The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Winithar King of the Ostrogoths




Husband Winithar King of the Ostrogoths

           Born: Abt 384
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Vandalarius of the Ostrogoths

            AKA: Wandalar
           Born: Abt 405 - Hispaniae (Spain)
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 459
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Winithar King of the Ostrogoths

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875430 :
Succeeded Hunimund as King of the Ostragoths @ 400 A.D.


Research Notes: Child - Vandalarius of the Ostrogoths

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #308143 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer)

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875429 has b. abt 415, d. 459.


Wulgrin III Count of Angoulęme




Husband Wulgrin III Count of Angoulęme

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: William IV Taillifer Count of Angoulęme (      -1179) 1 2
         Mother: Marguerite de Turenne (      -      ) 3


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Mahaut de Angoulęme

           Born:  - <Angoulęme, Angoumois (Charente, France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1233
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hugh IX "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of La Marche (1163/1168-1219) 4 5
           Marr: After 1194




Research Notes: Husband - Wulgrin III Count of Angoulęme

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-26 (Hugh IX de Lusignan)


Research Notes: Child - Mahaut de Angoulęme

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-26 (Hugh IX de Lusignan)


Yaroslav I of Kiev and Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden




Husband Yaroslav I of Kiev




            AKA: Jarisleif "the Lame," Yaroslav I "the Wise" of Kiev
           Born: Abt 978
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Feb 1054 - Kiev, Ukraine
         Buried: 


         Father: Vladimir I of Kiev (Abt 0958-1015) 6 7
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 1019



Wife Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden 8 9

            AKA: Ingigerd of Sweden, Irina Olofsdotter
           Born: Abt 1001
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Feb 1050
         Buried: 


         Father: Olov II Skotkonung King of Sweden (Abt 0960-Abt 1020) 10
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Agatha 11 12

            AKA: Agafiia
           Born: Abt 1020
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1070
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Edward "the Exile" Saxon Prince of England (1016-1057) 13 14
           Marr: Abt 1040



2 F Anne of Kiev 15 16




            AKA: Agnes of Kiev, Anna of Kiev, Anna Yaroslavna
           Born: Between 1024 and 1032
     Christened: 
           Died: 1075
         Buried:  - Villiers Abbey, La-Ferte-Alais, Essonne, (Île-de-France), France
         Spouse: Henry I of France (1008-1060) 17 18
           Marr: 19 May 1051 - Cathédral de Rheims, Rheims, (Marne), Champagne, France




Research Notes: Husband - Yaroslav I of Kiev

Possibly not the father of Agatha, the wife of Edward the Exile.

From Wikipedia - Yaroslav I the Wise :

Yaroslav I the Wise (c. 978 , Kiev -20 February 1054 , Kiev ) (East Slavic: ; Christian name: George; Old Norse : Jarizleifr) was thrice Grand Prince of Novgorod and Kiev , uniting the two principalities for a time under his rule. During his lengthy reign, Kievan Rus' reached a zenith of its cultural flowering and military power.

Early years of Yaroslav's life are enshrouded in mystery. He was one of the numerous sons of Vladimir the Great , presumably his second by Rogneda of Polotsk , although his actual age (as stated in the Primary Chronicle and corroborated by the examination of his skeleton in the 1930s) would place him among the youngest children of Vladimir. It has been suggested that he was a child begotten out of wedlock after Vladimir's divorce with Rogneda and his marriage to Anna Porphyrogeneta , or even that he was a child of Anna Porphyrogeneta herself. Yaroslav figures prominently in the Norse Sagas under the name of Jarisleif the Lame; his legendary lameness (probably resulting from an arrow wound) was corroborated by the scientists who examined his relics...

<<b>>Family life and posterity<</B>>
In 1019, Yaroslav married Ingegerd Olofsdotter , daughter of the king of Sweden , and gave Ladoga to her as a marriage gift. There are good reasons to believe that before that time he had been married to a woman named Anna, of disputed extraction.[citation needed ]

In the Saint Sophia Cathedral , one may see a fresco representing the whole family: Yaroslav, Irene (as Ingigerd was known in Rus), their five daughters and five sons. Yaroslav married three of his daughters to foreign princes who lived in exile at his court: Elizabeth to Harald III of Norway (who had attained her hand by his military exploits in the Byzantine Empire ); Anastasia to the future Andrew I of Hungary , and the youngest daughter Anne of Kiev married Henry I of France and was the regent of France during their son's minority. Another daughter may have been the Agatha who married Edward the Exile , heir to the throne of England and was the mother of Edgar Ćtheling and St. Margaret of Scotland .


Yaroslav had one son from the first marriage (his Christian name being Ilya), and 6 sons from the second marriage. Apprehending the danger that could ensue from divisions between brothers, he exhorted them to live in peace with each other. The eldest of these, Vladimir of Novgorod , best remembered for building the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod , predeceased his father. Three other sons-Iziaslav , Sviatoslav , and Vsevolod -reigned in Kiev one after another. The youngest children of Yaroslav were Igor of Volynia and Vyacheslav of Smolensk .


Research Notes: Wife - Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden

Possibly not the mother of Agatha, the wife of Edward the Exile.

From Wikipedia - Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden :

Princess Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden (1001 - 10 February 1050 ) was a Swedish princess and a Grand Princess of Kiev, the daughter of Swedish King Olof Skötkonung and Estrid of the Obotrites and the consort of Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev.

Biography
Ingegerd was born in Sigtuna ,[citation needed ] Sweden, and was engaged to be married to Norwegian King Olaf II , but when Sweden and Norway got into a feud, Swedish King Olof Skötkonung wouldn't allow for the marriage to happen.

Instead, Ingegard's father quickly arranged for a marriage to the powerful Yaroslav I the Wise of Novgorod . The marriage took place in 1019. Once in Kiev , her name was changed to the Greek Irene. According to several sagas , she was given as a marriage gift Ladoga and adjacent lands, which later received the name Ingria (arguably a corruption of Ingegerd's name). She set her friend jarl Ragnvald Ulfsson to rule in her stead.

Ingegard initiated the building of the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev that was supervised by her husband, who styled himself tsar . They had six sons and four daughters, the latter of whom became Queens of France , Hungary , Norway , and (arguably) England . The whole family is depicted in one of the frescoes of the Saint Sophia. Upon her death, Ingegard was buried in the same cathedral.

Ingegerd-Irene is sometimes confused with Yaroslav's first wife, whose name was Anna and who was later declared a local saint in Novgorod because of her initiative to build the local version of the Saint Sophia . Her remains were exhumed in the 1930s and examined by Soviet scientists who determined that they belonged to a young woman rather than to Ingigerd, who died at the age of fifty or so.

Children

Ingegerd had the following children
Elisiv of Kiev , queen of Norway
Anastasia of Kiev , queen of Hungary
Anne of Kiev , queen of France
(Disputed) Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile
Vladimir of Novgorod
Iziaslav
Sviatoslav
Vsevolod
Igor of Volynia
Vyacheslav of Smolensk . 8 9


Research Notes: Child - Agatha

Her origins are disputed.

From Wikipedia - Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile :

Agatha was the wife of Edward the Exile (heir to the throne of England ) and mother of Edgar Ćtheling , Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina of England . Her antecedents are unclear, and subject to much speculation.

Life
Nothing is known of her early life, and what speculation has appeared is inextricably linked to the contentious issue of Agatha's paternity, one of the unresolved questions of medieval genealogy . She came to England with her husband and children in 1057, but she was widowed shortly after her arrival. Following the Norman conquest of England , in 1067 she fled with her children to Scotland , finding refuge under her future son-in-law Malcolm III . While one modern source indicates that she spent her last years as a nun at Newcastle-upon-Tyne , dying before circa 1093 [1] , Simeon of Durham [1] carries what appears to be the last reference to her in 1070. [2]

Origin
Medieval sources
Agatha's origin is alluded to in numerous surviving medieval sources, but the information they provide is sometimes imprecise, often contradictory, and occasionally outright impossible. The earliest surviving source, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , along with Florence of Worcester 's Chronicon ex chronicis and Regalis prosapia Anglorum, Simeon of Durham and Ailred of Rievaulx describe Agatha as a kinswoman of "Emperor Henry" (thaes ceseres maga, filia germani imperatoris Henrici). In an earlier entry, the same Ailred of Rievaulx had called her daughter of emperor Henry, as do later sources of dubious credibility such as the Chronicle of Melrose Abbey , while Matthew of Paris calls her the emperor's sister (soror Henrici imperatoris Romani). Geoffrey Gaimar in Lestoire des Engles states that she was daughter of the Hungarian king and queen (Li reis sa fille), although he places the marriage at a time when Edward is thought still to have been in Kiev , while Orderic Vitalis in Historiae Ecclesiasticae is more specific, naming her father as king Solomon (filiam Salomonis Regis Hunorum), actually a contemporary of Agatha's children. William of Malmesbury in De Gestis Regis Anglorum states that Agatha's sister was a Queen of Hungary (reginae sororem) and is echoed in this by Alberic of Trois-Fontaines , while less precisely, Ailred says of Margaret that she was derived from English and Hungarian royal blood (de semine regio Anglorum et Hungariorum extitit oriunda). Finally, Roger of Howden and the anonymous Leges Edwardi Confessoris indicate that while Edward was a guest of Kievan "king Malesclodus" he married a woman of noble birth (nobili progenio), Leges adding that the mother of St. Margaret was of Rus royal blood (ex genere et sanguine regum Rugorum).[3]

German and Hungarian theories
While various sources repeat the claims that Agatha was daughter or sister of either Emperor Henry, it seems unlikely that such a sibling or daughter would have been ignored by the German chroniclers.[4]

The description of Agatha as a blood relative of "Emperor Henry" may be applicable to a niece of either Henry II or Henry III , Holy Roman Emperors (although Florence, in Regalis prosapia Anglorum specifies Henry III). Early attempts at reconstructing the relationship focused on the former. Georgio Pray 1764, Annales Regum Hungariae), O.F. Suhm (1777, Geschichte Dänmarks, Norwegen und Holsteins) and Istvan Katona (1779, Historia Critica Regum Hungariae) each suggested that Agatha was daughter of Henry II's brother Bruno of Augsburg (an ecclesiastic described as beatae memoriae, with no known issue), while Daniel Cornides (1778, Regum Hungariae) tried to harmonise the German and Hungarian claims, making Agatha daughter of Henry II's sister Giselle of Bavaria , wife of Stephen I of Hungary .[5] This solution remained popular among scholars through a good part of twentieth century.[6]

As tempting as it may be to thus view St. Margaret as a granddaughter of another famous saint, Stephen of Hungary, this popular solution fails to explain why Stephen's death triggered a dynastic crisis in Hungary. If St. Stephen and Giselle were indeed Agatha's parents, her offspring might have succeeded to the Hungarian crown and the dynastic strife that followed Stephen's death could have been averted. Actually, there is no indication in Hungarian sources that any of Stephen's children outlived him. Likewise, all of the solutions involving Henry II would seem to make Agatha much older than her husband, and prohibitively old at the time of the birth of her son, Edgar.

Based on a more strict translation of the Latin description used by Florence and others as well as the supposition that Henry III was the Emperor designated in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, genealogist Szabolcs de Vajay popularised another idea first suggested in 1939. In that year, Joszef Herzog published an analysis suggesting that Agatha was daughter of one of the half-brothers of Henry III, born to his mother Gisela of Swabia by one of her earlier marriages to Ernest I of Swabia and Bruno of Brunswick , probably the former based on more favourable chronology.[7] De Vajay reevaluated the chronology of the marriages and children of Gisela and concluded that Agatha was the daughter of Henry III's elder (uterine) half-brother, Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia .[8] This theory saw broad acceptance for thirty years [9] until René Jetté resurrected a Kievan solution to the problem,[10] since which time opinion has been divided among several competing possibilities.[11]

Kievan theory

Jetté pointed out that William of Malmesbury in De Gestis Regis Anglorum and several later chronicles unambiguously state that Agatha's sister was a Queen of Hungary. From what we know about the biography of Edward the Exile , he loyally supported Andrew I of Hungary , following him from Kiev to Hungary in 1046 and staying at his court for many years. Andrew's wife and queen was Anastasia, a daughter of Yaroslav the Wise of Kiev by Ingigerd of Sweden . Following Jetté's logic, Edward's wife was another daughter of Yaroslav.

This theory accords with the seemingly incongruous statements of Geoffrey Gaimar and Roger of Howden that, while living in Kiev, Edward took a nativeborn wife "of noble parentage" or that his father-in-law was a "Rus king".[12]

Jetté's theory seems to be supported by an onomastic argument.[13] Among the medieval royalty, Agatha's rare Greek name is first recorded in the Macedonian dynasty of Byzantium ; it was also one of the most frequent feminine names in the Kievan Rurikid dynasty.[14] After Anna of Byzantium married Yaroslav's father, he took the Christian name of the reigning emperor, Basil II , while some members of his family were named after other members of the imperial dynasty. Agatha could have been one of these.[15]

The names of Agatha's immediate descendants-Margaret, Cristina, David , Alexander -were likewise extraordinary for Anglo-Saxon Britain. They may provide a clue to Agatha's origin. The names Margaret and Cristina are today associated with Sweden, the native country of Yaroslav's wife Ingigerd.[16] The name of Margaret's son, David, obviously echoes that of Solomon , the son and heir of Andrew I.[17] Furthermore, the first saint of the Rus (canonized ca. 1073) was Yaroslav's brother Gleb , whose Christian name was David.

The name of Margaret's other son, Alexander, may point to a variety of traditions, both occidental and oriental: the biography of Alexander the Great was one of the most popular books in eleventh-century Kiev.

One inference from the Kievan theory is that Edgar Atheling and St. Margaret were, through their mother, first cousins of Philip I of France . The connection is too notable to be omitted from contemporary sources, yet we have no indication that medieval chroniclers were aware of it. The argumentum ex silentio leads critics of the Kievan theory to search for alternative explanations.

Bulgarian theory
In response to the recent flurry of activity on the subject, Ian Mladjov reevaluated the question and presented a completely novel solution.[18] He dismissed each of the prior theories in turn as insufficiently grounded and incompatible given the historical record, and further suggested that many of the proposed solutions would have resulted in later marriages that fell within the prohibited degrees of kinship. He argued that the documentary testimony of Agatha's origins is tainted or late, and concurred with Humphreys' evaluation that the names of the children and grandchildren of Agatha, so central to prior reevaluations, may have had non-family origins (for example, Pope Alexander II played a critical role in the marriage of Malcolm and Margaret). However, he then focused in on the name of Agatha as being critical to determining her origin. He concluded that of the few contemporary Agathas, only one could possibly have been an ancestor of the wife of Edward the Exile, Agatha,[19] wife of Samuel of Bulgaria . Some of the other names associated with Agatha and used to corroborate theories based in onomastics are also readily available within the Bulgarian ruling family at the time, including Mary and several Davids. Mladjov inferred that Agatha was daughter of Gavril Radomir , Tsar of Bulgaria , Agatha's son, by his first wife, a Hungarian princess thought to have been the daughter of Duke Géza of Hungary . This hypothesis has Agatha born in Hungary after her parents divorced, her mother being pregnant when she left Bulgaria, and naming her daughter after the mother of the prince who had expelled her. Traditional dates of this divorce would seem to preclude the suggested relationship, but the article re-examined some long-standing assumptions about the chronology of Gavril Radomir's marriage to the Hungarian princess, and concludes that its dating to the late 980s is unsupportable, and its dissolution belongs in c. 1009-1014. The argument is based almost exclusively on the onomastic precedent but is said to vindicate the intimate connection between Agatha and Hungary attested in the Medieval sources. Mladjov speculates further that the medieval testimony could largely be harmonized were one to posit that Agatha's mother was the same Hungarian princess who married Samuel Aba of Hungary , his family fleeing to Kiev after his downfall, thereby allowing a Russian marriage for Agatha.

This solution fails to conform with any of the relationships appearing in the primary record. It is inferred that the relative familiarity with Germany and unfamiliarity with Hungary partly distorted the depiction of Agatha in the English sources; her actual position would have been that of a daughter of the (unnamed) sister of the King of Hungary (Stephen I), himself the brother-in-law of the Holy Roman Emperor (Henry II, and therefore kinsman of Henry III).

Other theories
In 2002, in an article meant to refute the Kievan hypothesis, John Carmi Parsons suggested yet another possible origin. He made Agatha daughter of a documented count Cristinus (explaining the name Christina for Agatha's daughter) by Oda of Haldensleben, hypothesized to be maternal granddaughter of Vladimir I of Kiev by a German wife, kinswoman to Emperor Henry III. He also floated the possibility that Edward may have married twice, suggesting that the contradictory primary record may in part reflect the confusion between two distinct wives.[20] Recently, one additional theory has appeared. John P. Ravilious has proposed that she was daughter of Mieszko II Lambert of Poland by his German wife, making her kinswoman of both Emperors Henry, as well as sister of a Hungarian queen, the wife of Béla I .[21] 11 12


Death Notes: Child - Anne of Kiev

Ancestral Roots line 241-6 has d. aft. 1075


Research Notes: Child - Anne of Kiev

3rd wife of Henry I of France.

From Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev :

Anne of Kiev or Anna Yaroslavna (between 1024 and 1032 - 1075 ), daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife Ingegerd Olofsdotter , was the queen consort of France as the wife of Henry I , and regent for her son Philip I .

After the death of his first wife, Matilda, King Henry searched the courts of Europe for a suitable bride, but could not locate a princess who was not related to him within illegal degrees of kinship. At last he sent an embassy to distant Kiev , which returned with Anne (also called Agnes or Anna). Anne and Henry were married at the cathedral of Reims on May 19 , 1051 .

They had three sons:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.
Hugh (1057 - October 18 , 1102 ) - called the Great or Magnus, later Count of Crépi, who married the heiress of Vermandois and died on crusade in Tarsus , Cilicia .
Robert (c. 1055 -c. 1060 )

For six years after Henry's death in 1060 , she served as regent for Philip, who was only seven at the time. She was the first queen of France to serve as regent. Her co-regent was Count Baldwin V of Flanders . Anne was a literate woman, rare for the time, but there was some opposition to her as regent on the grounds that her mastery of French was less than fluent.
A year after the king's death, Anne, acting as regent, took a passionate fancy for Count Ralph III of Valois , a man whose political ambition encouraged him to repudiate his wife to marry Anne in 1062 . Accused of adultery, Ralph's wife appealed to Pope Alexander II , who excommunicated the couple. The young king Philip forgave his mother, which was just as well, since he was to find himself in a very similar predicament in the 1090s . Ralph died in September 1074 , at which time Anne returned to the French court. She died in 1075 , was buried at Villiers Abbey , La-Ferte-Alais , Essonne and her obits were celebrated on September 5 .

Sources
Bauthier, Robert-Henri. Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe sičcle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985
Retrieved from "" 15 16


Yngvi-Frey King of the Swedes and Gerd Gymersson




Husband Yngvi-Frey King of the Swedes 19

           Born: Abt 235 - <Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Njord King of the Swedes (Abt 0214-      ) 20
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Gerd Gymersson 21

           Born: Abt 239 - <Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Gymer (Abt 0214-      ) 21
         Mother: Orboda (Abt 0218-      ) 21




Children
1 M Fjolner Yngvi-Freysson 22

           Born: Abt 256 - <Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden>
     Christened: 
           Died:  - Hleithra, Denmark
         Buried: 





Pierre de Courtenay and Yolanda of Flanders




Husband Pierre de Courtenay 23

            AKA: Peter of Courtenay
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1219
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 

Events

• Emperor: of the Latin Empire of Constantinople, 1216-1217.




Wife Yolanda of Flanders 24

           Born: 1175
     Christened: 
           Died: 1219
         Buried: 


         Father: Baldwin V of Hainaut (1150-1195) 25
         Mother: Margaret I of Flanders (      -1194) 26


Events

• Ruled: the Latin Empire in Constantinople for her husband, 1217-1219.


Children
1 F Yolanda de Courtenay 27

           Born: Abt 1200
     Christened: 
           Died: 1233
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Andrew II of Hungary (Abt 1177-1235) 28
           Marr: Feb 1215 - Székesfehérvár, Hungary




Research Notes: Husband - Pierre de Courtenay

From Wikipedia - Peter II of Courtenay :

Peter of Courtenay French : Pierre de Courtenay (died 1219) was emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople from 1216-1217.

He was a son of Peter of Courtenay (d. 1183), the youngest son of Louis VI of France and his second Queen consort Adélaide de Maurienne . His mother was Elizabeth of Courtenay.

Peter first married Agnes of Nevers, via whom he obtained the three counties of Nevers , Auxerre , and Tonnerre . He took for his second wife, Yolanda of Flanders (d. 1219), a sister of Baldwin and Henry of Flanders , who were afterwards the first and second emperors of the Latin Empire of Constantinople. Peter accompanied his cousin, King Philip Augustus , on the crusade of 1190 and fought (alongside his brother Robert) in the Albigensian Crusade in 1209 and 1211, when he took part in the siege of Lavaur . He was present at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214.

When his brother-in-law, the emperor Henry , died without sons in 1216, Peter was chosen as his successor, and with a small army set out from France to take possession of his throne. Consecrated emperor at Rome, in a church outside the walls, by Pope Honorius III on April 9 , 1217 , he borrowed some ships from the Venetians, promising in return to conquer Durazzo for them; but he failed in this enterprise, and sought to make his way to Constantinople by land. On the journey he was seized by the despot of Epirus , Theodore Komnenos Doukas , and, after an imprisonment of two years, died, probably by foul means. Peter thus never governed his empire, which, however, was ruled for a time by his wife, Yolanda, who had succeeded in reaching Constantinople. Two of his sons, Robert and Baldwin , in turn held the throne of the Latin Empire.

Children
By his first wife Agnes of Nevers he had one child, Mahaut de Courtenay (Maud, Matilda, d. 1254), countess of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonerre.

By his second wife Yolanda of Flanders , he had 10 children:
Philip (d. 1226), Marquis of Namur, who declined the offer of the crown of the Latin Empire
Robert of Courtenay (d. 1228), Latin Emperor
Henry (d. 1229), Marquis of Namur
Baldwin II of Constantinople (d. 1273)
Margaret , Marchioness of Namur, who married first Raoul d'Issoudun and then Henry count of Vianden
Elizabeth, who married Walter count of Bar and then Eudes sire of Montagu
Yolanda de Courtenay , who married Andrew II of Hungary
Eleanor, who married Philip of Montfort, Lord of Tyre
Marie de Courtenay , who married Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea
Agnes, who married Geoffrey II Villehardouin , Prince of Achaea 23


Research Notes: Wife - Yolanda of Flanders

From Wikipedia - Yolanda of Flanders :

Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219) ruled the Latin Empire in Constantinople for her husband Peter II of Courtenay from 1217 to 1219.

She was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Hainault , and Countess Margaret I of Flanders . Two of her brothers, Baldwin I and then Henry , were emperors in Constantinople. After the death of the latter in 1216 there was a brief period without an emperor, before Peter was elected. Peter sent Yolanda to Constantinople while he fought the Despotate of Epirus , during which he was captured. Because his fate was unknown (although he was probably killed), Yolanda ruled as regent. She allied with the Bulgarians against the various Byzantine successor states, and was able to make peace with Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea , who married her daughter. However, she soon died, in 1219.

She was succeeded by her second son Robert of Courtenay because her first son did not want the throne. As Robert was still in France at the time, there was technically no emperor until he arrived in 1221.

Yolanda also held Namur , which she inherited from her uncle Philip of Namur in 1212 and left to her eldest son Philip when she went to Constantinople in 1216.

By Peter of Courtenay she had 10 children:
Philip (d. 1226), Marquis of Namur, who declined the offer of the crown of the Latin Empire
Robert of Courtenay (d. 1228), Latin Emperor
Henry (d. 1229), Marquis of Namur
Baldwin II of Constantinople (d. 1273)
Margaret , Marchioness of Namur, who married first Raoul d'Issoudun and then Henry count of Vianden
Elizabeth, who married Walter count of Bar and then Eudes sire of Montagu
Yolanda de Courtenay , who married Andrew II of Hungary
Eleanor, who married Philip of Montfort, Lord of Tyre
Marie de Courtenay , who married Theodore I Lascaris of the Empire of Nicaea
Agnes, who married Geoffrey II Villehardouin , Prince of Achaea 24


Research Notes: Child - Yolanda de Courtenay

Second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary


From Wikipedia - Yolanda de Courtenay :

Yolanda de Courtenay (c. 1200-1233), Queen Consort of Hungary [1] was the second wife of King Andrew II of Hungary .

Yolanda was the daughter of Count Peter II of Courtenay and his second wife, Yolanda of Flanders , the sister of Baldwin I and Henry I , the Emperors of Constantinople . Her marriage with King Andrew II, whose first wife, Gertrude had been murdered by conspirators on 24 September 1213 , was arranged by her uncle, the Emperor Henry I.

Their marriage was celebrated in February 1215 in Székesfehérvár and Archbishop John of Esztergom crowned her queen consort. However, Bishop Robert of Veszprém sent a complaint to Pope Innocent III , because the coronation of the queens consort in Hungary had been traditionally the privilege of his see . The Pope sent a legate to Hungary in order to investigate the complaint and confirmed the privilege of the See of Veszprém .

Following her uncle's death on 11 July 1216 , her husband was planning to acquire the imperial crown for himself, but the barons of the Latin Empire proclaimed her father emperor, instead.

Yolanda maintained good relations with his husband's children from his first marriage. Her husband survived her. She was buried in the White Monks ' Abbey in Egres .

Marriages and children
February 1215: Andrew II of Hungary (c. 1177 - 21 September 1235)
Yolanda (c. 1215 - 12 October 1251), wife of King James I of Aragon 27


Yorfid Baron of Widnes




Husband Yorfid Baron of Widnes 29

           Born: 
     Christened: 
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         Buried: 
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Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Aliva 30

           Born: Abt 1085 - East Halton, Skipton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William FitzNigell 2nd Baron of Halton (1085-1153) 31 32
           Marr: Abt 1110 - Flamborough, East Riding, Yorkshire, England





Ysbwch




Husband Ysbwch 33

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 466
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ysbwys ap Ysbwch 34

           Born: Bef 466
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Ysbwch

Source: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, edited by Thomas Allen Glenn (Philadelphia, 1902), provided by books.google.com, p. 37 -
"...Ysbwys and Ysbwch, father and son, came into Britain out of Spain with Aurelius and Uther, A.D. 466, and when Aurelius conquered Vortigern, he rewarded Ysbwch and Ysbwys, being among his officers, for their services, by a grant of the whole Comôt of Talybont, and part of Estimaner, in Merionethshire." 33


Research Notes: Child - Ysbwys ap Ysbwch

Source: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, edited by Thomas Allen Glenn (Philadelphia, 1902), provided by books.google.com, p. 37 -
"...Ysbwys and Ysbwch, father and son, came into Britain out of Spain with Aurelius and Uther, A.D. 466, and when Aurelius conquered Vortigern, he rewarded Ysbwch and Ysbwys, being among his officers, for their services, by a grant of the whole Comôt of Talybont, and part of Estimaner, in Merionethshire." 34


Ziemomysl Prince of Poland




Husband Ziemomysl Prince of Poland 35

           Born: Abt 892 - <Poznan, Poznan>, Poland
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 964
         Buried: 


         Father: Leszek IV Prince of Poland (Abt 0865-0921) 35
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Mieszko Prince of Poland 35

           Born: Abt 922 - <Poznan, Poznan>, Poland
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 May 992
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dbubravka Princess of Bohemia (Abt 0931-0977) 35
           Marr: 965





Ziemovit Prince of Poland




Husband Ziemovit Prince of Poland 35

           Born: Abt 835 - <Poznan, Poznan>, Poland
     Christened: 
           Died: 892
         Buried: 


         Father: Piast Duke of Poland (Abt 0813-0892) 35
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Leszek IV Prince of Poland 35

           Born: Abt 865 - <Poznan, Poznan>, Poland
     Christened: 
           Died: 921
         Buried: 





Nis < > and < > < >




Husband Nis < >

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife < > < >

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Helene Nissen 36 37

            AKA: Ellen Cathrine Nissen
           Born: <1803>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Jřrgen Christensen (1800-      ) 36
           Marr: 27 Jun 1830 - Marstal, Svendborg, Denmark 37



2 M Jens Markussen Nissen 37

            AKA: Jens Markusen Nissen
           Born: <1809>
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1863
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maren Rasmussen (1809-1863) 37
           Marr: 21 Jan 1838 - Marstal, Svendborg, Denmark 37




Sources


1 Wikipedia.org, William IV of Angoulęme.

2 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1111.htm.

3 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1112.htm.

4 Wikipedia.org, Hugh IX of Lusignan.

5 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-26.

6 Wikipedia.org, Vladimir I of Kiev.

7 Wikipedia.org, Family life and children of Vladimir I.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

9 Wikipedia.org, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-22 (Henry I of France).

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 241-6, , 1-20 (Edward the Exile), 158-23 (Eustace III).

12 Wikipedia.org, Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20.

14 Wikipedia.org, Edward the Exile.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 241-6.

16 Wikipedia.org, Anne of Kiev.

17 Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France; Elizabeth of Vermandois.

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-22, 101-22.

19 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025091.htm.

20 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025094.htm.

21 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025092.htm.

22 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f50/a0025089.htm.

23 Wikipedia.org, Peter II of Courtenay.

24 Wikipedia.org, Yolanda of Flanders.

25 Wikipedia.org, Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut.

26 Wikipedia.org, Margaret I, Countess of Flanders.

27 Wikipedia.org, Yolanda de Courtenay.

28 Wikipedia.org, Andrew II of Hungary.

29 Wikipedia.org, Barons of Halton.

30 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #890149 Maitland Dirk Brower.

31 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f51/a0025193.htm.

32 http://www.familysearch.org, mpact Disc #125 Pin #879421 Maitland Dirk Brower.

33 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p.37.

34 Glenn, Thomas Allen, ed, Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry. (Philadelphia: (Privately Printed), 1902.), p. 37.

35 http://www.familysearch.org.

36 Correspondence, Email correspondence from Mark Johnson beginning May 2012.

37 FamilySearch Historical Files (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FVLY-5QQ.


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