hilary and Aveline. Together they had seven children.

By Maud de St. Hilary
Mabel de Clare 1160 1204 m. (c. 1175), Nigel de Mowbray.
Richard de Clare c. 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England November 28 , 1217 6th Earl of Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford
James de Clare 1164, Clare , Suffolk , England.
Eveline (Aveline) de Clare 1164 4 June 1225 m. [1] (c. 1204), Geoffrey IV Fitz Piers (Fitz Peter), 1st Earl of Essex . m. [2] Sir William Munchensy, (b. c. 1184), son of Warin de Munchensy and Agnes Fitz John.
Roger II de Clare 1168 1241, Middleton, Norfolk , England.
John de Clare 1170, Clare, Suffolk, England. Unknown
Henry de Clare 1172, Clare, Suffolk, England. Unknown



Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary




Husband Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford 3 59 60 61

           Born: 1116 - <Tonbridge Castle, Tonbridge>, Kent, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1173 - Oxfordshire, England
         Buried:  - Eynsham Priory, Oxfordshire, England


         Father: Richard FitzGilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Hertford (Between 1084/1090-1136) 3 61 70 71
         Mother: Adelize de Gernon (Abt 1094-1128) 3 71 77


       Marriage: Abt 1150

Events

• Adult: by 1156.

• 3rd Earl of Hertford: 1153-1173.




Wife Maud de St. Hilary 3 62 63

            AKA: Maud de Saint-Hilaire, Matilda de St. Hilaire du Harcouet, Matilda de St. Hilary
           Born: 1132 - <Burkenham, Norfolk>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Dec 1193 - Norfolk, England
         Buried: 


         Father: James de St. Hilary of Harcourt (Abt 1105-Abt 1154) 3 85
         Mother: Aveline (Abt 1109-      ) 3 63



   Other Spouse: William d'Aubigny 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex (      -1193) 86 87 - After 1173


Children
1 M Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare 22 23 24

           Born: Abt 1153 - Tonbridge Castle, Tonbridge, Kent, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Dec 1218 - Oxfordshire, England
         Buried:  - Clare or Tunbridge Priory
         Spouse: Amice FitzWilliam Countess of Gloucester (Abt 1160-1225) 24 25
           Marr: Abt 1180


2 F Aveline de Clare 62 88

            AKA: Eveline de Clare
           Born: 1164 - <Hertford, Hertfordshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: by 4 Jun 1225 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Geoffrey FitzPeter 1st Earl of Essex (Abt 1162-1213) 89 90
           Marr: by 29 may 1205 - <England>



Research Notes: Husband - Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford

Second son of Richard de Clare. First husband of Maud de Saint-Hilaire.

From thepeerage.com:
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Hertford [E., c. 1138] in 1152.4 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

---------
From Wikipedia - Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford :

Roger de Clare was a son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon. He succeeded to the earldom when his brother Gilbert died without issue. In 1164 he assisted with the Constitutions of Clarendon . From his munificence to the Church and his numerous acts of piety, Roger was called the "Good Earl of Hertford". He married (c. 1150) Maud de St. Hilary (1132 -24 December 1193 ), daughter of James de St. Hilary and Aveline. Together they had seven children.

By Maud de St. Hilary
Mabel de Clare 1160 1204 m. (c. 1175), Nigel de Mowbray.
Richard de Clare c. 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England November 28 , 1217 6th Earl of Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford
James de Clare 1164, Clare , Suffolk , England.
Eveline (Aveline) de Clare 1164 4 June 1225 m. [1] (c. 1204), Geoffrey IV Fitz Piers (Fitz Peter), 1st Earl of Essex . m. [2] Sir William Munchensy, (b. c. 1184), son of Warin de Munchensy and Agnes Fitz John.
Roger II de Clare 1168 1241, Middleton, Norfolk , England.
John de Clare 1170, Clare, Suffolk, England. Unknown
Henry de Clare 1172, Clare, Suffolk, England. Unknown


Death Notes: Wife - Maud de St. Hilary

May have been 1173


Research Notes: Wife - Maud de St. Hilary

Daughter and heiress of James de St. Hilaire du Harcourt, of Field Dalling, Norfolk

Sources: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey and Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-26 (William d'Aubigny)


Death Notes: Child - Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare

Ancestral Roots has. d. 28 Nov 1217. Magna Charta Barons & Wikipedia have 30 Dec 1218.


Research Notes: Child - Richard de Clare 6th Earl of Clare

4th Earl of Hertford, 6th Earl of Clare, Earl of Gloucester.

Sources are fairly certain that this is the Richard de Clare who was a Magna Charta Surety.

----------
From Wikipedia - Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford :

Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford (c.1153[1] - December 30 , 1218 ) was the son of Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary. More commonly known as the Earl of Clare, he had the moiety of the Giffard estates from his ancestor Rohese. He was present at the coronation of King Richard I at Westminster , 3 September 1189 , and King John on 27 May 1199 . He was also present at the homeage of King William of Scotland at Lincoln.
He married (c. 1172) Amice FitzRobert, Countess of Gloucester (c. 1160-1220), second daughter, and co-heiress, of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester , and Hawise de Beaumont.

He sided with the Barons against King John , even though he had previously sworn peace with the King at Northampton , and his castle of Tonbridge was taken. He played a leading part in the negotiations for Magna Carta , being one of the twenty five Barons appointed as guardians. On 9 November 1215 , he was one of the commissioners on the part of the Barons to negotiate the peace with the King. In 1215, his lands in counties Cambridge , Norfolk , Suffolk and Essex were granted to Robert de Betun . He and his son were among the Barons rxcommunicated by the Pope in 1215. Sometime before 1198 Earl Richard and his wife Amice were ordered to separate by the Pope on grounds of consanguinity . They separated for a time because of this order but apparently they reconciled their marriage with the Pope later on.

His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.


Research Notes: Child - Aveline de Clare

2nd wife of Geoffrey Fitz Piers (Geoffrey Fitz Peter).


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68 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 54-29.

69 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 102.

70 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-25.

71 Wikipedia.org, Richard de Clare, 1st Earl of Hertford.

72 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 184-3, 246-24 (Adelaide de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis), 246B-24 (Adelaide).

73 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019557.htm.

74 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert Fitz Richard; Aubrey de Vere II.

75 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-24, 246B-24.

76 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019558.htm.

77 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132D-27, 246B-25 (Richard Fitz Gilbert).

78 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-26, 132D-26.

79 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), pp. 86-87.

80 Wikipedia.org, Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester.

81 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-26 (Ranulph III).

82 Wikipedia.org, Lucy of Bolingbroke.

83 Wikipedia.org, Baron Percy.

84 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford.

85 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-27 (Amice) & 149-26 (William d'Aubigny).

86 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (his son).

87 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26.

88 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-27, 246C-27.

89 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246B-27 (Aveline de Clare), 97-27 (Henry de Bohun).

90 Wikipedia.org, Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex.


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