The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord and Amélie Countess of Aubnay




Husband Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord 1 2 3

            AKA: Bernard I Comte de la Marche
           Born: Abt 970 - <Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1047 - <La Marche, (France)>
         Buried: 


         Father: Aldebert I Count of La Marche and Périgord (      -0997) 3 4
         Mother: Adalemode of Limoges (      -Between 1007/1010) 5 6


       Marriage: 



Wife Amélie Countess of Aubnay 1 7

            AKA: Amelia d'Angoulęme
           Born: Abt 974 - <Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1072
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges 1 8 9

            AKA: Almode de la Marche, Almodis de la Haute Marche, Almodis of La Marche
           Born: Abt 1000 - Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Nov 1071
         Buried:  - Cathedral of Barcelona, Spain
         Spouse: Hugh V "the Pious" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan (      -1060) 3 10 11
           Marr: Abt 1038
         Spouse: Pons Count of Toulouse, Albi and Dijon (Between 0990/1020-1060) 12 13
           Marr: 1045
         Spouse: Ramon Berenguer I Count of Barcelona (1023-1076) 1 14
           Marr: 1056



2 M Aldebert II Count of La Marche & Poitou 15

            AKA: Aldebert II de la Marche
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1088 - <La Marche, (France)>
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord

May have died about 1041.


Death Notes: Child - Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges

Murdered


Research Notes: Child - Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges

Second wife of Pons of Toulouse. Third wife of Ramon Berenguer I.

From Wikipedia - Almodis de la Marche :

Almodis de la Marche (990 or c. 1020 - 16 October 1071 ) was the daughter of Bernard I, Count of Marche and wife Amélie. She married Hugh V of Lusignan around 1038 and they had two sons and one daughter:
Hugh VI of Lusignan (c. 1039-1101)
Jordan de Lusignan
Mélisende de Lusignan (b. bef. 1055), married before 1074 to Simon I "l'Archevęque", Vidame de Parthenay

Almodis and Hugh of Lusignan divorced due to consanguinity , and Hugh arranged for her to marry Count Pons of Toulouse in 1040. Together they produced several children, including:
William IV of Toulouse
Raymond IV of Toulouse
Hugh, Abbot of Saint-Gilles
Almodis of Toulouse, married Count Pierre of Melgueil

She was still Pons' wife in April 1053, but shortly thereafter Almodis was abducted by Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona . He kidnapped her from Narbonne with the aid of a fleet sent north by his ally, the Muslim emir of Tortosa . They married immediately (despite the fact both of her previous husbands were still alive) and they appear with their twin sons in a charter the next year. Pope Victor II excommunicated Almodis and Ramon for this illegal marriage until 1056. Together they produced four children:
Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona
Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona
Inés of Barcelona, married Count Guigues I of Albon
Sancha of Barcelona, married Count Guillermo Ramon I of Cerdagne

Almodis maintained contact with her former husbands and many children, and in 1066/1067 she traveled to Toulouse for her daughter's wedding. A few years before, in 1060, Hugh V of Lusignan had revolted against his lord, Duke William VIII of Aquitaine , in support of Almodis' son William IV of Toulouse . Her sons supported one another in military campaigns; Hugh VI of Lusignan , Raymond IV of Toulouse , and Berenguer Ramon all took the Cross.

Her third husband Ramon had a son from a previous marriage, Pedro Ramon, who was his heir. Pedro apparently resented Almodis' influence and was concerned she was trying to replace him with her own two sons. He murdered her in October 1071. Pedro was disinherited and exiled for his crime, and fled the country. When his father died in 1076, Barcelona was split between Berenguer Ramon and Ramon Berenguer, Almodis' sons. The family history of murder did not end with Pedro Ramon, as Berenguer Ramon earned his nickname "The Fratricide " when he killed his own twin brother. 1 8 9


Heidrek "Ulfhamr" Angantyrsson and Amfleda "the Younger"




Husband Heidrek "Ulfhamr" Angantyrsson 1

           Born: Abt 552 - <Reidgotalandi, Norway>
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         Father: Angantyr Heidreksson King in Reidgotalandi (Abt 0532-      ) 1
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Amfleda "the Younger" 1

           Born: Abt 556 - Norway
     Christened: 
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Children
1 F Hildur Heidreksdatter 1

            AKA: Hervor Heidreksdatter, Hildis Heidreksdatter
           Born: Abt 572 - <Jutland, Denmark>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Harald Valdarsson (Abt 0568-      ) 1
           Marr: Abt 589 - <Jutland, Denmark>





Ralph de Mainwaring and Amice of Chester




Husband Ralph de Mainwaring 1

            AKA: Rafe de Mainwaring
           Born: Abt 1155 - <Warmingham, Cheshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger de Mainwaring (Abt 1130-      ) 1
         Mother: Ellen (Abt 1130-      ) 1


       Marriage: 1179 - Warmingham, Cheshire, England



Wife Amice of Chester 1 16

            AKA: Amicia de Meschines
           Born: Abt 1167
     Christened: 
           Died: 
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         Father: Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147-1181) 16 17 18
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Bertred Mainwaring 1 19

           Born: Abt 1196 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1249
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Henry de Aldithley (Abt 1175-Bef 1246) 1 19
           Marr: 1218 - Edgmond, Cheshire, England




Research Notes: Wife - Amice of Chester

Illegitimate daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, according to Wikipedia. 1 16


Humbert I Count of Savoy and Ancelie von Lenzburg




Husband Humbert I Count of Savoy 1

           Born: Abt 972 - <Geneva, Switzerland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Jul 1042 or 1051
         Buried: 


         Father: Gerald of Geneva (Abt 0942-      ) 1
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Ancelie von Lenzburg 1

           Born: Abt 974 - <Geneva, Switzerland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Arnold von Schannis (Abt 0948-      ) 1
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy 1 20

            AKA: Eudo I Count of Savoy and Maurienne, Odo I Count of Maurienne (Savoy) and Chablis, Otto Count of Maurienne and Savoy
           Born: Abt 1002 - <Geneva, Switzerland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Mar 1060
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alix Duchess of Turin (Abt 1015-1091) 1 21 22
           Marr: Abt 1046




Death Notes: Child - Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy

FamilySearch has d. 19 Jan 1057 or 1060.


Research Notes: Child - Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy

Count of Maurienne and Savoy, Margrave of Susa, Count of Chablis 1 20


Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Private
         Mother: Private


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Wife (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Private




Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Aeneas :

In Greco-Roman mythology , Aeneas (Greek : Aineías; pronounced /?'ni??s/ in English ) was a Trojan hero, the son of prince Anchises and the goddess Venus . His father was also the second cousin of King Priam of Troy. The journey of Aeneas from Troy, (led by Venus, his mother) which led to the founding of the city Rome , is recounted in Virgil 's Aeneid . He is considered an important figure in Greek and Roman legend and history. Aeneas is a character in Homer 's Iliad , Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica , and Shakespeare 's Troilus and Cressida . Also, Aeneas has been known for his skills in combat during the battle of Troy. He also was one of the keys to the founding of Rome.

Mythology
In the Iliad , Aeneas is the leader of the Dardanians (Trojans - descendants of Dardanus), and a principal lieutenant of Hector , son of the Trojan king Priam . In the poem, Aeneas's mother Aphrodite frequently comes to his aid on the battlefield; he is also a favorite of Apollo . Aphrodite and Apollo rescue Aeneas from combat with Diomedes of Argos , who nearly kills him, and carry him away to Pergamos for healing. Even Poseidon , who normally favors the Greeks, comes to Aeneas's rescue when the latter falls under the assault of Achilles , noting that Aeneas, though from a junior branch of the royal family, is destined to become king of the Trojan people.


As seen in the first books of the Aeneid, Aeneas is one of the few Trojans who were not killed in battle or enslaved when Troy fell. When Troy was sacked by the Greeks, Aeneas, after being commanded by the gods to flee, gathered a group, collectively known as the Aeneads , who then traveled to Italy and became progenitors of the Romans . The Aeneads included Aeneas's trumpeter Misenus , his father Anchises , his friends Achates , Sergestus and Acmon , the healer Lapyx, the steady helmsman Palinurus , and his son Ascanius (also known as Iulus, Julus, or Ascanius Julius.) He carried with him the Lares and Penates , the statues of the household gods of Troy, and transplanted them to Italy.


(From here on, the Greek myths make room for the Roman mythology, so the Roman names of the gods will be used.) After a brief, but fierce storm sent up against the group at Juno 's request, and several failed attempts to found cities, Aeneas and his fleet made landfall at Carthage after six years of wanderings. Aeneas had a year long affair with the Carthaginian queen Dido (also known as Elissa), who proposed that the Trojans settle in her land and that she and Aeneas reign jointly over their peoples. Once again, this was in favour of Juno, who was told of the fact that her favorite city would eventually be defeated by the Trojans' descendants. However, the messenger god Mercury was sent by Jupiter and Venus to remind Aeneas of his journey and his purpose, thus compelling him to leave secretly and continue on his way. When Dido learned of this, she ordered her sister Anna to construct a pyre, she said, to get rid of Aeneas' possessions, left behind by him in his haste to leave. Standing on it, Dido uttered a curse that would forever pit Carthage against Rome. She then committed suicide by stabbing herself with the same sword she gave Aeneas when they first met and then falling on the pyre. Anna reproached the mortally wounded Dido. Meanwhile, Juno, looking down on the tragedy and moved by Dido's plight, sent Iris to make Dido's passage to Hades quicker and less painful. When Aeneas later traveled to Hades, he called to her ghost but she neither spoke to nor acknowledged him.


The company stopped on the island of Sicily during the course of their journey. After the first trip, before the Trojans went to Carthage, Achaemenides , one of Odysseus ' crew who had been left behind, traveled with them. After visiting Carthage, the Trojans returned to Sicily where they were welcomed by Acestes , king of the region and son of the river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman.


Latinus , king of the Latins , welcomed Aeneas's army of exiled Trojans and let them reorganize their life in Latium . His daughter Lavinia had been promised to Turnus , king of the Rutuli , but Latinus received a prophecy that Lavinia would be betrothed to one from another land - namely, Aeneas. Latinus heeded the prophecy, and Turnus consequently declared war on Aeneas at the urging of Juno, who was aligned with King Mezentius of the Etruscans and Queen Amata of the Latins. Aeneas' forces prevailed. Turnus was killed and his people were captured. According to Livy , Aeneas was victorious but Latinus died in the war. Aeneas founded the city of Lavinium , named after his wife. He later welcomed Dido's sister, Anna Perenna , who then committed suicide after learning of Lavinia's jealousy.

After his death, his mother, Venus asked Jupiter to make her son immortal. Jupiter agreed and the river god Numicus cleansed Aeneas of all his mortal parts and Venus anointed him with Ambrosia and Nectar, making him a god. Aeneas was recognized as the god Jupiter Indiges . Inspired by the work of James Frazer , some have posited that Aeneas was originally a life-death-rebirth deity .

Family and legendary descendants
Aeneas had an extensive family tree. His wet-nurse was Caieta , and he is the father of Ascanius with Creusa , and of Silvius with Lavinia. The former, also known as Iulus (or Julius), founded Alba Longa and was the first in a long series of kings. According to the mythology outlined by Virgil in the Aeneid, Romulus and Remus were both descendants of Aeneas through their mother Rhea Silvia, making Aeneas progenitor of the Roman people. Some early sources call him their father or grandfather,[1] but considering the commonly accepted dates of the fall of Troy (1184 BC) and the founding of Rome (753 BC), this seems unlikely. The Julian family of Rome, most notably Julius Cćsar and Augustus , traced their lineage to Ascanius and Aeneas, thus to the goddess Venus. Through the Julians, the Palemonids also make this claim. The legendary kings of Britain also trace their family through a grandson of Aeneas, Brutus . 25 26


Andrew II of Hungary and Yolanda de Courtenay




Husband Andrew II of Hungary 27

            AKA: Andrew II "the Jerosolimitan" of Hungary
           Born: Abt 1177
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Sep 1235
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Feb 1215 - Székesfehérvár, Hungary

Events

• King of Hungary: 1205-1235.




Wife Yolanda de Courtenay 28

           Born: Abt 1200
     Christened: 
           Died: 1233
         Buried: 


         Father: Pierre de Courtenay (      -1219) 29
         Mother: Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219) 30




Children
1 F Violant of Hungary 31

            AKA: Yolanda de Hungría
           Born: Abt 1216
     Christened: 
           Died: 1253
         Buried:  - Monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona, Lleida, Catalonia
         Spouse: James I of Aragon (1208-1276) 32
           Marr: 1235




Research Notes: Husband - Andrew II of Hungary

From Wikipedia - Andrew II of Hungary :

Andrew II the Jerosolimitan (Hungarian : Jeruzsálemi II András/Endre, Croatian : Andrija II. Arpadovic Slovak : Ondrej) (c. 1177 - 21 September, 1235), King of Hungary [1](1205-1235). He was the younger son of King Béla III of Hungary , who invested him with the government of the Principality of Halych . However, the boyars of Halych rebelled against his rule and expelled the Hungarian troops. Following their father's death, Andrew continuously conspired against his brother, King Emeric of Hungary who had to grant him the government of Croatia and Dalmatia . When his brother and his infant son died, Andrew ascended the throne and started to grant royal domains to his partisans. He participated in the Fifth Crusade but he could not achieve any major military success. He was obliged to issue the Golden Bull confirming the privileges of the noblemen of Hungary and later he was also obliged to confirm the special privileges of the clergy. During his long reign, he had several quarrels with his sons.

The turbulent duke
Andrew was the second son of King Béla III and his first wife, Agnes of Antioch . As younger son, Andrew had no hope to inherite the Kingdom of Hungary from his father who wanted to ensure the inheritance of his elder son, Emeric and had him crowned already in 1182.

Nevertheless, when Prince Volodymyr II of Halych , who had been expelled from his country by his subjects, fled to Hungary seeking for assistance in 1188, King Béla III had him arrested and occupied his principality and he invested Andrew with Halych . The child Andrew's rule in Halych must have been only nominal; he even did not visit his principality. Although, the young prince's troops could get the mastery in 1189 when the boyars of Halych rose against his rule, but shortly afterwards Prince Volodymyr II managed to escape from his captivity and he expelled the Hungarian troops from Halych.

On 23 April 1196, King Béla III died and he left the Kingdom of Hungary unportioned to his eldest son, Emeric, while Andrew inherited a large amount of money in order to fulfill his father's Crusader oath. However, Andrew used the money to recruit followers among the barons and also sought the assistance of Leopold V, Duke of Austria . In December 1197, Andrew's troops defeated King Emeric's armies in a battle near to Macsek in December 1197. Following Andrew's victory, the king was obliged to transfer the government of the Duchies of Croatia and Dalmatia to Andrew.

In the beginning of 1198, Pope Innocent III requested Andrew to fulfill his father's last will and lead a Crusade to the Holy Land . However, instead of a Crusade, Andrew made a campaign against the neighbouring provinces and occupied Zahumlje and Rama . Andrew also went on conspiring with some prelates against his brother, but King Emeric was informed on Andrew's plans and he personally arrested Bishop Boleszlo of Vác , one of Andrew's main supporters, and he also deprived his brother's followers (e.g., Palatine Mog ) of their dignities. In the summer of 1199, King Emeric defeated Andrew in the Battle of Rád and Andrew had to fleed to Austria. Finally, the two brothers made peace with the mediation of the Papal Legate Gregory, and the king granted again the government of Croatia and Dalmatia to his brother.

Around 1200, Andrew married Gertrude , a daughter of Berthold IV, Duke of Merania . It was probably his wife who persuaded him to conspire against his brother again, but when King Emeric, who had realised that Andrew's troops outnumbered his armies, went unarmed, wearing only the crown and the sceptre , to Andrew's camp near Varasd , Andrew surrendered voluntarily on the spur of the scene. The king had his brother arrested, but Andrew managed to escape shortly afterwards.

Nevertheless, the king become more and more ill, and wanted to secure the ascension of his young son, Ladislaus , who had been crowned on 26 August 1204. Shortly afterwards, the king reconciled with Andrew whom he appointed to govern the kingdom during his son's minority. After his brother's death on 30 September/November 1204, Andrew took over the government of the kingdom as his nephew's tutor and he also seized the money his brother had deposited on behalf of the child Ladislaus. The Dowager Queen Constance was anxious about her son's life and she escaped with King Ladislaus to the court of Leopold VI, Duke of Austria . Andrew made preparations for a war against Austria , but the child king died on 7 May 1205, thus Andrew inherited the throne.

Novć institutiones
Andrew was crowned by Archbishop John of Kalocsa on 29 May 1205 in Székesfehérvár , but before the coronation, he had to take an oath. Andrew made a radical alteration in the internal policy followed by his predecessors and he began to bestow the royal estates to his partisans. He called this new policy novć institutiones in his deeds, and he declared that "Nothing can set bounds to generosity of the Royal Majesty, and the best measure of grants, for a monarch, is immeasurableness". He gave away everything - money, villages, domains, whole counties - to the utter impoverishment of the treasury. Andrew was generous primarily with his wife's German relatives and followers, which caused discontent among his subjects.

His last years
On 14 May 1234, Andrew, who had lost his second wife in the previous year, married Beatrice D'Este who was thirty years younger than himself. Because of the new marriage, his relationship enworthened with his sons.

In the summer of 1234, the Bishop John of Bosnia excommunicated Andrew because he had not respected some provisions of the Agreement of Bereg. Andrew appealed to the Pope against the bishop's measure. In the autumn of 1234, Prince Danylo laid siege to the capital of Andrew's youngest son who died during the siege. Thus, the Hungarian supremacy over Halych disappeared.

In the beginning of 1235, Andrew made a campaign against Austria and enforced Duke Frederick II to make a peace.

He was still alive when one of his daughters, Elisabeth , who had died some years before, was canonized on 28 May 1235. Before his death, he was absolved from the excommunication; moreover, the Pope also promised that the King of Hungary and his relatives would not be excommunicated without the special permission of the Pope.

Marriages and children
#1. around 1200: Gertrude of Merania (1185 - 8 September 1213), a daughter of Berthold IV, Duke of Merania and his wife, Agnes of Wettin
Anna Maria of Hungary (c. 1204 - 1237), wife of Tzar Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria
King Béla IV of Hungary (1206 - 3 May 1270)
Saint Elisabeth of Hungary (1207 - 10 November 1231), wife of Landgraf Louis IV of Thuringia
King Coloman of Halych (1208 - after 11 April 1241)
Prince Andrew II of Halych (c. 1210 - 1234)
#2. February 1215: Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200 - 1233), daughter of Peter I , Emperor of the Latin Empire and his second wife, Yolanda I , Empress of the Latin Empire
Violant of Hungary or Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon
#3. 14 May 1234: Beatrice D'Este (c. 1215 - before 8 May 1245), daughter of Aldobrandino I D'Este and his wife
Stephen (1236 - 10 April 1271) 27


Research Notes: Wife - Yolanda de Courtenay

Second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary


From Wikipedia - Yolanda de Courtenay :

Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200-1233), Queen Consort of Hungary [1] was the second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary .

Yolanda was the daughter of Count Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife, Yolanda of Flanders , the sister of Baldwin I and Henry I , the Emperors of Constantinople . Her marriage with King Andrew II, whose first wife, Gertrude had been murdered by conspirators on 24 September 1213 , was arranged by her uncle, the Emperor Henry I.

Their marriage was celebrated in February 1215 in Székesfehérvár and Archbishop John of Esztergom crowned her queen consort. However, Bishop Robert of Veszprém sent a complaint to Pope Innocent III , because the coronation of the queens consort in Hungary had been traditionally the privilege of his see . The Pope sent a legate to Hungary in order to investigate the complaint and confirmed the privilege of the See of Veszprém .

Following her uncle's death on 11 July 1216 , her husband was planning to acquire the imperial crown for himself, but the barons of the Latin Empire proclaimed her father emperor, instead.

Yolanda maintained good relations with his husband's children from his first marriage. Her husband survived her. She was buried in the White Monks ' Abbey in Egres .

Marriages and children
February 1215: Andrew II of Hungary (c. 1177 - 21 September 1235)
Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon 28


Research Notes: Child - Violant of Hungary

From Wikipedia - Violant of Hungary :

Violant of Hungary (Esztergom , Kingdom of Hungary , c. 1216 - 1253) was Queen consort of James I of Aragon . She is also called Jolánta in Hungarian , Iolanda or Violant d'Hongria in Catalan and Yolanda or Violante de Hungría in Spanish .

Family
Violant was a daughter of Andrew II of Hungary and Violant of Courtenay . Her paternal grandparents were Béla III of Hungary and his first wife Agnes of Antioch . Her maternal grandparents were Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife Yolanda of Flanders .

Violant was a half-sister of Anne Marie, Empress of Bulgaria , Béla IV of Hungary , Saint Elisabeth of Hungary and Coloman of Lodomeria .

Violant's mother died in 1233, when Violant was seventeen years old. Her father remarried, to Beatrice d'Este , they had a son called Stephen.

Marriage
Violant married James I in 1235, being his second wife. By the marriage, Violant became Queen Consort of Aragon . James already had one son, Alfonso by his first marriage to Eleanor of Castile . James however divorced Eleanor and decided to remarry, he chose Violant.[1] [2]


James and Violant had ten children:
Violant of Aragon (1236-1301), queen of Castile by her marriage to Alphonse X .
Constance of Aragon (1239-1269), infanta of Castile by her marriage to Juan Manuel of Castile , son of Ferdinand III of Castile .
Peter III of Aragon (1240-1285).
James II of Majorca (1243-1311).
Ferdinand of Aragon (1245-1250).
Sancha of Aragon (1246-1251).
Isabella of Aragon (1247-1271), married Philip III of France
Maria of Aragon (1248-1267), nun.
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo (1250-1275)
Eleanor of Aragon (1251-?, young)

Violant's daughter, Isabella became Queen of France by her marriage to Philip III of France . Isabella was mother of Philip IV of France and Charles of Valois .

Charles of Valois was father of Philip VI of France , Isabella, Duchess of Bourbon and Blanche, Queen of Germany .

Violant died in 1253. Violant and her daughter Sancha's remains are at the monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona in Lleida , Catalonia .

Her husband remarried one more time, to Teresa Gil de Vidaure , who was once James' mistress. 31



Andronicus Angelus and Euphrosyne Castamonitia




Husband Andronicus Angelus 33

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         Father: Constantinus Angelus (      -      ) 33
         Mother: Theodora Comnena (      -      ) 34


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Wife Euphrosyne Castamonitia

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Children
1 M Isaac II Angelus Eastern Roman Emperor 35

            AKA: Isaac II Angelos Eastern Roman Emperor
           Born: 
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           Died: 1204
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Herina (      -      )




Research Notes: Child - Isaac II Angelus Eastern Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia - Isaac II Angelos :

Isaac II Angelos or Angelus (Greek : Isaakios II Angelos) (September 1156 - January 1204) was Byzantine emperor from 1185 to 1195, and again from 1203 to 1204.

His father Andronikos Dukas Angelos, a military leader in Asia Minor (c. 1122 - aft. 1185), married bef. 1155 Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa (c. 1125 - aft. 1195). Andronikos Dukas Angelos was the son of Konstantinos Angelos, Admiral of Sicily (c. 1085 - aft. July 1166, son of Manolis Angelos from Philadelphia ) and Theodora Komnene (b. January 5 , 1096/1097) who was the youngest daughter of Emperor Alexios I Komnenos and Eirene Doukaina , by her marriage c. 1120 to Thus Isaac was a member of the extended imperial clan.


<<b>>Rising by revolt
During the brief reign of Andronikos I Komnenos , Isaac was involved (alongside his father and brothers) in the revolt of Nicaea and Prousa . Atypically, the Emperor did not punish him for this disloyalty, and Isaac remained at Constantinople .

On September 11 , 1185 , during Andronikos' absence from the capital, the latter's lieutenant Stephanos Hagiochristophorites moved to arrest Isaac. Isaac killed Hagiochristophorites and took refuge in the church of Hagia Sophia . Andronikos, in some ways a capable ruler, was hated for his cruelty and his efforts to keep the aristocracy obedient. Isaac appealed to the populace, and a tumult arose which spread rapidly over the whole city. When Andronikos arrived he found that during his absence he had lost popular support, and that Isaac had been proclaimed emperor. Andronikos attempted to flee by boat but was apprehended. Isaac handed him over to the people of the City, and he was killed on September 12 , 1185 .


Family
The identity of Isaac II's first wife is unknown, but her name, Herina (i.e., Eirene), is found on the necrology of Speyer Cathedral , where their daughter Irene is interred. (It must be noted, however, that it would have been extremely unusual for a mother and daughter to bear the same name, unless the mother's name was monastic.)[3] Isaac's wife may have been a member of the Palaiologos family.[4] A possible foreign origin is also given to her due to having the same name as her daughter.[5][6] Their third child was born in 1182 or 1183 and she was dead or divorced by 1185, when Isaac remarried. Their children were:
Euphrosyne Angelina, a nun.
Irene Angelina , married first to Roger III of Sicily , and secondly to Philip of Swabia .
Alexios IV Angelos .
By his second wife, Margaret of Hungary (renamed Maria), Isaac II had two sons:
John Angelos (b. ca. 1193 - d. 1259). He migrated to Hungary and ruled over Syrmia and Bacs (1227-42) as a vassal of king Béla IV of Hungary .
Manuel Angelos (b. after 1195 - d. 1212) 35


Andronicus Ducas and Maria




Husband Andronicus Ducas 33

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Wife Maria

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         Father: Trojan of Bulgaria (      -      ) 33
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Irene

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           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alexius I Comnenus Byzantine Emperor (1048-1118) 33
           Marr: Abt 1078





Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire and Angharad




Husband Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire

           Born: Cir 1190
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Methusalem ap Hwfa ap Cynddelw (Cir 1160-      )
         Mother: Agnes ferch Griffith ap Conan (      -      ) 36


       Marriage: 



Wife Angharad

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Iorwerth ap Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon

           Born: Cir 1220
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire

Source: http://www.varrall.net/pafg45.htm#976. Note: Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire


Research Notes: Child - Iorwerth ap Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon

Source: http://www.varrall.net/pafg119.htm#2405 Note: Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon


Edward Darcy "the Colonist" and Ann




Husband Edward Darcy "the Colonist" 1 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

            AKA: Edward D'Arcy, Edward Dorsey
           Born: Abt 1615 - <Hockley, Middlesex, England>
     Christened: 1619 - <England> 44
           Died: Bef Nov 1670 - <Maryland>, (United States)
         Buried:  - Virginia, (United States)


         Father: Edward Darcy [uncertain] (Abt 1590-      ) 1
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 1638 - <Virginia, (United States)>

Events

• Transported: to Virginia by Cornelius Lloyd, Bef 15 Dec 1642.

• Purchased: 200 acres on 'a neck of land upon the south turning' of the Elizabeth River, 1642, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

• Bought: 3 head of cattle from John Browne, 1642, Elizabeth River District, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

• Occupation: Boatwright, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, United States.

• Purchased: 200 acres from Robert Taylor, 20 Oct 1649, Elizabeth River District, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

• Witness: Quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod (Todd), Oct 1649, Virginia, (United States).

• Relocated: From Virginia to Maryland, 1649, Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States.

• Occupation: Boatwright, Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States.

• Was granted: a warrant for 200 acres from the Lord Proprietary, Nov 1650, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Was granted: an additional 200 acres adjoining the original warrant, 23 Feb 1651, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Purchased: "Bush Manning," 600 acres on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's, in partnership with Thomas Manning, from Thomas Marsh, Bef 1655, St. Mary's Co., Maryland, (United States).

• Purchased: 300 acres from Thomas Marsh/March, 1655, <Anne Arundel>, Maryland, (United States).

• Converted: to Quakerism, Abt 1657.

• Acquired: 400 acres on the south side of the Severn, possibly on a branch of Broad Creek, Abt 1658, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Patented: "Bush Manning", 1661.

• Assigned: his right to land to Cornelius Howard for transporting seven persons into the Province, 1667.

• Sold: 200 acres granted to him in November 1650 and 200 acres from February 1651 to George Yate, Apr 1667, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Bought back: 68 acres of the land he sold to George Yate in April 1667, Aug 1668, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Bought: 60 more acres called "Darsy" from George Yate, Abt Sep 1668, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).




Wife Ann

           Born: Abt 1609
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Jan 1690 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States) 45
         Buried: 

Events

• Converted: to Quakerism, Abt 1658.


Children
1 M Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey" 38 39 41 43 46 47 48 49 50

            AKA: Colonel Edward Dorsey of "Dorsey"
           Born: Abt 1640 - <Lower Norfolk, Virginia>, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: After 26 Oct 1704 - <Major's Choice>, Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried:  - <Major's Choice, Baltimore Co.>, Maryland, (United States)
         Spouse: Sarah Wyatt (1657-1690) 46 51
           Marr: 12 Oct 1671 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States
         Spouse: Margaret Ruth Larkin (1643-1707) 1 52
           Marr: Abt 1693 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States)



2 M Honorable Capt. John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole" 38 41 43 53 54 55 56 57




            AKA: Honorable John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole," Captain John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole"
           Born: Abt 1645 - Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Mar 1715 - Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Pleasance Ely (Abt 1660-Bef 1734) 43 58 59
           Marr: 1683 - <Anne Arundel>, Maryland, (United States)



3 M Joshua Dorsey of "Hockley" 60 61

           Born: Abt 1646 - Virginia, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 1688 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sarah Richardson (      -1705) 61



4 F Ann Dorsey [uncertain] 62

           Born: Abt 1649
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Apr 1698 - "Greenberry Point", Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried:  - St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Annapolis, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States)



5 F Sarah Dorsey 63

            AKA: Sarah Darcy
           Born: Abt 1650 - Virginia, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef Oct 1691 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Matthew Howard Jr. (Abt 1641-1692) 1 64 65 66
           Marr: Bef May 1667 - <Maryland, (United States)>




Birth Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

Some sources have b. abt 1619


Christening Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

Some source has him christened in 1619 in Queen Caroline Parish-Elk Ridge, Anne Arundel, but this is unlikely for two reasons:
1) He was not yet in North America in 1619
2) Queen Caroline Parish did not exist until 1728


Death Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

Supposed to have drowned with several other people in a shipwreck off the Isle of Kent in the Chesapeake Bay on 2 August 1659. However, some researchers have argued that either a different Edward Darcy drowned or this Edward survived the shipwreck, as land transactions and other documents seem to indicate that he was living until at least 1667, but was deceased in November 1670.

From http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rawl/corneliuslloyd.html:
He [Edward Dorsey] died on 2 Aug 1659 in Chesapeake Bay. Edward Dorsey drowned in Chesapeake Bay, off the Isle of Kent, Maryland.

A petition in the Court records from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 the following: "At a Court holden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd, 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing the hee having taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy and some others drowned, near the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy's Overseer to take up the same, which he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell and now by his Petition craving for his paynes taken therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudge him. It is ordered that the said Thomas Hinson have one hundred pounds of Tobacco payd him for the said paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they be) that possesse and enjoy the sd Boate."


Research Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

The pedigree of Edward Darcy, the colonist, is uncertain. Recent DNA evidence points to an Irish, rather than Norman, heritage. The ancestors given here are those found in "traditional" sources, prior to any DNA research.

-----------

From Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland, pp. 610-611:

"The name Dorsey, was pronounced as if spelt 'Dossy,' and in fact it appears, at times, so recorded. It was also written 'Darcy,' from which circumstance a French origin has been claimed for the family; but there is evidence to indicate that the Maryland Dorseys had been located for a time, at least, in Ireland, prior to their arrival in America. That the family bore arms is proved by the seal to the original will (dated January 7, 1742), of Caleb Dorsey, of Anne Arundel county, which displays: 'on a fess between three wolf heads, a lion passant, guardant.'

"Edward Dorsey, also called 'Edward Darcy, Gentleman,' received in 1650 a warrant for two hundred acres of land in Anne Arundel county, Maryland, and a grant was issued to him on February 23, 1651, for two hundred acres additional... Edward Dorsey died prior to 1681, for on December 6th of that year, Edward Dorsey of Anne Arundel county, Gent., son of Edward Dorsey, late of said county, deceased, conveys his interest in 'Hockley-in-the-Hole' to his brother John Dorsey..."

-----

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm has d. 1659 in Chesapeake Bay, off Kent Island MD. According to the above, that would mean that his son, Edward Jr., arrived in 1661after the original Edward Darcy was deceased. This source states that Edward Darcy was born in England.

---------
From http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm:

"Descendants of Edward DORSEY,
boatwright of Lower Norfolk Co. VA and Anne Arundel Co., MD

"Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents. His ancestry has been the subject of much debate over the last 80 years. Some of this debate can be read in the 1997 issues of the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin. There are several genealogies on the family of Edward Dorsey. Among these are The Dorsey Family by Dorsey, Dorsey & Ball; Anne Arundel Gentry (first Edition), by Harry C. Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry Volume 2 by Harry C. Newman. Information on the family is also in The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties Maryland by J. D. Warfield (1905). I also believe there is a book about the Georgia desendants of Edward Dorsey. A couple of articles on Edward Dorsey's family have also appeared over the years in the Maryland Historical Magazine. There have also been some Dorsey newsletters including Dorsey Dreams which was published by Mrs. Lois Colette Bennington, and The Dorsey Project that was published quarterly by Mr. Donavon Dorsey of Benton City, Wash. I would recommend that people interested in this family to obtain copies of the above listed books for much in-depth material on the families.>/P>

"While, there is much controversy over the ancestry of Edward Dorsey, recent DNA testing seems to rule out claimed relations to the family of Thomas, Lord D-Arcy. However there are a few facts that should be considered with the history of the time and places. Edward Dorsey was in Lower Norfolk Co VA by 1642, when Cornelius Lloyd claimed land for transporting him to the colony. (The 1642 date is the claim for head rights to receive land for transporation of persons into Virginia, and not necessarily the date the person arrived in Virginia.) Edward Dorsey bought 200 acres in Elizabeth River Parish; in 1642 he bought cattle there (3 head of cattle from John Browne of the Elizabeth River District of Lower Norfolk Co., In the Cort Records B book of Lower Norfolk Co.; 15 April 1648: Henry Nichxxx appointed constable for the head of Eastern Branch beginning at Edward DORSEYS and so Upwards on both sides of said River including Richard Woodman's Plantation. On 20 Oct 1649 Robert Taylor sold Edward DORSEY 200 acres. This land is described by a deed dated 19 October 1647 recorded 31 Oct 1649: William Julian selling 200 acres of land to Robert Taylor of Elizabeth River, Planter, which is part of a patent of 500 Acres as being a Neck of land upon the south turning of ye Said River, East upon a creeke and South upon upon a creek north into ye woods as is bounded in the patent bearing date 22 July 1634, witnesss: Abraham Weekes and William Hancock. He witnessed by Edward E.D Dorsey. quit-claim deed Oct 1649 to Virginia land executed by Thomas Tod (Todd). This deed he signed Edward E D Dorsey

"Edward Darcy granted in November 1650 a warrant for 200 acres of land. & another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)

"A little history of Virginia shows that Cornelius Lloyd and his brother Edward Lloyd were involved with Richard Bennet who was a puritan and advocate of the independent church, and endevored to establish a purtian settlement on the south shore of the James River in the late 1630s and early 1640s. It was among these Puritans or memeber of the Independent church with which Edward Dorsey associated. Given that we find Edward buying cattle in 1642, it is doubtful if he was an indentured servant. Rather, I suspect he was among young men and families (including college graduates) that were recruited for the Puritan settlement on the south shore of the James River. At this time England was in the early stages of the English Civil War, with King Charles I taking a hardline stance against the Indendent/Putitan and other sects that were not outside the Church of England.

"The provinical court records tell us of Edward Dorsey's death. 'Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate.'

"In addition to the information on this site, I know of several people who have created their own web sites with Dorsey Genealogical Information. On the Internet there is a Dorsey Genealogy mailing list at rootsweb.com. The information on this website has been extensively updated in Feb 2009 . It presents material on 8 generations of Dorsey descendants including data from church records, census, graveyards, marriage licenses, and genealogies. The data is not complete. There are Dorseys that seem to belong to this family that have not been connected to Edward Dorsey's lineage. It is also noted that there is another early Dorsey family in Maryland which settled mostly in Calvert Co. and the Eastern Shore, at times this family used the spelling of Dossey as well as Dorsey. This family's progenitors were James, Ralph, and John D-arcy or Dorsey, kinsmen of Richard Preston of the Clifts in Calvert Co. MD. "

Op. cit.:

"Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents. His ancestry has been the subject of much debate over the last 60 years. Some of this debate can be read in the 1997 issues of the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin. There are several genealogies on the family of Edward Dorsey. Among these are The Dorsey Family by Dorsey, Dorsey & Ball; Anne Arundel Gentry (first Edition), by Harry C. Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry Volume 2 by Harry C. Newman. Information on the family is also in The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties Maryland by J. D. Warfield (1905). I also believe there is a book about the Georgia desendants of Edward Dorsey. A couple of articles on Edward Dorsey's family have also appeared over the years in the Maryland Historical Magazine. There have also been some Dorsey newsletters including Dorsey Dreams which was published by Mrs. Lois Colette Bennington, and The Dorsey Project being published quarterly by Mr. Donavon Dorsey of Benton City, Wash. I would recommend that people interested in this family to obtain copies of the above listed books for much in-depth material on the families

"In addition to the information on this site, I know of several people who have created their own web sites with Dorsey Genealogical Information. Patricia Summers Smith has placed her lineage on line as has David Dorsey . On the Internet there is a Dorsey Genealogy mailing list at rootsweb.com

"The information on this website has been extensively updated in December 1999. It presents material on 7 generations of Dorsey descendants including data from church records, census, graveyards, marriage licenses, and genealogies. The data is not complete. There are Dorseys that seem to belong to this family that have not been connected to Edward Dorsey's lineage. It is also acknowledged that there is another early Dorsey family in Maryland which settled mostly in Calvert Co. and the Eastern Shore, at times this family used the spelling of Dossey as well as Dorsey."

-------

From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Dorseys of Hockley

"Of all the distinguished officials whose presence with their families and retainers lent luster to the ancient capital [of Baltimore], none are more indelibly impressed upon the history of the Province than the early Dorsey brothers, sons of Edward Darcy who received his first warrant for land from the Lord Proprietary in the year 1650.

"In that year Edward Darcy, the original progenitor of the Hockley branch of the Dorseys of Maryland, received another grant for land adjoining his original warrant, the latter patented in connection with Captain John Norwood.

"These lands were in the year 1667 assigned to George Yate, Edward Darcy having in 1661 been granted a valuable estate in that part of St. Mary's County which in 1663 became a part of the newly erected County of Calvert. This was Teobush Manning patented to Edward Darcy and Thomas Manning, as shown in the Land Warrants, but incorrectly entered in Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls for Calvert County, as belonging to 'Edward Darby.'

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province."

------------

From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 30:

"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., pp. 55-56:

"In the Land Office of Annapolis, may be seen the following warrant, which explains itself:

"'Warrant MDCL, granted to Edward Dorsey, of Anne Arundel Co., for 200 acres of land, which he assigns as followeth; as also 200 acres more, part of a warrant for 400 acres, granted John Norwood and the said Dorsey, dated XXIII of Feb., MDCLI. Know all men by these presents that I, Edward Dorsey, of the County of Anne Arundel, boatwright, have granted, bargained and sold, for a valuable consideration, already received, all my right, title, interest of and in a warrant for 200 acres, bearing date 1650, and also 200 acres more, being half of a warrant of 400 acres--the one half belonging to Captain Norwood, bearing date, 1651, both of which assigned to George Yate.--Edward Dorsey, Sealed.'

"Signed in the presence of Cornelius Howard, John Howard, Oct. 22nd, MDCLXVII, (1667).

"That same year the same Edward Dorsey assigned to Cornelius Howard, his right for land for transporting seven persons into the province. Edward Dorsey and Thomas Manning held a certificate from Thomas Marsh, for 600 acres adjoining Captain Norwood. 'Norwood's Fancy,' held by Captain Norwood, was near Round Bay. 'Dorsey,' held by Edward Dorsey, gave the name to 'Dorsey's Creek,' upon which was located Thomas Gates, whose will of 1659, reads: 'I give to Michael Bellott and John Holloway my plantation. I desire that they give to Edward Dorsey's children free outlet to the woods and spring as formally I have given them.'"

-----------

Ibid., p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th, 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now in the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

----

Ibid., p. 11:
[Around 1650] Nicholas Wyatt surveyed 'Wyatt's Harbor' and 'Wyatt's Hills,' upon which 'Belvoir' now stands, just south of, and in sight of Round Bay. Adjoining it was Thomas Gates, upon 'Dorsey's Creek,' near 'Dorsey,' taken up by the first Edward Dorsey, in partnership with Captain John Norwood."

----------
From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

From Lee Garlock:

Edward DORSEY/D'ARCY died in 1659 in Chesapeake Bay, off Kent Island MD. He was born in England. Was in Lower Norfolk Co VA by 1642, when Cornelius Lloyd claimed land for transporting him to the colony.

From Anne Arundel Gentry:
1642 - He bought 200 acres in Elizabeth River Parish; bought cattle there (3 head of cattle from John Browne of the Elizabeth River District of Lower Norfolk Co. [Lower Norfolk County Recrds, Book A, part III, page 36, source cited in Maryland Genealogies.]

From Maryland Genealogies, p. 387: Cites proof that Cornelius Lloyd used Edward Dorsey's headright as early as December 15, 1642.

Anne Arundel Gentry:
October 1649 - Witnessed by mark E.D. a quit-claim deed to Virginia land executed by Thomas Tod (Todd) in favor of James Allard, Abraham Parrott and Alexander Hall.. This deed he signed Edward E D Dorsey [Lower Norfolk County Records, Book B, page 134, source cited in Maryland Genealogies . All this suggests that Edward Dorsey was in Virginia for the seven years between the 1642 purchase from Browne and the 1649 quit claim.]

November 1650 - Edward Darcy granted a warrant for 200 acres of land and another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)

1658 - Robert Clarkson, a Quaker convert, states in a letter of Ann Dorsey and her husband, both Converts (to Quakerism), Ann had abundant grace, but he doubted that her husband would stick to the faith. According to Newman, a letter of Thomas Hart dated 28 of the 2nd inst 1658 London, in which is embodied a letter of Robert Clarkson dtd. 14 of ye 11 mo. 1657 (which would be February) "..& likewise Ann Dorsey in a more larger measure, hir husband I hope abideth faithfull in his measure.."

1659 - Edward drowned off Kent Island. In Anne Arundel Court on 2 Aug. 1659, one
Thomas Hinson petitioned "for compensation for having taken up the boate wherein Edward Darcy and some otheres were drowned neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy Overseer to take up the same which he did deliuery the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority. . . ." So unsure if the Edward mentioned above may be his son from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 "Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Shewing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the deliuery of same attAnarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate." [Maryland Archives, Vo. 4, p. 314]

--------

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

! Birth: (1d,e) Edward DORSEY was claimed by some as being descended from Sir Norman D'ARCIE cousin of William the Conqueror, and from the Lord D'ARCY family of Hornby Castle. DNA evidence has proven that theory to be incorrect, showing that Edward DORSEY is not related to those families. (1f) The latest DNA results would indicate a likely Irish origin for Edward DORSEY. (2) 1619. England.

Marriage to Ann __: (1a) Ann DORSEY and "hir husband" [not named] mentioned in a 1658 letter. Edward DORSEY was the only DORSEY in Anne Arundel Co., MD at that time who was married. (1b) Some researchers have inaccurately listed her as Ann, daughter of Matthew HOWARD. While Matthew HOWARD did have a daughter named Ann, there is record of her husband being James GRENEFFE, who mentions wife Ann, "brother John HOWARD" and "brother Samuel HOWARD" in his will. (1c) She may have been the daughter of Humphrey BACHE of London, and the aunt of Elizabeth HARRIS, of Quaker fame. (2) Bef. 1646. England.

Death: (1g) Drowned near the Isle of Kent in 1659. (2) 2 Aug 1659. Near Isle of Kent, Anne Arundel Co., MD.

----------

From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

36. Edward DORSEY24 was born before 1620 in England.20 He is believed to have been the son of Thomas D'Arcy. He immigrated in 1642 to State of Virginia.25 Edward Darcy/Dorsey lived several years in Virginia. On December 15, 1642, Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing 60 persons into the colony of Virginia. Among those named was Edw: _orsey, the first letter of the last name is obliterated. (Minute Book, f 160) (New Eng Hist Gen Vol 47, f 63). On October 7, 1646, Thomas Brown was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by assignment of the right of 5 persons transported by Cornelius Lloyd, among them Edward Dorsey. (Patents 2, State of Virginia f. 113). He died on Aug 2 1659 in Chesapeake Bay.20 Edward Dorsey drowned in Chesapeake Bay, off the Isle of Kent, Maryland. A petition in the Court records from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 the following: "At a Court holden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd, 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing the hee having taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy and some others drowned, near the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy's Overseer to take up the same, which he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell and now by his Petition craving for his paynes taken therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudge him. It is ordered that the said Thomas Hinson have one hundred pounds of Tobacco payd him for the said paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they be) that possesse and enjoy the sd Boate." Edward Dorsey, the immigrant, was gentleman and settler, first in Virginia and later in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. At a County Court held on November 3, 1645, at the home of William Shipp, it was recorded tat John Browne of Elizabeth River in the County of Lower Norfolk, VA, planter, had on the 11th of February, 1642 sold unto Edward Darsey of the county aforesaid, planter, three head of Cattle (Vixt) one Cowe aged about seaven yeares of a brinded coulor and marked with a cropp on the right eare and the left eare whole, and a steare of a color as aforesaid aged about one yeare and a halfe and marked with a cropp on the left eare and the right eare slitt allsoe, one heifar calfe brinded as aforesaid aged about three quarters of a yeare and marked with a cropp on both eares and a slitt in one and doe by these presents give graunt, bargaine and sell unto the said Edward Darsey his heirs and ecut(rs) administrator and assignes for ever for a valuable consideration pt in hand paid. Dated the 11th of February, 1642. (Minute Book A.f. 293, Lower Norfolk Co., Portsmouth, VA.) By 1650 Edward Darcy was in Anne Arundel County, Maryland where he was granted a warrent for 200 acres of land and another 200 acres in 1651, half warrent for 400 acres he purchased in partnership with John Norwood. (Patents 11; folio 98). In April 1657 Edward Darcy, (he refers to himself in this document as a "boatwright of Anne Arundel County"), sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to him in November of 1650 and half a warrent of 40 acres granted to himself and Capt. Norwood in February, 1651. In August 1668, Yates re-assigned to Edward Dorsey (son of Edward) 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 additional acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh or March. By 1658 Edward Dorsey had land in the Province of Maryland. On February 27, 1658, Ensign Thomas Gates, who transported himself into the Province in 1649 was granted a parcell of land called "Gatenby" lying on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, on the south side of the Severn River and north side of Darcy's Creek. In the will of Thomas Gates made May 2, 1659 he indicates that the Dorsey family was living on a nearby tract of land and desired and willed that his heirs "shall give to Edward Darcey's children a free outlet to the woods and also to the spring an inlet for their cattle as formerly they had in my time (Wills 1, f.105). Due to failure to obtain patents, carelessness of clerks and fire which destoyed early records at Annapolis, it has become virtually impossible to locate the land of Edward Darcy/Dorsey. (Arch of Md, 111, f 250) Descriptions of surveys which were recorded after the fire of 1706, however, show that Thomas Todd was located on the south side of the Severn River between Todd's Creek (later Spa Creek) and Deep Cove Creek which was known as Darcy's Creek in the 1658 surveys. The name of the creek was later changed to Sprigg's Creek, then to Graveyard Creek and finally to College Creek. Information regarding the names of these creeks was furnished by Mr. Trader of the Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md. To the west and north across Darcy's Creek, which no doubt bears the name of the immigrant, were the tracts taken up by Edward Dorsey and Capt. John Norwood, with the land of Nicholas Wyatt lying between them. Farther up the Severn River near Marshes Creek, later called Hockley Creek, was the land taken up by Matthew Howard. Adjoining this land on the south was the tract called "Wyatt", laid out for Nicholas Wyatt. Nearby was Hockley-in-ye-Hole, taken up by Edward Dorsey and later patented by his three sons, Edward, Joshua, and John Dorsey. The date of the original grant for "Hockley" in ye Hole" (Hole being Old English for Valley) was 1664 and wassigned and sealed by Charles, third Lord Baltimore. That grant was in possession of a descendant having been handed down with the land to the eighth generation. He was married to Ann ---- before 1648.20,26 In 1658 the Quakers came into Maryland spreading their religion among the settlers, claiming as converts, Nicholas Wyatt, Edward Dorsey and Ann, his wife and many others. A letter written by Robert Clarkson, a Quaker convert, to Elizabeth Harris, then in England shows that the Dorseys did embrace the faith. He writes that Ann Dorsey had abundant grace, but he seemed doubtful that her husband would stick to the faith. (MD Hist Mag XXXII, 47). "Quakers in the Founding of Anne Arundel County, Maryland" states that, "Ann and Edward Dorsey, mentioned by Clarkson as 'convinced Quakers' were founders of the Dorsey family of Maryland. Their sons were Edward, Joshua, and John. Edward Dorsey's land, 'Dorsey' was on Dorsey, now College, Creek. He surveyed 'Hockley in Ye Hole,' which was granted to his three sons on January 27, 1663 (Patents, Liber 7 f.378) after his death by drowning. (Dorsey Book)" The list of those convinced of the truth of Quakerism includes, "founding settlers and leading citizens of the county, and some were of armorial families. The list constitutes a high tribute to the labors of Elizabeth Harris, Maryland's first Publisher of Truth." There was an apparent attempt to restrict the activities of Friends in the Province of Maryland. Sometime around 1658 Edward Dorsey took up a tract of land containing 400 acres, lying in Anne Arundel County on the south side of the Severn River and or a branch of Broad Creek. This tract was later patented by his three sons. See Patents 7, f.378.

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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

"Most of the older Dorsey genealogies assume that our immigrant Edward is descended from the Norman D'Arcy family. I must confess to jumping on that bandwagon myself. But new genetic research tosses this out the window. A Dorsey family DNA project that started in 2002 has resulted in an excellent web page <http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/LineageI.htm> that points strongly to an Irish branch of the family that has had no "paper trail" documenting a link to our Maryland emigrant, Edward Dorsey. The Irish cousins date from the nineteenth century, so there must be an older common ancestor from the early seventeenth century, or still farther back. The Anglo-Norman D'Arcy/Dorsey men who have participated in a DNA project are clearly of a quite different genetic stock from Edward and the Irish cousins. My thanks to Rick Saunders, who brought this to my attention. As he explains, "If you go to the Results page <http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/Results800.htm> you can compare the lines of Edward DORSEY, and the French-Norman DARCY line more readily. Not only are the results not close, but their haplotypes (R1b and E3b) are different."[1]

"Of the seven references in sixteenth and seventeenth century British records to Edward Dorsey (with nearly as many spellings), the only one that is at all likely to be our ancestor is No. 16 in the Exchequer Record of the King's Remembrancer: "Edward Darcie -- lycensed April 18th 1632, aged thirteen, to go with his master Richard Gips to Berghen." Translated, this means the young teenager had permission to leave England with Richard Gips, or GIBBS, either as an apprentice, servant, or ward, probably to Bergen op Zoom in the Netherlands. It was easier to get a license to go to Europe than to the new world. It would be relatively easy to travel from the Netherlands to Virginia, perhaps by way of Barbados.[2] However, there is as yet no proof that this is our man. I am unaware of any research of Irish records of the period, looking for an Edward Dorsey.

"One way or another, Edward Dorsey1 managed to emigrate from the British Isles (exactly where, Ireland or England, is unclear) to Virginia. Perhaps he came via by a circuitous route through The Netherlands, or more possibly, he was transported by Cornelius LLOYD (see below). So far I have found no record of when he married his wife, Ann. A common assumption is that she was Ann BACHE, since Ann Do?y was mentioned in the 1662 will of her brother Humphrey Bache, a Londoner who became a Quaker. Humphrey's daughter Elizabeth married William HARRIS in 1649 in St. Mary's Abchurch.[3] Elizabeth Harris became a well-travelled and well-known Friends minister. However, a direct descendant named Edward Dorsey has examined the probate record of Humphrey Bache. He concludes: "The reference to his sister Anne lists her last name as Do?y where the "?" could be a "u" or "n" (quill pens were not reliable) -- but, comparing the letter to others in the document, I can't see how it could be much else."[3a] While misspellings and mis-translations were not uncommon in probate records it seems a bit of stretch to get Dorsey from Douy or Dony.

"In May 1638 another pair of our ancestors, Matthew HOWARD <../southern/howard.html> and his wife Ann, were granted land in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, on the western branch of the Elizabeth River, south of Broad Creek. In the immediate vacinity were grants to Robert TAYLOR, Edward LLOYD, Richard OWEN, and Cornelius LLOYD. The year before, Matthew Howard had with him "two persons unnamed", one of whom might have been 17- or 18-year old Edward Dorsey. Although a male could own land at the age of 16, obviously Edward did not. In fact, throughout his life he seemed to be curiously careless about registering his land. This may have been because an oath was required, and he may have early felt a scruple against swearing that would eventually find full fruition in the Quaker testimony. It is suggested that young Edward was in Virginia by 1636, or even as early as 1635, and he stayed near Richard Owen and John Howard.[4] For three generations these families stayed together and intermarried.

"There is a 1642 contract for Edward's purchase of three cattle (a cow, steer, and calf), with descriptions of each animal, indicating that he had some disposable wealth and was not indentured. When the County Court met 15 December 1645, at the house of William SHIPP, it ordered Thomas TOD to pay Edward "Darcy" and Thomas HALL forty pounds of tobacco apiece "for theire tyme and charge in attendance of the Court for two days." On 10 December 1649 Edward witnessed a quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod; his signature reads "E D: Dorsy".[5]

"References to Edward Dorsey, with a variety of spellings, are found in the land records of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, between 1642 and 1648. On 7 October 1646 Thomas BROWN was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by assignment of the rights of five persons transported by Cornelius LLOYD, including Edward Dorsey. On 15 December 1642 Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing sixty people to the colony, including "Edw:_orsey" -- the first letter is illegible. Edward bought 200 acres in Lower Norfolk County on "a neck of land upon the south turning" of the Elizabeth River. The boundaries were further delimited: going "east upon a creek, and south upon a creek, and north into the woods". Dorsey's tract was on the point of land at the foot of present day Chestnut Street, and on it in the 1930s were the ruins of an old Marine Hospital. The land lies on Ferry Point and was once offered to the fledgling United States as a site for its capital. Dorsey styled himself a "boatwright" (i.e. involved in naval stores, perhaps, rather than actually building ships) and was probably in business with and for his near neighbor, Thomas TOD.[6]

"Apparently a number of settlers in Lower Norfolk County were not members of the established church, but were a variety of dissenters or nonconformists; some were Puritans. A ten-year controversy had raged between Governor BERKELEY and the more vocal Puritans that was both political and religious. When a few Roman Catholics immigrated into the colony in 1642 Berkeley saw his chance. The colony decreed that no "popish recusants" could hold any office. It also decreed that anyone holding office and refusing to take the "oath of allegiance and supremacy" should be dismissed from office and fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco. The following year it was enacted that all ministers must be conformed to the Church of England, and any nonconformists should be compelled to leave the colony.[7]

"Meanwhile farther up the Chesapeake Bay in 1637, Maryland forces had taken over Kent Island, which had originally been an outpost of Virginia. Lord Baltimore gave the settlers full civil and religious rights. In 1648 he specifically invited disgruntled dissenters to move from Virginia to his colony. He appointed the Virginia Protestant, William STONE, (apparently no relation to our William Stone) as his governor. Baltimore patronized the newly settled Protestants, who quickly moved into important political posts in both local and provincial government.[8]


"The lack of freedom of religion in Virginia, coupled with an invitation to move north, led between 400 and 600 settlers to migrate to Maryland, mostly to Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties. The larger group of immigrants, whose religious affiliations are not known, included Edward Dorsey, John NORWOOD <../southern/norwood.html>, Matthew HOWARD <../southern/howard.html>, Thomas TODD, and Nicholas WYATT and their families who settled in and around Annapolis. They had owned land near each other in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, and soon acquired tracts near each other along the Severn River in Maryland; their children and grandchildren intermarried. However, 15 November 1652 Edward and four others returned to Virginia where Francis FLEETWOOD got a grant of land for their transportation.[9] They soon returned to Maryland.

"In November 1650 Edward Dorsey was granted a warrant for 200 acres in Maryland, and in 1651 for another 200 acres. Lord Baltimore had instituted the English practice of granting and patenting tracts of land under proper names. Acreages named "Norwood", "Howard", "Todd", and "Wyatt" were laid out for other members of the group, with their locations specified in the records. Unfortunately, the location of Dorsey's land was not specified. Before 1655 Edward Dorsey, together with Thomas MANNING bought 600 acre "Theobush Manning" on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's, north of the Bay. Perhaps because it was incorrectly entered on Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls as belonging to Edward "Darby", the patent was not issued until 1661. Whenever he acquired it, eventually Edward Dorsey owned land that is now occupied by part of the Naval Academy and Bloomsbury Square in Annapolis.[10]

"In 1655 or 1556 Elizabeth (Bache) HARRIS, a British Friend, came to Maryland and found a receptive audience among the community of dissenters settled along the Severn and Patuxent Rivers, and among the unchurched folks on Kent Island. Many who heard her and worshipped with her were convicted inwardly and convinced of the Truth Friends proclaimed. She was followed in 1657-1658 by Josiah COALE from Bristol, Thomas THURSTON from Gloucestershire, and Thomas CHAPMAN. Among the new Friends in Maryland were Thomas MEARS, Nicholas WYATT, Edward and Ann DORSEY, Robert CLARKSON and his wife, John BALDWIN, Henry CAPLIN, Charles BALYE, Elizabeth BEASLEY, William FULLER, William DURAND, Thomas and William COLE, Henry WOOLCHURCH, and others.[11]

"A letter from Robert CLARKSON, member of the House of Burgesses from Anne Arundel County, to Elizabeth HARRIS, back in England, summarized Elizabeth's work and reported on the condition of local Friends:[12]

'Elizabeth Harris, Dear Heart, I salute thee in the tender love of the Father, which moved thee toward us and I do own thee to have been a minister by the will of God to bear the outward testimony to the inward word of truth in me and others. Of which word of life God hath made my wife a partaker with me and hath established our hearts in His fear, and likewise Ann Dorsey in a more large measure; her husband I hope abides faithful . . .

'We have disposed of the most part of the books which were sent, so that all parts where there are Friends are furnished and every one that desires may have benefit of them; at Herring Creek, Rhoad River, South River, all about Severn, the Brand Neck, and thereabouts the Seven Mountains and Kent. . . . '

"Echoing the political events in England, there had been a coup in Maryland against Lord Baltimore in 1654. But many dissenters, especially in Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties, and on Kent Island, were more loyal to Baltimore than to the new Puritan regime. William FULLER, acting governor after 1654, was convinced upon hearing Elizabeth HARRIS, and became a Friend. By 1658 definitely five, and perhaps as many as eleven of the 24 commissioners had become Quakers. Others had close ties with Friends.[13]

"Then Edward Dorsey was drowned with several other people off the Isle of Kent. On 2 August 1659 the Court paid Thomas HINSON 100 pounds of tobacco for raising the boat in which they had drowned, as desired by Dorsey's overseer. But was this our ancestor? Although the Dorsey family historians assume it was, genealogist Caroline BULKLEY thinks it was some other person with the same name. She discovered a 1667 deed referring to Edward Dorsey, boatwright, a designation never used by his son. Descendant Ed Dorsey, who examined the bill of sale, notes that "the seller declares himself to BE Edward Dorsey but did not use the word 'said' that was typically used when repeating a previous reference (to the purchaser). So we have to conclude that it really was the immigrant OR it was his son (after all they really were both Edward Dorsey). He does not specify that he is heir which he did with later documents. So either the immigrant was the seller OR, more likely, his son impersonated him." Another "curious case was the sale, again by the son, in 1664 of other property owned by his father which he just didn't get around to recording until November of 1670 (six years?). He then calls himself heir of the 'late' Edward Dorsey. So it appears to me that the immigrant was alive in 1667 but had died by November 1670."[13a] More conclusive, perhaps, was a reference by Edward Jr. to land "my father Edward Dorsey [had] from Thomas MARSH in 1661". Edward Jr. stated that his father was living in 1667, but by the time Edward Jr. transferred "Hockley-in-the-Hole" to his brother John in 1681, their father was dead. Edward Dorsey, either father or son, appraised the estate of Thomas TODD 12 May 1677.[14] Thomas was the old companion from Virginia with whom the elder Dorsey had worked on ships.

"The Dorsey family chroniclers found no further records of Ann Dorsey. They assumed she returned to Virginia. I assume she remained in Maryland near her children. Unfortunately the West River Friends minutes do not begin until 1671. Family historian Ed Dorsey thinks she went back to England with the immigrant Edward Dorsey.[15]
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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

(1) Some researchers have attributed a daughter to Edward DORSEY a daughter Ann who married Nicholas GREENBERRY. There is no evidence that Edward DORSEY had a daughter named Ann. While Nicholas GREENBERRY's wife was named Ann, she could not have been a daughter of Edward DORSEY. Nicholas GREENBERRY did not emigrate from England to Maryland until 1674, at which time he arrived with his wife and two children. (Maryland Patent Liber 18 (Vol. 21):160 FHL microfilm 0,013,071.) Land was claimed in 1674 for Nicholas GREENBERRY, wife, and two children (not named) who were on the ship "Constant Friendship." His wife could not have been the daughter of Edward DORSEY, who had been living in the colonies for over 25 years.


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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

April 1667 - Edward Darcy, of the County of Anne Arundell, boatwright, sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to Darcy in Nov 1650 and half a warrant of four hundred acres granted to him and Capt. Norwood in Feb. 1651. In Aug 1668, Yates reassigned to Dorsey 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 more acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh/March. His son Edward sold this tract Nov 6, 1670 to Thomas Manniage of the Cliffs.

A question arises as to whether the Edward Darcy who signed the paper in 1667 was the Edward Darcy who bought and sold land in the 1650s. Caroline Kemper assumes that it is the same person and that a different, unrelated Edward Dorsey died in a boating accident in 1659. Other historians think that Edward Dorsey one bought and sold the property in the 1650s but that his son signed the papers in the 1670s.

From Maryland Genealogies, "The Identity of Edward Dorsey I," by Caroline Kemper Bulkley, 1938, pp. 398-399:

The record in the Land Office (Liber II, [Margin Liber G G] (98)) reads: '(125) Edward Dorsey assigns to George Yate 400 acres: Warrant XI November M.D.C.L. (1650); to Edward Dorsey for 200 acres of land the which he assigned away as followeth; as also 200 acres more part of a warrant for 400 acres granted John Norwood and Edward Dorsey dated xxiiij February MDCLi (1651); said Dorsey of County of Ann [sic] Arundell, Boatwright, consideration already received, all my right, title, interest, claim and demand of an--in a warrant for 200 acres of land bearing date sixteen hundred and fifty [so written out] and also to 200 acres more being the one half of a warrant for 400 acres, the one half belong to Capt. Norwood bearing date one thousand six hundred fifty one unto George Yate, etc.'"

The date of this assignment, duly signed and sealed, is April 23, 1667, and the witness is John Howard, eldest son of the Virginia Matthew and Ann Howard. A year later (August 24, 1668) there is a deed filed from Yate to Dorsey for sixty-eight acres of the above "Dorsey" tract. In the same year one James Connoway assigned back the "right for 1000 acres" to George Yate, who transfers sixty acres to "Darsy." . . . .

It is contended that the Edward Dorsey who signed the records of 1667-1668 may have been the son Edward. This is highly improbable, since Edward Dorsey the younger could not have had land in his own rights from warrants cited of 1650 and 1651, nor did he ever name himself as "boatwright" in the documents known to bear his signature.

Those who deny that the record quoted was signed by Edward Dorsey, Senior, argue from the story many times repeated that he was drowned in 1659. No evidence has ever been produced to prove this: there is an authentic record of an Edward Dorsey who was drowned, but who the person was, or whether the name may be mistakenly recorded cannot be determined.

It is clear that the signer of the 1667-1668 deeds was the father Edward Dorsey, and as further testimony that he was alive after 1659 is a document assigning land--the Bush-Manning tract-- bought by "My father Edward Dorsey from Thomas Marsh in 1661." This same land is later confirmed to Manning in a warrant and power of attorney to Sheriff Stockett from Colonel Edward Dorsey, the son, giving these facts. 1 37 38 39 40 41 42 43


Research Notes: Wife - Ann

Not to be confused with Ann Howard, daughter of Matthew Howard and Anne Hall, as the dates make such a relationship impossible.

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

Some researchers have inaccurately listed her as Ann, daughter of Matthew HOWARD. While Matthew HOWARD did have a daughter named Ann, there is record of her husband being James GRENEFFE, who mentions wife Ann, "brother John HOWARD" and "brother Samuel HOWARD" in his will. (1c) She may have been the daughter of Humphrey BACHE of London, and the aunt of Elizabeth HARRIS, of Quaker fame. (2) Bef. 1646. England.

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

37. Ann ---- was Quaker in 1658 in State of Virginia.27 A letter from 1658 "for Elizabeth Harris signifieing, a good fruite of hir labours there for the Lord, wch heare ensueth:" Elizabeth Harris, Deare hearte; I salute thee in ye tender love of the father wch mooved in thee towards ye goode of god in us wch had longe leynn hid and bin made a pray upon by the dragon (who) first made ware with ye lambes and by his subteleties overcame but when ye apoynted time of the father was come he fulfiled the good word of his grace wch he spake by his sperit concereining his sonn, yt he would not leave his soule in grave nor suffer his holy one to see corruption it being impossible yet he could be houlden under of deth but by the powre of his resurreccion in mee, hee hath brocken those bonds and hath manifested that blessed life in his son whome hee hath raysed from the ded, wherein the second deth has no powre..." The writer of the letter goes on ..."God hath made my wife partakers with mee and haith established our heartes in his feare, & likewise Ann Dorsey in a more larger measure, hir husband I hope abideth faithfull in his measure likewise." [P15] An (Ann) Dorcey had apparently been requested to "visett An James." [P16] "We read every particuler, thy letter & the rest of the letters from the others of our friends therein att ye reading where of the measures of God in us who were together then present who were Edward Dorcy & his wife..." Ann Dorsey, wife of Edward is thought to have outlived her husband, and to have returned to their former home in Virginia, for no further record is found of her in Maryland. It seems reasonable to suppose that their children were born in Virginia. Edward DORSEY and Ann ----



Birth Notes: Child - Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey"

Some sources have b. abt 1646 in Virginia


Death Notes: Child - Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey"

At the time of his death he was living on "Major's Choice," [now in Howard County?], Maryland.


Research Notes: Child - Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey"

Patented "Hockley-in-the-Hole" on the south side of the Severn with his brothers John and Joshua.

From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province.

"Major Edward Dorsey, later known as Colonel, Judge in the High Court of Chancery, and Keeper of the Great Seal, was active in military affairs, and was also a Gentleman Justice of Anne Arundel County. His house on Prince George's Street, Annapolis, was probably built when he disposed of his interest in Hockley to his youngest brother the 'Honorable John Dorsey.'

"Colonel Edward Dorsey's house in the ancient city was the largest mansion there when upon the removal of the capital from St. Mary's the seat of government was changed to what is now Annapolis, and so it became the home of the Royal Governor Sir Francis Nicholson, and the meeting place of the Assembly until permanent public buildings could be erected.

"...It was at the house on Prince George's Street that Major Edward Dorsey lived during the lifetime of his first wife, Sarah Wyatt, while the Honorable John Dorsey, captain of the Baltimore County militia in later years, took possession of Hockley, three miles from Annapolis, over which his wife, Madam Pleasance Ely, presided, of whom it has been noted--perhaps as a warning to her descendants, that her name was in no sense suggestive of her disposition.

"Certain it is that the amiable Sarah, wife of Major Edward Dorsey, died, after bearing six sons and two daughters to her liege lord, while 'Pleasance,' of austere memory, buried the 'Honorable John,' and was led a second time to the altar by Thomas Wainwright. Upon the death of Sarah Wyatt, his wife, Major Edward Dorsey keeper of the Great Seal, wooed and won young Margarey Larkin, who became the mother of four sons and one daughter.

"In the year 1692 Major Edward Dorsey was one of the committee appointed to read and inspect the laws of the Province, and a few years later we find him a commissioner in Chancery.

"He was one of the first to contribute to the fund for establishing free schools in Maryland, was a trustee of King William and Mary School, and was given authority to conduct the arrangements for the building of St. Anne's Church, of which he was a vestryman. On account of the inability to secure workmen he resigned the latter commission.

"Although referred to as Major in the Archives, the title of 'Colonel' is given Edward Dorsey in the settlement of his estate, indicating that he attained the higher military honor before his death.

"The inventory of Colonel Edward Dorsey's estate bears evidence of his manner of life, for the bequests of silver tankards and cordial cups, silver-hilted swords, chafing dish and other evidences of the convenience and elegancies, indicate that he kept up the dignity incident to a Provincial Justice and Keeper of the Great Seal and field officer of the Colonial troops in his county. His seal gold ring, which was left to his son, Edward, was probably the one used later by Edward and Joshua in sealing a joint deed. The impression of these seals has caused no little conuecture, because of the device and motto which must have belonged to a maternal line. The small shield has in the center a hand holding an upright unsheathed sword, with the motto 'An Por Peth' surrounding it. As both Breek scholars and those versed in old Gaelic have found this too hard a problem to solve, I give it as interesting study to the many who spring from the early Dorseys.

"...The Dorsey men have largely inclined to the law, and several of the descendants of the distinguished Judge of the High Court of Chancery, Major Edward Dorsey, have occupied seats on the Maryland bench..."

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From Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland, p. 610-611:

"In 1667, Edward Dorsey [Jr.] assigned to Cornelius Howard his right to land for transporting seven persons into the Province. 'Dorsey,' held by Edward Dorsey, gave the name to Dorsey's creek, upon which was located Thomas Gates, whose will of 1659 provided that 'Edward Dorsey's children shall have free outlet to the woods and spring, as formerly I have given them.' He therefore had children, although it is not known whether they followed him to the Province or traveled between the Province and England; but an early record read: 'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.' The record continues: 'August 24, 1664, patented to him (Edward Dorsey, Jr.) and to John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," originally 400 acres (later resurvey, 842 acres), near the site of Annapolis.' Edward Dorsey died prior to 1681, for on December 6th of that year, Edward Dorsey of Anne Arundel county, Gent., son of Edward Dorsey, late of said county, deceased, conveys his interest in 'Hockley-in-the-Hole' to his brother John Dorsey...

"Colonel Edward Dorsey, son of Edward Dorsey, the American ancestor, came to Maryland before 1664. He is doubtless the Edward Dorsey brought over by Robert Bullen in 1661; but whether this was his first trip across the sea is not known. He was a Justice for the County of Anne Arundel in 1679, again in 1686, and again in 1689; was styled 'Captain' in 1686, 'Major' in 1687; commissioned Major of Horse, of Anne Arundel county, September 4, 1689; Major of Anne Arundel county, October 9, 1694; was commissioned Associate Commissioner in Chancery, October 17, 1694; Burgess of Anne Arundel county in 1694, again in 1695, 1696, 1697, and for Baltimore county, 1701-1705. He was Commissioner, also Judge of High court of Chancery, March 2, 1695-96; and was styled 'Colonel' in 1702; was one of the committee in 1694 to lay out town lots and a common for Annapolis, Trustee of King William and Mary School in 1696, and a Commissioner for the erection of St. Anne's Church, Annapolis. The first session of the Legislature in Annapolis was held at the house of Major Edward Dorsey, commencing February 28, 1694-95. Prior to 1700, and after his marriage to his second wife, Margaret Larkin, Colonel Edward Dorsey removed from Annapolis to 'Major's Choice,' west of Waterloo, and north of the Old Brick Church. Colonel Dorsey's sons by Sarah Wyatt, his first wife, were located near him upon 'Long Beach' and Major's Choice.' Colonel Dorsey owned landed estates not only in Anne Arundel county, but also in Baltimore county. Colonel Edward Dorsey died at 'Major's Choice' (now Howard county), in 1705. His will is dated October 26, 1704, and was proved December 31, 1705...."

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From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 30:

"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., p. 57:

"From 1680 to 1705, Major Dorsey was in every movement looking to the development of the colony. From 1694 to 1696 he was Judge of the High Court of Chancery, during which time he was commissioned to hold the Great Seal. In 1694, he was a member of the House of Burgesses for Anne Arundel, and from 1697 to his death, in 1705, was a member from Baltimore County (now Howard). He was one of the subscribers and treasurer of the fund for building St. Anne's church, and a free school for the province also received his aid. He signed the protestant address from Baltimore County to the King's most gracious Majestie, upon the succession of King William III--an appeal in behalf of Charles Lord Baron of Baltimore, whose proprietary government had been wrested from the family through the influence of Captain John Coode. Though a Protestant, he was found in support of a government which left religious faith untouched."

Ibid., p. 58:
"As Major of the Horse, he joined Captain Edward Burgess, in asking for additional arms and ammunition for defense.

"In 1694, Major Dorsey was upon the committee with Major John Hammond, Hon. John Dorsey, Captain Philip Howard, Major Nicholas Greenberry and John Bennett, to layout town lots and a town common for 'the town of Proctor,' or Annapolis. In 1705, he sold a row of houses upon Bloomsbury Square, Annapolis, which had been entailed to his children, but which, for want of tenants, had greatly depreciated.

"At the time of his death, he was living on 'Major's Choice,' now Howard County."


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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41176:

(1a) 1681, 6 Dec: Edward DORSY, "Son and heir of Edward DORSY late of the County of Ann Arundell" sold the parcel Hockley in the Hole granted to "the said Edward DORSY, Joshua DORSY and John DORSEY my brothers" on 20 Aug. 1664.


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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

130. Colonel Col. Edward Dorsey, born 1646 in Virginia25,26; died [estate probated] 31 Dec 1705 in Major's Choice, Baltimore Co., MD26. He was the son of 260. Edward D'Arcy and 261. Anne Howard. He married 131. Sarah Wyatt Bef. 1670 in Anne Arundel Co., MD27,28.
131. Sarah Wyatt28, born 1657 in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland29,30; died 1690 in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland31,32. She was the daughter of 262. Nicholas Wyatt and 263. Damaris Stockett.

Notes for Colonel Col. Edward Dorsey:
[Ancestors of Abednego Baker by Muriel Schulz.ged]

Anne Arimde Gentry, pp. 11ff]: January 4, 1700/01: [Provincial Court, Liber TL no. 2, folios 169, 279]

Edward Dorsey, of Baltimore County, and Margaret his wife, "for disposing of goods and chattels for advancement of our children after death" assigned to his "well-beloved friends, Major John Hammond, Captain Charles Hammond and my oldest son Edward Dorsey" four plantations bordering his dwelling-plantation at Elk Ridge and one on the south side of the Patapsco a little beyond the Falls with Negroes, livestock, household furniture whereon in trust for his five sons, that is, Samuel, Joshua, John, Nicholas, and Benjamin.
To son Samuel the Patapsco plantation with three Negroes and other personalty.
To son Joshua the plantation "where Black Dick lives" with 100 adjoining acres, Negroes, and other personalty.
[13] To son John plantation that Negro Bacon "now lives on" with 100 acres, Negroes.
To son Nicholas the plantation "that Negro Tom lives on" with 100 acres.
To son Benjamin piece of land between Dick and Bacon.

In the event that any of the said sons died without issue then their estates were to be divided equally among their lawful heirs, but if any son proved "rudely," then the trustees had the power to bind him to a trade.

On June 25, 1702, Edward Dorsey for 90 lbs. bought of Colonel John Larkin and Thomas Larkin, of Anne Arundel, a portion of "United Friendship" on the north side of the Patapsco in Baltimore County as laid out for 350 acres. [Testamentary Proceedings, Liber 6, folio 613]

1679 - Made a Justice of the Peace for Anne Arundel Co. And a Gentleman Justice of the Quorum. Continued to serve for several years.

1681 - Petitioned the Commissioner of Accounts to pay him for 15 days of service to the Province. Also received at one time 375 lbs. Tobacco and at another 390 lbs.

1683 - Placed on the Commission for the advancement of trade and for the laying out of ports in AA Co. Also was on a committee with Henry Ridgely, Nicholas Gassaway, and William Richardson to erect a building for the Courts and Assembly of the Province, and for the keeping of records of the Secretary's Office.

1686 - Styled Captain of His Lordship's Army; Gentleman Justice of the Quorum.

Later rose to Colonel of His Lordship's Army.

1694 - Entered the General Assembly as a delegate from Anne Arundel Co. And served in all succeeding sessions of the Lower House until his death. [14] As Major Dorsey was on the Commission to erect the court house and the free school for Anne Arundel Towne.

1695 - [13] Made a keeper of the Great Seal of the Province.

[14]
1696 - Granted the contract for the erection of the first church of St. Anne. Ultimately fined for failure to complete by the allotted date. [Extended discussion on page 14 of Anne Arundel Gentry.]

Nov. 28, 1689, he with other prominent men endorsed a petition to the "Most Gracious Majesty King William III" setting forth the privileges which they had received under the deposed Charles, Lord Baron of Baltimore, and protested against the intrigue of John Coode who with others undermined the Proprietary Government. [Document is in the London Public Records Office.]

He was a Jacobean and a supporter of the House of Stuart.

Probably his house at Annapolis no longer exists. Although the DAR has placed a plaque on a house alleged to have been his, it was built after his death.

[15] In 1698, Major Dorsey was on the commission to settle the boundary between Baltimore and Anne Arundel Counties.

1694 - One of the first subscribers for the founding of a free school in the province. Subscribed 2000 lbs. of tobacco and was made a trustee of the system.

1704 - After the state house, built in 1696, burnt, the General Assembly held its sessions in a house rented from Col. Edward Dorsey.

1705 - Sold 3 houses on "Bloomsbury Square" to Lord Baltimore for the storing of arms and ammunition.

26 Oct. 1704 - will dated, on file in Annapolis.
Witnessed by Katherine Organ, John Huntsmen, John Dorsey, and John Ball.
27 Dec. 1705 - Probated in Baltimore County.

The inventory and appraisement of Edward Dorsey's personal estate was made by Thomas Hammond and William Talbott. The inventory was taken at the "seated plantation," and also at the Upper Plantation, Elk Ridge Quarters, the Round Bay Plantation, in the Store House and in the Little Flat House. There were books, a gold seal ring, a silver seal ring, an ivory headed can, silver tobacco box, silver hilted sword, silver plate, and surveying chain. His wearing apparel was appraised at &7/10/- lbs. There were also 13 Negro slaves and 2 white indentured servants. Samuel Dorsey, the eldest surviving son, approved the valuation of 528/8/11 lbs. It was filed at court on April 1, 1706. [Wills, Liber 3, folio 725]

By Feb. 15, 1706/07 the widow had married John Israel. Both filed accounts on that date.

An account filed by John Israel on Oct. 24, 1710 reported that 8 Negroes had been given to Col. Dorsey's children in his lifetime.

From Lee Garlock:
Col Edward DORSEY was born about 1640 in Virginia. He died after 26 Oct 1704 in Anne Arundel Co., MD. In the estate of Thomas Chandler (Inn keeper of Anne Arundel Co) 2 Dec 1675, Edward Darsey is listed in the list of debts due estate. He was married to Sarah WYATT before Nov 1670 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.

Edward Dorsey practiced law and was a Justice of Anne Arundel Co from 1679 to 1685. In 1686, he was appointed Captain in the Militia. He was promoted to Major in 1687, served as field officer of Calvert Co in 1694, and was promoted to Colonel in 1702. He was Judge of the High Court of Chancery and Keeper of the Great Seal from 1695 to 1697. He was a member of the House of Burgesses from Anne Arundel Co from 1694 to 1697 and from Baltimore Co from 1701 to 1704. (KG Lindsay, 'Grandpas, Inlaws & Outlaws')

More About Colonel Col. Edward Dorsey:
Fact 1: Ship Builder during part of his life.33,34
Fact 2: A member of Jacobite Party.35,36
Fact 3: 1681, Hockley Deed - See notes for brother John36
Fact 4: 1689, Signed petition to King Wm. III supporting Lord Baltimore.37,38
Fact 5: 28 Feb 1694/95, First Assembly of MD met in his house.39,40
Fact 6: Bet. 1699 - 1705, Census - Tax Rolls41,42

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Confusion on the part of researchers about the death date of Edward Darcy, the colonist, and whether it was he or his son, Major Edward Dorsey, in a number of transactions and records after the shipwreck in 1659, in which an "Edward Darcy" drowned. Edward Darcy was a shipwright. His son Edward may have been one as well.

From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

April 1667 - Edward Darcy, of the County of Anne Arundell, boatwright, sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to Darcy in Nov 1650 and half a warrant of four hundred acres granted to him and Capt. Norwood in Feb. 1651. In Aug 1668, Yates reassigned to Dorsey 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 more acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh/March. His son Edward sold this tract Nov 6, 1670 to Thomas Manniage of the Cliffs.


"A question arises as to whether the Edward Darcy who signed the paper in 1667 was the Edward Darcy who bought and sold land in the 1650s. Caroline Kemper assumes that it is the same person and that a different, unrelated Edward Dorsey died in a boating accident in 1659. Other historians think that Edward Dorsey one bought and sold the property in the 1650s but that his son signed the papers in the 1670s.

"From Maryland Genealogies, "The Identity of Edward Dorsey I," by Caroline Kemper Bulkley, 1938, pp. 398-399:

"The record in the Land Office (Liber II, [Margin Liber G G] (98)) reads: '(125) Edward Dorsey assigns to George Yate 400 acres: Warrant XI November M.D.C.L. (1650); to Edward Dorsey for 200 acres of land the which he assigned away as followeth; as also 200 acres more part of a warrant for 400 acres granted John Norwood and Edward Dorsey dated xxiiij February MDCLi (1651); said Dorsey of County of Ann [sic] Arundell, Boatwright, consideration already received, all my right, title, interest, claim and demand of an--in a warrant for 200 acres of land bearing date sixteen hundred and fifty [so written out] and also to 200 acres more being the one half of a warrant for 400 acres, the one half belong to Capt. Norwood bearing date one thousand six hundred fifty one unto George Yate, etc.'"

"The date of this assignment, duly signed and sealed, is April 23, 1667, and the witness is John Howard, eldest son of the Virginia Matthew and Ann Howard. A year later (August 24, 1668) there is a deed filed from Yate to Dorsey for sixty-eight acres of the above "Dorsey" tract. In the same year one James Connoway assigned back the "right for 1000 acres" to George Yate, who transfers sixty acres to "Darsy." . . . .

"It is contended that the Edward Dorsey who signed the records of 1667-1668 may have been the son Edward. This is highly improbable, since Edward Dorsey the younger could not have had land in his own rights from warrants cited of 1650 and 1651, nor did he ever name himself as "boatwright" in the documents known to bear his signature.

"Those who deny that the record quoted was signed by Edward Dorsey, Senior, argue from the story many times repeated that he was drowned in 1659. No evidence has ever been produced to prove this: there is an authentic record of an Edward Dorsey who was drowned, but who the person was, or whether the name may be mistakenly recorded cannot be determined.

"It is clear that the signer of the 1667-1668 deeds was the father Edward Dorsey, and as further testimony that he was alive after 1659 is a document assigning land--the Bush-Manning tract-- bought by "My father Edward Dorsey from Thomas Marsh in 1661." This same land is later confirmed to Manning in a warrant and power of attorney to Sheriff Stockett from Colonel Edward Dorsey, the son, giving these facts.

--------

From Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, pp. 193-194:

In 1694 Governor Nicholson met in Council at the Court House in Anne Arundel Town and issued an order for the removal of the records from the city of St. Mary's to Anne Arundel Town, to be conveyed in good, strong bags, to be secured with cordage and hides, and well packed, with guards to attend them night and day, and to be delivered to the Sheriff of Anne Arundel County, at Anne Arundel Town. This removal took place in the winter of 1694-5.

The first Assembly was held in a house of Major Edward Dorsey on 28th February 1694, O. S., and in 1695, the town became Annapolis, with a resident naval officer and a public ferry across the Severn...

The foundation of the first State House was laid April 30, 1696. In June, 1697, the building was so well advanced as to be set apart for public use... Struck by lightning in 1699 and entirely consumed by fire in 1704, the first State House had but a brief existence. This gav e Governor Seymour occasion to say, "I never saw any public building left solely to Providence but in Maryland."

Major Dorsey's house was again rented for the Assembly Hall until a new State House could be built...

A Commission, consisting of Major John Hammond, Major Edward Dorsey, Mr. John Bennett, Hon. John Dorsey, Mr. Andrew Norwood, Captain Philip Howard, Mr. James Saunders and Colonel Nicholas Greenberry laid out the town. Four of these were property holders on the North Severn side and four were residents of Middle Nick. They were authorized to buy, or condemn, all that parcel of land within the present Grave Yard Creek and Spa Creek, to be fenced in and called the Town Common, or Pasture; Governor Nicholson's lot was within this enclosure, which ran along East Street to State House Circle...

A picture is extant of a house, No. 83 Prince George Street, Anapolis, which tradition decides is a part of the house owned by Major Edward Dorsey, which became the first Governor's mansion, being later occupied by Governor Nicholson. The house is well preserved and is of solid architecture [as of 1905]....

In 1696 the Assembly of Annapolis appointed His Excellency, Sir Francis Nicholson, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Hon. Nicholas Greenberry, Hon. Thomas Tench, Major Hammond, Major Edward Dorsey, Mr. James Saunders and Captain Richard Hill a Commission "for keeping good rules and orders," making them a body corporate for the new capital. Mr. Richard Beard, surveyor, made a map of the place...

"That part of the land which lye on ye creeke by Major Dorsey's house, whereby His Excellency at present lives, to be sett aside for public buildings, and if in case the same happen to come within any of ye said Major's lotts--we proposed that land be given him elsewhere for it."

A forty-foot water front for warehouses was reserved, and a committee was appointed to consider the erection of a church. Major Edward Dorsey, of that committee, reported a fund already in "banck" amounting to Ł458. The carpenter's estimate was Ł250; brick maker, Ł90; bricklayer, having all stuff upon the place, Ł220. The entire charge would amount to Ł1,200. The Assembly imposed a three-pence tax on tobacco to be continued until May 12, 1698, to be appied to building a church at Annapolis...

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

i. Col. Edward DORSEY was born about 1662 in State of Virginia.20 He served in the military in 1686 in Anne Arundel Co, MD. He was Captain of the Militia of AA County. He was Major Dorsey in 1687. He was recommissioned major on September 4, 1689 and again October 9, 1694. He held office Member of the House of Burgesses representing Anne Arundel County, MD in 1694 in Anne Arundel Co, MD.28,29 "Major Edward Dorsey, by act of the Assembly in 1694, was appointed one of the first commissioners for the 'Town Land at Proctor,' now Annapolis." "It was at the house of Major Edward Dorsey that the first Assembly of Maryland held in the new capital of the Province met on February 28, 1695. The major was an avowed supporter of Charles, Third Lord Baltimore. In 1689 he signed a petition to King William III endorsed by many prominent men of Maryland, 'setting forth the privileges which they had received under the deposed Lord Baltimore and protested against the intrigue of John Coode who, with others, undermined the Proprietary Government.' He was a member of the Jacobite Party, and other accused Jacobites were Colonel Henry Darnall, a Roman Catholic, Samuel Chew II, a Quaker, and Mareen Duval, a Protestant." (Anne Arundel Gentry) He died in 1705 in State of Maryland.20 At the time of his death he was residing on "Major's Choice" (now in Howard County). His will is recorded both at Annapolis and at Baltimore. It mentions various tracts of land; Hockley on the Patapsco Falls, land on the north side of the Patapsco River, Barnes Folly, Major's Choice, Long Reach at Elkridge, and two other sections by the same name. There were also slaves and personal estate mentioned. His executrix was "My beloved wife, Margaret"... of whom he left five minor children, Charles, Larkin, Francis, Edward and Ann, also mentioned in his will. He held office Justice of Anne Arundel County, Maryland 1679 to 1685. He held office Member of House of Burgesses representing Howard County, Maryland 1679 to 1705. He held office Keeper of the Great Seal of the Province of Maryland 1681 and 1696. He held office Judge of the High Court of Chancery 1694 to 1698 in Anne Arundel Co, MD. He Migrated to Maryland.20 Major Edward Dorsey came up with his wife and family from Virginia to Maryland. Edward Dorsey was a man with many irons in the fire; he was a planter, boatwright, builder, lawyer and was much involved in the governmental affairs of the colony. He was a member of a committee commissioned to lay out town lots and a common and to build the court house and free school in Annapolis in 1694. Edward contributed 2,000 pounds of tobacco for the founding of the free-school in Annapolis. The school, then called "King William's School" was later to be known as St. John's College, one of the three oldest colleges in America. According to the records of the Archives of Maryland, Edward Dorsey represented Anne Arundel County rom 1694-1697 at the House of Burgesses, first legislative body for America convened at Jamestown in 1691. The first session of the Legislature in Annapolis was held in the home of Major Edward Dorsey, beginning February 28, 1694/95. From 1701-1705 he represented Baltimore County. He was a delegate to the Maryland Assembly from 1696 to 1704. He was active in military affairs rising through the ranks. In 1686 he was Captain of the Militia, a major in 1687, field officer in 1694, and colonel in 1702. (Maryland Archives Volumes, 5, 13-15, 19-20, 24, 26). He had large land holdings in both Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, some of which he had inherited from his father, including "Hockley-in-the-Hole" and "Major's Choice." These two parcels were handed down through many generations in the Dorsey line. He also owned "Major's Fancy," "Long Reach," "United Friendship," and "Owen's Adventure." In addition he held several parcels of land in and around the Port of Annapolis. His home in Annapolis was built of brick and materials from England. In its day this house was considered large and spacious, rising to two levels. Fine English gardens sloped down in the back to Prince George's Creek. It stands today on Prince George Street. The family lived prior to the building of the Annapolis home on the plantation at Elk Ridge in Baltimore County, located midway between Baltimore and Annapolis on a deep-water inlet at the mouth of the Patspsco River. Edward was a vestryman at St. Anne's Parish. He was a subscriber to and treasurer of the fund for building St. Anne's Church and was given authority to conduct arrangements for the building of the church but resigned due to inability to find workmen. In politics Edward Dorsey was a supporter of the Stuart Kings and the Jacobean Party. Once William of Orange dethroned the Stuart King, Dorsey was recommended in a letter written by Michajoh Perry to John Povey in London 17 Oct 1691. It says that Perry had met "a gentleman, one M. John Hammond, who presented him a list of Gentlemen in Maryland; good, honest, substantial Protestants, who are well affected." The list recommended "to be of their Majesty's Council...Major Edward Dorsey and Thomas Lawrence." (Maryland Archives Liber 8, folio 283-285). Edward was a Protestant but held in great esteem the Government that respected religious liberty. He was one of the signers of the Protestant Address from Baltimore County to King William III, an appeal on behalf of Charles, Lord Baron of Baltimore, the proprietary government having been siezed from the Calvert family through the influence of Capt. John Coode.
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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

"Although Edward was raised a Quaker, he was listed as "Protestant" as an adult. He was a planter, merchant, and contractor. After Edward sold his share of "Hockley-in-the-Hole" to his brother John, Edward probably built a large home on Prince George's Street in Annapolis; there is confusion over whether it became the home of Gov. Sir Francis NICKOLSON, where the Assembly met for a while. Edward was a judge in the Chancery court. His strong support of Lord Baltimore brought his dismissal from the bench and from the militia after 1689. He went to England to testify against the Protestant Associators in 1690. Two years later he was accused of being a Jacobite. He was quite active politically; referred to first as Col., more usually as Major. Edward was involved in contesting the will of Nicholas WYATT, father of his first wife, Sarah, in 1673. Edward was one of the original trustees for King William's School in Annapolis, founded in 1696. His estate inventory was valued at Ł721.9.8 sterling, and included 13 enslaved people and 2 servants.[16]" 38 39 41 43 46 47 48 49 50



Death Notes: Child - Honorable Capt. John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole"

1714/15.


Research Notes: Child - Honorable Capt. John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole"

Youngest son of Edward, the colonist. Patented "Hockley-in-the-Hole" on the south side of the Severn with his brothers Edward and Joshua in 1664. Acquired "Troy" around 1699.
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From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province.

"[Major Edward Dorsey's] house on Prince George's Street, Annapolis, was probably built when he disposed of his interest in Hockley to his youngest brother the 'Honorable John Dorsey.'

"... the Honorable John Dorsey, captain of the Baltimore County militia in later years, took possession of Hockley, three miles from Annapolis, over which his wife, Madam Pleasance Ely, presided, of whom it has been noted--perhaps as a warning to her descendants, that her name was in no sense suggestive of her disposition."
-------

From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels [sic] up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th [20th], 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now in the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

Ibid., p. 30:
"In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., pp. 61-62:

"HON. JOHN DORSEY, OF 'HOCKLEY.'

"Coming into possession of 'Hockley,' in 1683, Hon. John Dorsey married Plesance Ely, who later took up a tract of land on Elk Ridge, which she named 'The Isle of Ely.' In 1694, Hon. John Dorsey, was a commissioner for the development of Annapolis. He was upon many important committees during his service in the Lower House of the Assembly. In 1711, he was advanced to the Upper House, and there remained until his death in 1714. During his life-time he was a surveyor of a vast estate of valuable lands. He left an exceedingly intelligent will of entail, which gives a summary of his large estate. It reads: 'My wife, Plesance, is to have one-third of my estate, and also the choice of my estate on South River, or my now dwelling place on Elk Ridge [Troy]. To my grandson, John Dorsey, son of my son, Edward Dorsey, deceased, my Patuxent plantation and lands thereunto adjoining called 'Dorsey's Search,' lying in Baltimore County. If no issue, to go to the three youngest grandchildren of my daughter, Deborah

'I give to my grandson, Edward Dorsey, son of my son, Edward Dorsey, de ceased, "Dorsey's Adventure" and "Whitaker's Purchase" adjoining it. If he leave no issue, then to John, of Edward, and if he leave none, then as above, to Deborah's youngest three children. To my grandsons, Charles and William Ridgely, of Deborah, my tract called "White Wine and Claret," south side of the middle branch of the Patuxent. If they leave no issue, to go to Martha, Elinor and Edward Clagett.

'I give to my two grandsons, Samuel and Richard, of Caleb, my son, my plantation on South River, called "South River Quarter," it being the remainder of a tract given to my son, Caleb. In case of no issue, the same to go to granddaughters, Achsah and Sophia of Caleb.

'To grandson, Basil, of Caleb, my plantation on Elk Ridge, called "Troy." If no issue, to my grandsons, John and Caleb, of Caleb. My son, Caleb, to be my administrator.--JOHN DORSEY. (Seal.'

"Mrs. Plesance Dorsey became Mrs Robert Wainwright. Her tract, 'The Isle of Ely,' was sold by her grandson, 'Patuxent John Dorsey,' to Basil Dorsey, of Caleb, whose homestead, 'Troy Hill,' was the former residence of Hon. John Dorsey."

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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

Notes for Captain John Dorsey:
[Ancestors of Abednego Baker by Muriel Schulz.ged]

From Anne Arundel Gentry, p. 10:
Edward Dorsey II before 1683 assigned to his brother, John, his portion of 400 acres for 24,000 lbs. Tobacco. Joshua, the second son, had conveyed his portion of "Hockley" for 8,000 lbs. Tobacco. In 1685 Caleb Dorsey, son of John, had the plantation resurveyed and found that it contained 843 acres instead of the original 400.

[Page 10]: 1681 - Deed from Edward Dorsey II, to John Dorsey:
Edward Dorsey of the County of Anne Arundel Gent son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of the County of Anne Arundel . . . deceased. . . whereas the Rt. Honorable Cecillius Lord Baron of Baltimore by his pattent bearing date the twentieth day of August one thousand six hundred and sixty four for ye Consideration therein mentioned Grant unto the said Edward Dorsey, Joshua Dorsey and John Dorsey my brothers a parcell of land Called Hockley in ye Hole lying in Anne Arundel County aforesaid on ye South side Seaverne River in ye Woods beginning at a marke Oake being a bound tree of the land of Cornelius and Samuell Howard . . . . the said four hundred Acres of land unto the said Edward Dorsey, John Dorsey and Joshua Dorsey . . . . Now know ye that I the said Edward Dorsey for & in consideration of Twenty four Thousand pounds of good sound merchantable leafe tobacco to me in hand paid by my said Brother John Dorsey the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge and thereof of every part & parcell thereof do acquitt and discharge the said John Dorsey . . . . . and quit claim unto my said brother John Dorsey now in possession of the said four hundred Acres of land . . . . by virtue of ye aforesaid pattent or grant of ye sa Lord Baltemore to me the said Edward Josua and John Dorsey in Joynt tenancy as aforesaid or by virtue of any with Same or demand that may or might demand or accrue from my said father Edward Dorsey deceased . . . . Sixth day of December in ye Yeare of our Lord One thousand Six hundred Eighty one."

The indenture was witnessed by Richard Hill and Nicholas Greenbury. Ref. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber IH:, No. 3, folio 62-63, Hall of Records, Annapolis.


The inventory of his personal estate was taken on April 25, 1715 and filed by his son and executor, Caleb Dorsey. At the home-plantation there were 11 slaves and in "ye new Roome" were books and a pair of spectacles. His quarters at Elk Ridge had five slaves, the Patuxent Quarters four slaves, but none was listed at the South River Quarters. The entire estate was appraised at 1440/3/9 with credit due from merchants in London. Richard Clagett and John Dorsey approved as the next of kin.

He apparently had a state funeral and certainly one in which the mourners and friends enjoyed traditional Maryland hospitality. At an account filed on April 11, 1716, 10 gallons of rum and 30 gallons of cider were consumed as well as cakes costing 2 lbs. The Rev. Williams Tebbs who preached the funeral sermon was given 2 lbs. At that time the widow was allotted her third, that is 321/8/3 plus 4/154 lbs. tobacco.

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

Sometime around 1658 Edward Dorsey took up a tract of land containing 400 acres, lying in Anne Arundel County on the south side of the Severn River and or a branch of Broad Creek. This tract was later patented by his three sons. See Patents 7, f.378. In the year 1664 there was granted to Edward, Joshua and John Dorsey, 2,000 acres of land lying on the Severn River, not far from where the city of Annapolis now stands. A part of this, called "Hockley-in-ye-Hole" (hole meaning valley) which remained interminably in the hands of the descendants of John Dorsey to the present time. In 1681, Major Edward Dorsey transferred his interest in Hockley-in-the-Hole to his brother John. The transfer reads: "To all Christian People To Whom This Writing Shall Come, be Heard or Seen: I, Edward Dorsey, of the county of Anne Arundel, son and heir of the late Edward Dorsey, gentleman, deceased, for the consideration of 24,000 pounds of good merchantable tobacco, transfer my right in a tract of land called "Hockley-in-the- Hole" granted to Edward, Joshua and John Dorsey in 1664 to my brother, John Dorsey; and I further covenant to guarantee his right to said land against any demand that may descend from my said Father, Edward Dorsey, for or by reason of any right due to him in his lifetime or by reason of any survey by him made, or warrant returned, or for any other reason or any other matter." "Hockley" in the valley had pleasant environments. To the east, toward Annapolis, was the Carroll estates; to the north was the home of Gen. John Hammond; to the northwest were the lands of Cornelius, Samuel and John Howard; to the southwest was "Todd's Gap" through which the road to Lancelot Todd's led, and to the south the ancient Dorsey "God's Acre" which has since been abandoned for the family burial spot within the charming gardens of "Hockley" itself.

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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mrmarsha&id=I36906:

Dorsey, John, Honorable,Balto. Co.,26th Nov., 1714; 22nd Mch., 1714-15.
To wife Pleasance, 1/3 of estate, real and personal, she to make choice of plantation -- , on South R., or dwelling plantation -- , on Elk Ridge.
To grandson John, son of son Edward, deceased, and his hrs., the Patuxent plantation "Dorsey's Search," in Balto. Co.; he dying without issue, to pass to grandson Edward, son of son Edward, and he dying without issue, to 3 young. child., -- , of dau. Deborah Clegat.
To grandson Edward afsd., and hrs., plantation "Dorsey's Adventure" on Elk Ridge, Balto. County, also "Whiteaker's Purchase," bought of James Barley; He dying without issue, sd. land to pass to grandson John afsd. and hrs., and then to child. of dau. Deborah as afsd.
To grandsons Charles and Wm. Ridgley, sons of dau. Deborah, equally, and their hrs., "White Wine and Claret," on s. side Patuxent R., in Balto Co.; they dying without issue, sd. tract to pass to Martha, Elinor and Edward Clegatt, child. of dau. Deborah, and hrs.
To grandsons Sam'll and Rich'd Dorsey, sons of son Caleb, and hrs., plantation "South River Quarter," being residue of a tract given by deed of gift to son Caleb. Sd. land to be in possession of wife during life as afsd. should she so select; and should grandsons afsd. die without issue, to pass to granddaus. Acksah and Sophia and their hrs.
To grandson Bazill and hrs., son of son Caleb, plantation "Troy," in Balto. Co.; he dying without issue, to pass to grandsons Jno. and Caleb Dorsey, sons of son Caleb afsd.
To grandson John, son of Edward, deceased, personalty, to be held by his mother, -- , until he is 21 yrs. of age; and to grandchild. Charles, Ridgely, 2nd son of dau. Deborah, and other grandchild. afsd., personalty. Boys to receive their estate at 21 yrs.
To dau. Deborah Clegatt, personalty.
Son Caleb, ex. and residuary legatee of estate.
Test: Joseph Howard, Thos. Higgens, Sam'll Dorsey, Thos. Rogers, Jno. Beale, Vachel Denton. 14. 26.

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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

John Dorsey2, was born ca. 1645 in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, the son of Edward and his wife Ann, and died in 1715 in Maryland. He emigrated with his family in 1649 to Anne Arundel County, Maryland. John married in 1684 Pleasance ELY . One source identifies her as the step-daughter of Thomas WAINWRIGHT (d. 1729), while another states Thomas was her second husband. John is usually referred to in the records as "Hon." or Captain, a rank he held from 1695 until his death in 1714/5. Although raised as a Friend, he was later identified as Protestant, meaning neither Quaker or Anglican.[19]

"In 1663 John was living with his brothers at "Hockley in the Hole", Anne Arundel County, because it was surveyed for them on 27 January that year. This 400 acre plot had been taken up by their father sometime before 1658, on the south side of the Severn "and or a branch of Broad Creek". In 1681 John bought out his brothers' rights to it. He paid Edward 24,000 pounds of tobacco for it and additional land Edward had bought, and paid 8,000 pounds to Joshua. When it was resurveyed in 1683 (or 1685) it was found to contain 842 (or 843) acres (or resurveyed in 1685 and contained 1,842 acres).[20] The secondary accounts of the original records are a little hard to interpret in large part because they don't always differentiate among the multiplicity of bureaucratic steps necessary to secure title to a tract of land. The original patent was in the possession of a descendent, Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, who was still living in the old homestead in 1913. A photo of that date shows a relatively small house with two dormers on the roof, one chimney at the left end of the photo, and a narrow porch with a roof two storeys high suported on thin columns. The house was nearly obscured with shrubbery.[21] When we went to find it in April 2004, there was a white historical marker on the road, but the two houses that might conceivably have been a remnant of the old homestead both looked twentieth century, to me.

"John purchased significant amounts of land during his life. A list of them, by their names, includes:[22]

"Howard's Heirship" (150 acres) purchased from Cornelius and Elizabeth HOWARD on 4 August 1679; they were the brother and sister-in-law of our John Howard ;
"Hockley in the Hole", purchased Edward's and Joshua's rights in 1681; resurveyed in 1683 and found to contain 842 acres (see above);
"Orphan's Addition", near "Hockley in the Hole", on 10 March 1697, which he gave to his son Caleb on 6 August 1702;
"Dorsey's Adventure" (400 acres on Elk Ridge between the Patuxent and Patapsco) on 30 Feb [sic: perhaps April?] 1688; this tract with the next one were called "Patuxent Plantation", and were bequeathed to John's grandson, John Dorsey;
"Dorsey's Search" (479 acres) purchased on 6 December 1694 from James BAYLEY;
"Troy" (763 acres) on 12 October 1694;
"White Wine and Claret" (1,400 acres) on 6 January 1702;
"Whitaker's Purchase" (79 acres) in 1704;
"Roper's Increase" (100 acres) obtained on 14 February 1705 from Cornelius and Mary HOWARD;
"Mt. Gilboa" (245 acres) in 1706, which he conveyed the next year to Richard COLEGATE.

"On 12 June 1688 John and his brother Edward acquired land in what was then Baltimore County (now Howard County). Edward settled on his "Major's Choice", but John did not build on his "Dorsey's Adventure". Instead John commissioned surveyors to "go beyond Richard Warfield" in upper Anne Arundel County. There on 10 November 1695 he patented "Troy", 736 acres, between the present towns of Elkridge and Guilford, where he built his home. He also patented "Isle of Ely", named for his wife's family, and "Dorsey's Search". Another source says that Pleasance herself took up the tract after John's death, which she named "The Isle of Ely". The tax return of 1695 recorded, "John Dawsey's Quarter, on Elke Ridge, etc.", so John had a house there by that year. This makes "Troy" the oldest remaining house in Howard County, although it has been greatly altered. Originally "Troy" was a one-storey house with a front porch devoid of any ornamentation other than a simple ballustrade. Other floors were added later. The interior and exterior walls were about two feet thick. The old family burial ground was on one side of the house. The front porch now overlooks Meadowridge Cemetery (once part of the Dorsey estate) and route I-95. The entrance is from route 1 north of Dorsey Road.[23]

"John, like his brothers, probably opposed the Revolution of 1689. He gained his first appointed office from Governor Francis NICHOLSON who was sympathetic to the proprietor. From then on John had an active public career. He was appointed Justice of the Peace in Anne Arundel County in 1694 and 1696. In 1694 he was appointed to a commission charged with laying out the town and port of Anne Arundel in the County of the same name. On 17 May 1695 he petitioned the Assembly for a boat to carry the Burgesses of Anne Arundel County to St. Mary's. He was Captain in the Baltimore County militia in 1696. John served on a commission to oversee and direct construction of a Provincial prison in Annapolis. He was named to another commission to report on repairs to a house (purchased from his cousin Major Edward Dorsey) for the storage of public arms.[24]

"In 1692, after the consolidation of the reign of William and Mary in England, a new government was elected in Maryland that was very unsympathetic to Friends. They required an oath of allegiance in order to sit in the Assembly, and four Friends were immediately dismissed. The lower house tried to substitute an affirmation, but Governor Lionel COPLEY insisted on conforming to English practice. That year the Church of England was established, with a compulsary poll tax of forty pounds of tobacco. There were renewed efforts to force Friends to serve in the militia. The following year Friends were not permitted to give evidence in court unless they gave an oath. John Dorsey served as a member of the lower House of Assembly in 1692-93, and again in 1701-04 when a modified bill, rewritten by the Privy Council to meet some of the objections of Friends, was passed. It retained the 40 lb. tax to support the established church, and Friends continued up until the Revolution to suffer distraint of goods for refusing to pay it. In 1704 a bill was passed stipulating again that all office-holders must swear an oath.[25] I do not know how John felt about these attacks on his family's faith.

"John sat in the Lower House for Anne Arundel County in 1692-93 and 1701-04. He was appointed to the Provincial Council where he served from 1710/1 to 1714/5. On 18 January 1714 he described himself as "being lame and indisposed" and asked to be excused from the Council meeting. The following year the Council was said to consist of twelve "of the most able and discreet gentlemen" of the Province, including "John Dorsey, Esq., lately deceased."[26]

"John was a planter and merchant, somewhat more prosperous and less controversial than his older brother Edward. At the time of his first election, in 1692, John owned 1,242 acres. By 1696 he owned 2,484. In 1699 he was listed among the taxables on the South side of Patapsco, owning five slaves. Shortly thereafter he moved his family to "Troy", 763 acres at Elk Ridge, Baltimore County, which had been surveyed 12 October 1694. He took up 1,400 acres called "White Wine and Claret" between the present towns of Simpsonville and Clarksville in Howard County on 6 January 1702. The story goes that he sent out the surveyors with an ample supply of those liquid refreshments; when they returned with crooked lines, John figured that was the cause, and kept the name. The tax lists for Baltimore County sometimes indicate the number of slaves he owned at various plantations. In 1699 he had five on South Side Patapsco; in 1702 four, and in 1703 ten at Elk Ridge.[27]

"A few Friends were exercised about the institution of slavery, citing Jesus' injunction to do unto others as you would have them do unto you. But nothing was done at this time to rid the Society of Friends of this blemish. A few Friends were also exercised about the excessive use of tobacco. Hardshaw Monthly Meeting in Lancashire, Old England, minuted this advice 14 Fourth Month [June] 1691:

'It being considered that the too frequent use of smoking Tobacco is inconsistent with friends holy profession, it is desired that such as have occasion to make use thereof take it privately, neither too publicly in their own houses, nor by the highways, streets, or in alehouses or elsewhere, tending to the abetting the common excess.[27a]'

"Most Maryland Friends were oblivious of these movements that would impact so heavily on their economic and social well being.

"John signed his will in Baltimore County on 26 November 1714; it was witnessed by six men, one of whom signed with a mark. It was probated 22 March 1714/5. He left one third of his real and personal estate, after the payment of his debts, to his wife Pleasance as full payment of her dower. She was to be given her choice of either the plantation on South River or "my own dwelling plantation" on Elk Ridge. Her share of the estate included four human beings: Jacob and his wife Jenny, and two other Negro men, Lyman and Sambo. John's extensive real estate holdings and the remaining slaves were carefully apportioned to his grandchildren, with instructions for their further disposal if a given grandchild died with no heirs. His daughter Deborah was to be given Ł50, doled out at the rate of Ł8 per year "for her support", but no real estate. Her children were the third back-up to inherit if other grandchildren died without heirs. The residue went to his son Caleb, who was named executor. Nathaniell and Thomasin STINCHCOMB owed money to him.[28]

"An inventory of John's property was taken on 25 April 1715 by Thomas HAMMOND and John ISRAEL. The only values given in the Dorsey Family's copy were for the seventeen enslaved people. An odd assortment of items were listed "At the Home Plantation", "In the New Room", and "in the Kitchen". They included one silver tankard and one silver spoon; a dozen old leather chairs, six new leather chairs, and 4 "Turkey workt" chairs; an old sealskin trunk; a gun and 1/4 lb. of gunpowder; a small looking glass; one feather bed with canvas tick[ing], rug blanket, sheets, bedstead, and pillows; another feather bed and furniture, curtains and "vallens" [valence]; one pair Taylors Shears; a pair of money scales and weights; one parcel of new books; a pair of spectacles and case; 8 small brushes, 3 old combs, 3 pair sissors; 1 parcel of spice. There were lots of shoes, indicating the kind of merchandize with which John dealt: 2 dozen and 10 pair men's shoes, 3 pair women's shoes, 21 pair men's shoes. To go with them, 13 pair "large wove" stockings, 1 pair motheaten stockings, 20 pair of 4-thread hose, 5 pair women's thread stockings, 8 pair men's worsted hose, 1 pair large wove stockings. Then there was thread: 6.5 lbs. colored, 3 lbs. "Whited brown, coarse", 2 lbs. finer, 1 lb. brown, 1.5 lb. White and Brown, .5 lb. fine white, and about 1 lb. silk. John also had 6 gross Coat buttons and 6.5 gross Vest buttons, and about 5 gross fine thread [buttons?]. The only food mentioned was 1,692 lbs. of bacon. Negroes were listed "in the Kitchen": 2-year-old girl Beck; 6-year-old boy Sambo; 4-year-old boy Roger; 10-year-old girl Sarah, "much hurt by fire"; a "dropsical man" Jack; men named Jack and Tom, and one without a name; a woman, Beck, and young (unnamed) girl with child. The total value of these ten people was a mere Ł163 and 10d. At the Elk Ridge House there was ten lbs. of old pewter, a punch bowl, and more enslaved people: men named Simon, Sambo, Jack, and Toby; a woman named Jenny, a one-year old girl named Hagar and another girl (age not listed) named Juno. They were valued at Ł157. Other, unspecified items were at "Pattuxant Quarter", at South River, and at the "New Design". He probably owned about 5,000 acres; his estate was valued at Ł2,752.11.1.[29]

"Pleasance, "of austere memory" was described in family records: "between her name and her disposition there was no similarity." She married a second time, on 30 November 1722, Thomas WAINWRIGHT. With this marriage, "Troy" passed to her grandson Basil Dorsey, son of Caleb. Thomas died in 1729, leaving Pleasance the greater part of his estate. Pleasance apparently used her wealth to invest in land. A warrant was made out for her 17 December 1717 for 200 acres called "Isle of Ely" adjacent to "Troy". That year she also bought 100 acre "Oldman's Folly". In 1720 she bought 200 acre "Roper's Increase" (perhaps part of the original of which her husband had bought 79 acres in 1705), 50 acre "Howard's Addition", and 120 acre "Poplar Spring Garden" in Baltimore County at the head of the Patapsco River, adjacent to "Howard's Ridge".[30]

"Pleasance died in 1734. Her estate was appraised 14 August 1734, by Benjamin HOWARD and John HAMMOND, son of Charles. Her possessions included some items that had been in her first husband's inventory. Pleasance had wearing apparel, a silver tankard and cups, a silver spoon, thimble, and buckles, 3 silk handkerchiefs, taylor's shears, 2 small punch bowls, 4 ivory handled knives and forks, a pepper box, 1 caster, 1 tin baster, 1 flesh fork, 1 cutting knife and 1 pen knife, 2 chests, a pair of spectacles, 2 "Turkey-workt" chairs, 6 old books (unspecified), furniture and kitchen utensils, stock and feed, one old Negro man named Tom, one old Negro woman named Beck, and one Negro lad named George.[31] 38 41 43 53 54 55 56 57



Research Notes: Child - Joshua Dorsey of "Hockley"

Patented "Hockley-in-the-Hole" on the south side of the Severn with his brothers John and Edward.

From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th, 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now i the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

Ibid., p. 30:
"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41179:

(1a) 1681, 6 Dec: Edward DORSY, "Son and heir of Edward DORSY late of the County of Ann Arundell" sold the parcel Hockley in the Hole granted to "the said Edward DORSY, Joshua DORSY and John DORSEY my brothers" on 20 Aug. 1664. (2) 1681: Edward DORSEY of Anne Arundel Co., son and heir of the late Edward DORSEY, gentleman, deceased, transfered to my brother John DORSEY, for 24,000 pounds of tobacco, my right in a tract of land called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," granted to Edward, Joshua, and John DORSEY in 1664. Joshua DORSEY deeded to his brother John DORSEY, for 8,000 pounds of tobacco, his right in the same tract.
(2) He located upon "Taunton," a tract taken up by Lawrence RICHARDSON and left by him to his sons, one of whom, Lawrence Jr., conveyed his interest to Joshua DORSEY.
(1b) 1687, 20 Feb: (2) 1687/8: (1b,2) Joshua DORSEY made his will. (1b) Made bequests to his "cousins" John, Samuel and Matthew HOWARD. (1) Though not stated, these were children of Matthew HOWARD, Jr. [who married Joshua's sister Sarah DORSEY]. (2) Granted one third of his estate to his widow, Sarah DORSEY, and made his brothers Edward and John DORSEY guardians for the education of his son John DORSEY, to whom he left his estate. Gave to loving cousin John HOWARD a grey gelding; to cousin Samuel HOWARD, two hogsheads of tobacco. Gave to cousin Sarah DORSEY 20 shillings to buy her a ring.
(1c) 1688, 3 May: John ACTON made his will. Sarah DORSEY called widow and relict of Joshua DORSEY. 60 61



Research Notes: Child - Ann Dorsey [uncertain]

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

(1) Some researchers have attributed a daughter to Edward DORSEY a daughter Ann who married Nicholas GREENBERRY. There is no evidence that Edward DORSEY had a daughter named Ann. While Nicholas GREENBERRY's wife was named Ann, she could not have been a daughter of Edward DORSEY. Nicholas GREENBERRY did not emigrate from England to Maryland until 1674, at which time he arrived with his wife and two children. (Maryland Patent Liber 18 (Vol. 21):160 FHL microfilm 0,013,071.) Land was claimed in 1674 for Nicholas GREENBERRY, wife, and two children (not named) who were on the ship "Constant Friendship." His wife could not have been the daughter of Edward DORSEY, who had been living in the colonies for over 25 years. 62


Research Notes: Child - Sarah Dorsey

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/d4320.htm#P4320:

From Side-Lights on Maryland History with Sketches of Early Maryland Families by Hester Dorsey Richard, Baltimore, Maryland, 1918, vol. 2, p. 91:

"Sarah Dorsey, the only sister of the three brothers of Hockley, married Matthew Howard, one of the original five Howards who came to Maryland in 1650, the same year in which Edward Darcy patented his first land. The sons and daughters of all the early Dorseys married the representatives of Colonial worthies of prominence and influence until it is almost impossible to name an early notable from whom the later generations do not descend, or a persn of eminence in Maryland and many out of the State who do not with pride claim their Dorsey forbears." 63


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57 Website:, http://www.mdinns.com/inns/howard.html.

58 Richardson, Hester Dorsey, Side-Lights on Maryland History with Sketches of Early Maryland Families. (Vol. 2. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1913.), pp. 87-91, 212-213.

59 Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), pp. 61-62.

60 Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), pp. 56, 59.

61 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/d3730.htm#P3730.

62 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41162.

63 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41173.

64 Spencer, Richard Henry ed, Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland. (New York: American Historical Society, 1919.), p. 611.

65 Warfield, J. D, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. (Baltimore: Kohn & Pollock, 1905), p. 29.

66 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41172.


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