The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord and Amélie Countess of Aubnay




Husband Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord 1 2 3

            AKA: Bernard I Comte de la Marche
           Born: Abt 970 - <Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1047 - <La Marche, (France)>
         Buried: 


         Father: Aldebert I Count of La Marche and Périgord (      -0997) 3 4
         Mother: Adalemode of Limoges (      -Between 1007/1010) 5 6


       Marriage: 



Wife Amélie Countess of Aubnay 1 7

            AKA: Amelia d'Angoulęme
           Born: Abt 974 - <Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1072
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges 1 8 9

            AKA: Almode de la Marche, Almodis de la Haute Marche, Almodis of La Marche
           Born: Abt 1000 - Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Nov 1071
         Buried:  - Cathedral of Barcelona, Spain
         Spouse: Hugh V "the Pious" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan (      -1060) 3 10 11
           Marr: Abt 1038
         Spouse: Pons Count of Toulouse, Albi and Dijon (Between 0990/1020-1060) 12 13
           Marr: 1045
         Spouse: Ramon Berenguer I Count of Barcelona (1023-1076) 1 14
           Marr: 1056


2 M Aldebert II Count of La Marche & Poitou 15

            AKA: Aldebert II de la Marche
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1088 - <La Marche, (France)>
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord

May have died about 1041.


Death Notes: Child - Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges

Murdered


Research Notes: Child - Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges

Second wife of Pons of Toulouse. Third wife of Ramon Berenguer I.

From Wikipedia - Almodis de la Marche :

Almodis de la Marche (990 or c. 1020 - 16 October 1071 ) was the daughter of Bernard I, Count of Marche and wife Amélie. She married Hugh V of Lusignan around 1038 and they had two sons and one daughter:
Hugh VI of Lusignan (c. 1039-1101)
Jordan de Lusignan
Mélisende de Lusignan (b. bef. 1055), married before 1074 to Simon I "l'Archevęque", Vidame de Parthenay

Almodis and Hugh of Lusignan divorced due to consanguinity , and Hugh arranged for her to marry Count Pons of Toulouse in 1040. Together they produced several children, including:
William IV of Toulouse
Raymond IV of Toulouse
Hugh, Abbot of Saint-Gilles
Almodis of Toulouse, married Count Pierre of Melgueil

She was still Pons' wife in April 1053, but shortly thereafter Almodis was abducted by Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona . He kidnapped her from Narbonne with the aid of a fleet sent north by his ally, the Muslim emir of Tortosa . They married immediately (despite the fact both of her previous husbands were still alive) and they appear with their twin sons in a charter the next year. Pope Victor II excommunicated Almodis and Ramon for this illegal marriage until 1056. Together they produced four children:
Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona
Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona
Inés of Barcelona, married Count Guigues I of Albon
Sancha of Barcelona, married Count Guillermo Ramon I of Cerdagne

Almodis maintained contact with her former husbands and many children, and in 1066/1067 she traveled to Toulouse for her daughter's wedding. A few years before, in 1060, Hugh V of Lusignan had revolted against his lord, Duke William VIII of Aquitaine , in support of Almodis' son William IV of Toulouse . Her sons supported one another in military campaigns; Hugh VI of Lusignan , Raymond IV of Toulouse , and Berenguer Ramon all took the Cross.

Her third husband Ramon had a son from a previous marriage, Pedro Ramon, who was his heir. Pedro apparently resented Almodis' influence and was concerned she was trying to replace him with her own two sons. He murdered her in October 1071. Pedro was disinherited and exiled for his crime, and fled the country. When his father died in 1076, Barcelona was split between Berenguer Ramon and Ramon Berenguer, Almodis' sons. The family history of murder did not end with Pedro Ramon, as Berenguer Ramon earned his nickname "The Fratricide " when he killed his own twin brother.


Heidrek "Ulfhamr" Angantyrsson and Amfleda "the Younger"




Husband Heidrek "Ulfhamr" Angantyrsson 1

           Born: Abt 552 - <Reidgotalandi, Norway>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Angantyr Heidreksson King in Reidgotalandi (Abt 0532-      ) 1
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Amfleda "the Younger" 1

           Born: Abt 556 - Norway
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Hildur Heidreksdatter 1

            AKA: Hervor Heidreksdatter, Hildis Heidreksdatter
           Born: Abt 572 - <Jutland, Denmark>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Harald Valdarsson (Abt 0568-      ) 1
           Marr: Abt 589 - <Jutland, Denmark>




Ralph de Mainwaring and Amice of Chester




Husband Ralph de Mainwaring 1

            AKA: Rafe de Mainwaring
           Born: Abt 1155 - <Warmingham, Cheshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger de Mainwaring (Abt 1130-      ) 1
         Mother: Ellen (Abt 1130-      ) 1


       Marriage: 1179 - Warmingham, Cheshire, England



Wife Amice of Chester 1 16

            AKA: Amicia de Meschines
           Born: Abt 1167
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147-1181) 16 17 18
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Bertred Mainwaring 1 19

           Born: Abt 1196 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1249
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Henry de Aldithley (Abt 1175-Bef 1246) 1 19
           Marr: 1218 - Edgmond, Cheshire, England



Research Notes: Wife - Amice of Chester

Illegitimate daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, according to Wikipedia.


Humbert I Count of Savoy and Ancelie von Lenzburg




Husband Humbert I Count of Savoy 1

           Born: Abt 972 - <Geneva, Switzerland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Jul 1042 or 1051
         Buried: 


         Father: Gerald of Geneva (Abt 0942-      ) 1
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Ancelie von Lenzburg 1

           Born: Abt 974 - <Geneva, Switzerland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Arnold von Schannis (Abt 0948-      ) 1
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy 1 20

            AKA: Eudo I Count of Savoy and Maurienne, Odo I Count of Maurienne (Savoy) and Chablis, Otto Count of Maurienne and Savoy
           Born: Abt 1002 - <Geneva, Switzerland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Mar 1060
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alix Duchess of Turin (Abt 1015-1091) 1 21 22
           Marr: Abt 1046



Death Notes: Child - Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy

FamilySearch has d. 19 Jan 1057 or 1060.


Research Notes: Child - Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy

Count of Maurienne and Savoy, Margrave of Susa, Count of Chablis


Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
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         Father: Private
         Mother: Private


       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
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         Spouse: Private



Research Notes: Husband - Anchises Prince of Troy [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Anchises :

In Greek mythology , Anchises (Ancient Greek : was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme , a naiad . His major claim to fame in Greek mythology is that he was a mortal lover of the goddess Aphrodite (and in Roman mythology, the lover of Venus ). One version is that Aphrodite pretended to be a Phrygian princess and seduced him for nearly two weeks of lovemaking. Anchises learned that his lover was a goddess only nine months later, when she revealed herself and presented him with the infant Aeneas . The principal early narrative of Aphrodite's seduction of Anchises and the birth of Aeneas is the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite.

Anchises was a prince from Dardania , a territory neighbouring Troy . He had a mortal wife named Eriopis, according to the scholiasts, and he is credited with other children beside Aeneas. Homer , in the Iliad , mentions a daughter named Hippodameia , their eldest ("the darling of her father and mother"), who married her cousin Alcathous .

Anchises bred his mares with the divine stallions owned by King Laomedon . However, he made the mistake of bragging about his liaison with Aphrodite, and as a result Zeus , the king of the gods, hit him with a thunderbolt which left him lame.

After the defeat of Troy in the Trojan War , the elderly Anchises was carried from the burning city by his son Aeneas, accompanied by Aeneas' wife Creusa , who died in the escape attempt, and small son Ascanius (the subject is depicted in several paintings, including a famous version by Federico Barocci in the Galleria Borghese in Rome ). Anchises himself died and was buried in Sicily many years later. Aeneas later visited Hades and saw his father again in the Elysian Fields . Homer's Iliad mentions another Anchises, a wealthy native of Sicyon in Greece and father of Echepolus.


Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Aeneas :

In Greco-Roman mythology , Aeneas (Greek : Aineías; pronounced /?'ni??s/ in English ) was a Trojan hero, the son of prince Anchises and the goddess Venus . His father was also the second cousin of King Priam of Troy. The journey of Aeneas from Troy, (led by Venus, his mother) which led to the founding of the city Rome , is recounted in Virgil 's Aeneid . He is considered an important figure in Greek and Roman legend and history. Aeneas is a character in Homer 's Iliad , Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica , and Shakespeare 's Troilus and Cressida . Also, Aeneas has been known for his skills in combat during the battle of Troy. He also was one of the keys to the founding of Rome.

Mythology
In the Iliad , Aeneas is the leader of the Dardanians (Trojans - descendants of Dardanus), and a principal lieutenant of Hector , son of the Trojan king Priam . In the poem, Aeneas's mother Aphrodite frequently comes to his aid on the battlefield; he is also a favorite of Apollo . Aphrodite and Apollo rescue Aeneas from combat with Diomedes of Argos , who nearly kills him, and carry him away to Pergamos for healing. Even Poseidon , who normally favors the Greeks, comes to Aeneas's rescue when the latter falls under the assault of Achilles , noting that Aeneas, though from a junior branch of the royal family, is destined to become king of the Trojan people.


As seen in the first books of the Aeneid, Aeneas is one of the few Trojans who were not killed in battle or enslaved when Troy fell. When Troy was sacked by the Greeks, Aeneas, after being commanded by the gods to flee, gathered a group, collectively known as the Aeneads , who then traveled to Italy and became progenitors of the Romans . The Aeneads included Aeneas's trumpeter Misenus , his father Anchises , his friends Achates , Sergestus and Acmon , the healer Lapyx, the steady helmsman Palinurus , and his son Ascanius (also known as Iulus, Julus, or Ascanius Julius.) He carried with him the Lares and Penates , the statues of the household gods of Troy, and transplanted them to Italy.


(From here on, the Greek myths make room for the Roman mythology, so the Roman names of the gods will be used.) After a brief, but fierce storm sent up against the group at Juno 's request, and several failed attempts to found cities, Aeneas and his fleet made landfall at Carthage after six years of wanderings. Aeneas had a year long affair with the Carthaginian queen Dido (also known as Elissa), who proposed that the Trojans settle in her land and that she and Aeneas reign jointly over their peoples. Once again, this was in favour of Juno, who was told of the fact that her favorite city would eventually be defeated by the Trojans' descendants. However, the messenger god Mercury was sent by Jupiter and Venus to remind Aeneas of his journey and his purpose, thus compelling him to leave secretly and continue on his way. When Dido learned of this, she ordered her sister Anna to construct a pyre, she said, to get rid of Aeneas' possessions, left behind by him in his haste to leave. Standing on it, Dido uttered a curse that would forever pit Carthage against Rome. She then committed suicide by stabbing herself with the same sword she gave Aeneas when they first met and then falling on the pyre. Anna reproached the mortally wounded Dido. Meanwhile, Juno, looking down on the tragedy and moved by Dido's plight, sent Iris to make Dido's passage to Hades quicker and less painful. When Aeneas later traveled to Hades, he called to her ghost but she neither spoke to nor acknowledged him.


The company stopped on the island of Sicily during the course of their journey. After the first trip, before the Trojans went to Carthage, Achaemenides , one of Odysseus ' crew who had been left behind, traveled with them. After visiting Carthage, the Trojans returned to Sicily where they were welcomed by Acestes , king of the region and son of the river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman.


Latinus , king of the Latins , welcomed Aeneas's army of exiled Trojans and let them reorganize their life in Latium . His daughter Lavinia had been promised to Turnus , king of the Rutuli , but Latinus received a prophecy that Lavinia would be betrothed to one from another land - namely, Aeneas. Latinus heeded the prophecy, and Turnus consequently declared war on Aeneas at the urging of Juno, who was aligned with King Mezentius of the Etruscans and Queen Amata of the Latins. Aeneas' forces prevailed. Turnus was killed and his people were captured. According to Livy , Aeneas was victorious but Latinus died in the war. Aeneas founded the city of Lavinium , named after his wife. He later welcomed Dido's sister, Anna Perenna , who then committed suicide after learning of Lavinia's jealousy.

After his death, his mother, Venus asked Jupiter to make her son immortal. Jupiter agreed and the river god Numicus cleansed Aeneas of all his mortal parts and Venus anointed him with Ambrosia and Nectar, making him a god. Aeneas was recognized as the god Jupiter Indiges . Inspired by the work of James Frazer , some have posited that Aeneas was originally a life-death-rebirth deity .

Family and legendary descendants
Aeneas had an extensive family tree. His wet-nurse was Caieta , and he is the father of Ascanius with Creusa , and of Silvius with Lavinia. The former, also known as Iulus (or Julius), founded Alba Longa and was the first in a long series of kings. According to the mythology outlined by Virgil in the Aeneid, Romulus and Remus were both descendants of Aeneas through their mother Rhea Silvia, making Aeneas progenitor of the Roman people. Some early sources call him their father or grandfather,[1] but considering the commonly accepted dates of the fall of Troy (1184 BC) and the founding of Rome (753 BC), this seems unlikely. The Julian family of Rome, most notably Julius Cćsar and Augustus , traced their lineage to Ascanius and Aeneas, thus to the goddess Venus. Through the Julians, the Palemonids also make this claim. The legendary kings of Britain also trace their family through a grandson of Aeneas, Brutus .


Andrew II of Hungary and Yolanda de Courtenay




Husband Andrew II of Hungary 23

            AKA: Andrew II "the Jerosolimitan" of Hungary
           Born: Abt 1177
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Sep 1235
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Feb 1215 - Székesfehérvár, Hungary

Events

• King of Hungary: 1205-1235.




Wife Yolanda de Courtenay 24

           Born: Abt 1200
     Christened: 
           Died: 1233
         Buried: 


         Father: Pierre de Courtenay (      -1219) 25
         Mother: Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219) 26




Children
1 F Violant of Hungary 27

            AKA: Yolanda de Hungría
           Born: Abt 1216
     Christened: 
           Died: 1253
         Buried:  - Monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona, Lleida, Catalonia
         Spouse: James I of Aragon (1208-1276) 28
           Marr: 1235



Research Notes: Husband - Andrew II of Hungary

From Wikipedia - Andrew II of Hungary :

Andrew II the Jerosolimitan (Hungarian : Jeruzsálemi II András/Endre, Croatian : Andrija II. Arpadovic Slovak : Ondrej) (c. 1177 - 21 September, 1235), King of Hungary [1](1205-1235). He was the younger son of King Béla III of Hungary , who invested him with the government of the Principality of Halych . However, the boyars of Halych rebelled against his rule and expelled the Hungarian troops. Following their father's death, Andrew continuously conspired against his brother, King Emeric of Hungary who had to grant him the government of Croatia and Dalmatia . When his brother and his infant son died, Andrew ascended the throne and started to grant royal domains to his partisans. He participated in the Fifth Crusade but he could not achieve any major military success. He was obliged to issue the Golden Bull confirming the privileges of the noblemen of Hungary and later he was also obliged to confirm the special privileges of the clergy. During his long reign, he had several quarrels with his sons.

The turbulent duke
Andrew was the second son of King Béla III and his first wife, Agnes of Antioch . As younger son, Andrew had no hope to inherite the Kingdom of Hungary from his father who wanted to ensure the inheritance of his elder son, Emeric and had him crowned already in 1182.

Nevertheless, when Prince Volodymyr II of Halych , who had been expelled from his country by his subjects, fled to Hungary seeking for assistance in 1188, King Béla III had him arrested and occupied his principality and he invested Andrew with Halych . The child Andrew's rule in Halych must have been only nominal; he even did not visit his principality. Although, the young prince's troops could get the mastery in 1189 when the boyars of Halych rose against his rule, but shortly afterwards Prince Volodymyr II managed to escape from his captivity and he expelled the Hungarian troops from Halych.

On 23 April 1196, King Béla III died and he left the Kingdom of Hungary unportioned to his eldest son, Emeric, while Andrew inherited a large amount of money in order to fulfill his father's Crusader oath. However, Andrew used the money to recruit followers among the barons and also sought the assistance of Leopold V, Duke of Austria . In December 1197, Andrew's troops defeated King Emeric's armies in a battle near to Macsek in December 1197. Following Andrew's victory, the king was obliged to transfer the government of the Duchies of Croatia and Dalmatia to Andrew.

In the beginning of 1198, Pope Innocent III requested Andrew to fulfill his father's last will and lead a Crusade to the Holy Land . However, instead of a Crusade, Andrew made a campaign against the neighbouring provinces and occupied Zahumlje and Rama . Andrew also went on conspiring with some prelates against his brother, but King Emeric was informed on Andrew's plans and he personally arrested Bishop Boleszlo of Vác , one of Andrew's main supporters, and he also deprived his brother's followers (e.g., Palatine Mog ) of their dignities. In the summer of 1199, King Emeric defeated Andrew in the Battle of Rád and Andrew had to fleed to Austria. Finally, the two brothers made peace with the mediation of the Papal Legate Gregory, and the king granted again the government of Croatia and Dalmatia to his brother.

Around 1200, Andrew married Gertrude , a daughter of Berthold IV, Duke of Merania . It was probably his wife who persuaded him to conspire against his brother again, but when King Emeric, who had realised that Andrew's troops outnumbered his armies, went unarmed, wearing only the crown and the sceptre , to Andrew's camp near Varasd , Andrew surrendered voluntarily on the spur of the scene. The king had his brother arrested, but Andrew managed to escape shortly afterwards.

Nevertheless, the king become more and more ill, and wanted to secure the ascension of his young son, Ladislaus , who had been crowned on 26 August 1204. Shortly afterwards, the king reconciled with Andrew whom he appointed to govern the kingdom during his son's minority. After his brother's death on 30 September/November 1204, Andrew took over the government of the kingdom as his nephew's tutor and he also seized the money his brother had deposited on behalf of the child Ladislaus. The Dowager Queen Constance was anxious about her son's life and she escaped with King Ladislaus to the court of Leopold VI, Duke of Austria . Andrew made preparations for a war against Austria , but the child king died on 7 May 1205, thus Andrew inherited the throne.

Novć institutiones
Andrew was crowned by Archbishop John of Kalocsa on 29 May 1205 in Székesfehérvár , but before the coronation, he had to take an oath. Andrew made a radical alteration in the internal policy followed by his predecessors and he began to bestow the royal estates to his partisans. He called this new policy novć institutiones in his deeds, and he declared that "Nothing can set bounds to generosity of the Royal Majesty, and the best measure of grants, for a monarch, is immeasurableness". He gave away everything - money, villages, domains, whole counties - to the utter impoverishment of the treasury. Andrew was generous primarily with his wife's German relatives and followers, which caused discontent among his subjects.

His last years
On 14 May 1234, Andrew, who had lost his second wife in the previous year, married Beatrice D'Este who was thirty years younger than himself. Because of the new marriage, his relationship enworthened with his sons.

In the summer of 1234, the Bishop John of Bosnia excommunicated Andrew because he had not respected some provisions of the Agreement of Bereg. Andrew appealed to the Pope against the bishop's measure. In the autumn of 1234, Prince Danylo laid siege to the capital of Andrew's youngest son who died during the siege. Thus, the Hungarian supremacy over Halych disappeared.

In the beginning of 1235, Andrew made a campaign against Austria and enforced Duke Frederick II to make a peace.

He was still alive when one of his daughters, Elisabeth , who had died some years before, was canonized on 28 May 1235. Before his death, he was absolved from the excommunication; moreover, the Pope also promised that the King of Hungary and his relatives would not be excommunicated without the special permission of the Pope.

Marriages and children
#1. around 1200: Gertrude of Merania (1185 - 8 September 1213), a daughter of Berthold IV, Duke of Merania and his wife, Agnes of Wettin
Anna Maria of Hungary (c. 1204 - 1237), wife of Tzar Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria
King Béla IV of Hungary (1206 - 3 May 1270)
Saint Elisabeth of Hungary (1207 - 10 November 1231), wife of Landgraf Louis IV of Thuringia
King Coloman of Halych (1208 - after 11 April 1241)
Prince Andrew II of Halych (c. 1210 - 1234)
#2. February 1215: Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200 - 1233), daughter of Peter I , Emperor of the Latin Empire and his second wife, Yolanda I , Empress of the Latin Empire
Violant of Hungary or Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon
#3. 14 May 1234: Beatrice D'Este (c. 1215 - before 8 May 1245), daughter of Aldobrandino I D'Este and his wife
Stephen (1236 - 10 April 1271)


Research Notes: Wife - Yolanda de Courtenay

Second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary


From Wikipedia - Yolanda de Courtenay :

Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200-1233), Queen Consort of Hungary [1] was the second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary .

Yolanda was the daughter of Count Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife, Yolanda of Flanders , the sister of Baldwin I and Henry I , the Emperors of Constantinople . Her marriage with King Andrew II, whose first wife, Gertrude had been murdered by conspirators on 24 September 1213 , was arranged by her uncle, the Emperor Henry I.

Their marriage was celebrated in February 1215 in Székesfehérvár and Archbishop John of Esztergom crowned her queen consort. However, Bishop Robert of Veszprém sent a complaint to Pope Innocent III , because the coronation of the queens consort in Hungary had been traditionally the privilege of his see . The Pope sent a legate to Hungary in order to investigate the complaint and confirmed the privilege of the See of Veszprém .

Following her uncle's death on 11 July 1216 , her husband was planning to acquire the imperial crown for himself, but the barons of the Latin Empire proclaimed her father emperor, instead.

Yolanda maintained good relations with his husband's children from his first marriage. Her husband survived her. She was buried in the White Monks ' Abbey in Egres .

Marriages and children
February 1215: Andrew II of Hungary (c. 1177 - 21 September 1235)
Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon


Research Notes: Child - Violant of Hungary

From Wikipedia - Violant of Hungary :

Violant of Hungary (Esztergom , Kingdom of Hungary , c. 1216 - 1253) was Queen consort of James I of Aragon . She is also called Jolánta in Hungarian , Iolanda or Violant d'Hongria in Catalan and Yolanda or Violante de Hungría in Spanish .

Family
Violant was a daughter of Andrew II of Hungary and Violant of Courtenay . Her paternal grandparents were Béla III of Hungary and his first wife Agnes of Antioch . Her maternal grandparents were Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife Yolanda of Flanders .

Violant was a half-sister of Anne Marie, Empress of Bulgaria , Béla IV of Hungary , Saint Elisabeth of Hungary and Coloman of Lodomeria .

Violant's mother died in 1233, when Violant was seventeen years old. Her father remarried, to Beatrice d'Este , they had a son called Stephen.

Marriage
Violant married James I in 1235, being his second wife. By the marriage, Violant became Queen Consort of Aragon . James already had one son, Alfonso by his first marriage to Eleanor of Castile . James however divorced Eleanor and decided to remarry, he chose Violant.[1] [2]


James and Violant had ten children:
Violant of Aragon (1236-1301), queen of Castile by her marriage to Alphonse X .
Constance of Aragon (1239-1269), infanta of Castile by her marriage to Juan Manuel of Castile , son of Ferdinand III of Castile .
Peter III of Aragon (1240-1285).
James II of Majorca (1243-1311).
Ferdinand of Aragon (1245-1250).
Sancha of Aragon (1246-1251).
Isabella of Aragon (1247-1271), married Philip III of France
Maria of Aragon (1248-1267), nun.
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo (1250-1275)
Eleanor of Aragon (1251-?, young)

Violant's daughter, Isabella became Queen of France by her marriage to Philip III of France . Isabella was mother of Philip IV of France and Charles of Valois .

Charles of Valois was father of Philip VI of France , Isabella, Duchess of Bourbon and Blanche, Queen of Germany .

Violant died in 1253. Violant and her daughter Sancha's remains are at the monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona in Lleida , Catalonia .

Her husband remarried one more time, to Teresa Gil de Vidaure , who was once James' mistress.



Andronicus Angelus and Euphrosyne Castamonitia




Husband Andronicus Angelus 29

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Constantinus Angelus (      -      ) 29
         Mother: Theodora Comnena (      -      ) 30


       Marriage: 



Wife Euphrosyne Castamonitia

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Isaac II Angelus Eastern Roman Emperor 31

            AKA: Isaac II Angelos Eastern Roman Emperor
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1204
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Herina (      -      )



Research Notes: Child - Isaac II Angelus Eastern Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia - Isaac II Angelos :

Isaac II Angelos or Angelus (Greek : Isaakios II Angelos) (September 1156 - January 1204) was Byzantine emperor from 1185 to 1195, and again from 1203 to 1204.

His father Andronikos Dukas Angelos, a military leader in Asia Minor (c. 1122 - aft. 1185), married bef. 1155 Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa (c. 1125 - aft. 1195). Andronikos Dukas Angelos was the son of Konstantinos Angelos, Admiral of Sicily (c. 1085 - aft. July 1166, son of Manolis Angelos from Philadelphia ) and Theodora Komnene (b. January 5 , 1096/1097) who was the youngest daughter of Emperor Alexios I Komnenos and Eirene Doukaina , by her marriage c. 1120 to Thus Isaac was a member of the extended imperial clan.


<<b>>Rising by revolt
During the brief reign of Andronikos I Komnenos , Isaac was involved (alongside his father and brothers) in the revolt of Nicaea and Prousa . Atypically, the Emperor did not punish him for this disloyalty, and Isaac remained at Constantinople .

On September 11 , 1185 , during Andronikos' absence from the capital, the latter's lieutenant Stephanos Hagiochristophorites moved to arrest Isaac. Isaac killed Hagiochristophorites and took refuge in the church of Hagia Sophia . Andronikos, in some ways a capable ruler, was hated for his cruelty and his efforts to keep the aristocracy obedient. Isaac appealed to the populace, and a tumult arose which spread rapidly over the whole city. When Andronikos arrived he found that during his absence he had lost popular support, and that Isaac had been proclaimed emperor. Andronikos attempted to flee by boat but was apprehended. Isaac handed him over to the people of the City, and he was killed on September 12 , 1185 .


Family
The identity of Isaac II's first wife is unknown, but her name, Herina (i.e., Eirene), is found on the necrology of Speyer Cathedral , where their daughter Irene is interred. (It must be noted, however, that it would have been extremely unusual for a mother and daughter to bear the same name, unless the mother's name was monastic.)[3] Isaac's wife may have been a member of the Palaiologos family.[4] A possible foreign origin is also given to her due to having the same name as her daughter.[5][6] Their third child was born in 1182 or 1183 and she was dead or divorced by 1185, when Isaac remarried. Their children were:
Euphrosyne Angelina, a nun.
Irene Angelina , married first to Roger III of Sicily , and secondly to Philip of Swabia .
Alexios IV Angelos .
By his second wife, Margaret of Hungary (renamed Maria), Isaac II had two sons:
John Angelos (b. ca. 1193 - d. 1259). He migrated to Hungary and ruled over Syrmia and Bacs (1227-42) as a vassal of king Béla IV of Hungary .
Manuel Angelos (b. after 1195 - d. 1212)


Andronicus Ducas and Maria




Husband Andronicus Ducas 29

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Maria

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Trojan of Bulgaria (      -      ) 29
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Irene

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alexius I Comnenus Byzantine Emperor (1048-1118) 29
           Marr: Abt 1078




Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire and Angharad




Husband Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire

           Born: Cir 1190
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Methusalem ap Hwfa ap Cynddelw (Cir 1160-      )
         Mother: Agnes ferch Griffith ap Conan (      -      ) 32


       Marriage: 



Wife Angharad

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Iorwerth ap Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon

           Born: Cir 1220
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire

Source: http://www.varrall.net/pafg45.htm#976. Note: Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon, Caernarvonshire


Research Notes: Child - Iorwerth ap Maredudd ap Methusalem Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon

Source: http://www.varrall.net/pafg119.htm#2405 Note: Lord of Cwmwd Lhivon


Adam Eamon and Ann




Husband Adam Eamon

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Rhoda A. Eamon

           Born: Abt 1847
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William Ezra Poaps (1848-1929)
           Marr: 30 Dec 1871 - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp (South Stormont), Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada



Research Notes: Child - Rhoda A. Eamon

From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~poaps/Notices.htm :

(Stormont Co): William E. POAPST, 23, engineer, Osnabruck, same,
s/o Jacob & Eliza,
married Rhoda EAMON, 24, Russell, Osnabruck,
c/o Adam & Ann,
witn: Jacob A. POAPST & William ANDERS?,
both of Osnabruck, 30 Dec 1871 at Osnabruck.


Sources


1. http://www.familysearch.org.

2. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 185A-4, 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

3. Wikipedia.org, County of La Marche.

4. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-3.

5. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A (Adalbert I).

6. Wikipedia.org, William V, Duke of Aquitaine.

7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-4 (Bernard I).

8. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

9. Wikipedia.org, Almodis de la Marche.

10. Wikipedia.org, Hugh V of Lusignan.

11. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21.

12. Wikipedia.org, Pons, Count of Toulouse.

13. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-5 (Almode), 185-2 (Emma of Mortain).

14. Wikipedia.org, Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona.

15. Wikipedia.org, Roger the Poitevin; County of La Marche.

16. Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

17. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

18. http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

19. Wikipedia.org, Audley-Stanley family.

20. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 274-22.

21. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 274-22 & 274A-22.

22. Wikipedia.org, Bertha of Savoy.

23. Wikipedia.org, Andrew II of Hungary.

24. Wikipedia.org, Yolanda de Courtenay.

25. Wikipedia.org, Peter II of Courtenay.

26. Wikipedia.org, Yolanda of Flanders.

27. Wikipedia.org, Violant of Hungary.

28. Wikipedia.org, James I of Aragon.

29. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27 (Philip II).

30. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27.

31. Wikipedia.org, Isaac II Angelos.

32. Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg45.htm#977.


Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org.

2 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 185A-4, 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

3 Wikipedia.org, County of La Marche.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-3.

5 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A (Adalbert I).

6 Wikipedia.org, William V, Duke of Aquitaine.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-4 (Bernard I).

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

9 Wikipedia.org, Almodis de la Marche.

10 Wikipedia.org, Hugh V of Lusignan.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21.

12 Wikipedia.org, Pons, Count of Toulouse.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-5 (Almode), 185-2 (Emma of Mortain).

14 Wikipedia.org, Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona.

15 Wikipedia.org, Roger the Poitevin; County of La Marche.

16 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

18 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

19 Wikipedia.org, Audley-Stanley family.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 274-22.

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 274-22 & 274A-22.

22 Wikipedia.org, Bertha of Savoy.

23 Wikipedia.org, Andrew II of Hungary.

24 Wikipedia.org, Yolanda de Courtenay.

25 Wikipedia.org, Peter II of Courtenay.

26 Wikipedia.org, Yolanda of Flanders.

27 Wikipedia.org, Violant of Hungary.

28 Wikipedia.org, James I of Aragon.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27 (Philip II).

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27.

31 Wikipedia.org, Isaac II Angelos.

32 Website:, http://www.varrall.net/pafg45.htm#977.


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