The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Ivan Vladislav Tsar of West Bulgaria




Husband Ivan Vladislav Tsar of West Bulgaria 1

            AKA: John Vladislav Tsar of West Bulgaria
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1 M Trojan of Bulgaria 1

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Ivar "Hvide"




Husband Ivar "Hvide" 2

           Born: Abt 999 - <Opland, Norway>
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1 M Haakon Ivarsson 2

           Born: Abt 1031 - <Norway>
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         Spouse: Ragnhild Magnusdatter Princess of Norway (Abt 1041-      ) 2
           Marr: 1062 - Norway




Ivo




Husband Ivo 2

           Born: Abt 1124 - <Braybrook, Northamptonshire>, England
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1 F Aubrey 2

            AKA: Albreda
           Born: Abt 1150 - <Braybrook, Northamptonshire>, England
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         Spouse: Ingebald de Braybrooke (Abt 1146-      ) 2
           Marr: Abt 1168 - Braybrook, Northamptonshire, England




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1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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Death Notes: Husband - Jacob

Supposedly lived 147 years.


Research Notes: Husband - Jacob

From Wikipedia - Jacob :

Jacob (Hebrew : Standard Ya; Septuagint Greek : "heel" or "leg-puller"), also known as Israel (Hebrew : Standard Yisra, Isr; Septuagint Greek : "struggler with God"; pronounced /'d?e?k?b/ [1]), was the third Biblical patriarch and ancestor of the twelve tribes of Israel , named after ten of his twelve sons, as well as the two sons of his son Joseph.
The Bible says he was the son of Isaac and Rebecca , the grandson of Abraham and Sarah and of Bethuel , and the twin brother of Esau . He had twelve sons and one daughter by his two wives , Leah and Rachel , and their maidservants, Bilhah and Zilpah . The children were Reuben , Simeon , Levi , Judah , Dan , Naphtali , Gad , Asher , Issachar , Zebulun , daughter Dinah , Joseph , and Benjamin .[2] Before the birth of Benjamin, Jacob is renamed "Israel" by an angel, the name after which the modern nation of Israel is named.
As a result of a severe famine in Canaan , Jacob resettled his whole family in Egypt , in the Land of Goshen , at the time when his son Joseph was viceroy. Jacob died there 17 years later, and Joseph carried Jacob's remains to the land of Canaan, where he gave them stately burial in the same Cave of Machpelah as were buried Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebecca and Jacob's wife Leah (Genesis 49:29-50:14 ).


[edit ] Jacob's marriages
At Haran, Jacob saw a well where the shepherds were gathering their flocks to water them, and met Laban's younger daughter Rachel, Jacob's first cousin ; she was working as a shepherdess. He loved her immediately, and after spending a month with his relatives, asked for her hand in marriage in return for working seven years for Laban. Laban agreed to the arrangement. These seven years seemed to Jacob "but a few days, for the love he had for her"; but when they were complete and he asked for his wife, Laban deceived Jacob by switching Rachel's older sister, Leah, as the veiled bride.
According to the Midrash , both Jacob and Rachel suspected that Laban would pull such a trick; Laban was known as the "Aramean" (deceiver), and changed Jacob's wages ten times during his employ (Genesis 31:7). The couple therefore devised a series of signs by which Jacob could identify the veiled bride on his wedding night. But when Rachel saw her sister being taken out to the wedding canopy, her heart went out to her for the public shame Leah would suffer if she were exposed. Rachel therefore gave Leah the signs so that Jacob would not realize the switch.
In the morning, when the truth became known, Laban justified himself, saying that in his country it was unheard of to give the younger daughter before the older. However, he agreed to give Rachel in marriage as well if Jacob would work another seven years for her. After the week of wedding celebrations with Leah, Jacob married Rachel, and he continued to work for Laban for another seven years.
Jacob loved Rachel more than Leah, and Leah felt hated. God opened Leah's womb and she gave birth to four sons rapidly: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah. Rachel, however, remained barren. Following the example of Sarah, who gave her handmaid to Abraham after years of infertility, Rachel gave Jacob her handmaid, Bilhah, in marriage, so that Rachel could raise children through her. Bilhah gave birth to Dan and Naphtali. Seeing that she had left off childbearing temporarily, Leah then gave her handmaid Zilpah to Jacob in marriage so that Leah could raise more children through her. Zilpah gave birth to Gad and Asher. (According to some commentators, Bilhah and Zilpah were younger daughters of Laban.) Afterwards, Leah became fertile again and gave birth to Issachar, Zebulun, and Dinah. God remembered Rachel, who gave birth to Joseph. If pregnancies of different marriages overlapped, the twelve births could have occurred within seven years.
After Joseph was born, Jacob decided to return home to his parents. Laban was reluctant to release him, as God had blessed his flock on account of Jacob. Laban asked what he could pay Jacob, and Jacob proposed that all the spotted, speckled, and brown goats and sheep of Laban's flock, at any given moment, would be his wages. Jacob placed peeled rods of poplar, hazel, and chestnut within the flocks' watering holes or troughs, an action he later attributes to a dream. The text suggests that Jacob performed breeding experiments over the years to make his own flocks both more abundant and stronger than Laban's, that Laban responded by repeatedly reinterpreting the terms of Jacob's wages, and that the breeding favored Jacob regardless of Laban's pronouncements. Thus Jacob's herds increased and he became very wealthy.
As time passed, Laban's sons noticed that Jacob was taking the better part of their flocks, and Laban's friendly attitude towards Jacob began to change. God told Jacob that he should leave, and he and his wives and children did so without informing Laban. Before they left, Rachel stole the teraphim , considered to be household idols, from Laban's house.
In a rage, Laban pursued Jacob for seven days. The night before he caught up to him, God appeared to Laban in a dream and warned him not to say anything good or bad to Jacob. When the two met, Laban played the part of the injured father-in-law and also demanded his teraphim back. Knowing nothing about Rachel's theft, Jacob told Laban that whoever stole them should die, and stood aside to let him search. When Laban reached Rachel's tent, she hid the teraphim by sitting on them and stating she could not get up because she was menstruating ; this event was considered by the Biblical audience as conveying significant defilement upon the teraphim. Jacob and Laban then parted from each other with a pact to preserve the peace between them. Laban returned to his home and Jacob continued on his way.

[edit ] Joseph in Egypt
Joseph was separated from his father Jacob at the age of 17 when his brothers, who had been jealous of his dreams of kingship over them, sold him to traders heading down to Egypt, then-capital of the slave trade. Jacob was deeply grieved by the loss of his favorite son, and refused to be comforted. Unbeknownst to the family, Joseph was sold as a slave to Potiphar, Pharaoh 's chief butcher. He resisted the advances of his master's wife for a long time until she accosted him and then accused him of trying to rape her; he was then thrown into prison.
After Joseph had spent twelve years in prison, the Pharaoh of Egypt had two troubling dreams, and his butler recalled having met Joseph, a successful interpreter of dreams, in Pharaoh's prison. Joseph was called from prison and interpreted the dreams as prophesying seven years each of abundance and famine; Pharaoh was so impressed that he made Joseph viceroy (second in command) over Egypt and the manager of Egypt's grain stores, due to the prophecy of famine. When the prophesied famine struck throughout the known world, Joseph sold stored grain to men of all nations.
In the first year of famine, Jacob sent ten sons to Egypt, excluding Benjamin, to procure grain for their starving families (Genesis 42:3 ). Joseph recognized them but did not reveal himself to them; desirous to see his full brother Benjamin, of whom they had spoken, Joseph accused them of being spies, imprisoned Simeon as a hostage, and demanded Benjamin be produced to verify their claims. Jacob was distraught by this news, concluding that Simeon was as lost as Joseph, and refusing to send Benjamin, even in response to a rash vow by Reuben. Benjamin is taken to represent all that is left to Jacob of his favorite wife's children.
When famine worsened the second year and food stores ran out, Judah pledged his own honor to Jacob that he would protect Benjamin from harm, and Jacob relented and sent the brothers again. On meeting them, Joseph threatened to imprison Benjamin, but Judah offered himself in Benjamin's place. Interpreters say Joseph had tested his brothers with this threat and recognized that Judah passed the test, by refusing to sell Rachel's son into slavery as he had done once before. Overcome with emotion, Joseph revealed himself to his brothers and provided for them to move Jacob's entire family to Egypt.
Jacob's family, including 66 direct descendants, were housed by Joseph in the Egyptian province of Goshen . Jacob's final 17 years were spent in peace and tranquility in Egypt, with all 12 sons.

Jacob adopted Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, as his own. Anticipating his death, he blessed each of his 12 sons with varying blessings he deemed appropriate. It has been understood that Judah, the fourth born, received the primary blessing, due to Reuben's incest and Simeon's and Levi's betrayal. Jacob also made Joseph promise that he would bury him in the Cave of the Patriarchs (with Leah, and Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, and Rebecca; Rachel was buried at Bethlehem). According to the Midrash,[22] he desired to tell his sons the exact date when the Messiah would arrive, but the prophecy fails him. Another tradition states that the two lines of the Shema Yisrael were exchanged, the sons proclaiming their righteousness to "Yisrael" (Jacob), and Jacob blessing God's name responsively. The first line is actually Deuteronomy 6:4 and the response was instituted by the rabbis, and the chant is central to Jewish prayer services.
After giving these instructions, Jacob died at the age of 147 (Genesis 47:28). With Pharaoh's permission, Joseph had Jacob meticulously embalmed and led a huge state funeral back to Canaan, with the twelve sons carrying their father's coffin and many Egyptian officials accompanying them.

[edit ] Sons of Jacob
See also: Israelite
Jacob's wives had twelve sons and one daughter: Reuben (Genesis 29:32 ), Simeon (Genesis 29:33 ), Levi (Genesis 29:34 ), Judah (Genesis 29:35 ), Dan (Genesis 30:5 ), Naphtali (Genesis 30:7 ), Gad (Genesis 30:10 ), Asher (Genesis 30:12 ), Issachar (Genesis 30:17 ), Zebulun (Genesis 30:19 ), Dinah (Genesis 30:21 ), Joseph (Genesis 30:23 ), and Benjamin (Genesis 35:18 ).


Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Judah (Bible) :

Judah/Yehuda (Hebrew : , Standard Y Tiberian Y) was, according to the Book of Genesis , the fourth son of Jacob and Leah , and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Judah ; however some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation.[1] With Leah as a matriarch, Biblical scholars regard the tribe as having been believed by the text's authors to have been part of the original Israelite confederation; however, it is worthy of note[2] that the tribe of Judah was not purely Israelite, but contained a large admixture of non-Israelites, with a number of Kenizzite groups, the Jerahmeelites , and the Kenites , merging into the tribe at various points.[3]
The text of the Torah argues that the name of Judah, meaning to praise, refers to Leah's intent to praise Yahweh , on account of having achieved four children, and derived from odeh, meaning I will give praise. In classical rabbinical literature , the name is interpreted as just being a combination of Yahweh and a dalet (the letter d); in Gematria , the dalet has the numerical value 4, which these rabbinical sources argue refers to Judah being Jacob's fourth son.[4]
When Reuben lost his firstborn right ( kingship, preisthood, and the double-portion), Judah inherited kingship instead.


Births and deaths
Main article: Tamar (biblical figure)
According to Classical rabbinical literature , Judah was born on the 15th of Sivan ;[2] classical sources differ on the date of death, with the Book of Jubilees advocating a death at age 119, 18 years before Levi ,[5] but the midrashic Book of Jasher advocating a death at the age of 129.[6] The marriage of Judah and births of his children are described in a passage widely regarded as an abrupt change to the surrounding narrative.[7] The passage is often regarded as presenting a significant chronological issue, as the surrounding context appears to constrain the events of the passage to happening within 22 years,[8] and the context together with the passage itself requires the birth of the grandson of Judah and of his son's wife,[9] and the birth of that son,[10] to have happened within this time (to be consistent, this requires an average of less than 8 years gap per generation). According to textual scholars, the reason for the abrupt interruption this passage causes to the surrounding narrative, and the chronological anomaly it seems to present, is that it derives from the Jahwist source, while the immediately surrounding narrative is from the Elohist [11].[2][12]
In this passage, Judah married the daughter of Shuah , a Canaanite . The Book of Jubilees argues for Bat Shua as the name of the wife,[13] the midrashic Book of Jasher argues for lllit as her name.[14] The passage goes on to state that Judah and his wife had three children between them - Er , Onan , and Shelah - and that the first married Tamar ;[15] after Er died without any children, Tamar became Onan's wife in accordance with custom , but he too died without children.[16] The narrative continues by stating that Judah decided that marriage to Tamar was cursed to be fatal, and so avoided letting Shelah marry her;[17] this would have left Tamar unable to have children, so she managed to trick Judah into having sex with her, by pretending to be a prostitute .[18] According to the text, when Judah discovered that Tamar was pregnant, he intended to have her burnt ,[19] but when he discovered that he was the father, he recanted and confessed that he had used a prostitute;[20] she was pregnant with twins, and they were Pharez and Zerah , the fourth and fifth sons of Judah.[21] According to the Talmud , Judah's confession atoned for some of his prior faults, and itself resulted in him being divinely rewarded by a share in the future world .[22]
The main motive of the Tamar narrative, is, according to many Biblical scholars, an eponymous aetiological myth concerning the fluctuations in the constituency of the tribe of Judah; textual scholars attribute the narrative to the Yahwist , though Biblical scholars regard it as concerning the state of the clans not much earlier.[23][24] A number of scholars have proposed that the deaths of Er and Onan reflect the dying out of two clans;[25][26] Onan may represent an Edomite clan named Onam,[27] who are mentioned in an Edomite genealogy in Genesis,[28] while Er appears from a genealogy in the Book of Chronicles [29] to have later been subsumed by the Shelah clan.[30][31]
Some scholars have argued that the narrative secondarily aims to either assert the institution of levirate marriage , or present an aetiological myth for its origin, since it highlights cases of marriage for pleasure not for having children (Onan), of refusal to perform the marriage (Jacob, on behalf of Shelah), and of levirate activities with men related to the dead husband other than fraternally;[32] Emerton regards the evidence for this as inconclusive, though according to classical rabbinical writers this is the origin of levirate marriage.[33] A number of scholars, particularly in recent decades (as of 1980), have proposed that the narrative reflects an anachronistic interest in the biblical account of king David , with the character of Tamar being the same;[34][35] the proposals partly being due to the scenes of the narrative - Adullam , Chezib , and Timnah - overlapping.[36][37]
The Book of Chronicles mentions that ... a ruler came from Judah ...,[38] which classical rabbinical sources took to imply that Judah was the leader of his brothers, terming him the king.[39][40] The same part of the Book of Chronicles also describes Judah as the strongest of his brothers,[41] and rabbinical literature portrays him as having had extraordinary physical strength, able to shout for over 400 parasangs , able to crush iron into dust by his mouth, and with hair that stiffened so much, when he became angry, that it pierced his clothes.[42]

[edit ] Fighting Canaanites
Classical rabbinical sources allude to a war between the Canaanites and Judah's family (which isn't mentioned in the Bible), as a result of their destruction of Shechem in revenge for the rape of Dinah [43][44][45];[46][47] Judah features heavily as a protagonist in accounts of this war. In these accounts Judah kills Jashub , king of Tappuah , in hand-to-hand combat, after first having deposed Jashub from his horse by throwing an extremely heavy stone (60 shekels in weight) at him from a large distance away (the Midrash Wayissau states 177 cubits, while other sources have only 30 cubits );[2] the accounts say that Judah was able to achieve this even though he was himself under attack, from arrows which Jashub was shooting at him with both hands.[48] The accounts go on to state that while Judah was trying to remove Jashub's armour from his corpse, nine assistants of Jashub fell upon him in combat, but after Judah killed one, he scared away the others;[49] nevertheless, Judah killed several members of Jashub's army (42 men according to the midrashic Book of Jasher , but 1000 men according to the Testament of Judah ).[50]
[edit ] Selling Joseph
In the Torah's Joseph narrative, when his brothers are jealous of Joseph and contemplate murdering him, Judah suggests that the brothers should sell Joseph to some passing Ishmaelites ;[51] it is unclear from the narrative whether Judah's motives were to save Joseph, or to harm him but keep him alive but does clearly state that he sold him for 20 pieces of silver saying "how can we profit from conselling our brothers blood". The narrative goes on to state that the brothers dipped Joseph's coat in fresh goat's blood, and showed it to Jacob, after Joseph had gone, so that he would think that Joseph was dead; according to some classical rabbinical sources, Jacob suspected that Judah had killed Joseph,[52] especially, according to the Midrash Tanhuma , when Judah was the one who had brought the blood stained coat to Jacob.[2]
Since rabbinical sources held Judah to have been the leader of his brothers, these sources also hold him responsible for this deception, even if it was not Judah himself who brought the coat to Jacob.[53] Even if Judah had been trying to save Joseph, the classical rabbinical sources still regard him negatively for it; these sources argue that, as the leader of the brothers, Judah should have made more effort, and carried Joseph home to Jacob on his (Judah's) own shoulders.[54] These sources argue that Judah's brothers, after witnessing Jacob's grief at the loss of Joseph, deposed and excommunicated Judah, as the brothers held Judah entirely responsible, since they would have brought Joseph home if Judah had asked them to do so.[55] Divine punishment, according to such classical sources, was also inflicted on Judah in punishment; the death of Er and Onan, and of his wife, are portrayed in by such classical rabbis as being acts of divine retribution.[56]
[edit ] Protecting Benjamin
The Biblical Joseph narrative eventually describes Joseph as meeting his brothers again, while he is in a position of power, and without his brothers recognising him; in this latter part of the narrative, Benjamin initially remains in Canaan, and so Joseph takes Simeon hostage, and insists that the brothers return with their younger brother (Benjamin) to prove they aren't spies.[57] The narrative goes on to state that Judah offers himself to Jacob as surety for Benjamin's safety, and manages to persuade him to let them take Benjamin to Egypt ; according to classical rabbinical literature, because Judah had proposed that he should bear any blame forever, this ultimately led to his bones being rolled around his coffin without cease, while it was being carried during the Exodus , until Moses interceded with God, by arguing that Judah's confession (in regard to having sex with Tamar) had led to Reuben confessing his own incest.[2]
When, in the Joseph narrative, the brothers return with Benjamin to Joseph, Joseph tests whether the brothers have reformed by tricking them into a situation where he can demand the enslavement of Benjamin .[58] The narrative describes Judah as making an impassioned plea against enslaving Benjamin, ultimately making Joseph recant and reveal his identity;[59] the Genesis Rabbah , and particularly the midrashic book of Jasher, expand on this by describing Judah's plea as much more extensive than given in the Torah, and more vehement.[60][61]
The classical rabbinical literature goes on to argue that Judah reacted violently to the threat against Benjamin, shouting so loudly that Hushim , who was then in Canaan, was able to hear Judah ask him to travel to Egypt , to help Judah destroy it;[2] some sources have Judah angrily picking up an extremely heavy stone (400 shekels in weight), throwing it into the air, then grinding it to dust with his feet once it had landed.[62] These rabbinical sources argue that Judah had Naphtali enumerate the districts of Egypt , and after finding out that there were 12 (historically, there were actually 20 in Lower Egypt and 22 in Upper Egypt ), he decided to destroy three himself, and have his brothers destroy one of the remaining districts each;[2] the threat of destroying Egypt was, according to these sources, what really motivated Joseph to reveal himself to his brothers.[63]


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Death Notes: Husband - Jacob

Supposedly lived 147 years.


Research Notes: Husband - Jacob

From Wikipedia - Jacob :

Jacob (Hebrew : Standard Ya; Septuagint Greek : "heel" or "leg-puller"), also known as Israel (Hebrew : Standard Yisra, Isr; Septuagint Greek : "struggler with God"; pronounced /'d?e?k?b/ [1]), was the third Biblical patriarch and ancestor of the twelve tribes of Israel , named after ten of his twelve sons, as well as the two sons of his son Joseph.
The Bible says he was the son of Isaac and Rebecca , the grandson of Abraham and Sarah and of Bethuel , and the twin brother of Esau . He had twelve sons and one daughter by his two wives , Leah and Rachel , and their maidservants, Bilhah and Zilpah . The children were Reuben , Simeon , Levi , Judah , Dan , Naphtali , Gad , Asher , Issachar , Zebulun , daughter Dinah , Joseph , and Benjamin .[2] Before the birth of Benjamin, Jacob is renamed "Israel" by an angel, the name after which the modern nation of Israel is named.
As a result of a severe famine in Canaan , Jacob resettled his whole family in Egypt , in the Land of Goshen , at the time when his son Joseph was viceroy. Jacob died there 17 years later, and Joseph carried Jacob's remains to the land of Canaan, where he gave them stately burial in the same Cave of Machpelah as were buried Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebecca and Jacob's wife Leah (Genesis 49:29-50:14 ).


[edit ] Jacob's marriages
At Haran, Jacob saw a well where the shepherds were gathering their flocks to water them, and met Laban's younger daughter Rachel, Jacob's first cousin ; she was working as a shepherdess. He loved her immediately, and after spending a month with his relatives, asked for her hand in marriage in return for working seven years for Laban. Laban agreed to the arrangement. These seven years seemed to Jacob "but a few days, for the love he had for her"; but when they were complete and he asked for his wife, Laban deceived Jacob by switching Rachel's older sister, Leah, as the veiled bride.
According to the Midrash , both Jacob and Rachel suspected that Laban would pull such a trick; Laban was known as the "Aramean" (deceiver), and changed Jacob's wages ten times during his employ (Genesis 31:7). The couple therefore devised a series of signs by which Jacob could identify the veiled bride on his wedding night. But when Rachel saw her sister being taken out to the wedding canopy, her heart went out to her for the public shame Leah would suffer if she were exposed. Rachel therefore gave Leah the signs so that Jacob would not realize the switch.
In the morning, when the truth became known, Laban justified himself, saying that in his country it was unheard of to give the younger daughter before the older. However, he agreed to give Rachel in marriage as well if Jacob would work another seven years for her. After the week of wedding celebrations with Leah, Jacob married Rachel, and he continued to work for Laban for another seven years.
Jacob loved Rachel more than Leah, and Leah felt hated. God opened Leah's womb and she gave birth to four sons rapidly: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah. Rachel, however, remained barren. Following the example of Sarah, who gave her handmaid to Abraham after years of infertility, Rachel gave Jacob her handmaid, Bilhah, in marriage, so that Rachel could raise children through her. Bilhah gave birth to Dan and Naphtali. Seeing that she had left off childbearing temporarily, Leah then gave her handmaid Zilpah to Jacob in marriage so that Leah could raise more children through her. Zilpah gave birth to Gad and Asher. (According to some commentators, Bilhah and Zilpah were younger daughters of Laban.) Afterwards, Leah became fertile again and gave birth to Issachar, Zebulun, and Dinah. God remembered Rachel, who gave birth to Joseph. If pregnancies of different marriages overlapped, the twelve births could have occurred within seven years.
After Joseph was born, Jacob decided to return home to his parents. Laban was reluctant to release him, as God had blessed his flock on account of Jacob. Laban asked what he could pay Jacob, and Jacob proposed that all the spotted, speckled, and brown goats and sheep of Laban's flock, at any given moment, would be his wages. Jacob placed peeled rods of poplar, hazel, and chestnut within the flocks' watering holes or troughs, an action he later attributes to a dream. The text suggests that Jacob performed breeding experiments over the years to make his own flocks both more abundant and stronger than Laban's, that Laban responded by repeatedly reinterpreting the terms of Jacob's wages, and that the breeding favored Jacob regardless of Laban's pronouncements. Thus Jacob's herds increased and he became very wealthy.
As time passed, Laban's sons noticed that Jacob was taking the better part of their flocks, and Laban's friendly attitude towards Jacob began to change. God told Jacob that he should leave, and he and his wives and children did so without informing Laban. Before they left, Rachel stole the teraphim , considered to be household idols, from Laban's house.
In a rage, Laban pursued Jacob for seven days. The night before he caught up to him, God appeared to Laban in a dream and warned him not to say anything good or bad to Jacob. When the two met, Laban played the part of the injured father-in-law and also demanded his teraphim back. Knowing nothing about Rachel's theft, Jacob told Laban that whoever stole them should die, and stood aside to let him search. When Laban reached Rachel's tent, she hid the teraphim by sitting on them and stating she could not get up because she was menstruating ; this event was considered by the Biblical audience as conveying significant defilement upon the teraphim. Jacob and Laban then parted from each other with a pact to preserve the peace between them. Laban returned to his home and Jacob continued on his way.

[edit ] Joseph in Egypt
Joseph was separated from his father Jacob at the age of 17 when his brothers, who had been jealous of his dreams of kingship over them, sold him to traders heading down to Egypt, then-capital of the slave trade. Jacob was deeply grieved by the loss of his favorite son, and refused to be comforted. Unbeknownst to the family, Joseph was sold as a slave to Potiphar, Pharaoh 's chief butcher. He resisted the advances of his master's wife for a long time until she accosted him and then accused him of trying to rape her; he was then thrown into prison.
After Joseph had spent twelve years in prison, the Pharaoh of Egypt had two troubling dreams, and his butler recalled having met Joseph, a successful interpreter of dreams, in Pharaoh's prison. Joseph was called from prison and interpreted the dreams as prophesying seven years each of abundance and famine; Pharaoh was so impressed that he made Joseph viceroy (second in command) over Egypt and the manager of Egypt's grain stores, due to the prophecy of famine. When the prophesied famine struck throughout the known world, Joseph sold stored grain to men of all nations.
In the first year of famine, Jacob sent ten sons to Egypt, excluding Benjamin, to procure grain for their starving families (Genesis 42:3 ). Joseph recognized them but did not reveal himself to them; desirous to see his full brother Benjamin, of whom they had spoken, Joseph accused them of being spies, imprisoned Simeon as a hostage, and demanded Benjamin be produced to verify their claims. Jacob was distraught by this news, concluding that Simeon was as lost as Joseph, and refusing to send Benjamin, even in response to a rash vow by Reuben. Benjamin is taken to represent all that is left to Jacob of his favorite wife's children.
When famine worsened the second year and food stores ran out, Judah pledged his own honor to Jacob that he would protect Benjamin from harm, and Jacob relented and sent the brothers again. On meeting them, Joseph threatened to imprison Benjamin, but Judah offered himself in Benjamin's place. Interpreters say Joseph had tested his brothers with this threat and recognized that Judah passed the test, by refusing to sell Rachel's son into slavery as he had done once before. Overcome with emotion, Joseph revealed himself to his brothers and provided for them to move Jacob's entire family to Egypt.
Jacob's family, including 66 direct descendants, were housed by Joseph in the Egyptian province of Goshen . Jacob's final 17 years were spent in peace and tranquility in Egypt, with all 12 sons.

Jacob adopted Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, as his own. Anticipating his death, he blessed each of his 12 sons with varying blessings he deemed appropriate. It has been understood that Judah, the fourth born, received the primary blessing, due to Reuben's incest and Simeon's and Levi's betrayal. Jacob also made Joseph promise that he would bury him in the Cave of the Patriarchs (with Leah, and Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, and Rebecca; Rachel was buried at Bethlehem). According to the Midrash,[22] he desired to tell his sons the exact date when the Messiah would arrive, but the prophecy fails him. Another tradition states that the two lines of the Shema Yisrael were exchanged, the sons proclaiming their righteousness to "Yisrael" (Jacob), and Jacob blessing God's name responsively. The first line is actually Deuteronomy 6:4 and the response was instituted by the rabbis, and the chant is central to Jewish prayer services.
After giving these instructions, Jacob died at the age of 147 (Genesis 47:28). With Pharaoh's permission, Joseph had Jacob meticulously embalmed and led a huge state funeral back to Canaan, with the twelve sons carrying their father's coffin and many Egyptian officials accompanying them.

[edit ] Sons of Jacob
See also: Israelite
Jacob's wives had twelve sons and one daughter: Reuben (Genesis 29:32 ), Simeon (Genesis 29:33 ), Levi (Genesis 29:34 ), Judah (Genesis 29:35 ), Dan (Genesis 30:5 ), Naphtali (Genesis 30:7 ), Gad (Genesis 30:10 ), Asher (Genesis 30:12 ), Issachar (Genesis 30:17 ), Zebulun (Genesis 30:19 ), Dinah (Genesis 30:21 ), Joseph (Genesis 30:23 ), and Benjamin (Genesis 35:18 ).


Research Notes: Wife - Rachel

FamilySearch.org Disc #94 Pin #98689 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer)


Jacquetta of Luxembourg




Husband (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Jacquetta of Luxembourg 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Jacquetta Woodville 3

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John L'Estrange (      -      ) 3




James I of Aragon and Violant of Hungary




Husband James I of Aragon 4

            AKA: James I "the Conqueror" King of Aragon
           Born: 2 Feb 1208
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Jul 1276
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 1235



Wife Violant of Hungary 5

            AKA: Yolanda de Hungría
           Born: Abt 1216
     Christened: 
           Died: 1253
         Buried:  - Monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona, Lleida, Catalonia


         Father: Andrew II of Hungary (Abt 1177-1235) 6
         Mother: Yolanda de Courtenay (Abt 1200-1233) 7




Children
1 F Yolanda of Aragon 8

            AKA: Violant of Aragon, Violante of Aragon
           Born: 1236 - Zaragoza, Aragon (Zaragoza), (Spain)
     Christened: 
           Died: 1301 - Roncevalles
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alfonso X "El Sabio" King of Galicia, Castile and León (1221-1284) 9
           Marr: 26 Dec 1246 - Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain



Research Notes: Husband - James I of Aragon

From Wikipedia - James I of Aragon :

James I the Conqueror (Catalan : Jaume el Conqueridor, Aragonese : Chaime lo Conqueridor, Spanish : Jaime el Conquistador, Occitan : Jacme lo Conquistaire; 2 February 1208 - 27 July 1276) was the King of Aragon , Count of Barcelona , and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276. His long reign saw the expansion of the Crown of Aragon on all sides: into Valencia to the south, Languedoc to the north, and the Balearic Islands to the east. By a treaty with Louis IX of France , he wrested the county of Barcelona from nominal French suzerainty and integrated it into his crown. His part in the Reconquista was similar in Mediterranean Spain to that of his contemporary Ferdinand III of Castile in Andalusia .

As a legislator and organiser, he occupies a high place among the Spanish kings. James compiled the Libre del Consulat de Mar ,[1] which governed maritime trade and helped establish Aragonese supremacy in the western Mediterranean . He was an important figure in the development of Catalan , sponsoring Catalan literature and writing a quasi-autobiographical chronicle of his reign: the Llibre dels fets .

Early life and reign until majority
James was born at Montpellier as the only son of Peter II and Mary , heiress of William VIII of Montpellier and Eudokia Komnene . As a child, James was a pawn in the power politics of Provence , where his father was engaged in struggles helping the Cathar heretics of Albi against the Albigensian Crusaders led by Simon IV de Montfort , Earl of Leicester , who were trying to exterminate them. Peter endeavoured to placate the northern crusaders by arranging a marriage between his son James and Simon's daughter. He entrusted the boy to be educated in Montfort's care in 1211, but was soon forced to take up arms against him, dying at the Battle of Muret on 12 September 1213. Montfort would willingly have used James as a means of extending his own power had not the Aragonese and Catalans appealed to Pope Innocent III , who insisted that Montfort surrender him. James was handed over, at Carcassonne , in May or June 1214, to the papal legate Peter of Benevento .

James was then sent to Monzón , where he was entrusted to the care of William of Montredon , the head of the Knights Templar in Spain and Provence; the regency meanwhile fell to his great uncle Sancho, Count of Roussillon , and his son, the king's cousin, Nuño . The kingdom was given over to confusion until, in 1217, the Templars and some of the more loyal nobles brought the young king to Zaragoza .[2]


In 1221, he was married to Eleanor, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonora of England . The next six years of his reign were full of rebellions on the part of the nobles. By the Peace of Alcalá of 31 March 1227, the nobles and the king came to terms.[3]

Acquisition of Urgell
In 1228, James faced the sternest opposition from a vassal yet. Guerau IV de Cabrera had occupied the County of Urgell in opposition to Aurembiax , the heiress of Ermengol VIII , who had died without sons in 1208. While Aurembiax' mother, Elvira, had made herself a protegée of James' father, on her death (1220), Guerao had occupied the county and displaced Aurembiax, claiming that a woman could not inherit.

James intervened on behalf of Aurembiax, whom he owed protection. He bought Guerau off and allowed Aurembiax to reclaim her territory, which she did at Lleida , probably also becoming one of James' earliest mistresses.[4] She surrendered Lleida to James and agreed to hold Urgell in fief from him. On her death in 1231, James exchanged the Balearic Islands for Urgell with her widower, Peter of Portugal .


Relations with France and Navarre
From 1230 to 1232, James negotiated with Sancho VII of Navarre , who desired his help against his nephew and closest living male relative, Theobald IV of Champagne . James and Sancho negotiated a treaty whereby James would inherit Navarre on the old Sancho's death, but when this did occur, the Navarrese nobless instead elevated Theobald to the throne (1234), and James disputed it. Pope Gregory IX was required to intervene.[5] In the end, James accepted Theobald's succession.

James endeavoured to form a state straddling the Pyrenees , to counterbalance the power of France north of the Loire . As with the much earlier Visigothic attempt, this policy was victim to physical, cultural, and political obstacles. As in the case of Navarre, he was too wise to launch into perilous adventures. By the Treaty of Corbeil , signed in May 1258, he frankly withdrew from conflict with Louis IX of France and was content with the recognition of his position, and the surrender of antiquated and illusory French claims to the overlordship of Catalonia.

Reconquest
After his false start at uniting Aragon with the Kingdom of Navarre through a scheme of mutual adoption, James turned to the south and the Mediterranean Sea , where he conquered Majorca on 10 September in 1229 and the rest of the Balearic Islands; Minorca 1232; Ibiza 1235) and where Valencia capitulated 28 September 1238.

During his remaining two decades after Corbeil, James warred with the Moors in Murcia , on behalf of his son-in-law Alfonso X of Castile . On 26 March 1244, the two monarchs signed the Treaty of Almizra to determine the zones of their expansion into Andalusia so as to prevent squabbling between them. Specifically, it defined the borders of the newly-created Kingdom of Valencia . James signed it on that date, but Alfonso did not affirm it until much later. According to the treaty, all lands south of a line from Biar to Villajoyosa through Busot were reserved for Castile.

Crusade of 1269
The "khan of Tartary" (actually the Ilkhan ) Abaqa corresponded with James in early 1267, inviting him to join forces with the Mongols and go on Crusade .[6] James sent an ambassador to Abaqa in the person of Jayme Alaric de Perpignan , who returned with a Mongol embassy in 1269.[7] Pope Clement IV tried to dissuade James from Crusading, regarding his moral character as sub-par, and Alfonso X did the same. Nonetheless, James, who was then campaigning in Murcia , made peace with Mohammed I ibn Nasr , the Sultan of Granada , and set about collecting funds for a Crusade. After organising the government for his absence and assembling a fleet at Barcelona in September 1269, he was ready to sail east. The troubadour Olivier lo Templier composed a song praising the voyage and hoping for its success. A storm, however, drove him off course and he landed at Aigues-Mortes . According to the continuator of William of Tyre , he returned via Montpellier por l'amor de sa dame Berenguiere ("for the love his lady Berengaria") and abandoned any further effort at a Crusade.

James' bastard sons Pedro Fernández and Fernán Sánchez , who had been given command of part of the fleet, did continue on their way to Acre , where they arrived in December. They found that Baibars , the Mameluke sultan of Egypt , had broken his truce with the Kingdom of Jerusalem and was making a demonstration of his military power in front of Acre. During the demonstration, Egyptian troops hidden in the bushes ambushed a returning Frankish force which had been in Galilee . James' sons, initially eager for a fight, changed their minds after this spectacle and returned home via Sicily , where Fernán Sánchez was knighted by Charles of Anjou .

Patronage of art, learning, and literature

James built and consecrated the Cathedral of Lleida , which was constructed in a style transitional between Romanesque and Gothic with little influence from Moorish styles .[8]

James was a patron of the University of Montpellier , which owed much of its development to his impetus.[9] He also founded a studium at Valencia in 1245 and received privileges for it from Pope Innocent IV , but it did not develop as splendidly.[10] In 1263, James presided over a debate in Barcelona between the Jewish rabbi Nahmanides and Pablo Christiani , a prominent converso .

James was the first great sponsor and patron of vernacular Catalan literature. Indeed, he may himself be called "the first of the Catalan prose writers."[11] James wrote or dictated at various stages a chronicle of his own life, Llibre dels fets in Catalan, which is the first self-chronicle of a Christian king. As well as a fine example of autobiography the "Book of Deeds" expresses concepts of the power and purpose of monarchy; examples of loyalty and treachery in the feudal order; and medieval military tactics. More controversially, some historians have looked at these writings as a source of Catalan identity, separate from that of Occitania and Rome .

James also wrote the Libre de la Saviesa or "Book of Wisdom." The book contains proverbs from various authors going back as far as King Solomon and as close to his own time, such as Albert the Great . It even contains maxims from the medieval Arab philosophers and from the Apophthegmata Philosophorum of Honein ben Ishak , which was probably translated at Barcelona during his reign. A Hebrew translator by the name of Jehuda was employed at James's court during this period.[12]


Though James was himself a prose writer and sponsored mostly prose works, he had an appreciation of verse.[13] In consequence of the Albigensian Crusade , many troubadours were forced to flee southern France and many found refuge in Aragon. Notwithstanding his early patronage of poetry, by the influence of his confessor Ramon de Penyafort , James brought the Inquisition into his realm in 1233 to prevent any vernacular translation of the Bible .[14]

Succession
The favour James showed his illegitimate offspring led to protest from the nobles, and to conflicts between his sons legitimate and illegitimate. When one of the latter, Fernán Sánchez , who had behaved with gross ingratitude and treason to his father, was slain by the legitimate son Peter , the old king recorded his grim satisfaction.

In his Will James divided his states between his sons by Yolanda of Hungary : the aforementioned Peter received the Hispanic possessions on the mainland and James , the Kingdom of Majorca (including the Balearic Islands and the counties of Roussillon and Cerdanya ) and the Lordship of Montpellier. The division inevitably produced fratricidal conflicts. In 1276, the king fell very ill at Alzira and resigned his crown, intending to retire to the monastery of Poblet , but he died at Valencia on 27 July.

Marriages and children
James first married, in 1221, Eleanor, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonora of England . Though he later had the marriage annulled, his one son by her was declared legitimate:

Alfonso (1229-1260), married Constance of Montcada , Countess of Bigorre

In 1235, James remarried to Yolanda , daughter of Andrew II of Hungary by his second wife Yolande de Courtenay. She bore him numerous children:
Yolanda , also known as Violant, (1236-1301), married Alfonso X of Castile
Constance (1239-1269), married Juan Manuel, Lord of Villena , son of Ferdinand III
Peter (1240-1285), successor in Aragon, Catalonia, and Valencia
James (1243-1311), successor in Balearics and Languedoc
Ferdinand (1245-1250)
Sancha (1246-1251)
Isabella (1247-1271), married Philip III of France
Mary (1248-1267), nun
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo (1250-1279)
Eleanor (born 1251, died young)

James married thirdly Teresa Gil de Vidaure , but only by a private document, and left her when she developed leprosy.
James (c.1255-1285), lord of Xèrica
Peter (1259-1318), lord of Ayerbe
The children in the third marriage were recognised in his last Will as being in the line of Successon to the Throne, should the senior lines fail.

James also had several lovers, both during and after his marriages, and a few bore him illegitimate sons.
By Blanca d'Antillón:
Ferran Sanchis (or Fernando Sánchez; 1240-1275), baron of Castro
By Berenguela Fernández:
Pedro Fernández, baron of Híjar
By Elvira Sarroca:
Jaume Sarroca (born 1248), Archbishop of Huesca


Research Notes: Wife - Violant of Hungary

From Wikipedia - Violant of Hungary :

Violant of Hungary (Esztergom , Kingdom of Hungary , c. 1216 - 1253) was Queen consort of James I of Aragon . She is also called Jolánta in Hungarian , Iolanda or Violant d'Hongria in Catalan and Yolanda or Violante de Hungría in Spanish .

Family
Violant was a daughter of Andrew II of Hungary and Violant of Courtenay . Her paternal grandparents were Béla III of Hungary and his first wife Agnes of Antioch . Her maternal grandparents were Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife Yolanda of Flanders .

Violant was a half-sister of Anne Marie, Empress of Bulgaria , Béla IV of Hungary , Saint Elisabeth of Hungary and Coloman of Lodomeria .

Violant's mother died in 1233, when Violant was seventeen years old. Her father remarried, to Beatrice d'Este , they had a son called Stephen.

Marriage
Violant married James I in 1235, being his second wife. By the marriage, Violant became Queen Consort of Aragon . James already had one son, Alfonso by his first marriage to Eleanor of Castile . James however divorced Eleanor and decided to remarry, he chose Violant.[1] [2]


James and Violant had ten children:
Violant of Aragon (1236-1301), queen of Castile by her marriage to Alphonse X .
Constance of Aragon (1239-1269), infanta of Castile by her marriage to Juan Manuel of Castile , son of Ferdinand III of Castile .
Peter III of Aragon (1240-1285).
James II of Majorca (1243-1311).
Ferdinand of Aragon (1245-1250).
Sancha of Aragon (1246-1251).
Isabella of Aragon (1247-1271), married Philip III of France
Maria of Aragon (1248-1267), nun.
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo (1250-1275)
Eleanor of Aragon (1251-?, young)

Violant's daughter, Isabella became Queen of France by her marriage to Philip III of France . Isabella was mother of Philip IV of France and Charles of Valois .

Charles of Valois was father of Philip VI of France , Isabella, Duchess of Bourbon and Blanche, Queen of Germany .

Violant died in 1253. Violant and her daughter Sancha's remains are at the monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona in Lleida , Catalonia .

Her husband remarried one more time, to Teresa Gil de Vidaure , who was once James' mistress.


Research Notes: Child - Yolanda of Aragon

From Wikipedia - Violant of Aragon :

Violant or Violante of Aragon, also known as Yolanda of Aragon (1236 - 1301) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252-1284).

She was born in Zaragoza , the daughter of King James I of Aragon (1213-1276) and his second wife the queen Yolande of Hungary (ca.1215-1253). Her maternal grandparents were Andrew II of Hungary and Violant of Courtenay.

On December 26, 1246 she married in Valladolid with the future King Alfonso X of Castile and Leon (1221-1284). Because of her youth (Violante was only 10 years old at the time of the marriage), she produced no children for several years and it was feared that she was barren. The oft-repeated claim that Alfonso almost had their marriage annulled is untrue, and they went on to have twelve children:
Fernando, died in infancy, and buried in Las Huelgas in Burgos .
Berengaria of Castile (1253-after 1284). She was betrothed to Louis, the son and heir of King Louis IX of France , but her fiance died prematurely in 1260. She entered the convent in Las Huelgas , where she was living in 1284.
Beatriz of Castile (1254-1280). She married William VII, Marquess of Montferrat .
Ferdinand de la Cerda, Infante of Castile (October 23, 1255-July 25, 1275). He married Blanche , the daughter of King Louis IX of France , by whom he had two children. Because he predeceased his father, his younger brother Sancho inherited the throne.
Leonor of Castile (1257-1275)
Sancho IV of Castile (May 13, 1258-1295)
Constanza of Castile (1258-August 22, 1280), a nun at Las Huelgas.
Pedro of Castile (June 1260-October 10, 1283)
Juan of Castile, Lord of Valencia (March or April, 1262-June 25, 1319).
Isabella, died young.
Violante of Castile (1265-1296). She married Diego Lopez de Haro
Jaime of Castile (August 1266-August 9, 1284)

She died at Roncevalles .


Evan ap Robert Lewis of Vron Gôch farm, Lord of Rhiwlas and Jane




Husband Evan ap Robert Lewis of Vron Gôch farm, Lord of Rhiwlas 10 11

            AKA: Evan Robert Lewis
           Born: Abt 1585
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert ap Lewis ap Griffith Lord of Rhiwlas (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Jane

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Owen ap Evan of Vron Gôch farm 10 12

           Born: Bef 1636 - <Fron Gôch, Penllyn, Merionethshire, Wales>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1669 - Fron Gôch, Penllyn, Merionethshire, Wales
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Gainor John (      -Abt 1682) 10 13


2 M Evan ap Evan of Vron Gôch farm, Merionethshire 14 15

           Born:  - <Vron Gôch, Penllyn, Merionethshire, Wales>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 M John ap Evan 12

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Evan ap Robert Lewis of Vron Gôch farm, Lord of Rhiwlas

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 282


Research Notes: Wife - Jane

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania by Charles H. Browning (Philadelphia, 1912), p. 282


Research Notes: Child - Owen ap Evan of Vron Gôch farm

The children of Owen ap Evan assumed the surname of Owen.


Owen Humphrey of Llwyn du and Jane




Husband Owen Humphrey of Llwyn du 16 17

            AKA: Humphrey Owen of Llwyn du
           Born: 1625 - <Llwyn du>, Llangelynin, Talybont, Merionethshire, Wales
     Christened: 13 Apr 1629 - Llangelynin Parish, Talybont, Merionethshire, Wales
           Died: 1699 - Llangelynin Parish, Talybont, Merionethshire, Wales
         Buried: 


         Father: Humphrey ap Hugh of Llwyn du (Between 1600/1603-1664)
         Mother: Elizabeth verch John Powell of Gadfa, Rhiwargor (1593/1607-      )


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Margaret Vaughan (1630-1699) 2 18 - 1681 - London, England

   Other Spouse: Elizabeth Thomas (Abt 1631-      ) 2

Events

• Converted: to the Quaker faith, Bef 1662, [Llwyngwril], Merionethshire, Wales. 19

• Justice: 1678.




Wife Jane 20

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Rebecca Humphrey (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Owen Humphrey of Llwyn du

2nd son and heir of Humphrey ap Hugh.

From Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania, p. 151:

"[John Humphrey and Samuel Humphrey] were brothers to Owen Humphrey, of Llwyn du, 1625-1695, a J. P. in Merioneth, and a prominent Friend, who was the father of Rebecca, wife of Robert Owen, of Merion [Pennsylvania], and Elizabeth, wife of John Roberts..."
-------------
From Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, p. 48:

"Issue [of Humphrey ap Hugh]:...
3. Owen, bapt. in Llangelynin Church, 13 April, 1629; of whom presently [see footnote 3, p. 48]..."

Footnote 3, p. 48:
"Owen Humphrey, second son and heir of Humphrey ap Hugh, inherited Llwyn du. He married Margaret, daughter of ______________, and had, among other issue, some of whom removed to Pennsylvania, a daughter, Rebecca, who married, 1678, Robert Owen, of Fron Gôch, near Bala, in the Comôt of Pennlyn, Merionethshire. Robert and Rebecca Owen removed to Pennsylvania in 1690 and settled in Merion Township, where they died 1697, leaving besides daughters, male issue as follows; Evan Owen, Provincial Councillor, Judge of Court of Common Pleas, etc.; Owen Owen, High Sheriff of Philadelphia County and Coroner; John Owen High Sheriff of the County of Chester, Member of Assembly and Trustee of the Loan Office; and Robert Owen, who married Susanna, daughter of William Hudson, Mayor of Philadelphia. The second Robert Owen's daughter, Hannah, married, first, John Ogden, by whom she had a son, William Ogden, who left issue, and, secondly, Joseph Wharton, of Walnut Grove, by whom she had, besides other children, Robert Wharton, Mayor of Philadelphia, Captain of First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry."


Research Notes: Child - Rebecca Humphrey

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia, 1912. From p. 287: "REBECCA HUMPHREY, who m. in 1678, Robert Owen, of Vron Goch farm, and removed to Merion [Pennsylvania] in 1690, as mentioned [on p. 283]."



John Wilmot and Jane




Husband John Wilmot

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Jane

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Constant Wilmot

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John Ashman (Abt 1689-After 1731)
           Marr: 1713 or 1714



Research Notes: Husband - John Wilmot

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jsa3rd/AshmanAncestorsinAmerica.htm


Research Notes: Wife - Jane

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jsa3rd/AshmanAncestorsinAmerica.htm


Research Notes: Child - Constant Wilmot

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jsa3rd/AshmanAncestorsinAmerica.htm


Sources


1. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27 (Philip II).

2. http://www.familysearch.org.

3. Wikipedia.org, George Stanley, 9th Baron Strange.

4. Wikipedia.org, James I of Aragon.

5. Wikipedia.org, Violant of Hungary.

6. Wikipedia.org, Andrew II of Hungary.

7. Wikipedia.org, Yolanda de Courtenay.

8. Wikipedia.org, Violant of Aragon.

9. Wikipedia.org, Alfonso X of Castile.

10. Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), p. 282.

11. The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," p. 168. (Digitized by Google)

12. The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," p. 168.

13. The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," p. 168-169.

14. Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), p. 284.

15. The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," pp. 168-169.

16. Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), p. 151, 286.

17. Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 48.

18. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=billotte&id=P3368786258.

19. Richard Davies, An Account of the Convincement, Exercises, Services, and Travels, of that Ancient Servant of the Lord, Richard Davies with Some Relation of Ancient Friends, and of the Spreading of Truth in North Wales, fifth ed; London: 1794 (Google Books (http://books.google.co.uk) : downloaded 5 Jul 2014), 59.

20. Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), pp. 286-287.


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27 (Philip II).

2 http://www.familysearch.org.

3 Wikipedia.org, George Stanley, 9th Baron Strange.

4 Wikipedia.org, James I of Aragon.

5 Wikipedia.org, Violant of Hungary.

6 Wikipedia.org, Andrew II of Hungary.

7 Wikipedia.org, Yolanda de Courtenay.

8 Wikipedia.org, Violant of Aragon.

9 Wikipedia.org, Alfonso X of Castile.

10 Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), p. 282.

11 The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," p. 168. (Digitized by Google)

12 The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," p. 168.

13 The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," p. 168-169.

14 Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), p. 284.

15 The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. (Vol. 13. Philadelphia: Publication Fund of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1889.), Glenn, Thomas Allen, "Owen of Merion," pp. 168-169.

16 Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), p. 151, 286.

17 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 48.

18 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=billotte&id=P3368786258.

19 Richard Davies, An Account of the Convincement, Exercises, Services, and Travels, of that Ancient Servant of the Lord, Richard Davies with Some Relation of Ancient Friends, and of the Spreading of Truth in North Wales, fifth ed; London: 1794 (Google Books (http://books.google.co.uk) : downloaded 5 Jul 2014), 59.

20 Browning, Charles H, Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Philadelphia: William J. Campbell, 1912.), pp. 286-287.


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