The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Jenkin Hanmer and Margred ferch Dafydd ap Bleddyn Fychan




Husband Jenkin Hanmer

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Efa ferch Dafydd (      -      )



Wife Margred ferch Dafydd ap Bleddyn Fychan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dafydd ap Bleddyn Fychan (      -      )
         Mother: Margred ferch Llywelyn (      -      )




Children
1 M Gruffudd Hanmer

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elen ferch Pirs Dutton (      -      )



Research Notes: Husband - Jenkin Hanmer

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy


Research Notes: Wife - Margred ferch Dafydd ap Bleddyn Fychan

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy


Research Notes: Child - Gruffudd Hanmer

RootsWeb - Celtic Royal Genealogy


Madog Puleston of Bers and Angharad verch Dafydd ap Gronwy




Husband Madog Puleston of Bers

            AKA: Madoc Puleston of Bersham
           Born: Abt 1390 - Emral, Flintshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Puleston Esq., of Emral (Abt 1358-After 1415) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
         Mother: Lowry Fychan verch Gruffydd Fychan (Abt 1367-      )


       Marriage: 



Wife Angharad verch Dafydd ap Gronwy 1 6 8

            AKA: Angharad verch David, Ankarett verch David ap Grono
           Born: 1392 - Burton, <Somerset>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dafydd ap Goronwy (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 M John Puleston of Bers and Hafod y Wern 2 7

            AKA: John Puleston of Plas-ym-mers, John ap Madog Puleston of Bers and Havod-y-wern
           Born: Cir 1425 - Hafod-y-Wern, Berse (Bersham), (Wrexham, Denbighshire), Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 1461
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alswn Fychan ferch Hywel ap Ieuan of Havod y Wern,  Bersham, Co. Denbigh (      -      ) 2 9 10 11
           Marr: Abt 1461


2 F Angharad Puleston

            AKA: Angharad verch Madog Puleston
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elis Eyton of Rhiwabon (      -      )


3 M Edward Puleston

            AKA: Edward ap Madog Puleston
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Husband - Madog Puleston of Bers

Sources differ in approximate birth year from abt 1390 to abt 1414. This source, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=youngwolf&id=I786, has b. 1414 in Emrell, Wales. Another source has b. abt 1390 in Bersham, [Wrexham, ] Denbighshire, Wales. Since he was Robert Puleston's second son, he was probably born after 1380, but not as late as 1414.


Research Notes: Husband - Madog Puleston of Bers

Second son of Robert Puleston of Emral

Source: http://www.varrall.net/pafg60.htm#1197

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. II (London, 1882) has from Cae Cyriog M.S.; Lewys Dwnn, vol ii: "John Puleston of Bers and Havod y Wern, son of Madog of Bers, 2nd son of Robert Puleston of Emrall, ab Richard ab Sir Roger Puleston. Argent on a bend sable, three mullets of the field for Madog Puleston."

From Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales by Thomas Nicholas, Vol. I (London, 1872), p. 455: "Robert Puleston, Esq., of Emral... By his wife Lowri he was father of--1. John Puleston, Esq., of Emral. 2 Madog, who m. Angharad, dau. and co-h. of David ap Gronwy (some say David ap Llewelyn--Dwnn, ii, 151), and became the progenitor of the Pulestons of Havodywern, Bersham (Dwnn, ii, 359), Llwynycnotie (ibid., 361) and Carnarvon (ibid., 150)...."

Source: Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII. (London, 1880), "The Tanat Pedigree", p. 123 - "Madoc Puleston of Havolywerne, 2nd son. (The like diff. with a crescent.) = Ankarett, dau. and co-heir of David ap Grono ap Ierwerth. (Vert, a lion ramp. or.)




Research Notes: Wife - Angharad verch Dafydd ap Gronwy

From Annals and Antiquities, Vol. I, p. 455:
"Madog, who m. Angharad, dau. and co-h. of David ap Gronwy (some say David ap Llewelyn--Dwnn, ii., 151), and became the progenitor of the Pulestons of Havodywern, Bersham (Dwnn, ii, 359), Llwynycuotie (ibid., 361), and Carnarvon (ibid., 150)."

From Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII, "The Tanat Pedigree", p. 123 - "Madoc Puleston of Havolywerne, 2nd son. (The like diff. with a crescent.) = Ankarett, dau. and co-heir of David ap Grono ap Ierwerth. (Vert, a lion ramp. or.)


Birth Notes: Child - John Puleston of Bers and Hafod y Wern

Sources differ in birthdate from abt 1425 to abt 1438. This source http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=youngwolf&id=I783 has b. abt 1438, with his father (Madoc Puleston) b. abt 1414. The 1414 date for Madoc is probably too late (see Madog Puleston).


Research Notes: Child - John Puleston of Bers and Hafod y Wern

Eldest son of Madog Puleston.

Source: http://www.varrall.net/pafg56.htm#1141.

Wikipedia (List of baronetcies in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom) has:
Title: Puleston of Emral created 1813 surname: Puleston extinct 1896

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. II (London, 1882) has from Cae Cyriog M.S.; Lewys Dwnn, vol ii: "John Puleston of Bers and Havod y Wern, son of Madog of Bers, 2nd son of Robert Puleston of Emrall, ab Richard ab Sir Roger Puleston. Argent on a bend sable, three mullets of the field for Madog Puleston."

The following has been disputed:
From Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales by Thomas Nicholas, Vol. I, London, 1872, p. 455:
"Sir John, the first son [of Madog Puleston], m. Angharad, dau. and h. of Gruffydd Hanmer, Esq., of Hanmer, Flintshire, and had issue, besides Catherine, who d. s. p., a son,--Sir Roger Puleston..."
---------
From Welsh Biography Online (http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-PULE-EST-1283.html) :
"(2) Before the middle of the 15th cent. a branch of the family had settled at Berse, near Wrexham, and by the end of that century Hafod-y-wern, in the same area, had come into possession of the Pulestons through the marriage of JOHN PULESTON of Plas-ym-mers, a grandson of the Robert and Lowry, previously mentioned, and Alswn, daughter and heiress of Hywel ap Ieuan ap Gruffydd of Hafod-y-wern. JOHN PULESTON ('HEN'), of Hafod-y-wern, the eldest son of this John Puleston, fought at Bosworth, and for his services on that occasion received a grant for life from Henry VII of an annuity of twenty marks out of the tithes of the lordship of Denbigh (6th Report Royal Commission on Historical MSS., 421), and was appointed a gentleman usher of the king's chamber. In 1502 he was made deputy-lieutenant to the chief steward of Bromfield and Yale (ibid.), and seven years later, in 1509, Henry VIII granted him the receivership of the town of Ruthin and the lordship of Dyffryn Clwyd (Cal. L. & P. Henry VIII, i, 1, 67), and in 1519 that of the lordship of Denbigh and Denbighland (ibid., iii, 1, 146). Like his kinsman, Sir Roger Puleston, he served in the French campaign of 1513, as also did his two sons, both named John, the one by his first, and the other by his second marriage. JOHN PULESTON, of Hafod-y-wern ('John Puleston of Tir M˘n,' as he is sometimes described), son of John Puleston ('Hen') by his second wife, Alice, daughter of Hugh Lewis of Presaddfed, was sheriff of Denbighshire, 1543-4. During the latter years of Elizabeth I, two of these Pulestons were presented for recusancy at the Denbighshire Great Sessions: EDWARD PULESTON, of Hafod-y-wern, in 1585, 1588, and 1592, and Anne, wife of JOHN PULESTON, of Berse, in 1587. The last of the Hafod-y-wern family was Frances, daughter of PHILIP PULESTON (d. 1776); she m., in 1786, Bryan Cooke, of Ouston, Yorks (see Davies-Cooke, Gwysaney ). "


Research Notes: Child - Angharad Puleston

2nd wife of Elis Eyton

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. II (London, 1882), p. 175


Research Notes: Child - Edward Puleston

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1034016&id=I73600


Maredudd ap Tudur and Margaret verch Dafydd Fychan




Husband Maredudd ap Tudur 12

            AKA: Meredith Tudor
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1406
         Buried: 


         Father: Tudur ap Goronwy (      -1367) 13
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Margaret verch Dafydd Fychan 12

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Sir Owen Meredith Tudor 14

            AKA: Owain ap Maredudd ap Tewdwr, Owen ap Maredudd ap Tudor
           Born: Abt 1400
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Feb 1461
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Catherine of Valois (1401-1437) 15



Death Notes: Child - Sir Owen Meredith Tudor

Executed by the Yorkists following the Battle of Mortimer's Cross in Herefordshire.


Sir Roger Vaughan and Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam




Husband Sir Roger Vaughan 16

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Oct 1415 - Azincourt, (Pas-de-Calais), France
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam 17

            AKA: Gwladys "the Star of Abergavenny" verch Dafydd Gam, Gwladys verch Davy Gam
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn ap Hywel (Abt 1380-1415) 18 19
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: Sir William ap Thomas of Ragland Castle, Monmouthshire (      -1445) 18 20


Children

Death Notes: Husband - Sir Roger Vaughan

Died at the Battle of Agincourt.


Research Notes: Wife - Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam

Widow of Sir Roger Vaughan.


Sir William ap Thomas of Ragland Castle, Monmouthshire and Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam




Husband Sir William ap Thomas of Ragland Castle, Monmouthshire 18 20

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1445
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam 17

            AKA: Gwladys "the Star of Abergavenny" verch Dafydd Gam, Gwladys verch Davy Gam
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn ap Hywel (Abt 1380-1415) 18 19
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: Sir Roger Vaughan (      -1415) 16


Children
1 M Sir William Herbert First Earl of Pembroke 21 22

            AKA: Sir William "Black William" Herbert First Earl of Pembroke
           Born: Abt 1423
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Jul 1469 - Northampton, Northamptonshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maud verch Adam (      -      ) 23


2 M Richard ap William ap Thomas of Coldbrook 18

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 F Elizabeth verch William ap Thomas 18

           Born: 
     Christened: 
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         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Sir William ap Thomas of Ragland Castle, Monmouthshire

Second husband of Gwladys verch Davy Gam.

From Wikipedia - William ap Thomas :
William ap Thomas (died 1445) was a member of a minor Welsh gentry family and was responsible for beginning the construction of Raglan Castle one of the finest late medieval Welsh castles .

Marriage
He obtained Raglan through his marriage to Elizabeth Bloet , widow of Sir James Berkeley shortly after 1406. When Elizabeth died in 1420, ap Thomas retained Raglan as a tenant of his stepson James Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley , and in 1425 Lord Berkeley agreed that he could continue to hold Raglan for the duration of his life.

2nd Marriage
William married for a second time, and chose another heiress, Gwladus , described by a Welsh poet as 'The Star of Abergavenny' for her beauty. She was the daughter of Sir Dafydd Gam and the widow of Sir Roger Vaughan . Both these men had been part of the Welsh contingent that fought with King Henry V of England in France, and both were at the battle of Agincourt , where William ap Thomas had also fought.

The Blue Knight of Gwent
In 1426, ap Thomas was knighted by King Henry VI , becoming known to his compatriots as "Y marchog glas o Went" (the blue knight of Gwent). Gradually he began to establish himself as a person of consequence in south Wales .

Important Offices In Wales
As early as 1421 William held the important position of Steward of the Lordship of Abergavenny , and later became Chief Steward of the Duke of York's estates in Wales, 1442-1443. Other positions held by Sir William included that of Sheriff of Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire , to which he was appointed in 1435, and his position as Sheriff of Glamorgan followed in 1440. Although he became one of the followers of Richard, Duke of York , and a member of the Duke's military council, Sir William's sphere of influence was largely confined to south Wales.

Raglan Castle
By 1432 William was in a position to purchase the manor of Raglan from the Berkeleys for about L667 and it was probably from this time that he began to build the castle as we know it. His building programme eventually swept away most of the original structures. The principal buildings surviving from this time are the Great Tower (left) a self-contained fortress in its own right, together with the south gate, both equipped with gunloops. He also raised the hall, though later largely rebuilt, and part of the service range beyond. Two sources indicate that William ap Thomas was the builder of the keep. One of which is a contemporary poem praising ap Thomas, mentioning the tower at Raglan Castle which "stands above all other buildings." There is also a reference to Sir William Thomas' tower from a family chronicle written by Sir Thomas Herbert of Tintern .

Death & Burial
William ap Thomas died in London in 1445, and his body was brought back to Wales to be buried in the Benedictine Priory Church of St Mary, Abergavenny [1] . His wife Gwladus, died in 1454 and her tomb and effigy can also be seen in Abergavenny in the Priory Church of St Mary. William was succeeded by his eldest son, William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423-1469) who took the surname Herbert.


Research Notes: Wife - Gwladys verch Dafydd Gam

Widow of Sir Roger Vaughan.


Death Notes: Child - Sir William Herbert First Earl of Pembroke

Beheaded after his defeat at the battle of Edgecote Moor near Banbury.


Research Notes: Child - Sir William Herbert First Earl of Pembroke

From Wikipedia - William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423-1469) :

William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (c. 1423-1469), known as "Black William", was the grandson of Dafydd Gam , an adherent of King Henry V of England .

Herbert supported the Yorkist faction during the Wars of the Roses , as had his father, William ap Thomas . Herbert was rewarded by King Edward IV with the title Lord Herbert of Raglan in 1461, having assumed an English-style surname in place of the Welsh patronymic . In 1468 he was promoted to Earl of Pembroke . He obtained custody of the young Henry, Earl of Richmond , whom he planned to marry to his own daughter. However, he soon fell out with his great rival, Warwick "the Kingmaker" , who turned against the king. Herbert was executed by the Lancastrians , now led by Warwick, after the Battle of Edgecote Moor , near Banbury.

Herbert was succeeded by his legitimate son, William, but the earldom was surrendered in 1479. It was later revived for a grandson, another William Herbert , the son of Black William's illegitimate son, Sir Richard Herbert of Ewyas .

Marriage and children

He married Anne Devereux, daughter of Walter Devereux , Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Elizabeth Merbury. They had at least ten children:
William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (5 March 1451 - 16 July 1491 ).
Sir Walter Herbert.
Sir George Herbert of St. Julians.
Philip Herbert of Lanyhangel.
Cecilie Herbert.
Maud Herbert, Countess of Northumberland . Married Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland .
Katherine Herbert. Married George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent .
Anne Herbert. Married John Grey, 2nd Lord of Powis .
Isabel Herbert. Married Sir Thomas Cokesey.
Margaret Herbert. Married first Thomas Talbot, 2nd Viscount Lisle and secondly Sir Henry Bodringham.

William had two illegitimate children but the identity of their mother or mothers are uncertain:
Sir Richard Herbert of Ewyas. Father of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1551 creation) .
Sir George Herbert of Swansea. Married Elizabeth Berkeley,


Ludwig von Dagsburg




Husband Ludwig von Dagsburg 24

           Born: Abt 940 - <Dagsburg (Dabo), (Moselle), Lorraine, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Heilwig von Dagsburg 24

           Born: Abt 964 - <Dagsburg (Dabo), (Moselle), Lorraine, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1046
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hugo VI Count in Nordgau (Abt 0960-Bef 1049) 24
           Marr: Abt 987 - Dabo, Moselle, France




Halfdan "the Mild" Eysteinsson King of Vestfold and Romerike [Semi-legendary] and Liv Dagsdotter of Vestmar




Husband Halfdan "the Mild" Eysteinsson King of Vestfold and Romerike [Semi-legendary] 25 26

            AKA: Halfdan Eysteinsson, Halfdan "the Meek" Eysteinsson King in Vestfold
           Born: Abt 704 - <Vestfold, (Norway)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Eystein Halfdansson King in Vestfold [Semi-legendary] (      -      ) 24 27
         Mother: Hild of Vestfold (      -      ) 27


       Marriage: 



Wife Liv Dagsdotter of Vestmar 24 26

            AKA: Hilf Dagsdotter of Vestmar
           Born:  - <Holtum, Vestfold, (Norway)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dag King of Vestmar (      -      ) 26
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Gudr°d "the Hunter" Halfdansson King of Vestfold [Semi-legendary] 28 29

            AKA: Gudr°d Halfdansson, Gudr°d "Jaktkonge" Halfdansson King of Vestfold
           Born: Abt 738 - <Holtum, Vestfold, (Norway)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alfhild Alfarinsdatter (      -      ) 24 29
         Spouse: Asa Haraldsdatter (Abt 0794-      ) 24
           Marr: Abt 821 - Vestfold, (Norway)



Research Notes: Husband - Halfdan "the Mild" Eysteinsson King of Vestfold and Romerike [Semi-legendary]

From Wikipedia - Halfdan the Mild :

Halfdan the Mild (Old Norse : Hßlfdan hinn mildi) was the son of king Eystein Halfdansson , of the House of Yngling and he succeeded his father as king, according to Heimskringla . He was king of Romerike and Vestfold .

He was said to be generous in gold but to starve his men with food. He was a great warrior who often pillaged and gathered great booty.

His wife was Liv, the daughter of king Dag of Vestmar . Halfdan the Mild died of illness in his bed.

He was succeeded by his son, Gudr°d the Hunter .


Research Notes: Child - Gudr°d "the Hunter" Halfdansson King of Vestfold [Semi-legendary]

From Wikipedia - Gudr°d the Hunter :

Gudr°d the Hunter (Old Norse : Gu­r vei­ikonungr, Norwegian: Gudr°d Veidekonge) was a semi-legendary king in south-east Norway , during the early Viking Age . He is mentioned in the skaldic poem Ynglingatal . Snorri Sturluson elaborates on Gudr°d's story in Heimskringla , written c. 1230; however, this is not considered to be a historical account by modern historians. The following account is taken from Heimskringla.
Gudr°d was the son of Halfdan the Mild of the House of Yngling and Liv Dagsdotter of Vestmar . He married Alfhild, a daughter of Alfarin the king of Alfheim (Bohuslńn ), which was the name of the area between Glomma and G÷ta ńlv , and inherited half the province of Vingulmark . They had a son, Olaf Gudr°dsson .

When Alfhild died, Gudr°d sent his warriors to Agder and its king, Harald, to propose a marriage with his daughter ┼sa . However, Harald Granraude declined, so Gudr°d decided to take his daughter by force.

They arrived at night. When Harald realised that he was being attacked, he assembled his men and fought well, but died together with his son Gyrd. Gudr°d carried away ┼sa and married her. He raped her and she gave him a son named Halfdan who would be called Halfdan the Black .

In the fall, when Halfdan was a year old, Gudr°d was having at a feast in Stiflesund . He was very drunk and in the evening, as he was walking on the gangway to leave the ship, an assassin thrust a spear through Gudr°d, killing him. Gudr°d's men instantly killed the assassin, who turned out to be ┼sa's page-boy. ┼sa admitted that the page-boy had acted on her behalf.


Agne Dagsson King in Sweden [Mythological] and Skjßlf Frostadotter




Husband Agne Dagsson King in Sweden [Mythological] 24 30

            AKA: Agni Dagsson King in Sweden, Agni Skjßlfarbondi King of Sweden, Hogne King of Sweden
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dag "the Wise" Dyggvisson King in Sweden [Mythological] (      -      ) 24 31
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Skjßlf Frostadotter 24 30

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Frosti King in Finland (      -      ) 24 30
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Alrik Agnesson King in Sweden [Legendary] 24 32

            AKA: Alrekr Agnarsson King in Sweden
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dagreid Dagsdotter (      -      ) 24


2 M EirÝk King of Sweden [Legendary] 32

            AKA: EirÝkr King of Sweden
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Agne Dagsson King in Sweden [Mythological]

Mythological Swedish king, of the House of Yngling.

From Wikipedia - Agne :

Agne, Agni, Hogne or Agni Skjßlfarbondi was a mythological king of Sweden , of the House of Yngling .

Snorri Sturluson relates that he was the son of Dag the Wise , and he was mighty and famous. He was also skilled in many ways.

One summer, he went to Finland with his army where he pillaged. The Finns gathered a vast host under a chief named Frosti .[1]


A great battle ensued which Agne won and many Finns were killed together with Frosti. Agne then subdued all of Finland with his army, and captured not only great booty but also Frosti's daughter Skjalf and her kinsman Logi .[2]


Agne returned to Sweden and they arrived at Stocksund (Stockholm ) where they put up their tent on the side of the river where it is flat. Agne had a torc which had belonged to Agne's great-great-great-grandfather Visbur (who, interestingly, was the son of Skjalf's niece DrÝfa). Although, they were related, Agne married Skjalf who became pregnant with two sons, Erik and Alrik .

Skjalf asked Agne to honour her dead father Frosti with a great feast, which he granted. He invited a great many guests, who gladly arrived to the now even more famous Swedish king. They had a drinking competition in which Agne became very drunk. Skjalf saw her opportunity and asked Agne to take care of Visbur's torc which was around his neck. Agne bound it fast around his neck before he went to sleep.

The king's tent was next to the woods and was under the branches of a tall tree for shade. When Agne was fast asleep, Skjalf took a rope which she attached to the torc. Then she had her men remove the tent, and she threw the rope over a bough. Then she told her men to pull the rope and they hanged Agne avenging Skjalf's father. Skjalf and her men ran to the ships and escaped to Finland, leaving her sons behind.

Agne was buried at the place and it is presently called Agnafit , which is east of the Tauren (the Old Norse name for S÷dert÷rn ) and west of Stocksund.

Ynglingatal then gives Alrekr and EirÝkr as Agne's successors.

The Historia NorwegiŠ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

This man [Dag] engendered Alrek, who was beaten to death with a bridle by his brother, Eirik. Alrek was father to Agne, whose wife dispatched him with her own hands by hanging him on a tree with a golden chain near a place called Agnafit.

His son, Ingjald, [...][8] Agne is incorrectly called Hogne[7]. Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia NorwegiŠ does not give Dagr as Agne's predecessor, but Alrekr . Instead Alrekr is Agne's predecessor and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi (incorrectly called Ingialdr[7]). The even earlier source ═slendingabˇk cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia NorwegiŠ: xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi[9].

The location indicated by Snorri Sturluson as the place of Agne's death has a barrow called Agneh÷gen (Agne's barrow) in Lillhersby . The barrow was excavated by Oxenstierna and dated to c. 400.[10]


Research Notes: Child - Alrik Agnesson King in Sweden [Legendary]

Legendary king of Sweden, brother of EirÝk

From Wikipedia - Alrek and EirÝk :

Alrek and EirÝk (Old Norse Alrekr and EirÝkr ) were two legendary kings of Sweden .

In the Ynglinga saga
According to the Ynglinga saga , Alrek and EirÝk were sons and heirs of the previous king Agni by his wife Skjßlf. They shared the kingship. They were mighty in both war and sports, but were especially skillful horsmen and vied with one another about their horsemanship and their horses.

One day they rode off from their retinue and did not return. They were found dead with their heads battered but no weapons with them save the bridle bits of their horses. Accordingly it was believed that they had quarreled and come to blows and had slain each other with their bridle bits. They were succeeded by Alrik's sons Yngvi and Alf.
However, in other sources, only Alrek died, and in the piece of Ynglingatal quoted by Snorri Sturluson it is only Alrek who dies explicitly. Erik's death seems to be a misunderstanding on Snorri's part due to an influence from the succeeding kings (see also the other sources below):

Ynglingatal then gives Yngvi and Alf as Alrekr's and EirÝkr's successors.
The Historia NorwegiŠ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

This man [Dag] engendered Alrek, who was beaten to death with a bridle by his brother, Eirik. Alrek was father to Agne, [...][6]

Hogna is an error for Agne .[5] Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia NorwegiŠ gives Dagr as Alrekr's predecessor. Instead Alrekr precedes Agne and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi (incorrectly called Ingialdr[5]). The even earlier source ═slendingabˇk cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia NorwegiŠ: xi Dagr. xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi.[7]

In Gautreks saga and Hrˇlfs saga Gautrekssonar
Gautreks saga also makes Alrek and EirÝk sons of Agni by Skjßlf and co-kings and it was to them that the warrior Starkad fled after his slaying of King Vikar. Starkad served them first as a companions on their viking expeditions and then, after Alrek and EirÝk had settled down, went on further Viking expeditions alone.

But King Alrek had a short life, for EirÝk struck Alrek dead with a bridle when they were out to train their horses and then ruled as sole ruler over Sweden. This version says that EirÝk reigned for a long time as told in Hrˇlfs saga Gautrekssonar (Saga of Hrˇlf son of Gautrek).

This second saga introduces Thornbj÷rg, the daughter of King EirÝk and Queen Ingigerd, who was a skillful shieldmaiden and ruled over part of the kingdom. Thornbj÷rg even called herself King Thorberg. But eventually she fell in love with Hrˇlf son of Gautrek and agreed to marry him, at which point she gave up her weapons to her father King EirÝk and took up embroidery.

In Gesta Danorum
Saxo Grammaticus in Book 5 of his Gesta Danorum introduces Ericus Desertus, that is Erik the Eloquent, son of a champion named Regnerus (Ragnar), both Norwegians in the service of King G°tarus (G÷tar) of Norway, a monarch otherwise unknown. This Erik is likely to be the EirÝk the Eloquent or EirÝkr the Wise in Speech mentioned by Snorri Sturluson in the Skßldskaparmßl as being of Ylfing lineage. But he otherwise has left no clear record in surviving Norse literature.

Saxo makes up for it by telling at greath length of Erik's amusing deeds. He relates how Erik outwitted all foes with clever tricks and became the counselor of Frˇ­i son of Fridleif, king of Denmark . Erik's expeditions on Frˇ­i's behalf always went well because of Erik's cunning and way with words. Erik finally married Frˇ­i's sister Gunvara and Erik's elder half-brother Rollerus (Roller) was made king of Norway.

Saxo then brings in a king of the Swedes named Alricus (Alrik) who corresponds to Alrek of the Norse tradition. Alrik was at war with Gestiblindus king of the Gautar (Geats) and Gestiblindus now sought Frˇ­i's aid. (In the Norse Hervarar saga Gestumblindi is the name assumed by the disguised Odin and it is possible that this Gestiblindus is also Odin in disguise.)

Erik and Skalk the Scanian pursued the war and slew Alrik's son Gunthiovus (Old Norse Gunn■jˇfr) leader of the men of Vermland and Solongs . Then occurred a parley and secret interview between Alrik and Erik in which Alrik attempted to win Erik over to his cause. When this failed, Alrik asked that the war be settled by a single combat between himself and Gestiblindus. Erik refused the offer because of Gestiblind's unfitness and advanced years but made a counter-offer to fight such a duel with Alrik himself if Alrik were willing. The fight occurred straightaway. Alrik was slain and Erik seemed to be fatally wounded so that a report actually came to King Frˇ­i that Erik was dead. Indeed Erik was long in recovering. However Frˇ­i was disabused when Erik himself returned announcing that Frˇ­i was now also king of Sweden, Vńrmland, Helsingland , and Soleyar . Frˇ­i then gave all those lands to Erik to rule directly and also gave Erik the two Laplands , Finland , and Estonia as dependencies paying annual tribute.

Saxo explains that this Erik was the first Swedish king to be called Erik but that after him it became a very common name among the Swedish kings. He also writes that Erik met and helped the champion Arngrim , an account that agrees with Hervarar saga , where Arngrim's sons meet Erik's successor Yngvi (see e.g. Angantyr and Hjalmar ).

That the duel occurred at the end of a "secret interview" suggests that Alrik and Erik were alone when they fought just as were their counterparts in the Norse accounts. That Erik was believed to have died suggests knowledge of the Ynglinga saga version in which both fighters met their death. There is no mention of horse bridles. But Erik is not elsewhere a great duelist or champion but instead a trickster who wins through stratagems and deceiving words so that is it likely that Saxo or his source passed over a stratagem in which a horse bridle played a part.

Saxo also mentions Starkad's stay in Sweden in Book 6 in a summary of Starkad's life up to that point in his history. But Saxo does not indicate what king or kings then ruled Sweden, saying only:

... he went into the land of the Swedes, where he lived at leisure for seven years' space with the sons of Fr°.

Fr° is of course the god Frey , the ancestor of the Swedish dynasty.
At the beginning of Book 6, Saxo notes that Erik died of a disease and was succeeded by his son Haldanus (Halfdan ). Halfdan was later slain by rivals for the throne but the warrior Starkad established Halfdans' heir Siward as the new king. Siward's daughter Signe was married to King Harald of Denmark who was co-king his brother Frˇ­i. Later Harald's son Halfdan, now king of Denmark, slew Siward in war. But Siward's grandson Erik, the son of Halfdan's uncle Frˇ­i by Signe, the direct heir to the throne, now rose up against Halfdan. After a long war this second Erik was captured by Haldfan and left in the woods in chains to be devoured by beasts. With him, it seems, the Swedish line of Erik the Eloquent, as set forth by Saxo, came to an end.

Commentary
It is not clear whether or not the accounts in the Gesta Danorum and the accounts in the Ynglinga saga' tales of a Danish king named Halfdan who became king of Sweden are at all related. See Halfdan .

Traditions of twin brothers connected with horses appear are a commonplace in Indo-European cultures as are foundation legends about two twin brothers, one of whom kills the other. It is possible that Alrek and Eirik are reflexes of such traditions.
Saxo's identification of the legendary EirÝk the Eloquent with the legendary Swedish king EirÝk probably originated as a flourish by a pro-Danish or pro-Norwegian story teller.


Research Notes: Child - EirÝk King of Sweden [Legendary]

Legendary king of Sweden, of the House of Yngling, brother of Alrek.


Agni Dagsson and Skjalf Frostasson




Husband Agni Dagsson 33

           Born: Abt 424 - <Sweden>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dag Dyggvasson (Abt 0403-      ) 34
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Skjalf Frostasson 35

           Born: Abt 428 - Finland
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Frosti (Abt 0402-      ) 36
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Alrek Agnasson 37

           Born: Abt 445 - <Sweden>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dagreid Dagsson (Abt 0449-      ) 38


2 M Eric Agnasson 39

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





Troy Ernest Manes Jr. and Lillie Mae Daily




Husband Troy Ernest Manes Jr. 40

           Born: 21 Nov 1928 - Shidler, Osage, Oklahoma, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Apr 2009 - Oklahoma, United States
         Buried:  - Tahlequah Cemetery, Tahlequah, Cherokee, Oklahoma, United States


         Father: Troy Manes Sr. (1904-1929) 41
         Mother: Thelma Sullivan (      -      ) 40


       Marriage: 



Wife Lillie Mae Daily (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Troy Ernest Manes Jr.

From FindaGrave.com:
Troy E. Manes was born the son of Troy and Thelma (Sullivan) Manes Sr. on November 21, 1928 in Shidler, OK in the Cooper Oil Camp. In 1946, he served in the U.S. Army and was stationed in Ft. Knox Kentucky. His family later moved to the Peggs area where he met and married the love of his life, Lillie Mae Daily on November 12, 1949, in Van Buren, AR. This marriage was blessed with six children. In the early years, Troy worked as a bulldozer operator. Later, he built a successful construction business and built a large number of homes in the Cherokee County area. When he wasn't working, he loved the time he spent with his wife, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. He loved hunting and fishing. He enjoyed listening to and singing along with bluegrass and gospel music. He enjoyed relaxing in the Colorado Rockies. A Christian by faith, Troy attended the Peggs Community Church and served the church faithfully. On Wednesday, April 29, 2009, Troy went home to his Lord and Savior with his family by his side. The house that Troy built remains strong. Troy is preceded in death by his parents, one granddaughter, LeeAnn Carpenter, one brother Jimmy Reed, and sisters Doris Price and Susie Reed. Those left to cherish his memory include his wife Lillie of the home; his loving children, Brenda Sue and husband Glen Carpenter of Tahlequah, Shirley Ann Manes and husband Jim Finley of Claremore, Patricia Marie Molloy and husband Steve of Tahlequah, Carolyn Faye Manes of Owasso, Jack Manes Jr., Billy Joe Manes and wife Mitzie of Tahlequah. His brothers and sisters include Nora Hildreth, Letha Cronin, Hubert and Helen Reed, and Johnny and Bonnie Reed of the Tahlequah area and brother\endash in\endash law Bobby Beck of Sand Springs, OK. His adored grandchildren include Hunter Manes, Taylor Manes, Tamra and husband John Burmeier, Danielle Manes, Troy Manes and wife Krystal Manes, Andy Molloy and wife Nikki, Kim Diaz and husband Jason, Lori Hogan and husband Jeff, J.W. Goad, Derrick Goad, and Michael Carpenter. His legacy lives on in his great grandchildren, Brittney Hogan, Noah Hogan, Daily Molloy, Lillie Diaz, and Mallory Diaz, MacKenziee Manes and Montana Manes and Jaxon Estes. Those planning an expression of sympathy are asked to consider the Peggs Community Church of Peggs, OK. Funeral services will be held on Friday, May 1st, 2009 at 2:00 PM at the Peggs Community Church with Reverend Rex Hendrickson officiating. Interment will follow at the Tahlequah City Cemetery. Services have been entrusted to Hart Funeral Home of Tahlequah. Pallbearers for Troy include his grandsons, Andy Molloy, J.W. Goad, Derrick Goad, Troy Matthew Manes, Jason Diaz and John Burmeier. Honorary pallbearers include Hunter Manes and Noah Hogan.



Sources


1. Nicholas, Thomas, Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales (Vol. 1. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, & Co., 1872), p. 455.

2. Lloyd, Jacob Youde Wukkuan, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 2. London: T. Richards, 1882.).

3. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 249-35 (Lowri ferch Gruffydd Fychan).

4. Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg60.htm#1198.

5. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=alanclark&id=I2914.

6. Powys-Land Club, Collections Historical & ArchŠological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and Its Borders. (Vol. 13. London: Thomas Richards, 1880.), p. 123.

7. Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, Dictionary of Welsh Biography (National Library of Wales. 2007. Welsh Biography Online. <http://wbo.llgc.org.uk/en/index.html> ), http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-PULE-EST-1283.html.

8. Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg60.htm#11.

9. Palmer, Alfred Neobard, History of the Town of Wrexham: Its Houses, Streets, Fields, and Old Families. (Wrexham: Woodall, Minshall and Thomas, 1893.), pp. 137-138.

10. Wynne, John, The History of the Gwydir Family. (Oswestry: Woodall and Venables, 1878.), Table II. [following p. 28].

11. Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg56.htm#1141.

12. Wikipedia.org, "Maredudd ap Tudur," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maredudd_ap_Tudur.

13. Wikipedia.org, "Tudur ap Goronwy," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tudur_ap_Goronwy.

14. Wikipedia.org, "Owen Tudor," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owen_Tudor.

15. Wikipedia.org, "Catherine of Valois," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_of_Valois.

16. Wikipedia.org, Dafydd Gan.

17. Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.).

18. Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), p. 340.

19. Wikipedia.org, Dafydd Gam.

20. Wikipedia.org, William ap Thomas.

21. Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), pp. 340-341.

22. Wikipedia.org, William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423ľ1469).

23. Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), pp. 341-342.

24. http://www.familysearch.org.

25. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025020.htm.

26. Wikipedia.org, Halfdan the Mild.

27. Wikipedia.org, Eystein Halfdansson.

28. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025022.htm.

29. Wikipedia.org, Gudr°d the Hunter.

30. Wikipedia.org, Agne.

31. Wikipedia.org, Dag the Wise.

32. Wikipedia.org, Alrek and EirÝk.

33. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025064.htm.

34. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025067.htm.

35. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025065.htm.

36. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025069.htm.

37. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025060.htm.

38. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025061.htm.

39. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025066.htm.

40. www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=36550663.

41. www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5300817.


Sources


1 Nicholas, Thomas, Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales (Vol. 1. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, & Co., 1872), p. 455.

2 Lloyd, Jacob Youde Wukkuan, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 2. London: T. Richards, 1882.).

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 249-35 (Lowri ferch Gruffydd Fychan).

4 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg60.htm#1198.

5 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=alanclark&id=I2914.

6 Powys-Land Club, Collections Historical & ArchŠological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and Its Borders. (Vol. 13. London: Thomas Richards, 1880.), p. 123.

7 Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, Dictionary of Welsh Biography (National Library of Wales. 2007. Welsh Biography Online. <http://wbo.llgc.org.uk/en/index.html> ), http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-PULE-EST-1283.html.

8 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg60.htm#11.

9 Palmer, Alfred Neobard, History of the Town of Wrexham: Its Houses, Streets, Fields, and Old Families. (Wrexham: Woodall, Minshall and Thomas, 1893.), pp. 137-138.

10 Wynne, John, The History of the Gwydir Family. (Oswestry: Woodall and Venables, 1878.), Table II. [following p. 28].

11 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg56.htm#1141.

12 Wikipedia.org, "Maredudd ap Tudur," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maredudd_ap_Tudur.

13 Wikipedia.org, "Tudur ap Goronwy," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tudur_ap_Goronwy.

14 Wikipedia.org, "Owen Tudor," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owen_Tudor.

15 Wikipedia.org, "Catherine of Valois," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_of_Valois.

16 Wikipedia.org, Dafydd Gan.

17 Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.).

18 Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), p. 340.

19 Wikipedia.org, Dafydd Gam.

20 Wikipedia.org, William ap Thomas.

21 Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), pp. 340-341.

22 Wikipedia.org, William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423ľ1469).

23 Thomas, Lawrence Buckley, The Thomas Book giving the Genealogies of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K. G., the Thomas Family descended from him, and of some Allied Families (New York: Henry T. Thomas Co., 1896.), pp. 341-342.

24 http://www.familysearch.org.

25 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025020.htm.

26 Wikipedia.org, Halfdan the Mild.

27 Wikipedia.org, Eystein Halfdansson.

28 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025022.htm.

29 Wikipedia.org, Gudr°d the Hunter.

30 Wikipedia.org, Agne.

31 Wikipedia.org, Dag the Wise.

32 Wikipedia.org, Alrek and EirÝk.

33 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025064.htm.

34 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025067.htm.

35 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025065.htm.

36 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025069.htm.

37 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025060.htm.

38 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025061.htm.

39 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025066.htm.

40 www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=36550663.

41 www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5300817.


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