The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




William the Conqueror Duke of Normandy, King of England and Matilda of Flanders




Husband William the Conqueror Duke of Normandy, King of England 1 2




            AKA: William of Normandy, William I King of England
           Born: Abt 1028 - Falaise, (Calvados), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Sep 1087 - Rouen, (Seine-Inferieure), Normandy, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert I Duke of Normandy (Abt 1008-1035) 2 3 4 5
         Mother: Harlette de Falaise (Abt 1003-Bef 1050) 6 7 8


       Marriage: 1053 - Cathédral de Notre Dame, < >, Normandy, France



Wife Matilda of Flanders 9 10

            AKA: Maud of Flanders
           Born: Abt 1032 - Flanders (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Nov 1083 - Caen, (Calvados), Normandy, France
         Buried:  - Abbaye aux Dames, Caen, (Calvados), Normandy, France


         Father: Baldwin V de Lille, Count of Flanders (1012-1067) 11 12 13
         Mother: Adele Capet Princess of France (Abt 1009-Abt 1079) 14 15




Children
1 F Adela of Normandy 16 17

            AKA: Adela of England, Adela of Blois
           Born: Between 1062 and 1067
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 8 Mar 1137
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Stephen of Blois, Count of Blois (Abt 1045-1102) 18 19
           Marr: Abt 1080



2 M Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England 20 21

            AKA: Henry I King of England, Henry I Beauclerc King of England
           Born: Between May 1068 and May 1069 - <Selby, Yorkshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Dec 1135 - St. Denis-le-Ferment, (Eure), Normandy, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Matilda of Scotland (1079-1118)
           Marr: 11 Nov 1100 - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England
         Spouse: Adeliza of Louvain (Abt 1103-1151) 22
           Marr: 1120
         Spouse: Sybilla Corbet of Alcester (1077-After 1157) 21
         Spouse: Elizabeth de Beaumont (      -      ) 23




Birth Notes: Husband - William the Conqueror Duke of Normandy, King of England

Wikipedia (William the Conqueror) and thepeerage.com give b. in 1027 or 1028.


Birth Notes: Wife - Matilda of Flanders

Ancestral Roots gives both abt. 1031 and 1032.


Death Notes: Wife - Matilda of Flanders

Ancestral Roots gives 1 Nov 1083 and 2 Nov 1083.


Research Notes: Wife - Matilda of Flanders

From Wikipedia - Matilda of Flanders :

Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031 - 2 November 1083) was Queen consort of the Kingdom of England and the wife of William I the Conqueror .

She was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders , and Adèle (1000-1078/9), daughter of Robert II of France .

At 4'2" (127 cm) tall, Matilda was England's smallest queen, according to the Guinness Book of Records . According to legend, Matilda (or "Maud") told the representative of William, Duke of Normandy (later king of England as William the Conqueror), who had come asking for her hand, that she was far too high-born (being descended from King Alfred the Great of England) to consider marrying a bastard. When that was repeated to him, William rode from Normandy to Bruges , found Matilda on her way to church, dragged her off her horse by her long braids, threw her down in the street in front of her flabbergasted attendants, and then rode off. Another version of the story states that William rode to Matilda's father's house in Lille, threw her to the ground in her room (again, by the braids), and hit her (or violently shook her) before leaving. Naturally Baldwin took offense at this but, before they drew swords, Matilda settled the matter [1] by deciding to marry him, and even a papal ban (on the grounds of consanguinity ) did not dissuade her. They were married in 1053.

There were rumours that Matilda had been in love with the English ambassador to Flanders , a Saxon named Brihtric, who declined her advances. Whatever the truth of the matter, years later when she was acting as Regent for William in England, she used her authority to confiscate Brihtric's lands and throw him into prison, where he died.

When William was preparing to invade England, Matilda outfitted a ship, the Mora, out of her own money and gave it to him. For many years it was thought that she had some involvement in the creation of the Bayeux Tapestry (commonly called La Tapisserie de la Reine Mathilde in French), but historians no longer believe that; it seems to have been commissioned by William's half-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux , and made by English artists in Kent .

Matilda bore William eleven children, and he was believed to have been faithful to her, at least up until the time their son Robert rebelled against his father and Matilda sided with Robert against William. After she died, in 1083 at the age of 51, William became tyrannical, and people blamed it on his having lost her. Contrary to the belief that she was buried at St. Stephen's, also called l'Abbaye-aux-Hommes in Caen , Normandy , where William was eventually buried, she is intombed at l'Abbaye aux Dames , which is the Sainte-Trinité church, also in Caen. Of particular interest is the 11th century slab, a sleek black stone decorated with her epitaph, marking her grave at the rear of the church. It is of special note since the grave marker for William was replaced as recently as the beginning of the 19th century. In 1961, their graves were opened and their bones measured, proving their physical statures. [2]

Children
Some doubt exists over how many daughters there were. This list includes some entries which are obscure.
Robert Curthose (c. 1054 - 1134), Duke of Normandy, married Sybil of Conversano , daughter of Geoffrey of Conversano
Adeliza (or Alice) (c. 1055 - ?), reportedly betrothed to Harold II of England (Her existence is in some doubt.)
Cecilia (or Cecily) (c. 1056 - 1126), Abbess of Holy Trinity, Caen
William Rufus (1056 - 1100), King of the English
Richard, Duke of Bernay (1057 - c. 1081), killed by a stag in New Forest
Adela (c. 1062 - 1138), married Stephen, Count of Blois
Agatha (c. 1064 - c. 1080), betrothed to (1) Harold of Wessex , (2) Alfonso VI of Castile
Constance (c. 1066 - 1090), married Alan IV Fergent , Duke of Brittany ; poisoned, possibly by her own servants
Matilda (very obscure, her existence is in some doubt)
Henry Beauclerc (1068-1135), King of England, married (1) Edith of Scotland , daughter of Malcolm III, King of Scotland , (2) Adeliza of Louvain
NOTE:
Gundred (c. 1063 - 1085), wife of William de Warenne (c. 1055 - 1088), was formerly thought of as being yet another of Matilda's daughters, with speculation that she was William I's full daughter, a stepdaughter, or even a foundling or adopted daughter. However, this connection to William I has now been firmly debunked--see Gundred's discussion page for further information.
Matilda was a seventh generation direct descendent of Alfred the Great . Her marriage to William strengthened his claim to the throne. All sovereigns of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom have been descended from her, as is the present Queen Elizabeth II . 9 10



Research Notes: Child - Adela of Normandy

From Wikipedia - Adela of Normandy :

Adela of Normandy also known as Adela of Blois and Adela of England "and also Adela Alice Princess of England" (c. 1062 or 1067 - 8 March 1137?) was, by marriage, Countess of Blois , Chartres , and Meaux . She was a daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders . She was also the mother of Stephen, King of England and Henry of Blois , Bishop of Winchester .

Her birthdate is generally believed to have been between 1060 and 1064; however, there is some evidence she was born after her father's accession to the English throne in 1066. She was the favourite sister of King Henry I of England ; they were probably the youngest of the Conqueror's children. She was a high-spirited and educated woman, with a knowledge of Latin .

She married Stephen Henry , son and heir to the count of Blois , sometime between 1080 and 1084, probably in 1083. Stephen inherited Blois, Chartres and Meaux in 1089, and owned over 300 properties, making him one of the wealthiest men of his day. He was a pious and revered leader who managed huge areas of France which inherited from his father and added to by his sharp administrations. He was, essentially a king in his own right. Stephen-Henry joined the First Crusade , along with his brother-in-law Robert Curthose . Stephen's letters to Adela form a uniquely intimate insight into the experiences of the Crusade's leaders. The Count of Blois returned to France in 1100 bringing with him several cartloads of maps, jewels and other treasures, which he deposited at Chartres. He was, however, under an obligation to the pope for agreements made years earlier and returned to Antioch to participate in the crusade of 1101 . He was ultimately killed in an ill advised charge at the Battle of Ramla . Rumors of his cowardice and defection under fire are untrue and unfounded and have been proven to be propaganda generated by later biased historians. Stephen-Henry was often referred to as "le Sage," and was a great patron of Troubadours and writers.

Adela and Stephen's children are listed here as follows. Their birth order is uncertain.
Guillaume (William)(d. 1150), Count of Chartres married Agnes of Sulli (d. aft 1104) and had issue.
Theobald II, aka Thibaud IV Count of Champagne
Odo of Blois, aka Humbert. died young.
Stephen of Blois King of England.
Lucia-Mahaut , married Richard d'Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester . Both drowned on 25 November 1120.
Agnes of Blois, married Hugh de Puiset and were parents to Hugh de Puiset .
Eléonore of Blois (d. 1147) married Raoul I of Vermandois (d.1152) & had issue they were divorced in 1142.
Alix of Blois (d. 1145) married Renaud (d.1134)III of Joigni & had Issue
Lithuise of Blois (d. 1118) married Milo I of Montlhéry (Divorced 1115)
Philip (d. 1100) Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne
Henry of Blois b.1101- d. 1171 (oblate child raised at Cherite sur Loire (Cluny Abbey) 1103.

Adela was regent for her husband during his extended absence as a leader of the First Crusade (1095-1098), and when he returned in disgrace it was at least in part at her urging that he returned to the east to fulfil his vow of seeing Jerusalem .[citation needed ] She was again regent in 1101, continuing after her husband's death on this second crusading expedition in 1102, for their children were still minors. Orderic Vitalis praises her as a "wise and spirited woman" who ably governed her husband's estates in his absences and after his death.

She employed tutors to educate her elder sons, and had her youngest son Henry pledged to the Church at Cluny . Adela quarrelled with her eldest son Guillaume, "deficient in intelligence as well as degenerate", and had his younger brother Theobald replace him as heir. Her son Stephen left Blois in 1111 to join his uncle's court in England.

Adela retired to Marcigny in 1120, secure in the status of her children. Later that same year, her daughter Lucia-Mahaut , was drowned in the wreck of the White Ship alongside her husband. She lived long enough to see her son Stephen seize the English throne, and took pride in the ascension of her youngest child Henry Blois to the bishophric of Winchester, but died soon after on 8 March 1135 in Marsilly, Charente, Poitou-Charentes, France. 16 17


Birth Notes: Child - Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England

Ancestral Roots line 124-25 has b. 1070.


Research Notes: Child - Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England

Fourth son of William the Conqueror.

From Wikipedia - Henry I of England :

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 - 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror . He succeeded his elder brother William II as King of England in 1100 and defeated his eldest brother, Robert Curthose , to become Duke of Normandy in 1106. He was called Beauclerc for his scholarly interests and Lion of Justice for refinements which he brought about in the administrative and legislative machinery of the time.

Henry's reign is noted for its political opportunism. His succession was confirmed while his brother Robert was away on the First Crusade and the beginning of his reign was occupied by wars with Robert for control of England and Normandy. He successfully reunited the two realms again after their separation on his father's death in 1087. Upon his succession he granted the baronage a Charter of Liberties , which formed a basis for subsequent challenges to rights of kings and presaged Magna Carta , which subjected the King to law.

The rest of Henry's reign was filled with judicial and financial reforms. He established the biannual Exchequer to reform the treasury . He used itinerant officials to curb abuses of power at the local and regional level, garnering the praise of the people. The differences between the English and Norman populations began to break down during his reign and he himself married a daughter of the old English royal house. He made peace with the church after the disputes of his brother's reign, but he could not smooth out his succession after the disastrous loss of his eldest son William in the wreck of the White Ship . His will stipulated that he was to be succeeded by his daughter, the Empress Matilda , but his stern rule was followed by a period of civil war known as the Anarchy .

Early life
Henry was born between May 1068 and May 1069, probably in Selby in Yorkshire . His mother, Queen Matilda , was descended from Alfred the Great (but not through the main West Saxon Royal line). Queen Matilda named the infant Prince Henry, after her uncle, Henry I of France . As the youngest son of the family, he was almost certainly expected to become a Bishop and was given rather more extensive schooling than was usual for a young nobleman of that time. The Chronicler William of Malmesbury asserts that Henry once remarked that an illiterate King was a crowned ass. He was certainly the first Norman ruler to be fluent in the English language .

William I's second son Richard was killed in a hunting accident in 1081, so William bequeathed his dominions to his three surviving sons in the following manner:
Robert received the Duchy of Normandy and became Duke Robert II
William Rufus received the Kingdom of England and became King William II
Henry Beauclerc received 5,000 pounds in silver

The Chronicler Orderic Vitalis reports that the old King had declared to Henry: "You in your own time will have all the dominions I have acquired and be greater than both your brothers in wealth and power."

Henry tried to play his brothers off against each other but eventually, wary of his devious manoeuvring, they acted together and signed an Accession Treaty. This sought to bar Prince Henry from both Thrones by stipulating that if either King William or Duke Robert died without an heir, the two dominions of their father would be reunited under the surviving brother.

Seizing the throne of England

When, on 2 August 1100 , William II was killed by an arrow in yet another hunting accident in the New Forest, Duke Robert had not yet returned from the First Crusade . His absence allowed Prince Henry to seize the Royal Treasury at Winchester, Hampshire , where he buried his dead brother. There are suspicions that, on hearing that Robert was returning alive from his crusade with a new bride, Henry decided to act and arranged the murder of William by the French Vexin Walter Tirel .[1] Thus he succeeded to the throne of England, guaranteeing his succession in defiance of William and Robert's earlier agreement. Henry was accepted as King by the leading Barons and was crowned three days later on 5 August at Westminster Abbey . He secured his position among the nobles by an act of political appeasement: he issued a Charter of Liberties which is considered a forerunner of the Magna Carta .

First marriage

On 11 November 1100 Henry married Edith , daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland. Since Edith was also the niece of Edgar Atheling and the great-granddaughter of Edward the Confessor 's paternal half-brother Edmund Ironside , the marriage united the Norman line with the old English line of Kings. The marriage greatly displeased the Norman Barons, however, and as a concession to their sensibilities Edith changed her name to Matilda upon becoming Queen. The other side of this coin, however, was that Henry, by dint of his marriage, became far more acceptable to the Anglo-Saxon populace.

The chronicler William of Malmesbury described Henry thus: "He was of middle stature, greater than the small, but exceeded by the very tall; his hair was black and set back upon the forehead; his eyes mildly bright; his chest brawny; his body fleshy."

Conquest of Normandy
In the following year, 1101, Robert Curthose , Henry's eldest brother, attempted to seize the crown by invading England. In the Treaty of Alton , Robert agreed to recognise his brother Henry as King of England and return peacefully to Normandy , upon receipt of an annual sum of 2000 silver marks, which Henry proceeded to pay.

In 1105, to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert and the drain on his fiscal resources from the annual payment, Henry led an expeditionary force across the English Channel .

Battle of Tinchebray
On the morning of 28 September 1106, exactly 40 years after William had made his way to England, the decisive battle between his two surviving sons, Robert Curthose and Henry Beauclerc, took place in the small village of Tinchebray. This combat was totally unexpected and unprepared. Henry and his army were marching south from Barfleur on their way to Domfront and Robert was marching with his army from Falaise on their way to Mortain. They met at the crossroads at Tinchebray and the running battle which ensued was spread out over several kilometres. The site where most of the fighting took place is the village playing field today. Towards evening Robert tried to retreat but was captured by Henry's men at a place three kilometres (just under two miles) north of Tinchebray where a farm named "Prise" (taken) stands today on the D22 road. The tombstones of three knights are nearby on the same road.

King of England and Ruler of Normandy
After Henry had defeated his brother's Norman army at Tinchebray he imprisoned Robert, initially in the Tower of London , subsequently at Devizes Castle and later at Cardiff. One day whilst out riding Robert attempted to escape from Cardiff but his horse was bogged down in a swamp and he was recaptured. To prevent further escapes Henry had Robert's eyes burnt out. Henry appropriated the Duchy of Normandy as a possession of the Kingdom of England and reunited his father's dominions. Even after taking control of the Duchy of Normandy he didn't take the title of Duke, he chose to control it as the King of England.

In 1113, Henry attempted to reduce difficulties in Normandy by betrothing his eldest son, William Adelin , to the daughter of Fulk of Jerusalem (also known as Fulk V), Count of Anjou, then a serious enemy. They were married in 1119. Eight years later, after William's untimely death, a much more momentous union was made between Henry's daughter, (the former Empress) Matilda and Fulk's son Geoffrey Plantagenet , which eventually resulted in the union of the two Realms under the Plantagenet Kings.


Activities as a King

Henry's need for finance to consolidate his position led to an increase in the activities of centralized government. As King, Henry carried out social and judicial reforms, including:
issuing the Charter of Liberties
restoring the laws of Edward the Confessor .

Between 1103 and 1107 Henry was involved in a dispute with Anselm , the Archbishop of Canterbury , and Pope Paschal II in the investiture controversy , which was settled in the Concordat of London in 1107. It was a compromise. In England, a distinction was made in the King's chancery between the secular and ecclesiastical powers of the prelates. Employing the distinction, Henry gave up his right to invest his bishops and abbots, but reserved the custom of requiring them to come and do homage for the "temporalities " (the landed properties tied to the episcopate), directly from his hand, after the bishop had sworn homage and feudal vassalage in the ceremony called commendatio, the commendation ceremony , like any secular vassal.

Henry was also known for some brutal acts. He once threw a treacherous burgher named Conan Pilatus from the tower of Rouen; the tower was known from then on as "Conan's Leap". In another instance that took place in 1119, Henry's son-in-law, Eustace de Pacy, and Ralph Harnec, the constable of Ivry , exchanged their children as hostages. When Eustace blinded Harnec's son, Harnec demanded vengeance. King Henry allowed Harnec to blind and mutilate Eustace's two daughters, who were also Henry's own grandchildren. Eustace and his wife, Juliane, were outraged and threatened to rebel. Henry arranged to meet his daughter at a parley at Breteuil, only for Juliane to draw a crossbow and attempt to assassinate her father. She was captured and confined to the castle, but escaped by leaping from a window into the moat below. Some years later Henry was reconciled with his daughter and son-in-law.

Legitimate children
He had two children by Matilda (Edith), who died on 1 May 1118 at the palace of Westminster. She was buried in Westminster Abbey.
Matilda . (c. February 1102 - 10 September 1167 ). She married firstly Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor , and secondly, Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou , having issue by the second.
William Adelin , (5 August 1103 - 25 November 1120 ). He married Matilda (d.1154), daughter of Fulk V, Count of Anjou .

Second marriage
On 29 January 1121 he married Adeliza , daughter of Godfrey I of Leuven , Duke of Lower Lotharingia and Landgrave of Brabant , but there were no children from this marriage. Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Empress Matilda , widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor , as his heir.

Death and legacy

Henry visited Normandy in 1135 to see his young grandsons, the children of Matilda and Geoffrey. He took great delight in his grandchildren, but soon quarrelled with his daughter and son-in-law and these disputes led him to tarry in Normandy far longer than he originally planned.

Henry died on 1 December 1135 of food poisoning from eating "a surfeit of lampreys " (of which he was excessively fond) at Saint-Denis-en-Lyons (now Lyons-la-Forêt ) in Normandy. His remains were sewn into the hide of a bull to preserve them on the journey, and then taken back to England and were buried at Reading Abbey , which he had founded fourteen years before. The Abbey was destroyed during the Protestant Reformation . No trace of his tomb has survived, the probable site being covered by St James' School. Nearby is a small plaque and a large memorial cross stands in the adjoining Forbury Gardens .

Although Henry's barons had sworn allegiance to his daughter as their Queen, her gender and her remarriage into the House of Anjou , an enemy of the Normans, allowed Henry's nephew Stephen of Blois , to come to England and claim the throne with popular support.

The struggle between the former Empress and Stephen resulted in a long civil war known as the Anarchy . The dispute was eventually settled by Stephen's naming of Matilda's son, Henry Plantagenet , as his heir in 1153.

Illegitimate children
King Henry is famed for holding the record for the largest number of acknowledged illegitimate children born to any English king, with the number being around 20 or 25. He had many mistresses, and identifying which mistress is the mother of which child is difficult. His illegitimate offspring for whom there is documentation are:
Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester . Often, said to have been a son of Sybil Corbet.
Maud FitzRoy, married Conan III, Duke of Brittany
Constance FitzRoy, married Richard de Beaumont
Mabel FitzRoy, married William III Gouet
Aline FitzRoy, married Matthieu I of Montmorency
Gilbert FitzRoy, died after 1142. His mother may have been a sister of Walter de Gand.
Emma, born c. 1138; married Gui de Laval, Lord Laval. [Uncertain, born 2 years after Henry died.][2]

With Edith
Matilda, married in 1103 Count Rotrou II of Perche. She perished 25 Nov 1120 in the wreck of the White Ship . She left two daughters; Philippa who married Helie of Anjou (son of Fulk V) and Felice.

With Gieva de Tracy
William de Tracy

With Ansfride
Ansfride was born c. 1070. She was the wife of Anskill of Seacourt, at Wytham in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire ).
Juliane de Fontevrault (born c. 1090); married Eustace de Pacy in 1103. She tried to shoot her father with a crossbow after King Henry allowed her two young daughters to be blinded.
Fulk FitzRoy (born c. 1092); a monk at Abingdon .
Richard of Lincoln (c. 1094 - 25 November 1120 ); perished in the wreck of the White Ship .

With Sybil Corbet
Lady Sybilla Corbet of Alcester was born in 1077 in Alcester in Warwickshire . She married Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Herbert 'the Chamberlain' of Winchester and Emma de Blois. She died after 1157 and was also known as Adela (or Lucia) Corbet. Sybil was definitely mother of Sybil and Rainald, possibly also of William and Rohese. Some sources suggest that there was another daughter by this relationship, Gundred, but it appears that she was thought as such because she was a sister of Reginald de Dunstanville but it appears that that was another person of that name who was not related to this family.
Sybilla de Normandy , married Alexander I of Scotland .
William Constable, born before 1105. Married Alice (Constable); died after 1187.
Reginald de Dunstanville, 1st Earl of Cornwall .
Gundred of England (1114-46), married 1130 Henry de la Pomeroy, son of Joscelin de la Pomerai.
Rohese of England, born 1114; married William de Tracy (b. 1040 in Normandy, France d. 1110 in Barnstaple, Devon, England)son of Turgisus de Tracy. They married in 1075. They had four children 1)Turgisus II de Tracy b. 1066, 2) Henry de Tracy b. 1068, 3) Gieva de Tracy b. 1068 d. 1100, 4)Henry of Barnstaple Tracy b. 1070 d.1170.

With Edith FitzForne
Robert FitzEdith, Lord Okehampton, (1093-1172) married Dame Maud d'Avranches du Sap. They had one daughter, Mary, who married Renaud, Sire of Courtenay (son of Miles, Sire of Courtenay and Ermengarde of Nevers).
Adeliza FitzEdith. Appears in charters with her brother Robert.

With Princess Nest
Nest ferch Rhys was born about 1073 at Dinefwr Castle , Carmarthenshire , the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr of Deheubarth and his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhywallon. She married, in 1095, to Gerald de Windsor (aka Geraldus FitzWalter) son of Walter FitzOther, Constable of Windsor Castle and Keeper of the Forests of Berkshire . She had several other liaisons - including one with Stephen of Cardigan, Constable of Cardigan (1136) - and subsequently other illegitimate children. The date of her death is unknown.
Henry FitzRoy , 1103-1158.

With Isabel de Beaumont
Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont (after 1102 - after 1172), daughter of Robert de Beaumont , sister of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester . She married Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke , in 1130. She was also known as Isabella de Meulan.
Isabel Hedwig of England
Matilda FitzRoy , abbess of Montvilliers, also known as Montpiller 20 21


Matt and Becky Warner




Husband Matt (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Becky Warner (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: John Warner
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Evelyn Rose (details suppressed for this person)

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Henry Tuchet and Maud




Husband Henry Tuchet

           Born: Bef 1143
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1178
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry Tuchet Lord of Low Clawson, Leicestershire (      -Bef 1149)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Maud

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Children
1 M Simon Tuchet

           Born: Abt 1160
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1203-1205
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Pernel de Cumbrai (      -After 1718)




Research Notes: Husband - Henry Tuchet

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 176C-26


Research Notes: Wife - Maud

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 176C-26 (Henry Tuchet)


Research Notes: Child - Simon Tuchet

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 176C-27


Robert de Caen 1st Earl of Gloucester and Maud




Husband Robert de Caen 1st Earl of Gloucester 24 25 26

            AKA: Robert "the King's son" de Caen Earl of Gloucester, Robert de Caen "the Consul," Earl of Glouchester
           Born: Abt 1090 - <Caen, Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 Oct 1147 - Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
         Buried:  - St. James Priory, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England


         Father: Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England (Between 1068/1069-1135) 20 21
         Mother: Sybilla Corbet of Alcester (1077-After 1157) 21


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester (1090-1157) 25 27 28 - 1107

   Other Spouse: Elizabeth (      -      )

Events

• 2nd Lord of Glamorgan:

• Created: 1st Earl of Gloucester, Aug 1122.




Wife Maud

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Children

Research Notes: Husband - Robert de Caen 1st Earl of Gloucester

Natural son of Henry I. Half-brother of Empress Matilda.

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 123-26:
"ROBERT DE CAEN, Earl of Gloucester, 1122-1147 (natural son of Henry I, prob. by a NN dau. of the Gay or Gayt family of N. Oxfordshire... b. abt 1090, d. Bristol, 31 Oct. 1147, called 'the Consul'; m. Maud Fitz Hamon, dau. and h. of Robert Fitz Hamon, d. 1107, seigneur of Crelly in Calvados, Normandy, Lord of Thoringni, etc., and Sybil de Montgomery, dau. of Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury."

Also line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)
--------
From Wikipedia - Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester :

Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (c. 1090 - October 31 , 1147 ) was an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England , and one of the dominant figures of the period of English history sometimes called The Anarchy . He is also known as Robert of Caen, and Robert "the Consul", though both names are used by later historians and have little contemporary justification, other than the fact that Robert's clerks made a practice of using the Latin word consul rather than the more common comes for his title of 'Earl'.

Early life
Robert was the eldest of Henry's many illegitimate children. He was born well before his father's accession to the English throne, probably in the late 1080s, as he had himself had a son by 1104. There are numerous references noting him to have been the son of Sybil Corbet , heiress to Robert Corbet, Lord of Alcester, whose family had land in both England and Normandy. He was born in Caen, Normandy and was the first of several children between Henry and his Mistress Sybil Corbet. [1]

Robert was acknowledged at birth, though in view of the vicissitudes of his father's career between 1087 and 1096 it is unlikely he was raised in his household. He was educated to a high standard, was literate in Latin and had a serious interest in both history and philosophy, which indicates that he was at least partly raised in a clerical household, a suggestion made all the more likely as his first known child, born around 1104, was born to a daughter of Samson, Bishop of Worcester (died 1112) who up till 1096 had been a Royal Chaplain and Treasurer of Bayeux . It may be significant that his next brother Richard was brought up in an episcopal household, that of Robert Bloet , bishop of Lincoln . Robert later received dedications from both Geoffrey of Monmouth and William of Malmesbury . William's 'Historia Novella' contains a flattering portrait of the Earl.

Robert appears at court in Normandy in 1113, and in 1107 he had married Mabel, eldest daughter and heir of Robert Fitzhamon , who brought him the substantial honour of Gloucester in England, Glamorgan in Wales and the honours of Sainte-Scholasse-sur-Sarthe and Évrecy in Normandy, as well as Creully . In 1121 or 1122 his father created him Earl of Gloucester . Through his marriage to Mabel he became second Lord of Glamorgan, and gained possession of Cardiff Castle , and was responsible for the building of the stone keep there, which remains as the best preserved Norman shell keep in Wales, and one of the best in the British Isles. Robert had considerable authority and autonomy, to the extent that he even minted his own coinage, today preserved in the British Museum .

Family and children
He married, around 1107, Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester (died 1156), daughter of Robert Fitzhamon and Sibyl de Montgomery . Their children were:
William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester , died 1183. He married Hawise (died 1197) daughter of Robert II, Earl of Leicester.
Roger , Bishop of Worcester , (died 9 August 1179 , Tours ).
Hamon, killed at the siege of Toulouse in 1159.
Robert. (died before 1157) Also called Robert of Ilchester in documents. He married Hawise, (died after 1210) daughter of Baldwin de Redvers and Adeliz. Their daughter Mabel married Jordan de Cambernon .
Maud , (died 1190), wife of Ranulph de Gernon, 2nd Earl of Chester .
Philip, Castellan of Cricklade , (died after 1147). He took part in the Second Crusade .

Earl Robert had an illegitimate son, Richard, bishop of Bayeux (1135-1142), by Isabel de Douvres , sister of Richard de Douvres , bishop of Bayeux (1107-1133). 24 25 26


Research Notes: Wife - Maud

Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)


Simon III de Montfort Count of Evreux and Maud




Husband Simon III de Montfort Count of Evreux 29

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1181
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulf IV de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester (Abt 1100-1153) 25 30 31
         Mother: Maud FitzRobert of Gloucester (Abt 1120-1190) 25 32 33


       Marriage: 



Wife Maud

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux 34

            AKA: Bertred of Evreux, Bertrade d'Evreux de Montfort
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147-1181) 12 34 35
           Marr: 1169




Research Notes: Child - Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux

Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) 34


Simon de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton and Maud of Huntingdon




Husband Simon de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton 36 37

            AKA: Simon de St. Liz, Simon de Senliz Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1110
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulph the Rich (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 1090



Wife Maud of Huntingdon 38 39 40

            AKA: Matilda of Huntingdon, Maude of Huntingdon
           Born: Abt 1074
     Christened: 
           Died: 1131


         Buried: 


         Father: Waltheof II Earl of Northumberland (1050-1076) 25 41 42
         Mother: Judith of Lens (1054-      ) 25 41 43



   Other Spouse: David I "The Saint" King of Scots (Abt 1083-1153) 44 45 - 1113 or 1114

Events

• Countess of Huntingdon and Northumberland:


Children
1 F Maud de St. Liz 46 47 48

            AKA: Matilda of St Liz, Maud de Senlis, Maud de Senliz
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1140
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Robert Fitz Richard Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex (1064-Abt 1136) 49 50
           Marr: Abt 1114
         Spouse: Saer I de Quincy Lord of Daventry (      -      ) 47 51
           Marr: After 1136




Research Notes: Husband - Simon de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton

Crusader, son of Ranulph the Rich, a Norman.

From Wikipedia - Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton :

Simon I of St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton and 1st Earl of Huntingdon[1] (died 1109) was a Norman nobleman.

He built Northampton Castle and the town walls[2]. He also built one of the three remaining Round churches in England , the The Holy Sepulchre , Sheep Street, Northampton ).

Family
He married Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon . Simon de Senlis, 4th Earl of Northampton was their son. A daughter, Maud de St. Liz, married Robert Fitz Richard . Waltheof of Melrose was also a son. 36 37


Research Notes: Wife - Maud of Huntingdon

Widow of Simon de St. Liz.

From Wikipedia - Maud, Countess of Huntingdon :

Maud of Northumbria (1074-1130), countess for the Honour of Huntingdon , was the daughter of Waltheof II, Earl of Northumbria and Judith of Lens , the last of the major Anglo-Saxon earls to remain powerful after the Norman conquest of England in 1066. She inherited her father's earldom of Huntingdon and married twice.

Her mother, Judith, refused to marry Simon I of St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton . This refusal angered her uncle, King William I of England , who confiscated Judith's estates after she fled the country. Instead her daughter Maud was married to Simon of St Liz in 1090. She had a number of children with St Liz including:
Matilda of St Liz (Maud), married Robert FitzRichard and then Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester ..
Simon II de St Liz, 4th Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton .
Saint Walteof de St Liz (1100 - bt 1159 - 1160).

Her first husband died in 1109 and Maud next married King David I of Scotland in 1113. From this marriage she had one son, Henry .

The Scottish House of Dunkeld produced the remaining Earls of Huntingdon of the first creation of the title. She was succeeded to the Earldom of Huntingdon by her son Henry.

According to John of Fordun , she died in 1130 and was buried at Scone, but she appears in a charter dated 1147. 38 39 40


Death Notes: Child - Maud de St. Liz

Ancestral Roots, line 130-27 has "d. 1140 (or 1158/63?)"


Research Notes: Child - Maud de St. Liz

From Magna Charta Barons, p. 120:

Saier de Quincey, who had a grant from Henry II. of the manor of Bushby, Northamptonshire. He m. Maud de St. Liz, probably a daughter of Simon de St. Liz, a noble Norman, who was created Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, and his wife Maud, daughter and coheiress of Waltheof, first Earl of Northampton and Northumberland, who, conspiring against the Normans, was beheaded, in 1075, at Winchester, although his wife was a niece of the Conqueror. Waltheof was the son of Syward, the celebrated Saxon Earl of Northumberland. 46 47 48


Gilbert d' Umfreville and Maud




Husband Gilbert d' Umfreville 52

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Maud

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Malcolm Earl of Angus (      -1242)
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Gilbert d' Umfreville Earl of Angus 52

           Born: 1244
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 13 Oct 1307
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Margaret de Clare (Abt 1287-Between 1333/1334) 53 54 55 56
           Marr: 1289




Research Notes: Child - Gilbert d' Umfreville Earl of Angus

1st husband of Margaret de Clare. 52


Faramus de Boulogne and Maud




Husband Faramus de Boulogne 25

            AKA: Farramus de Boulogne Seigneur de Tingry
           Born: Abt 1105 - <Buckinghamshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1184
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Boulogne (Abt 1080-Abt 1159) 25 57
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Adult: by 1130.

• In charge of Dover Castle: 1157-1158.

• In charge of the Honour of Peverel of Dover: 1157-1158.




Wife Maud 25

            AKA: Matilda
           Born: Abt 1110 - <Buckinghamshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Sybil de Boulogne 25 58

            AKA: Sibylle de Tingry
           Born: Abt 1132 - <Buckinghamshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Enguerrand I de Fiennes Seigneur de Fiennes (Abt 1147-1190) 25 59




Research Notes: Husband - Faramus de Boulogne

Held lands at Eaton, Bedford, and Wendover, Bucks.

From Ancestral Roots, Line 158A-23 (p.153):
"The heir of Faramus was his daughter, Sybil, who married Enguerrand de Fiennes, whose heirs are the extant Fiennes family. However, Faramus had two younger brothers, Eustace and Simon, who witnessed his charter confirming land grants at Balham by Clapham made to the Abbey of Bec by their father and grandfather. The Eustace de Boulogne of that document may well be the Eustace de Boulogne who appears in a document of 1145-7 with his brother, Baldwin de Boulogne, the king's chaplain, who could, therefore, be another brother of Faramus.Widicumbe and Ash, in Martock, which had been held by Count Eustace before the Norman conquest, passed to his heir, William, Count of Boulogne (son of King Stephen), who granted these properties to his cousinFaramus de Boulogne, from which the overlordship passed to the Fiennes family. The sub-holders, however, were Boulognes, and in 1227 the sub-holder was a second Faramus de Boulogne, son of Thomas. Presumably Thomas was a grandson or great grandson of a brother of the first Faramus. 25


Research Notes: Child - Sybil de Boulogne

From Ancestral Roots, Line 158A-23 (p.153):

"The heir of Faramus was his daughter, Sybil, who married Enguerrand de Fiennes, whose heirs are the extant Fiennes family. However, Faramus had two younger brothers, Eustace and Simon, who witnessed his charter confirming land grants at Balham by Clapham made to the Abbey of Bec by their father and grandfather. The Eustace de Boulogne of that document may well be the Eustace de Boulogne who appears in a document of 1145-7 with his brother, Baldwin de Boulogne, the king's chaplain, who could, therefore, be another brother of Faramus.Widicumbe and Ash, in Martock, which had been held by Count Eustace before the Norman conquest, passed to his heir, William, Count of Boulogne (son of King Stephen), who granted these properties to his cousinFaramus de Boulogne, from which the overlordship passed to the Fiennes family. The sub-holders, however, were Boulognes, and in 1227 the sub-holder was a second Faramus de Boulogne, son of Thomas. Presumably Thomas was a grandson or great grandson of a brother of the first Faramus. 25 58


Fulk De Rycote and Maud




Husband Fulk De Rycote 60

            AKA: Fulk De Rycote
           Born: 1311 - Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1402 - <Oxfordshire>, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Fulk De Rycote (1294-1302) 60
         Mother: Margaret Le Despencer (1292-      ) 60


       Marriage: 



Wife Maud 60

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M John De Rycote 60

            AKA: John De Rycote
           Born: 1330 - Rycote, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Apr 1379 - Rycote, Oxfordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elizabeth Gernon (1325-1372) 60





Warin de Mortaigne and Melisende de Châteaudun




Husband Warin de Mortaigne 61

           Born: Abt 975 - Mortagne-au-Perche, (Orne), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1026
         Buried: 


         Father: William d'Alençon (Abt 0950-1048)
         Mother: Matilda de Condé (Abt 0950-Abt 1033) 62


       Marriage: Abt 999 - Mortagne, Orne, France



Wife Melisende de Châteaudun 63

           Born: Abt 990 - <Mortagne, (Orne), Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Geoffrey de Mortaigne 64

           Born: Abt 1005 - Mortagne-au-Perche, (Orne), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 15 Dec 1031
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hermengarde de Mortaigne (Abt 1005-      ) 65
           Marr: Abt 1029 - Mortagne, Orne, France



2 F Adeline de Domfront 66

           Born: Abt 1025 - Domfront, (Orne), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died:  - Mortagne-au-Perche, (Orne), Normandy, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Routrou de Mortaigne (Abt 1025-1079) 67
           Marr: Bef 1041 - Normandy, France




Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121-24, 169-23 (Maud of Flanders).

2 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

3 http://www.familysearch.org, Kevin Bradford.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-23.

5 Wikipedia.org, Robert I, Duke of Normandy.

6 Wikipedia.org, Herleva (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herleva).

7 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593882938.

8 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com (Herleva de Falaise).

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 162-23, 169-23.

10 Wikipedia.org, Matilda of Flanders.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 162-22, 128-22 (Adele of France).

12 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

13 Wikipedia.org, Baldwin V, Count of Flanders.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 128-22, 162-22 (Baldwin V).

15 Wikipedia.org, Adela of France, Countess of Flanders.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-24.

17 Wikipedia.org, Adela of Normandy.

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-24 (Adela of Normandy).

19 Wikipedia.org, Stephen II, Count of Blois.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121-25, 121B-26 (Elizabeth).

21 Wikipedia.org, Henry I of England.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25.

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121B-26 (Elizabeth).

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-26, 124-26.

25 http://www.familysearch.org.

26 Wikipedia.org, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 124-26 (Robert de Caen), 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont).

28 Wikipedia.org, Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28 (Hugh of Kevelioc).

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-27, 125-27 (Maud de Caen).

31 Wikipedia.org, Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester.

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-27.

33 Wikipedia.org, Maud of Gloucester.

34 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-26 (Maud of Huntingdon).

37 Wikipedia.org, Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton.

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-26.

39 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 413.

40 Wikipedia.org, Maud, Countess of Huntingdon.

41 Wikipedia.org, Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-25 (Judith of Lens).

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-25, 98A-23, 148-22 (Lambert of Boulogne).

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-22.

45 Wikipedia.org, David I of Scotland.

46 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-27, 53-27 (Margaret de Beaumont).

47 Wikipedia.org, Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester.

48 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 120.

49 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz).

50 Wikipedia.org, Robert Fitz Richard; Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester.

51 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-27, 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz).

52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 224-30 (Elizabeth Comyn).

53 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 54-32, 65-33.

54 Website:, www.thepeerage.com.

55 Wikipedia.org, Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere.

56 Website - Genealogy, www.thepeerage.com.

57 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 158A-24.

58 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 158A-26, 158B-26 (Enguerrand I de Fiennes), 158A-23 (Godfrey).

59 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 158B-26.

60 Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=13886631722.

61 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #879585 Maitland Dirk Brower.

62 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #878411 Maitland Dirk Brower.

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