The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Richard FitzEustace 5th Baron of Halton and Albreda de Lisoures




Husband Richard FitzEustace 5th Baron of Halton 1 2 3 4

            AKA: Richard Fitz Eustace
           Born: Abt 1128 - East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1157 and 1163
         Buried: 


         Father: Eustace FitzJohn 4th Baron of Halton (Abt 1110-1157) 4 5 6
         Mother: Agnes FitzWilliam (Abt 1114-1166) 4 7 8


       Marriage: 1150 - Chester, Cheshire, England

Events

• Baron of Halton: 1157-1171.

• Lord of Halton:

• Constable of Chester:




Wife Albreda de Lisoures 9

            AKA: Albreda de Lisours
           Born: Abt 1128 - Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1194 - Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Eudo de Lisoures (Abt 1097-      ) 10 11 12
         Mother: Albreda de Lacy (Abt 1097-      ) 13




Children
1 M John FitzRichard de Lacy 6th Baron of Halton 3 14

            AKA: John de Lacie, John de Lacy
           Born: Abt 1150 - Halton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Oct 1198 - Tyre, Lebanon
         Buried:  - Stanlow Abbey, Cheshire, England
         Spouse: Alice de Mandeville (Abt 1146-      ) 14
           Marr: Abt 1164 - Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England




Research Notes: Husband - Richard FitzEustace 5th Baron of Halton

From Wikipedia - Barons of Halton :

5 Richard FitzEustace
(1157-1171)
The son of Eustace FitzJohn. He married into the de Lacy family of Yorkshire .[9] 1 2 3 4


Research Notes: Wife - Albreda de Lisoures

Only daughter and heiress of Eudo (Robert) de Lisoures and Albreda de Lacy. 9


Death Notes: Child - John FitzRichard de Lacy 6th Baron of Halton

Wikipedia (Barons of Halton) has "died at the siege of Tyre [in 1190]."

Magna Charta Barons
has d. in the Holy Land, 1179.


Burial Notes: Child - John FitzRichard de Lacy 6th Baron of Halton

From Wikipedia - Stanlow Abbey :

Stanlow Abbey (or Stanlaw Abbey) was a Cistercian abbey situated on Stanlow Point on the banks of the River Mersey in the Wirral Peninsula , Cheshire , England (grid reference SJ427773 ).

The abbey was founded in 1178 by John FitzRichard , the sixth Baron of Halton .[1] Roger de Lacy , John de Lacy and Edmund de Lacy , respectively the 7th, 8th and 9th Barons of Halton, were buried at Stanlow.[2] The abbey was in an exposed situation near the Mersey estuary and it suffered from a series of disasters. In 1279 it was flooded by water from the Mersey and in 1287 during a fierce storm, its tower collapsed and part of the abbey was destroyed by fire. The monks appealed to the pope for the monastery to be moved to a better site and, with the pope's consent and the agreement of Edward I and Henry de Lacy , the 10th Baron, they moved to Whalley Abbey near Clitheroe , Lancashire .[3] This move took place in 1296.[4][5] However a small cell of monks remained on the site until the Reformation ,[3] the site becoming a grange of Whalley Abbey.[6] The remains of the abbey lie between the Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal . The standing remains include two sandstone walls and a re-used doorway, and the buried features include part of a drain leading to the River Gowy . These remains are recognised as a scheduled monument .[6]


Research Notes: Child - John FitzRichard de Lacy 6th Baron of Halton

Inherited the baronies of Halton and Pontefract, with the constableship of Chester, and assumed the surname de Lacie, through his mother, whose first husband was Henry, feudal Baron de Lacie.

From Wikipedia - List of Barons of Halton :

6 John FitzRichard
(1171-1190)
The son of Richard FitzEustace. He was a Governor in Ireland for Henry II . Being a patron of science, he maintained an astronomer at Halton Castle. He founded a Cistercian monastery at Stanlow .[8] In 1190 he granted the second known charter for a ferry at Runcorn Gap. He served with Richard I in the Third Crusade and died at the siege of Tyre .[10] 3 14



Gerard de Furnivalle Lord of Hallamshire and Maud FitzGeoffrey




Husband Gerard de Furnivalle Lord of Hallamshire

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1261
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Maud FitzGeoffrey 15 16 17

            AKA: Maud FitzJohn
           Born: Abt 1237 - Shere, Surrey, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Apr 1301 - <Grey Friars>, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 7 May 1301 - Grey Friars, Worcestershire, England


         Father: John FitzGeoffrey of Fambridge, Essex (Abt 1215-1258) 16 18
         Mother: Isabel Bigod (Abt 1212-1250) 19 20



   Other Spouse: William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick (Abt 1237-1298) 16 21 - Bef 1270 - Worcestershire, England


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Gerard de Furnivalle Lord of Hallamshire

Source: Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey


Burial Notes: Wife - Maud FitzGeoffrey

House of the Friars Minor, Worcester, Worcestershire, England.


Research Notes: Wife - Maud FitzGeoffrey

Eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey

Wikipedia - John FitzGeoffrey has d. 16/18 Apr 1301. Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?-1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire & his wife Isabel Mauduit.

From Wikipedia - Maud FitzJohn :

Maud FitzJohn, Countess of Warwick (died 16/18 April 1301), was an English noblewoman and the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere. Her second husband was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick , a celebrated soldier. Through her daughter, Isabella , Maud was the maternal grandmother of Hugh the younger Despenser , the unpopular favourite of King Edward II of England , who was executed in 1326.

Family
Maud was born in Shere, Surrey, England on an unknown date, the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey , Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland , and Isabel Bigod , a descendant of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster . Maud had two brothers, Richard FitzJohn of Shere and John FitzJohn of Shere, and three younger sisters, Aveline FitzJohn, Joan FitzJohn, and Isabel FitzJohn. She also had a half-brother, Walter de Lacy, and two half-sisters, Margery de Lacy, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville , from her mother's first marriage to Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy. The chronicle of Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire names Matilda uxor Guidono comitis Warwici as the eldest daughter of Johanni Fitz-Geffrey and Isabella Bygod.[1] Her paternal grandparents were Geoffrey Fitzpeter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare. Her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal .

Marriages and children
Maud married her first husband, Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord Hallamshire on an unknown date. Sometime after his death in 1261, Maud married her second husband, the celebrated soldier, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Upon their marriage, Maud was styled as Countess of Warwick.
Together William and Maud had at least two children:[2]
Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (1270/1271- 28 July 1315), on 28 February 1310, he married as her second husband, heiress Alice de Toeni , by whom he had seven children.

Isabella de Beauchamp (died before 30 May 1306), married firstly in 1281 Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth ; she married secondly in 1286, Hugh le Despenser, Lord Despenser by whom she had four children including Hugh Despenser the younger, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II, who was executed in 1326, shortly after his father.
Maud died between 16 and 18 April 1301. She was buried at the house of the Friars Minor in Worcester . 15 16 17


John Fitz Thomas FitzGerald 5th Baron of Offaly, 1st Earl of Kildare and Blanche Roche




Husband John Fitz Thomas FitzGerald 5th Baron of Offaly, 1st Earl of Kildare 22

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Sep 1316 - Laraghbryan near Maynooth
         Buried:  - Church of the Friars Minor, Kildare
       Marriage: 



Wife Blanche Roche 23

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: John Roche of Fermoy (      -      ) 23
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Joan FitzGerald 24

            AKA: Joan FitzGerald
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Edmund Botiller Justiciar and Governor of Ireland (      -1321)
           Marr: 1302





Maurice FitzGerald Lord of Lanstephan, Wales and Alice de Montgomery




Husband Maurice FitzGerald Lord of Lanstephan, Wales 25 26

           Born: Abt 1100 - <Windsor, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Sep 1176 - <Wexford, England>
         Buried: 


         Father: Gerald de Windsor (      -Bef 1136) 27
         Mother: Nest verch Rhys (      -After 1136) 28 29 30


       Marriage: 

Events

• Steward: of St. David's.

• Landed: in Wexford, 1 Sep 1176.




Wife Alice de Montgomery 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Arnulph de Montgomery (Bef 1074-      ) 31 32
         Mother: Lafracoth O'Brien (Bef 1076-      ) 32




Children
1 M Gerald FitzMaurice 1st Baron of Offaly 33

           Born: Abt 1150
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 15 Jan 1204
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eve de Bermingham (      -Bef 1226) 34
           Marr: Abt 1193




Research Notes: Husband - Maurice FitzGerald Lord of Lanstephan, Wales

Brother of David FitzGerald, Bishop of St. David's.

From Wikipedia - Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Lanstephan :

Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Lanstephan [1] (c1100 - 1 September 1176 ) was a major figure in the Norman conquest of Ireland .

He was the son of Gerald de Windsor , Constable of Pembroke Castle . His mother was Nest , a Welsh princess and former mistress of Henry I . He fought under Robert FitzMartin at the Battle of Crug Mawr in 1136 . The exiled High King of Ireland , Dermot MacMurrough (Irish Diarmait Mac Murchada) sought his assistance to regain his position.

Family
The original Earldom of Desmond was based on land holdings in Munster belonging to his descendents. His son Sir Gerald FitzMaurice (c1152 -c1203 ) married the daughter of Robert de Birmingham . Their son was Sir Maurice FitzGerald , Justiciar of Ireland , Lord of Offaly , (1190 - 1257 , died at Youghal . His son was Sir Maurice FitzMaurice Fitz Gerald , Justiciar of Ireland , Lord of Offaly , (c1239 , Wexford - 1286 , Ross ,Ireland ) 25 26


Research Notes: Child - Gerald FitzMaurice 1st Baron of Offaly

First husband of Eve de Bermingham. 33


Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald 3rd Lord of Offaly and Maud de Prendergast




Husband Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald 3rd Lord of Offaly 35 36

            AKA: Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald
           Born:  - Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1286
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Maurice FitzGerald 2nd Baron Offaly (1190-1257) 36 37
         Mother: Juliane (      -      ) 36


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Emmeline Longespée (Abt 1250-1291) - Abt 1266

Events

• Justiciar of Ireland: 1238-1287.




Wife Maud de Prendergast 36

           Born: 17 Mar 1243
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Gerald de Prendergast (      -      ) 36
         Mother: < > de Burgh (      -      ) 36




Children
1 F Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly 36 38

            AKA: Juliana FitzMaurice of Offaly, Juliane FitzMaurice
           Born: Abt 1263 - Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1300
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Thomas de Clare Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal (Abt 1245-1287) 36 39
           Marr: Feb 1275




Research Notes: Child - Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly

From Wikipedia - Juliana FitzGerald :

Juliana FitzGerald, Lady Thomond (c.1263- 1300), was a Norman -Irish noblewoman, the daughter of Maurice FitzGerald , 3rd Lord of Offaly , and the wife of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond , a powerful Anglo-Norman baron in Ireland, who was a younger brother of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford . Juliana had a total of three husbands; Thomas was her first. He was the father of her four children.

She is sometimes referred to as Juliane FitzMaurice.

Family
Juliana FitzGerald was born in about 1263 in Dublin , Ireland the eldest daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly, Justiciar of Ireland (1238- 1287) and his first wife, Maud de Prendergast (born 17 March 1243).[1]She had a younger sister Amabel who died childless. Her first cousin was John FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare . Her paternal grandparents were Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Lord of Offaly (1190- 1257) and Juliana. Her maternal grandparents were Gerald de Prendergast and the unnamed daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh , Lord of Connacht and Egidia de Lacy . Juliana's maternal ancestors included Brian Boru , Dermot McMurrough , and Maud de Braose .

Juliana's mother Maud died on an unknown date. Her father married secondly in 1273, Emmeline Longespee, but fathered no children by her.[2]

Marriages and children
In February 1275, at the age of about twelve years, Juliana married her first husband, Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Yougal. He was the second eldest son of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford , 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy . Thomas was a friend of King Edward I of England , with whom he went on a Crusade . He held many important posts including the Office of Governor of Colchester Castle (1266), Governor of the City of London (1273). He was also the commander of the English forces in Munster , Ireland , and in 1276, he was granted the lordship of Thomond . He was born in 1245, which made him about eighteen years older than Juliana.
Juliana and her husband Thomas resided at Bunratty Castle , which Thomas constructed in stone replacing the earlier wooden structure. Together Thomas and Juliana had four children:[3]

Maud de Clare (1276- 1326/27), married firstly on 3 November 1295 Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford , by whom she had issue; she married secondly after 1314 Robert de Welle.

Richard de Clare, Steward of Forest of Essex , 1st Lord Clare (1278- 10 May 1318 at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea ), married a woman by the name of Joan by whom he fathered one son, Thomas.
Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond (3 February 1281- 1307)
Margaret de Clare (c.1 April 1287- 22 October 1333/3 January 1334), married firstly in 1303 Gilbert de Umfraville; she married secondly before 30 June 1308 Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere , by whom she had four daughters and one son.

Life at Bunratty Castle was marked by unrest and strife as civil war was waged between rival factions of the powerful O'Brien clan. In 1277, Juliana's husband had his former ally Brian Ruad , the deposed King of Thomond, hanged for treason at Bunratty.[4]

Thomas died on 29 August 1287, leaving Juliana a widow at the age of twenty-four with four small children; the youngest, Margaret was not quite five months old. On an unknown date she married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel. He presumably died before 1292, as that was the year she married her third husband, Adam de Cretynges.

Juliana died in 1300. Her numerous descendants included English kings Henry V , Edward IV , Richard III , Mary, Queen of Scots , Anne Boleyn , Mary Boleyn , and Diana, Princess of Wales . The current British Royal Family directly descend from her, as do most of the other European royal families. 36 38


Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald 3rd Lord of Offaly and Emmeline Longespée




Husband Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald 3rd Lord of Offaly 35 36

            AKA: Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald
           Born:  - Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1286
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Maurice FitzGerald 2nd Baron Offaly (1190-1257) 36 37
         Mother: Juliane (      -      ) 36


       Marriage: Abt 1266

   Other Spouse: Maud de Prendergast (1243-      ) 36

Events

• Justiciar of Ireland: 1238-1287.




Wife Emmeline Longespée

           Born: Abt 1250
     Christened: 
           Died: 1291
         Buried: 


         Father: Stephen Longespée (      -      ) 40
         Mother: Emeline de Ridelisford (      -      ) 40




Children

Research Notes: Wife - Emmeline Longespée

Wikipedia (Juliane FitzGerald) states that she was Maurice FitzMaurice's second wife and had no children by him. Ancestral Roots line 178-6 states that she was the mother of Juliana FitzGerald.


Geoffroy de Neufmarché and Ada FitzGilbert de Hugleville




Husband Geoffroy de Neufmarché 16 41 42

            AKA: Geoffrey de Neufmarché
           Born: Abt 1025 - <France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Thurcytel (Abt 0990-      ) 16 41
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Ada FitzGilbert de Hugleville 16 41

            AKA: Ada de Hugleville, Ada de Heugelville
           Born: Abt 1030 - <Saint-Valéry-en-Caux>, Haute-Normandie, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard FitzGilbert Seigneur of Hugleville & Auffay (Abt 1005-      ) 16 41
         Mother: <Papia> (      -      )




Children
1 M Bernard de Neufmarché Lord of Brecon 41 42

            AKA: Bernard of Newmarket, Lord of Brecon
           Born: Abt 1050 - Le-Neuf-Marché-en-Lions, (Seine-Maritime), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1125
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Nesta (Abt 1079-      ) 16 43




Birth Notes: Child - Bernard de Neufmarché Lord of Brecon

FamilySearch has b. abt 1070


Research Notes: Child - Bernard de Neufmarché Lord of Brecon

From Wikipedia - Bernard de Neufmarché :

Bernard of Neufmarché or Newmarket (c. 1050 - c. 1125) was "the first of the original conquerors of Wales ."[1] He was a minor Norman lord who rose to power in the Welsh Marches before successfully undertaking the invasion and conquest of the Kingdom of Brycheiniog between 1088 and 1095. Out of the ruins of the Welsh kingdom he created the Anglo-Norman lordship of Brecon .

Coming to England
Because Bernard's family had attachments to the monastery of Saint-Evroul-sur-Ouche , the monkish chronicler Orderic Vitalis of that foundation had special knowledge of him and his family, though this still does not reduce the general obscurity of his origins or his life when compared to the richer Marcher lords , like the great Roger of Montgomery .[2] Bernard was the son of the minor and incompetent Norman baron Geoffrey de Neufmarché and Ada de Heugelville,[3] and he was born at the castle of Le-Neuf-Marché-en-Lions on the frontier between Normandy and Beauvais .[4] His ancestors on his mother's side had founded the town of Aufay south of Dieppe on the Sie , while his paternal grandfather, Turketil had served the young William II of Normandy as a guardian and was killed in that capacity. On his mother's side he also descended from Richard II of Normandy .[5]

The question of Bernard's participation in the Battle of Hastings and therefore in the Norman Invasion is subject to debate.[4] While Bernard had close family connexions to the port of Saint-Valery-sur-Somme from which William's invading fleet launched, Bernard himself was not the ruler of that city and need not have been in the fleet. He had later connexions with Battle Abbey : he established a cell of that abbey in Brecon, but that may have been an analogous foundation intended to mark his conquest of Brycheiniog.[6] Bernard's peculiar absence from the Domesday Book more or less damns the case for his presence at Hastings, for it is impossible that a noble participant in the victorious battle should not have received land to be recorded in Domesday if he was still living in 1087.[6]


Rise to power
Bernard was finally rewarded by the king, then William II of Normandy, in 1086 or 1087. He received lands in Herefordshire and lands which had devolved to the crown with the deaths of Gilbert fitz Thorold and Alfred of Marlborough .[7] Gilbert's lands were concentrated in Herefordshire and included the manors of Bach , Middlewood , and Harewood in the Golden Valley and the castles of Dorstone , Snodhill , and Urishay connecting Clifford Castle to Ewyas Harold , which belonged to Alfred's lordship.[8] Among Bernard's acquisitions from Gilbert was the domus defensabilis of Eardisley . From Alfred he received Pembridge , Burghill , and Brinsop .[6] Of these it should be noted that Snodhill was not founded until the twelfth century and then became the caput of the honour of Chandos . Bernard was also established in Speen and Newbury in Berkshire and Brinsop and Burghill in Herefordshire sometime before 1079. Both these latter vills were held from his honour of Brecon in the twelfth century. Bernard's ommission from Domesday is especially peculiar there. It is possible that he had some kind of exemption.

Probably as a consequence of his rapid rise in the marches, Bernard attracted the attention of Osbern fitz Richard , who gave him his daughter, Agnes (Nest), whose mother was the Welsh princess Nest, daughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn and Edith of Mercia ,[3] in marriage sometime before 1099.[9] She brought with her a dowry of Berrington and Little Hereford .
All of Bernard's estates lay in the valley of the river Wye and along an old Roman road which led from Watling Street to Y Gaer and on into Brycheiniog. The military possibilities of that road could only have encouraged his subsequent ventures into Wales.[10]

Conquest of Brycheiniog
Bernard joined the rebellion of the marcher lords against William Rufus at Lent in 1088.[11] Bernard escaped without recorded punishment and the king probably conceded the marcher lords the right to expand their lands by conquest at the expense of the Welsh buffer kingdoms of Brycheiniog, Morgannwg , and Gwynllwg .[12] Shortly after the settlement with the king, Bernard spearheaded an invasion of Brycheiniog which was to lead eventually to its conquest. Before the end of the year, though, he had captured Glasbury , for he issued a charter for lands near that place to the abbey of Saint Peter's at Gloucester (Autumn 1088).[6]

The chronology of events at this juncture is often confused. Bernard may well have already been in power in Brycheiniog by 1088 if he had already inherited a claim to it after the defeat of Roger de Breteuil , Earl of Hereford , in 1075. In 1088 the king, William Rufus, confirmed a previous charter of Bernard's stating that he had already made an exchange "within his lordship of Brycheiniog" at Glasbury. He also already held Castell Dinas which had probably been built by the Earl of Hereford before 1075.

After the initial conquest of 1088, Bernard continued warring with Brycheiniog until 1090, probably supported by Richard fitz Pons , the lord of Clifford.[13] Talgarth was captured early and a castle was constructed at Bronllys where the rivers Dulais and Llyfni meet, a site probably central to the llys of the tywysog of the commote of Bronllys.[13] By 1091 Bernard had reached the valley of the Usk , which was at the centre of the kingdom which was to become his own principality.

There is some discrepancy in this description of events also. Richard Fitz Pons was lord of Llandovery , which he had reached probably through Glamorgan , already by 1088. Bronllys Castle may not have been built until 1144, when Roger Fitzmiles , Earl of Hereford, is first recorded granting it as a five knights' fee mesne barony to Walter de Clifford , son of Richard Fitz Pons.

According to much later accounts and reconstructions, the accuracy of which is very dubious but which contain some references to verifiable history, the king of Brycheiniog, Bleddyn ap Maenarch , allied with the king of Deheubarth , Rhys ap Tewdwr , in 1093 (or perhaps 1094) and tried to attack the forces of Bernard which were building a castle at Brecon on the Usk and Honddu in the centre of a great plain in his kingdom where several Roman viae met.[14] Bleddyn led a charge up the hill, but the Normans defeated the Welsh and Rhys was killed in battle. Brecknock Priory , which was later founded at the site of the battle, may have been built on the spot where Rhys supposedly fell.[15] Bleddyn died not long after and Bernard was able to advance over the whole of Brycheiniog.

Reliable historical records refer to no king of Brycheiniog after a Tewdwr ab Elise who died after 934. Certainly there is no contemporary reference to a Bleddyn ap Maenarch. The Welsh Bruts simply state that "Rhys ap Tewdwr, king of Deheubarth, was slain by the Frenchmen who were inhabiting Brycheiniog." This passage lends evidence to the belief that the conquest of Brycheiniog was mostly finished by Eastertide 1093 and that the main effect of the battle of Brecon was to open the way to the conquest of Deheubarth.

Pacification and administration of Brycheiniog
He followed the Usk down to Ystradyw and took it, which incited the bishops of Llandaff to protest because the annexation of Ystradyw removed it from their diocese and brought it into the lordship of Brecon, which was under the episcopal authority of Saint David's .[16] In Spring 1094, the southern Welsh rose in revolt against the Normans that had come to dominate them. Brycheiniog was unaffected and the Normans of that region launched a counterattack from Ystrad Tywy and Cantref Bychan which devastated Kidwelly and Gower but did not put down the revolt.[16] In 1095 it spread to Brycheiniog and the Welsh of the countryside, allied with their compatriots of Gwynllwg and Gwent took back control of the province while the Normans were forced into their fortified centres.
Two expeditions from Glamorgan came to the rescue of the garrisons of Brycheiniog. The first was crushed in battle at Celli Carnant , but the second defeated the rebels at Aber Llech .[17] What followed was the complete encastellation of Brycheiniog. Among the castles possibly built during Bernard's lordship to defend the entrances to Brycheiniog from the southeast were Tretower , Blaen Llyfni (not attested before 1207-1215), and Crickhowell .

Bernard also extensively enfeoffed his followers with Welsh land.[17] Richard fitz Pons may have been enfeoffed at Cantref Selyff on the western border of Brycheiniog and immediately he began in miniature the process whereby Bernard had come to rule Brycheiniog.[17] However, Richard's son Walter is the first recorded landholder at Cantref Selyff. Furthermore, Bernard enfeoffed the sons of the king he had displaced in the less habitable land, thereby creating a loyal Welsh aristocracy and extracting more out of his land than the Normans otherwise knew how to do.[18] The Normans lived predominantly in the valleys and lowlands in an agrarian society while the Welsh kept to the hills and mountains living pastorally, thus creating an overall economic gain.[19] Among Bleddyn's sons, Gwrgan received Blaen Llyfni and Aberllyfni while Caradog received an unnamed hill country, and Drymbenog, Bleddyn's brother, was given land neighbouring that of Richard fitz Pons.

Death and succession
By the time of his death around 1125, Bernard had established a flourishing borough around his castle of Brecon. Henry I had married Bernard's daughter Sybil to Miles Fitz Walter , the sheriff of Gloucestershire , in 1121 and passed a significant portion of Bernard's honour to him as a dowry, including Hay-on-Wye Castle.[20] According to Giraldus Cambrensis this was because Mahel de Neufmarché the son and heir of Bernard had mutilated the paramour of his mother. In vengeance his mother, Princess Nesta, swore to King Henry I that her son was illegitimate. Henry was therefore able by law and custom to pass over Mahel and give the land to his friend and confident Miles Fitz Walter with Bernard's legal heiress in marriage. 41 42


Richard I FitzGilbert of Clare and Tonbridge and Rohese Giffard




Husband Richard I FitzGilbert of Clare and Tonbridge 16 44 45

            AKA: Richard FitzGilbert de Bienfaite, Richard de Clare, Richard FitzGilbert de Clare of Clare and Tonbridge, Richard I Fitz Gilbert of Clare and Tonbridge, Richard de Tonbridge
           Born: 1030 - <Bienfaite (Saint-Martin-de-Bienfaite-la-Cressonière), (Calvados)>, Normandy, France
     Christened:  - Brionne, (Eure), Normandy, France
           Died: Bef Apr 1088 - <Huntingdonshire, England>
         Buried:  - St. Neots, Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire, England


         Father: Gilbert Count of Brionne and Count of Eu (Abt 1000-1040) 16 46 47
         Mother: Gunnora D'Aunou (Abt 0984-      ) 16 48


       Marriage: Abt 1054

Events

• Seigneur of Bienfaite & Orbec, Normandy:

• Lord of Clare, Suffolk:




Wife Rohese Giffard 49 50

            AKA: Rohese Gifford
           Born: Abt 1034 - Longueville, (Calvados), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1113
         Buried: 


         Father: Walter II Giffard 1st Earl of Buckingham (Abt 1015-1102) 16 51
         Mother: Agnes Ribemont (      -      ) 52




Children
1 F Rohese FitzRichard de Clare 16 53

            AKA: Rohese de Clare, Rohesia de Clare, Rohese FitzRichard de Clare
           Born: Abt 1055 - Tunbridge, Kent, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1121 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eudo de Rie (Abt 1047-Abt 1120) 16 54 55



2 M Robert Fitz Richard Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex 56 57

            AKA: Robert FitzRichard Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex
           Born: 1064
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1136
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maud de St. Liz (      -1140) 58 59 60
           Marr: Abt 1114



3 M Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare 16 61 62 63

            AKA: Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare, Gilbert Fitz Richard Earl of Clare and Lord of Tonbridge
           Born: Abt 1065 - <Clare, Suffolk>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1115 - <England>
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelaide de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (Abt 1058-      ) 64 65 66
           Marr: Abt 1083




Birth Notes: Husband - Richard I FitzGilbert of Clare and Tonbridge

FamilySearch has b. abt 1024, Bienfaite, Normandy, France.


Death Notes: Husband - Richard I FitzGilbert of Clare and Tonbridge

Ancestral Roots, line 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz) has d. abt. 1090; line 184-2 has d. bef Apr 1088.
http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019582.htm has d. 1090 in Huntingdon, England.


Research Notes: Husband - Richard I FitzGilbert of Clare and Tonbridge

From Wikipedia - Richard Fitz Gilbert :

Richard FitzGilbert (c. 1030 - 1090), was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. He was the founder of the English noble family, the de Clares .

Victor at Hastings
Known as "de Bienfaite", "de Clare", and "de Tonbridge", he accompanied his reputed kinsman William, Duke of Normandy into England . He served at the Battle of Hastings , and assisted William in subduing the Anglo-Saxons .

Rewards
He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge . Richard Fitz Gilbert took the name Earl of Clare from one of his lordships in Suffolk , where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.

He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075.

Rebel Baron
On William 's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux , Robert, Count of Mortain , William fitzOsbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge , Pevensey and Rochester .

Death and succession
He died in St. Neot's Priory in 1090. His land was inherited by his son, Gilbert Fitz Richard .

Family
He was the son of Gilbert "Crispin", Count of Brionne .

The reference listed below states that Richard's great grandfather was Richard I of Normandy . Richard's father is also sometimes listed as Robert I "the Devil" , father of William the Conqueror . Sources as far back as the Annals of the Four Masters claim that Richard's great-grandson, Richard "Strongbow", was the direct descendant of Robert "the Devil". Gilbert "Crispin" was a descendant of Robert's cousin, but not Robert himself.

The modern Irish county of County Clare was historically part of the North Munster Gaelic kingdom of Thomond , dominated by the O'Briens, Kings of Thomond. The region was granted to the De Clare family in 1275 and they became Lords of Thomond. When the boundaries of the modern County Clare were fixed by Sir Henry Sidney in 1565, it was named after the De Clares .

Surrey
Richard's Surrey lands had a value of £241: 30% of the value of his English lands. Within Surrey, Richard Fitz Gilbert owned manors in the following places: Albury , Beddington , Bletchingley , Buckland , Chelsham , Chessington , Chipstead , Chivington, Effingham , Apps in Elmbridge , Farleigh , Immerworth (Kingston upon Thames ), Long Ditton , Mickleham , Molesey , Ockley , Old Malden , Shalford , Streatham , Tandridge , Tolworth , Tooting , Walton-on-Thames , Warlingham , Tillingdon, and Woldingham . 16 44 45



Birth Notes: Child - Rohese FitzRichard de Clare

FamilySearch has b. abt 1067, Tunbridge, Kent, England.


Research Notes: Child - Robert Fitz Richard Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex

First husband of Maud de St. Liz.

From Wikipedia - Robert Fitz Richard :

Robert Fitz Richard (1064-1136), entitled Robert Fitz Richard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard , was a Norman landowner in England. His estates near Little Dunmow are said[1] to have been given to him after confiscation from Ralph Baynard , who had them earlier[2].

He was steward under Henry I of England [3] and under Stephen of England [4]. He served for a period as High Sheriff of Yorkshire

Family
He was the son of Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert , Lord of Clare and Tonbridge (c. 1035-1090) and Rohese Giffard, (b. c. 1034), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville ,[5] and Agnes Flatel.[6]

He married (c. 1114), Maud de St. Liz, daughter of Sir Simon de St Liz, Earl of Northampton , and Maud de Huntingdon .

Children were:
Sir Walter Fitz Robert , (b. c. 1124).
Maud Fitz Robert, (b. c. 1132), Essex , who married (c. 1146, William d'Aubigny , son of Sir William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir , and Cecily Bigod. 56 57



Birth Notes: Child - Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019557.htm has b. 1065


Death Notes: Child - Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019557.htm has d. 1114


Research Notes: Child - Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare

Lord of Clare, Tonbridge, and Cardigan, Wales; or Earl of Clare, Lord of Tonbridge and Cardigan.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert Fitz Richard :

Gilbert Fitz Richard (1065-1115) was son and heir of Richard Fitz Gilbert , earl of Clare, and heiress Rohese Giffard. He succeeded to his father's possessions in England in 1090; his brother, Roger Fitz Richard, inherited his father's lands in Normandy . Earl Gilbert's inheritance made him one of the wealthiest magnates in early twelfth-century England.

Gilbert may have been present at the suspicious death of William II in the New Forest in 1100. He was granted lands and the Lordship of Cardigan by Henry I , including Cardigan Castle . He and his wife Adeliza had nine children, two of whom became peers of the realm . He founded the Cluniac priory at Stoke-by-Clare, Suffolk. 16 61 62 63




Hamon FitzHamo




Husband Hamon FitzHamo 16 67

            AKA: Hamo Dapifer, Haimo Dapifer
           Born: Abt 1030 - <France>
     Christened: 
           Died: After Sep 1099
         Buried: 


         Father: Hamo Dentatus Lord of Torigni and Creuilly (Abt 1002-1047) 16
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Sheriff of Kent:

• Steward: to William I and William II.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully 16 68 69

            AKA: Robert FitzHamon Seigneur of Crelly in Calvados, Normandy
           Born: Between 1045 and 1055 - <East Chester>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Mar 1107 - Falaise, Calvados, Normandy, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sybil Montgomery (Abt 1066-      ) 16 70




Research Notes: Husband - Hamon FitzHamo

From Wikipedia - Haimo (dapifer) :

Haimo or Hamo (died around 1100) (sometimes Haimo Dapifer[1] or Hamo Dapifer[2]) was an Anglo-Norman royal official under both King William I of England and King William II of England . He held the office of dapifer, or seneschal , as well as the office of sheriff of Kent.

Haimo was the son of Haimo Denatus , a Norman lord who held Torigny-sur-Vire near Manche in Normandy . The elder Haimo rebelled against Duke William, later King William I, and died about 1047.[3]


Haimo was steward to both King William I and William II.[4] He was in the office of steward by 1069.[5] Haimo was appointed to the office of Sheriff of Kent in 1077, and held it until his death.[3] During William II's reign, Haimo was one of five known stewards, the others were Eudo , Eudo's brother Hubert of Ryes , Roger Bigod , and Ivo Taillebois .[6]


The historian Emma Mason argues that Haimo, along with Ranulf Flambard , Urse d'Abetot , Robert Fitzhamon (Haimo's son), Roger Bigod, and Eudo Dapifer, were the first recognizable barons of the Exchequer , during King William II's reign.[7] These men were often associated in government together, witnessing documents and being used by William II as officials.[8] Haimo witnessed six of William II's writs .[9] Haimo's involvement in the higher levels of government dates especially from William II's absence from England in the late 1090s.[10] In 1099, when William was in Normandy, Haimo was one of the main assistants to Flambard, who was left in charge of England in the king's absence.[2]


According to Domesday Book , Haimo held lands in Kent, Surrey, and Essex, with the estates in Essex being larger than the other two counties.[11]


Haimo was still witnessing royal documents in September 1099,[12] and was one of the witnesses to the letter that King Henry I , William's brother and successor, wrote to Anselm , the Archbishop of Canterbury , shortly after Henry's accession to the throne after William II's death in a hunting accident.[13] Haimo died at some point shortly after this. He had two sons, Haimo, who became sheriff after him, and Robert fitz Haimo .[3] Robert was probably the elder, as he received his father's lands in Normandy after Haimo's death. The younger Haimo received the English lands.[4] 16 67


Birth Notes: Child - Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully

Some sources have b. abt 1070. Wikipedia has b. between 1045 & 1055.


Research Notes: Child - Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)

---------
From The Collected Historical Works of Sir Francis Palgrave, K.H. in Ten Volumes, Volume Three: The History of Normandy and of England in Four Volumes, Volume Three, ed. by Sir R. H. Inglis Palgrave, F.R.S., Cambridge, 1921.
p. 389
Hamo Dentatus. Lord of Torigni and Creuilly. His grandson Robert, who built Cardiff Castle and was Lord of Glamorgan, died at Tinchebrai in 1106.
----------
From Wikipedia - Robert Fitzhamon :

Robert Fitzhamon (died March 1107), or Robert FitzHamon, Sieur de Creully in the Calvados region and Torigny in the Manche region of Normandy , was Lord of Gloucester and the Norman conqueror of Glamorgan , southern Wales .
As a kinsman of the Conqueror and one of the few Anglo-Norman barons to remain loyal to the two successive kings William Rufus and Henry I of England , he was a prominent figure in England and Normandy.
Not much is known about his earlier life, or his precise relationship to William I of England .

Parentage and ancestry
Robert FitzHamon (born c. 1045-1055, d. March 1107 Falaise , Normandy) was the son of Haimo the Sheriff of Kent and grandson of Haimo Dentatus ('The Toothy', i.e., probably buck-toothed). His grand-father held the lordships of Torigny, Creully, Mézy, and Evrecy in Normandy, but following is death at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes in 1047, the family might have lost these lordships.

Career in England and Wales
Few details of Robert's career prior to 1087 are available.

Robert probably did not fight at Hastings , and does not appear in the Domesday Book , although some relatives may. He first comes to prominence as a supporter of William Rufus during the Rebellion of 1088 . After the revolt failed he was rewarded with great estates in Gloucestershire and elsewhere. Some of these had belonged to the late Queen Matilda , and were supposed to be inherited by Rufus's younger brother Henry (the future Henry I ); nevertheless Fitzhamon remained on good terms with Henry.

The chronology of Fitzhamon's conquest of Glamorgan is uncertain, but it probably took place in the decades after he received Gloucester.

One explanation is the legend of the Twelve Knights of Glamorgan , which dates from the 16th century, in which the Welsh Prince Iestyn ap Gwrgan (Jestin), prince or Lord of Glamorgan, supposedly called in the assistance of Robert Fitzhamon. Fitzhamon defeated the prince of South Wales Rhys ap Tewdwr in battle in 1090. With his Norman knights as reward he then took possession of Glamorgan, and "the French came into Dyned and Ceredigion, which they have still retained, and fortified the castles, and seized upon all the land of the Britons." Iestyn did not profit long by his involvement with the Normans. He was soon defeated and his lands taken in 1091.

Whether there is any truth in the legend or not Robert Fitzhamon seems to have seized control of the lowlands of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg sometime from around 1089 to 1094. His key strongholds were Cardiff Castle , which already may have been built, on the site of an old Roman fort , new castles at Newport , and at Kenfig . His descendants would inherit these castles and lands.

Rhys's daughter Nest became the mistress of King Henry I of England and allegedly was mother of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester who married Mabel, Fitzhamon's daughter and heiress and thus had legitimacy both among the Welsh and the Norman barons.[1] (Robert of Caen's mother is however unknown to historians and genealogists).

Founder of Tewkesbury Abbey (1092)
He also refounded Tewkesbury Abbey in 1092. The abbey's dimensions are almost the same as Westminster Abbey . The first abbot was Giraldus, Abbot of Cranborne (d. 1110) who died before the abbey was consecrated in October 1121. The abbey was apparently built under the influence of his wife Sybil de Montgomery. [1] , said to be a beautiful and religious woman like her sisters.

Fitzhamon and His Kings
Legend has it that Robert had ominous dreams in the days before Rufus' fatal hunting expedition, which postponed but did not prevent the outing. He was one of the first to gather in tears around Rufus' corpse, and he used his cloak to cover the late king's body on its journey to be buried in Winchester . How much of these stories are the invention of later days is unknown.

In any case Fitzhamon proved as loyal to Henry I as he had been to his predecessor, remaining on Henry's side in the several open conflicts with Henry's brother Robert Curthose . He was one of the three barons who negotiated the 1101 truce between Henry I and Robert Curthose.

In 1105 he went to Normandy and was captured while fighting near his ancestral estates near Bayeux . This was one of the reasons Henry crossed the channel with a substantial force later that year. Fitzhamon was freed, and joined Henry's campaign, which proceeded to besiege Falaise . There Fitzhamon was severely injured in the head; although he lived two more years he was never the same mentally. He was buried in the Chapter House at Tewkesbury Abbey , which he had founded and considerably enriched during his lifetime.


Marriage and Children
Fitzhamon married Sybil de Montgomery around 1087 to 1090, apparently the youngest daughter of Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury
by his first wife Mabel Talvas , daughter of William I Talvas , by whom he is said to have had four daughters. His eldest daughter Mabel inherited his great estates and married Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester around 1107. Fitzhamon's Gloucestershire property thus became the nucleus of the Earldom of Gloucester later given to his son-in-law. Fitzhamon is sometimes called Earl of Gloucester, but was never so created formally.

Another daughter Isabella (or Hawisa) is said to have been married to a count from Brittany, but no further details exist. His widow and two other daughters (unnamed) are reported to have entered a convent.

Robert fitzHamon's great granddaughter Isabel of Gloucester married John of England . 16 68 69




Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully and Sybil Montgomery




Husband Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully 16 68 69

            AKA: Robert FitzHamon Seigneur of Crelly in Calvados, Normandy
           Born: Between 1045 and 1055 - <East Chester>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Mar 1107 - Falaise, Calvados, Normandy, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Hamon FitzHamo (Abt 1030-After 1099) 16 67
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Lord of Thoringni:

• Refounded: Tewkesbury Abbey, 1092.

• Lord of Glamorgan:

• Lord of Gloucester:




Wife Sybil Montgomery 16 70

            AKA: Sibyl de Montgomery
           Born: Abt 1066 - <St. Germain Montgomery, Normandy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger de Montgomery 1st Earl of Shrewsbury (Abt 1022-1094) 16 32 71 72 73
         Mother: Mabel Talvas (Abt 1026-1079) 16 74




Children
1 F Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester 16 68 75

            AKA: Maud FitzHammon, Maud FitzHamon
           Born: 1090 - Gloucestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Sep 1157 - Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Robert de Caen 1st Earl of Gloucester (Abt 1090-1147) 16 76 77
           Marr: 1107




Birth Notes: Husband - Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully

Some sources have b. abt 1070. Wikipedia has b. between 1045 & 1055.


Research Notes: Husband - Robert FitzHamon Sieur de Creully

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)

---------
From The Collected Historical Works of Sir Francis Palgrave, K.H. in Ten Volumes, Volume Three: The History of Normandy and of England in Four Volumes, Volume Three, ed. by Sir R. H. Inglis Palgrave, F.R.S., Cambridge, 1921.
p. 389
Hamo Dentatus. Lord of Torigni and Creuilly. His grandson Robert, who built Cardiff Castle and was Lord of Glamorgan, died at Tinchebrai in 1106.
----------
From Wikipedia - Robert Fitzhamon :

Robert Fitzhamon (died March 1107), or Robert FitzHamon, Sieur de Creully in the Calvados region and Torigny in the Manche region of Normandy , was Lord of Gloucester and the Norman conqueror of Glamorgan , southern Wales .
As a kinsman of the Conqueror and one of the few Anglo-Norman barons to remain loyal to the two successive kings William Rufus and Henry I of England , he was a prominent figure in England and Normandy.
Not much is known about his earlier life, or his precise relationship to William I of England .

Parentage and ancestry
Robert FitzHamon (born c. 1045-1055, d. March 1107 Falaise , Normandy) was the son of Haimo the Sheriff of Kent and grandson of Haimo Dentatus ('The Toothy', i.e., probably buck-toothed). His grand-father held the lordships of Torigny, Creully, Mézy, and Evrecy in Normandy, but following is death at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes in 1047, the family might have lost these lordships.

Career in England and Wales
Few details of Robert's career prior to 1087 are available.

Robert probably did not fight at Hastings , and does not appear in the Domesday Book , although some relatives may. He first comes to prominence as a supporter of William Rufus during the Rebellion of 1088 . After the revolt failed he was rewarded with great estates in Gloucestershire and elsewhere. Some of these had belonged to the late Queen Matilda , and were supposed to be inherited by Rufus's younger brother Henry (the future Henry I ); nevertheless Fitzhamon remained on good terms with Henry.

The chronology of Fitzhamon's conquest of Glamorgan is uncertain, but it probably took place in the decades after he received Gloucester.

One explanation is the legend of the Twelve Knights of Glamorgan , which dates from the 16th century, in which the Welsh Prince Iestyn ap Gwrgan (Jestin), prince or Lord of Glamorgan, supposedly called in the assistance of Robert Fitzhamon. Fitzhamon defeated the prince of South Wales Rhys ap Tewdwr in battle in 1090. With his Norman knights as reward he then took possession of Glamorgan, and "the French came into Dyned and Ceredigion, which they have still retained, and fortified the castles, and seized upon all the land of the Britons." Iestyn did not profit long by his involvement with the Normans. He was soon defeated and his lands taken in 1091.

Whether there is any truth in the legend or not Robert Fitzhamon seems to have seized control of the lowlands of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg sometime from around 1089 to 1094. His key strongholds were Cardiff Castle , which already may have been built, on the site of an old Roman fort , new castles at Newport , and at Kenfig . His descendants would inherit these castles and lands.

Rhys's daughter Nest became the mistress of King Henry I of England and allegedly was mother of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester who married Mabel, Fitzhamon's daughter and heiress and thus had legitimacy both among the Welsh and the Norman barons.[1] (Robert of Caen's mother is however unknown to historians and genealogists).

Founder of Tewkesbury Abbey (1092)
He also refounded Tewkesbury Abbey in 1092. The abbey's dimensions are almost the same as Westminster Abbey . The first abbot was Giraldus, Abbot of Cranborne (d. 1110) who died before the abbey was consecrated in October 1121. The abbey was apparently built under the influence of his wife Sybil de Montgomery. [1] , said to be a beautiful and religious woman like her sisters.

Fitzhamon and His Kings
Legend has it that Robert had ominous dreams in the days before Rufus' fatal hunting expedition, which postponed but did not prevent the outing. He was one of the first to gather in tears around Rufus' corpse, and he used his cloak to cover the late king's body on its journey to be buried in Winchester . How much of these stories are the invention of later days is unknown.

In any case Fitzhamon proved as loyal to Henry I as he had been to his predecessor, remaining on Henry's side in the several open conflicts with Henry's brother Robert Curthose . He was one of the three barons who negotiated the 1101 truce between Henry I and Robert Curthose.

In 1105 he went to Normandy and was captured while fighting near his ancestral estates near Bayeux . This was one of the reasons Henry crossed the channel with a substantial force later that year. Fitzhamon was freed, and joined Henry's campaign, which proceeded to besiege Falaise . There Fitzhamon was severely injured in the head; although he lived two more years he was never the same mentally. He was buried in the Chapter House at Tewkesbury Abbey , which he had founded and considerably enriched during his lifetime.


Marriage and Children
Fitzhamon married Sybil de Montgomery around 1087 to 1090, apparently the youngest daughter of Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury
by his first wife Mabel Talvas , daughter of William I Talvas , by whom he is said to have had four daughters. His eldest daughter Mabel inherited his great estates and married Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester around 1107. Fitzhamon's Gloucestershire property thus became the nucleus of the Earldom of Gloucester later given to his son-in-law. Fitzhamon is sometimes called Earl of Gloucester, but was never so created formally.

Another daughter Isabella (or Hawisa) is said to have been married to a count from Brittany, but no further details exist. His widow and two other daughters (unnamed) are reported to have entered a convent.

Robert fitzHamon's great granddaughter Isabel of Gloucester married John of England . 16 68 69



Research Notes: Wife - Sybil Montgomery

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont) 16 70


Research Notes: Child - Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont)
-----
From Wikipedia - Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester :

Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester, Countess of Gloucester (1090- 29 September 1157[1]), was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, and a wealthy heiress who brought the lordship of Gloucester , among other prestigious honours to her husband, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester upon their marriage. He was the illegitimate son of King Henry I of England . Her father was Robert Fitzhamon , Lord of Gloucester and Glamorgan . As she was the eldest daughter of four, and her younger sisters had become nuns, Mabel inherited all of his honours and properties upon his death in 1107.


Family
Mabel was born in Gloucestershire , England in 1090, the eldest of the three daughters of Robert FitzHamon, Lord of Glamorgan, and Gloucester, and his wife, Sybil de Montgomery. Her three younger sisters, Hawise, Cecile and Amice[2] all became nuns, making Mabel the sole heiress to her father's lordships and vast estates in England, Wales, and Normandy.

Her paternal grandfather was Hamon, Sheriff of Kent . Her maternal grandparents were Roger de Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel Talvas of Belleme.

In March 1107, her father died in Normandy , leaving his lordships and estates to Mabel. Her mother married secondly Jean, Sire de Raimes.[3]



Marriage and children
In 1107, Mabel married Robert of Caen, an illegitimate son of King Henry I by his mistress Sybil Corbet. Their marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis who also names her parents.[4] He would later become an important figure during the turbulent period in English history known as The Anarchy which occurred in the reign of King Stephen of England . Throughout the civil war , he was a loyal supporter of his half-sister Empress Matilda who would make him the chief commander of her army. He had originally sworn fealty to King Stephen, but after quarrelling with him in 1137, his English and Welsh possessions were forfeited, and thus he joined forces with Matilda.[5]

Mabel brought to her husband, the honours of Gloucester in England, Glamorgan in Wales, Sainte-Scholasse-sur-Sarthe, Evrecy and Creully in Normandy. By right of his wife, he became the 2nd Lord of Glamorgan, and gained possession of her father's castle of Cardiff in Wales. In August 1122, he was created 1st Earl of Gloucester; henceforth, Mabel was styled as Countess of Gloucester.

Together Robert and Mabel had at least eight children:

William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (23 November 1112- 23 November 1183), married Hawise de Beaumont by whom he had five children, including Isabella of Gloucester , the first wife of King John of England , and Amice FitzRobert, Countess of Gloucester.
Roger, Bishop of Worcester (died 9 August 1179)
Hamon FitzRobert, (died 1159), killed in the Siege of Toulouse.
Robert FitzRobert of Ilchester (died before 1157), married Hawise de Redvers, by whom he had a daughter Mabel who in her turn married Jordan de Cambernon.
Richard FitzRobert, Sire de Creully (died 1175), inherited the seigneury of Creully from Mabel, and became the ancestor of the Sires de Creully. He married the daughter of Hughes de Montfort by whom he had five children.
Philip FitzRobert, (died after 1147), Castellan of Cricklade . He took part in the Second Crusade .
Maud FitzRobert (died 29 July 1190), married Ranulf de Gernon , 4th Earl of Chester by whom she had three children.
Mabel FitzRobert, married Aubrey de Vere

Robert also sired an illegitimate son, Richard, Bishop of Bayeux by Isabel de Douvres.

Mabel's husband died on 31 October 1147. Mabel herself died on 29 September 1157 in Bristol at the age of sixty-seven years. 16 68 75


Sources


1 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025186.htm.

2 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #877611 Maitland Dirk Brower.

3 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 100.

4 Wikipedia.org, Barons of Halton.

5 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025188.htm.

6 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #881644 Maitland Dirk Brower.

7 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025189.htm.

8 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #879420 Maitland Dirk Brower.

9 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #877612 Maitland Dirk Brower.

10 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025190.htm.

11 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #877661 Maitland Dirk Brower.

12 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p.100.

13 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #877662 Maitland Dirk Brower.

14 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #890136 Maitland Dirk Brower.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.).

16 http://www.familysearch.org.

17 Wikipedia.org, Maud FitzJohn; John FitzGeoffrey.

18 Wikipedia.org, John Fitzgeoffrey.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 70-29, 71-29, 177A-8 (Gilbert de Lacy).

20 Wikipedia.org, Isabel Bigod.

21 Wikipedia.org, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 178A-7, 7-30 (Eleanor de Bohun).

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 73-31 (Edmund Botiller).

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 7-30 (Eleanor de Bohun).

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-3.

26 Wikipedia.org, Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Lanstephan.

27 Wikipedia.org, Gerald de Windsor.

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 178-2.

29 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.).

30 Wikipedia.org, Nest ferch Rhys.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-3 (Maurice FitzGerald).

32 Website:, http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/montgomery.htm.

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-4.

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-4 (Gerald FitzMaurice).

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-6, 54-31 (Thomas de Clare).

36 Wikipedia.org, Juliana FitzGerald.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-5.

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-7, 54-31 (Thomas de Clare).

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 54-31.

40 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 178-6 (Maurice FitzMaurice FitzGerald).

41 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177-3 (Nesta).

42 Wikipedia.org, Bernard de Neufmarché.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177-3.

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 184-2 (Rohese Giffard), 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz).

45 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019582.htm.

46 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019603.htm.

47 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert, Count of Brionne.

48 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019604.htm.

49 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 184-2, 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz.).

50 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019583.htm.

51 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 184-1.

52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 184-1 (Walter II Giffard).

53 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019589.htm.

54 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019588.htm.

55 Wikipedia.org, Eudo Dapifer.

56 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz).

57 Wikipedia.org, Robert Fitz Richard; Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester.

58 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-27, 53-27 (Margaret de Beaumont).

59 Wikipedia.org, Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester.

60 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 120.

61 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 184-3, 246-24 (Adelaide de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis), 246B-24 (Adelaide).

62 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019557.htm.

63 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert Fitz Richard; Aubrey de Vere II.

64 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-24, 246B-24.

65 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019558.htm.

66 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

67 Wikipedia.org, Haimo (dapifer).

68 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 124-26 (Robert de Caen), 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont).

69 Wikipedia.org, Robert Fitzhamon.

70 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont).

71 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 124-26 (Robert de Caen).

72 Wikipedia.org, Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury.

73 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/409.htm.

74 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/428.htm.

75 Wikipedia.org, Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester.

76 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-26, 124-26.

77 Wikipedia.org, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester.


Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 27 Sep 2016 with Legacy 8.0 from Millennia