The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Thomas Sprigg and Ann




Husband Thomas Sprigg 1

           Born: 1604 - Banbury, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died:  - London, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann 2

           Born: 1610 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thomas Sprigg Lord of Northhampton Manor

           Born: 1630 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Dec 1704 - Prince George's Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eleanor Nuthall (1645-1701) 3
           Marr: 1 Sep 1668 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England



Research Notes: Child - Thomas Sprigg Lord of Northhampton Manor

From: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I631844474 :

Thomas Sprigg, a well to-do planter, arrived in America in about 1650.

On 18 Jan 1658, a patent was issued to Thomas Sprigg who had transported to Maryland "Himself, Catherine, his wife, Verlinda Roger, Edward Bushell, Nathaiel Sprigge and Hugh Johnson." The patent was for a tract of 600 acres, called "Sprigley," on Chester River. Thomas Sprigg called one of the tracts he took up "Kittering" and another "Northampton." Ultimately, Thomas Sprigg owned nearly 1000 acres of land and is considered instrumental in developing Prince George County, MD.

His year of birth has been placed based on a deposition made in 1665 in which he gave his age as 35 years. Another deposition made in 1694 gave his age as 64 years.

His first wife, Kathryn, was living on 17 Aug 1661; she was probably a sister of Governor Stone of Maryland, who in his will, dated 3 Dec 1659 and proved 21 Dec 1660, mentions "my brother Sprigg;" and Thomas Stone, son of the governor, executes an assignment, 3 Aug 1662, 'to my uncle Thomas Sprigg."

In 1651 Thomas Sprigg was living in Northampton County, VA, but by 1660-61 he had settled in Calvert County, MD, on or near "Resurrection Manor," and later at "Northampton," Prince George County. In 1661 he and John Nuthall signed the "Submission to Parliament."

Thomas Sprigg fought against the Nanticoke Indians. He was Justice of the Peace and of the Quorum for Calvert County in 1658-67-68-69-70-74. Com. High Sheriff of Calvert County, 1 Apr 1664 to May 1665; he was also one of the first gentlemen to be made Justice of the Peace and Gentleman Justice of the Quorum for Prince George County, 1696.

"Lt." Thomas Sprigg was a signer of the Association Address to King William III congratulating him upon his escape from "Conspiracy and Assassination."

In 1696 he endorsed a round-robin letter from ship-owners and commanders of the fleet excusing delay in sailing to England on the ground of "illness among the men, backward crops, and desertions to Penna."

Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 3, pg 48
Sprigg, Thomas, Sr.,Prince George's Co., dated 9 May 1704;
Proved 29 Dec 1704.
To son Thomas, ex., plantation and land of Northamton and Kellering, which have not been disposed of; also 1/3 of patent 500 A. in manor of Colington.
To dau. Martha Prather and hrs., 1/3 of residue of 500 A. lying near Jonathan Prather's.
To dau. Oliver Nutthall, residue of afsd. patent lying near Jonathan Prather's.
To Thomas Stockett, grandson Thomas Stockett, Oliver Stockett, and each of sd. Thos. Stockett's child.,
To daus. Elizabeth Wade and her child., Ann Gittens and her child., Oliver Nutthall and her child., and Martha Prather and her child., personalty.
To daus. afsd., residue of estate; division to be made by Sam'l Magruder, Sr., Edward Willett and John Smith at Mattapany.
In event of death of son Thomas, sons-in-law Robert Wade, Phillip Gittens and Thomas Prather to assume executorship.
Test: Thomas Lucas, Sr., Thomas Lucas, Jr., Dorothy Lucas. 3. 443.
==
Thomas Shepard 19,139 1 PG £3,2.8 Mar 16 1698 Apr 6 1699
Appraisers: Thomas Sprigg, William Affotts.
List of debts: James Beale.
Administrator: James Beale,
===
Coughing, Thomas, (nunc. ) 15th Aug., 1662;
27th Oct., 1662.
Character of estate not shown.
Exs.: Matthew Stone, Thos. Sprigg, Thos. Trueman.
Test: Wm. Calvert. 1. 161


Edward Darcy "the Colonist" and Ann




Husband Edward Darcy "the Colonist" 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

            AKA: Edward D'Arcy, Edward Dorsey
           Born: Abt 1615 - <Hockley, Middlesex, England>
     Christened: 1619 - <England> 12
           Died: Bef Nov 1670 - <Maryland>, (United States)
         Buried:  - Virginia, (United States)


         Father: Edward Darcy [uncertain] (Abt 1590-      ) 7
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 1638 - <Virginia, (United States)>

Events

• Transported: to Virginia by Cornelius Lloyd, Bef 15 Dec 1642. 13

• Purchased: 200 acres on 'a neck of land upon the south turning' of the Elizabeth River, 1642, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

• Bought: 3 head of cattle from John Browne, 1642, Elizabeth River District, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States).

• Occupation: Boatwright, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, United States.

• Purchased: 200 acres from Robert Taylor, 20 Oct 1649, Elizabeth River District, Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States). 14

• Witness: Quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod (Todd), Oct 1649, Virginia, (United States). 14

• Relocated: From Virginia to Maryland, 1649, Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States.

• Occupation: Boatwright, Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States.

• Was granted: a warrant for 200 acres from the Lord Proprietary, Nov 1650, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Was granted: an additional 200 acres adjoining the original warrant, 23 Feb 1651, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Purchased: "Bush Manning," 600 acres on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's, in partnership with Thomas Manning, from Thomas Marsh, Bef 1655, St. Mary's Co., Maryland, (United States).

• Purchased: 300 acres from Thomas Marsh/March, 1655, <Anne Arundel>, Maryland, (United States).

• Converted: to Quakerism, Abt 1657.

• Acquired: 400 acres on the south side of the Severn, possibly on a branch of Broad Creek, Abt 1658, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Patented: "Bush Manning", 1661.

• Assigned: his right to land to Cornelius Howard for transporting seven persons into the Province, 1667.

• Sold: 200 acres granted to him in November 1650 and 200 acres from February 1651 to George Yate, Apr 1667, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Bought back: 68 acres of the land he sold to George Yate in April 1667, Aug 1668, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).

• Bought: 60 more acres called "Darsy" from George Yate, Abt Sep 1668, Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States).




Wife Ann

           Born: Abt 1609
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Jan 1690 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States) 15
         Buried: 

Events

• Converted: to Quakerism, Abt 1658.


Children
1 M Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey" 5 6 9 11 16 17 18 19 20

            AKA: Colonel Edward Dorsey of "Dorsey"
           Born: Abt 1640 - <Lower Norfolk, Virginia>, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: After 26 Oct 1704 - <Major's Choice>, Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried:  - <Major's Choice, Baltimore Co.>, Maryland, (United States)
         Spouse: Sarah Wyatt (1657-1690) 16 21
           Marr: 12 Oct 1671 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States
         Spouse: Margaret Ruth Larkin (1643-1707) 7 22
           Marr: Abt 1693 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States)


2 M Honorable Capt. John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole" 5 9 11 23 24 25 26 27




            AKA: Honorable John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole," Captain John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole"
           Born: Abt 1645 - Lower Norfolk Co., Virginia, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Mar 1715 - Baltimore Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Pleasance Ely (Abt 1660-Bef 1734) 11 28 29
           Marr: 1683 - <Anne Arundel>, Maryland, (United States)


3 M Joshua Dorsey of "Hockley" 30 31

           Born: Abt 1646 - Virginia, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 1688 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sarah Richardson (      -1705) 31


4 F Ann Dorsey [uncertain] 32

           Born: Abt 1649
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Apr 1698 - "Greenberry Point", Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried:  - St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Annapolis, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, (United States)



5 F Sarah Dorsey 33

            AKA: Sarah Darcy
           Born: Abt 1650 - Virginia, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef Oct 1691 - Anne Arundel, Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Matthew Howard Jr. (Abt 1641-1692) 7 34 35 36
           Marr: Bef May 1667 - <Maryland, (United States)>



Birth Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

Some sources have b. abt 1619


Christening Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

Some source has him christened in 1619 in Queen Caroline Parish-Elk Ridge, Anne Arundel, but this is unlikely for two reasons:
1) He was not yet in North America in 1619
2) Queen Caroline Parish did not exist until 1728


Death Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

Supposed to have drowned with several other people in a shipwreck off the Isle of Kent in the Chesapeake Bay on 2 August 1659. However, some researchers have argued that either a different Edward Darcy drowned or this Edward survived the shipwreck, as land transactions and other documents seem to indicate that he was living until at least 1667, but was deceased in November 1670.

From http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rawl/corneliuslloyd.html:
He [Edward Dorsey] died on 2 Aug 1659 in Chesapeake Bay. Edward Dorsey drowned in Chesapeake Bay, off the Isle of Kent, Maryland.

A petition in the Court records from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 the following: "At a Court holden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd, 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing the hee having taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy and some others drowned, near the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy's Overseer to take up the same, which he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell and now by his Petition craving for his paynes taken therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudge him. It is ordered that the said Thomas Hinson have one hundred pounds of Tobacco payd him for the said paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they be) that possesse and enjoy the sd Boate."


Research Notes: Husband - Edward Darcy "the Colonist"

The pedigree of Edward Darcy, the colonist, is uncertain. Recent DNA evidence points to an Irish, rather than Norman, heritage. The ancestors given here are those found in "traditional" sources, prior to any DNA research.

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From Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland, pp. 610-611:

"The name Dorsey, was pronounced as if spelt 'Dossy,' and in fact it appears, at times, so recorded. It was also written 'Darcy,' from which circumstance a French origin has been claimed for the family; but there is evidence to indicate that the Maryland Dorseys had been located for a time, at least, in Ireland, prior to their arrival in America. That the family bore arms is proved by the seal to the original will (dated January 7, 1742), of Caleb Dorsey, of Anne Arundel county, which displays: 'on a fess between three wolf heads, a lion passant, guardant.'

"Edward Dorsey, also called 'Edward Darcy, Gentleman,' received in 1650 a warrant for two hundred acres of land in Anne Arundel county, Maryland, and a grant was issued to him on February 23, 1651, for two hundred acres additional... Edward Dorsey died prior to 1681, for on December 6th of that year, Edward Dorsey of Anne Arundel county, Gent., son of Edward Dorsey, late of said county, deceased, conveys his interest in 'Hockley-in-the-Hole' to his brother John Dorsey..."

-----

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm has d. 1659 in Chesapeake Bay, off Kent Island MD. According to the above, that would mean that his son, Edward Jr., arrived in 1661after the original Edward Darcy was deceased. This source states that Edward Darcy was born in England.

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From http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/index.htm:

"Descendants of Edward DORSEY,
boatwright of Lower Norfolk Co. VA and Anne Arundel Co., MD

"Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents. His ancestry has been the subject of much debate over the last 80 years. Some of this debate can be read in the 1997 issues of the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin. There are several genealogies on the family of Edward Dorsey. Among these are The Dorsey Family by Dorsey, Dorsey & Ball; Anne Arundel Gentry (first Edition), by Harry C. Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry Volume 2 by Harry C. Newman. Information on the family is also in The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties Maryland by J. D. Warfield (1905). I also believe there is a book about the Georgia desendants of Edward Dorsey. A couple of articles on Edward Dorsey's family have also appeared over the years in the Maryland Historical Magazine. There have also been some Dorsey newsletters including Dorsey Dreams which was published by Mrs. Lois Colette Bennington, and The Dorsey Project that was published quarterly by Mr. Donavon Dorsey of Benton City, Wash. I would recommend that people interested in this family to obtain copies of the above listed books for much in-depth material on the families.>/P>

"While, there is much controversy over the ancestry of Edward Dorsey, recent DNA testing seems to rule out claimed relations to the family of Thomas, Lord D-Arcy. However there are a few facts that should be considered with the history of the time and places. Edward Dorsey was in Lower Norfolk Co VA by 1642, when Cornelius Lloyd claimed land for transporting him to the colony. (The 1642 date is the claim for head rights to receive land for transporation of persons into Virginia, and not necessarily the date the person arrived in Virginia.) Edward Dorsey bought 200 acres in Elizabeth River Parish; in 1642 he bought cattle there (3 head of cattle from John Browne of the Elizabeth River District of Lower Norfolk Co., In the Cort Records B book of Lower Norfolk Co.; 15 April 1648: Henry Nichxxx appointed constable for the head of Eastern Branch beginning at Edward DORSEYS and so Upwards on both sides of said River including Richard Woodman's Plantation. On 20 Oct 1649 Robert Taylor sold Edward DORSEY 200 acres. This land is described by a deed dated 19 October 1647 recorded 31 Oct 1649: William Julian selling 200 acres of land to Robert Taylor of Elizabeth River, Planter, which is part of a patent of 500 Acres as being a Neck of land upon the south turning of ye Said River, East upon a creeke and South upon upon a creek north into ye woods as is bounded in the patent bearing date 22 July 1634, witnesss: Abraham Weekes and William Hancock. He witnessed by Edward E.D Dorsey. quit-claim deed Oct 1649 to Virginia land executed by Thomas Tod (Todd). This deed he signed Edward E D Dorsey

"Edward Darcy granted in November 1650 a warrant for 200 acres of land. & another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)

"A little history of Virginia shows that Cornelius Lloyd and his brother Edward Lloyd were involved with Richard Bennet who was a puritan and advocate of the independent church, and endevored to establish a purtian settlement on the south shore of the James River in the late 1630s and early 1640s. It was among these Puritans or memeber of the Independent church with which Edward Dorsey associated. Given that we find Edward buying cattle in 1642, it is doubtful if he was an indentured servant. Rather, I suspect he was among young men and families (including college graduates) that were recruited for the Puritan settlement on the south shore of the James River. At this time England was in the early stages of the English Civil War, with King Charles I taking a hardline stance against the Indendent/Putitan and other sects that were not outside the Church of England.

"The provinical court records tell us of Edward Dorsey's death. 'Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate.'

"In addition to the information on this site, I know of several people who have created their own web sites with Dorsey Genealogical Information. On the Internet there is a Dorsey Genealogy mailing list at rootsweb.com. The information on this website has been extensively updated in Feb 2009 . It presents material on 8 generations of Dorsey descendants including data from church records, census, graveyards, marriage licenses, and genealogies. The data is not complete. There are Dorseys that seem to belong to this family that have not been connected to Edward Dorsey's lineage. It is also noted that there is another early Dorsey family in Maryland which settled mostly in Calvert Co. and the Eastern Shore, at times this family used the spelling of Dossey as well as Dorsey. This family's progenitors were James, Ralph, and John D-arcy or Dorsey, kinsmen of Richard Preston of the Clifts in Calvert Co. MD. "

Op. cit.:

"Edward Dorsey was among the first settlers of Anne Arundel Co. in 1649, coming from Lower Norfolk Co.,VA with other Puritans and Independents. His ancestry has been the subject of much debate over the last 60 years. Some of this debate can be read in the 1997 issues of the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin. There are several genealogies on the family of Edward Dorsey. Among these are The Dorsey Family by Dorsey, Dorsey & Ball; Anne Arundel Gentry (first Edition), by Harry C. Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry Volume 2 by Harry C. Newman. Information on the family is also in The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties Maryland by J. D. Warfield (1905). I also believe there is a book about the Georgia desendants of Edward Dorsey. A couple of articles on Edward Dorsey's family have also appeared over the years in the Maryland Historical Magazine. There have also been some Dorsey newsletters including Dorsey Dreams which was published by Mrs. Lois Colette Bennington, and The Dorsey Project being published quarterly by Mr. Donavon Dorsey of Benton City, Wash. I would recommend that people interested in this family to obtain copies of the above listed books for much in-depth material on the families

"In addition to the information on this site, I know of several people who have created their own web sites with Dorsey Genealogical Information. Patricia Summers Smith has placed her lineage on line as has David Dorsey . On the Internet there is a Dorsey Genealogy mailing list at rootsweb.com

"The information on this website has been extensively updated in December 1999. It presents material on 7 generations of Dorsey descendants including data from church records, census, graveyards, marriage licenses, and genealogies. The data is not complete. There are Dorseys that seem to belong to this family that have not been connected to Edward Dorsey's lineage. It is also acknowledged that there is another early Dorsey family in Maryland which settled mostly in Calvert Co. and the Eastern Shore, at times this family used the spelling of Dossey as well as Dorsey."

-------

From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Dorseys of Hockley

"Of all the distinguished officials whose presence with their families and retainers lent luster to the ancient capital [of Baltimore], none are more indelibly impressed upon the history of the Province than the early Dorsey brothers, sons of Edward Darcy who received his first warrant for land from the Lord Proprietary in the year 1650.

"In that year Edward Darcy, the original progenitor of the Hockley branch of the Dorseys of Maryland, received another grant for land adjoining his original warrant, the latter patented in connection with Captain John Norwood.

"These lands were in the year 1667 assigned to George Yate, Edward Darcy having in 1661 been granted a valuable estate in that part of St. Mary's County which in 1663 became a part of the newly erected County of Calvert. This was Teobush Manning patented to Edward Darcy and Thomas Manning, as shown in the Land Warrants, but incorrectly entered in Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls for Calvert County, as belonging to 'Edward Darby.'

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province."

------------

From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 30:

"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., pp. 55-56:

"In the Land Office of Annapolis, may be seen the following warrant, which explains itself:

"'Warrant MDCL, granted to Edward Dorsey, of Anne Arundel Co., for 200 acres of land, which he assigns as followeth; as also 200 acres more, part of a warrant for 400 acres, granted John Norwood and the said Dorsey, dated XXIII of Feb., MDCLI. Know all men by these presents that I, Edward Dorsey, of the County of Anne Arundel, boatwright, have granted, bargained and sold, for a valuable consideration, already received, all my right, title, interest of and in a warrant for 200 acres, bearing date 1650, and also 200 acres more, being half of a warrant of 400 acres--the one half belonging to Captain Norwood, bearing date, 1651, both of which assigned to George Yate.--Edward Dorsey, Sealed.'

"Signed in the presence of Cornelius Howard, John Howard, Oct. 22nd, MDCLXVII, (1667).

"That same year the same Edward Dorsey assigned to Cornelius Howard, his right for land for transporting seven persons into the province. Edward Dorsey and Thomas Manning held a certificate from Thomas Marsh, for 600 acres adjoining Captain Norwood. 'Norwood's Fancy,' held by Captain Norwood, was near Round Bay. 'Dorsey,' held by Edward Dorsey, gave the name to 'Dorsey's Creek,' upon which was located Thomas Gates, whose will of 1659, reads: 'I give to Michael Bellott and John Holloway my plantation. I desire that they give to Edward Dorsey's children free outlet to the woods and spring as formally I have given them.'"

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Ibid., p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th, 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now in the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

----

Ibid., p. 11:
[Around 1650] Nicholas Wyatt surveyed 'Wyatt's Harbor' and 'Wyatt's Hills,' upon which 'Belvoir' now stands, just south of, and in sight of Round Bay. Adjoining it was Thomas Gates, upon 'Dorsey's Creek,' near 'Dorsey,' taken up by the first Edward Dorsey, in partnership with Captain John Norwood."

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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

From Lee Garlock:

Edward DORSEY/D'ARCY died in 1659 in Chesapeake Bay, off Kent Island MD. He was born in England. Was in Lower Norfolk Co VA by 1642, when Cornelius Lloyd claimed land for transporting him to the colony.

From Anne Arundel Gentry:
1642 - He bought 200 acres in Elizabeth River Parish; bought cattle there (3 head of cattle from John Browne of the Elizabeth River District of Lower Norfolk Co. [Lower Norfolk County Recrds, Book A, part III, page 36, source cited in Maryland Genealogies.]

From Maryland Genealogies, p. 387: Cites proof that Cornelius Lloyd used Edward Dorsey's headright as early as December 15, 1642.

Anne Arundel Gentry:
October 1649 - Witnessed by mark E.D. a quit-claim deed to Virginia land executed by Thomas Tod (Todd) in favor of James Allard, Abraham Parrott and Alexander Hall.. This deed he signed Edward E D Dorsey [Lower Norfolk County Records, Book B, page 134, source cited in Maryland Genealogies . All this suggests that Edward Dorsey was in Virginia for the seven years between the 1642 purchase from Browne and the 1649 quit claim.]

November 1650 - Edward Darcy granted a warrant for 200 acres of land and another 200 acres in 1651, half of a warrant for 400 acres he shared with John Norwood (Patents 11/folio 98)

1658 - Robert Clarkson, a Quaker convert, states in a letter of Ann Dorsey and her husband, both Converts (to Quakerism), Ann had abundant grace, but he doubted that her husband would stick to the faith. According to Newman, a letter of Thomas Hart dated 28 of the 2nd inst 1658 London, in which is embodied a letter of Robert Clarkson dtd. 14 of ye 11 mo. 1657 (which would be February) "..& likewise Ann Dorsey in a more larger measure, hir husband I hope abideth faithfull in his measure.."

1659 - Edward drowned off Kent Island. In Anne Arundel Court on 2 Aug. 1659, one
Thomas Hinson petitioned "for compensation for having taken up the boate wherein Edward Darcy and some otheres were drowned neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy Overseer to take up the same which he did deliuery the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority. . . ." So unsure if the Edward mentioned above may be his son from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 "Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Shewing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the deliuery of same attAnarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate." [Maryland Archives, Vo. 4, p. 314]

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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

! Birth: (1d,e) Edward DORSEY was claimed by some as being descended from Sir Norman D'ARCIE cousin of William the Conqueror, and from the Lord D'ARCY family of Hornby Castle. DNA evidence has proven that theory to be incorrect, showing that Edward DORSEY is not related to those families. (1f) The latest DNA results would indicate a likely Irish origin for Edward DORSEY. (2) 1619. England.

Marriage to Ann __: (1a) Ann DORSEY and "hir husband" [not named] mentioned in a 1658 letter. Edward DORSEY was the only DORSEY in Anne Arundel Co., MD at that time who was married. (1b) Some researchers have inaccurately listed her as Ann, daughter of Matthew HOWARD. While Matthew HOWARD did have a daughter named Ann, there is record of her husband being James GRENEFFE, who mentions wife Ann, "brother John HOWARD" and "brother Samuel HOWARD" in his will. (1c) She may have been the daughter of Humphrey BACHE of London, and the aunt of Elizabeth HARRIS, of Quaker fame. (2) Bef. 1646. England.

Death: (1g) Drowned near the Isle of Kent in 1659. (2) 2 Aug 1659. Near Isle of Kent, Anne Arundel Co., MD.

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

36. Edward DORSEY24 was born before 1620 in England.20 He is believed to have been the son of Thomas D'Arcy. He immigrated in 1642 to State of Virginia.25 Edward Darcy/Dorsey lived several years in Virginia. On December 15, 1642, Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing 60 persons into the colony of Virginia. Among those named was Edw: _orsey, the first letter of the last name is obliterated. (Minute Book, f 160) (New Eng Hist Gen Vol 47, f 63). On October 7, 1646, Thomas Brown was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by assignment of the right of 5 persons transported by Cornelius Lloyd, among them Edward Dorsey. (Patents 2, State of Virginia f. 113). He died on Aug 2 1659 in Chesapeake Bay.20 Edward Dorsey drowned in Chesapeake Bay, off the Isle of Kent, Maryland. A petition in the Court records from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 the following: "At a Court holden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd, 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing the hee having taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy and some others drowned, near the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy's Overseer to take up the same, which he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell and now by his Petition craving for his paynes taken therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudge him. It is ordered that the said Thomas Hinson have one hundred pounds of Tobacco payd him for the said paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they be) that possesse and enjoy the sd Boate." Edward Dorsey, the immigrant, was gentleman and settler, first in Virginia and later in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. At a County Court held on November 3, 1645, at the home of William Shipp, it was recorded tat John Browne of Elizabeth River in the County of Lower Norfolk, VA, planter, had on the 11th of February, 1642 sold unto Edward Darsey of the county aforesaid, planter, three head of Cattle (Vixt) one Cowe aged about seaven yeares of a brinded coulor and marked with a cropp on the right eare and the left eare whole, and a steare of a color as aforesaid aged about one yeare and a halfe and marked with a cropp on the left eare and the right eare slitt allsoe, one heifar calfe brinded as aforesaid aged about three quarters of a yeare and marked with a cropp on both eares and a slitt in one and doe by these presents give graunt, bargaine and sell unto the said Edward Darsey his heirs and ecut(rs) administrator and assignes for ever for a valuable consideration pt in hand paid. Dated the 11th of February, 1642. (Minute Book A.f. 293, Lower Norfolk Co., Portsmouth, VA.) By 1650 Edward Darcy was in Anne Arundel County, Maryland where he was granted a warrent for 200 acres of land and another 200 acres in 1651, half warrent for 400 acres he purchased in partnership with John Norwood. (Patents 11; folio 98). In April 1657 Edward Darcy, (he refers to himself in this document as a "boatwright of Anne Arundel County"), sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to him in November of 1650 and half a warrent of 40 acres granted to himself and Capt. Norwood in February, 1651. In August 1668, Yates re-assigned to Edward Dorsey (son of Edward) 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 additional acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh or March. By 1658 Edward Dorsey had land in the Province of Maryland. On February 27, 1658, Ensign Thomas Gates, who transported himself into the Province in 1649 was granted a parcell of land called "Gatenby" lying on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, on the south side of the Severn River and north side of Darcy's Creek. In the will of Thomas Gates made May 2, 1659 he indicates that the Dorsey family was living on a nearby tract of land and desired and willed that his heirs "shall give to Edward Darcey's children a free outlet to the woods and also to the spring an inlet for their cattle as formerly they had in my time (Wills 1, f.105). Due to failure to obtain patents, carelessness of clerks and fire which destoyed early records at Annapolis, it has become virtually impossible to locate the land of Edward Darcy/Dorsey. (Arch of Md, 111, f 250) Descriptions of surveys which were recorded after the fire of 1706, however, show that Thomas Todd was located on the south side of the Severn River between Todd's Creek (later Spa Creek) and Deep Cove Creek which was known as Darcy's Creek in the 1658 surveys. The name of the creek was later changed to Sprigg's Creek, then to Graveyard Creek and finally to College Creek. Information regarding the names of these creeks was furnished by Mr. Trader of the Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md. To the west and north across Darcy's Creek, which no doubt bears the name of the immigrant, were the tracts taken up by Edward Dorsey and Capt. John Norwood, with the land of Nicholas Wyatt lying between them. Farther up the Severn River near Marshes Creek, later called Hockley Creek, was the land taken up by Matthew Howard. Adjoining this land on the south was the tract called "Wyatt", laid out for Nicholas Wyatt. Nearby was Hockley-in-ye-Hole, taken up by Edward Dorsey and later patented by his three sons, Edward, Joshua, and John Dorsey. The date of the original grant for "Hockley" in ye Hole" (Hole being Old English for Valley) was 1664 and wassigned and sealed by Charles, third Lord Baltimore. That grant was in possession of a descendant having been handed down with the land to the eighth generation. He was married to Ann ---- before 1648.20,26 In 1658 the Quakers came into Maryland spreading their religion among the settlers, claiming as converts, Nicholas Wyatt, Edward Dorsey and Ann, his wife and many others. A letter written by Robert Clarkson, a Quaker convert, to Elizabeth Harris, then in England shows that the Dorseys did embrace the faith. He writes that Ann Dorsey had abundant grace, but he seemed doubtful that her husband would stick to the faith. (MD Hist Mag XXXII, 47). "Quakers in the Founding of Anne Arundel County, Maryland" states that, "Ann and Edward Dorsey, mentioned by Clarkson as 'convinced Quakers' were founders of the Dorsey family of Maryland. Their sons were Edward, Joshua, and John. Edward Dorsey's land, 'Dorsey' was on Dorsey, now College, Creek. He surveyed 'Hockley in Ye Hole,' which was granted to his three sons on January 27, 1663 (Patents, Liber 7 f.378) after his death by drowning. (Dorsey Book)" The list of those convinced of the truth of Quakerism includes, "founding settlers and leading citizens of the county, and some were of armorial families. The list constitutes a high tribute to the labors of Elizabeth Harris, Maryland's first Publisher of Truth." There was an apparent attempt to restrict the activities of Friends in the Province of Maryland. Sometime around 1658 Edward Dorsey took up a tract of land containing 400 acres, lying in Anne Arundel County on the south side of the Severn River and or a branch of Broad Creek. This tract was later patented by his three sons. See Patents 7, f.378.

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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

"Most of the older Dorsey genealogies assume that our immigrant Edward is descended from the Norman D'Arcy family. I must confess to jumping on that bandwagon myself. But new genetic research tosses this out the window. A Dorsey family DNA project that started in 2002 has resulted in an excellent web page <http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/LineageI.htm> that points strongly to an Irish branch of the family that has had no "paper trail" documenting a link to our Maryland emigrant, Edward Dorsey. The Irish cousins date from the nineteenth century, so there must be an older common ancestor from the early seventeenth century, or still farther back. The Anglo-Norman D'Arcy/Dorsey men who have participated in a DNA project are clearly of a quite different genetic stock from Edward and the Irish cousins. My thanks to Rick Saunders, who brought this to my attention. As he explains, "If you go to the Results page <http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/Results800.htm> you can compare the lines of Edward DORSEY, and the French-Norman DARCY line more readily. Not only are the results not close, but their haplotypes (R1b and E3b) are different."[1]

"Of the seven references in sixteenth and seventeenth century British records to Edward Dorsey (with nearly as many spellings), the only one that is at all likely to be our ancestor is No. 16 in the Exchequer Record of the King's Remembrancer: "Edward Darcie -- lycensed April 18th 1632, aged thirteen, to go with his master Richard Gips to Berghen." Translated, this means the young teenager had permission to leave England with Richard Gips, or GIBBS, either as an apprentice, servant, or ward, probably to Bergen op Zoom in the Netherlands. It was easier to get a license to go to Europe than to the new world. It would be relatively easy to travel from the Netherlands to Virginia, perhaps by way of Barbados.[2] However, there is as yet no proof that this is our man. I am unaware of any research of Irish records of the period, looking for an Edward Dorsey.

"One way or another, Edward Dorsey1 managed to emigrate from the British Isles (exactly where, Ireland or England, is unclear) to Virginia. Perhaps he came via by a circuitous route through The Netherlands, or more possibly, he was transported by Cornelius LLOYD (see below). So far I have found no record of when he married his wife, Ann. A common assumption is that she was Ann BACHE, since Ann Do?y was mentioned in the 1662 will of her brother Humphrey Bache, a Londoner who became a Quaker. Humphrey's daughter Elizabeth married William HARRIS in 1649 in St. Mary's Abchurch.[3] Elizabeth Harris became a well-travelled and well-known Friends minister. However, a direct descendant named Edward Dorsey has examined the probate record of Humphrey Bache. He concludes: "The reference to his sister Anne lists her last name as Do?y where the "?" could be a "u" or "n" (quill pens were not reliable) -- but, comparing the letter to others in the document, I can't see how it could be much else."[3a] While misspellings and mis-translations were not uncommon in probate records it seems a bit of stretch to get Dorsey from Douy or Dony.

"In May 1638 another pair of our ancestors, Matthew HOWARD <../southern/howard.html> and his wife Ann, were granted land in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, on the western branch of the Elizabeth River, south of Broad Creek. In the immediate vacinity were grants to Robert TAYLOR, Edward LLOYD, Richard OWEN, and Cornelius LLOYD. The year before, Matthew Howard had with him "two persons unnamed", one of whom might have been 17- or 18-year old Edward Dorsey. Although a male could own land at the age of 16, obviously Edward did not. In fact, throughout his life he seemed to be curiously careless about registering his land. This may have been because an oath was required, and he may have early felt a scruple against swearing that would eventually find full fruition in the Quaker testimony. It is suggested that young Edward was in Virginia by 1636, or even as early as 1635, and he stayed near Richard Owen and John Howard.[4] For three generations these families stayed together and intermarried.

"There is a 1642 contract for Edward's purchase of three cattle (a cow, steer, and calf), with descriptions of each animal, indicating that he had some disposable wealth and was not indentured. When the County Court met 15 December 1645, at the house of William SHIPP, it ordered Thomas TOD to pay Edward "Darcy" and Thomas HALL forty pounds of tobacco apiece "for theire tyme and charge in attendance of the Court for two days." On 10 December 1649 Edward witnessed a quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod; his signature reads "E D: Dorsy".[5]

"References to Edward Dorsey, with a variety of spellings, are found in the land records of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, between 1642 and 1648. On 7 October 1646 Thomas BROWN was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by assignment of the rights of five persons transported by Cornelius LLOYD, including Edward Dorsey. On 15 December 1642 Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing sixty people to the colony, including "Edw:_orsey" -- the first letter is illegible. Edward bought 200 acres in Lower Norfolk County on "a neck of land upon the south turning" of the Elizabeth River. The boundaries were further delimited: going "east upon a creek, and south upon a creek, and north into the woods". Dorsey's tract was on the point of land at the foot of present day Chestnut Street, and on it in the 1930s were the ruins of an old Marine Hospital. The land lies on Ferry Point and was once offered to the fledgling United States as a site for its capital. Dorsey styled himself a "boatwright" (i.e. involved in naval stores, perhaps, rather than actually building ships) and was probably in business with and for his near neighbor, Thomas TOD.[6]

"Apparently a number of settlers in Lower Norfolk County were not members of the established church, but were a variety of dissenters or nonconformists; some were Puritans. A ten-year controversy had raged between Governor BERKELEY and the more vocal Puritans that was both political and religious. When a few Roman Catholics immigrated into the colony in 1642 Berkeley saw his chance. The colony decreed that no "popish recusants" could hold any office. It also decreed that anyone holding office and refusing to take the "oath of allegiance and supremacy" should be dismissed from office and fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco. The following year it was enacted that all ministers must be conformed to the Church of England, and any nonconformists should be compelled to leave the colony.[7]

"Meanwhile farther up the Chesapeake Bay in 1637, Maryland forces had taken over Kent Island, which had originally been an outpost of Virginia. Lord Baltimore gave the settlers full civil and religious rights. In 1648 he specifically invited disgruntled dissenters to move from Virginia to his colony. He appointed the Virginia Protestant, William STONE, (apparently no relation to our William Stone) as his governor. Baltimore patronized the newly settled Protestants, who quickly moved into important political posts in both local and provincial government.[8]


"The lack of freedom of religion in Virginia, coupled with an invitation to move north, led between 400 and 600 settlers to migrate to Maryland, mostly to Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties. The larger group of immigrants, whose religious affiliations are not known, included Edward Dorsey, John NORWOOD <../southern/norwood.html>, Matthew HOWARD <../southern/howard.html>, Thomas TODD, and Nicholas WYATT and their families who settled in and around Annapolis. They had owned land near each other in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, and soon acquired tracts near each other along the Severn River in Maryland; their children and grandchildren intermarried. However, 15 November 1652 Edward and four others returned to Virginia where Francis FLEETWOOD got a grant of land for their transportation.[9] They soon returned to Maryland.

"In November 1650 Edward Dorsey was granted a warrant for 200 acres in Maryland, and in 1651 for another 200 acres. Lord Baltimore had instituted the English practice of granting and patenting tracts of land under proper names. Acreages named "Norwood", "Howard", "Todd", and "Wyatt" were laid out for other members of the group, with their locations specified in the records. Unfortunately, the location of Dorsey's land was not specified. Before 1655 Edward Dorsey, together with Thomas MANNING bought 600 acre "Theobush Manning" on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, south of Norwood's, north of the Bay. Perhaps because it was incorrectly entered on Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls as belonging to Edward "Darby", the patent was not issued until 1661. Whenever he acquired it, eventually Edward Dorsey owned land that is now occupied by part of the Naval Academy and Bloomsbury Square in Annapolis.[10]

"In 1655 or 1556 Elizabeth (Bache) HARRIS, a British Friend, came to Maryland and found a receptive audience among the community of dissenters settled along the Severn and Patuxent Rivers, and among the unchurched folks on Kent Island. Many who heard her and worshipped with her were convicted inwardly and convinced of the Truth Friends proclaimed. She was followed in 1657-1658 by Josiah COALE from Bristol, Thomas THURSTON from Gloucestershire, and Thomas CHAPMAN. Among the new Friends in Maryland were Thomas MEARS, Nicholas WYATT, Edward and Ann DORSEY, Robert CLARKSON and his wife, John BALDWIN, Henry CAPLIN, Charles BALYE, Elizabeth BEASLEY, William FULLER, William DURAND, Thomas and William COLE, Henry WOOLCHURCH, and others.[11]

"A letter from Robert CLARKSON, member of the House of Burgesses from Anne Arundel County, to Elizabeth HARRIS, back in England, summarized Elizabeth's work and reported on the condition of local Friends:[12]

'Elizabeth Harris, Dear Heart, I salute thee in the tender love of the Father, which moved thee toward us and I do own thee to have been a minister by the will of God to bear the outward testimony to the inward word of truth in me and others. Of which word of life God hath made my wife a partaker with me and hath established our hearts in His fear, and likewise Ann Dorsey in a more large measure; her husband I hope abides faithful . . .

'We have disposed of the most part of the books which were sent, so that all parts where there are Friends are furnished and every one that desires may have benefit of them; at Herring Creek, Rhoad River, South River, all about Severn, the Brand Neck, and thereabouts the Seven Mountains and Kent. . . . '

"Echoing the political events in England, there had been a coup in Maryland against Lord Baltimore in 1654. But many dissenters, especially in Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties, and on Kent Island, were more loyal to Baltimore than to the new Puritan regime. William FULLER, acting governor after 1654, was convinced upon hearing Elizabeth HARRIS, and became a Friend. By 1658 definitely five, and perhaps as many as eleven of the 24 commissioners had become Quakers. Others had close ties with Friends.[13]

"Then Edward Dorsey was drowned with several other people off the Isle of Kent. On 2 August 1659 the Court paid Thomas HINSON 100 pounds of tobacco for raising the boat in which they had drowned, as desired by Dorsey's overseer. But was this our ancestor? Although the Dorsey family historians assume it was, genealogist Caroline BULKLEY thinks it was some other person with the same name. She discovered a 1667 deed referring to Edward Dorsey, boatwright, a designation never used by his son. Descendant Ed Dorsey, who examined the bill of sale, notes that "the seller declares himself to BE Edward Dorsey but did not use the word 'said' that was typically used when repeating a previous reference (to the purchaser). So we have to conclude that it really was the immigrant OR it was his son (after all they really were both Edward Dorsey). He does not specify that he is heir which he did with later documents. So either the immigrant was the seller OR, more likely, his son impersonated him." Another "curious case was the sale, again by the son, in 1664 of other property owned by his father which he just didn't get around to recording until November of 1670 (six years?). He then calls himself heir of the 'late' Edward Dorsey. So it appears to me that the immigrant was alive in 1667 but had died by November 1670."[13a] More conclusive, perhaps, was a reference by Edward Jr. to land "my father Edward Dorsey [had] from Thomas MARSH in 1661". Edward Jr. stated that his father was living in 1667, but by the time Edward Jr. transferred "Hockley-in-the-Hole" to his brother John in 1681, their father was dead. Edward Dorsey, either father or son, appraised the estate of Thomas TODD 12 May 1677.[14] Thomas was the old companion from Virginia with whom the elder Dorsey had worked on ships.

"The Dorsey family chroniclers found no further records of Ann Dorsey. They assumed she returned to Virginia. I assume she remained in Maryland near her children. Unfortunately the West River Friends minutes do not begin until 1671. Family historian Ed Dorsey thinks she went back to England with the immigrant Edward Dorsey.[15]
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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

(1) Some researchers have attributed a daughter to Edward DORSEY a daughter Ann who married Nicholas GREENBERRY. There is no evidence that Edward DORSEY had a daughter named Ann. While Nicholas GREENBERRY's wife was named Ann, she could not have been a daughter of Edward DORSEY. Nicholas GREENBERRY did not emigrate from England to Maryland until 1674, at which time he arrived with his wife and two children. (Maryland Patent Liber 18 (Vol. 21):160 FHL microfilm 0,013,071.) Land was claimed in 1674 for Nicholas GREENBERRY, wife, and two children (not named) who were on the ship "Constant Friendship." His wife could not have been the daughter of Edward DORSEY, who had been living in the colonies for over 25 years.


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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

April 1667 - Edward Darcy, of the County of Anne Arundell, boatwright, sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to Darcy in Nov 1650 and half a warrant of four hundred acres granted to him and Capt. Norwood in Feb. 1651. In Aug 1668, Yates reassigned to Dorsey 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 more acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh/March. His son Edward sold this tract Nov 6, 1670 to Thomas Manniage of the Cliffs.

A question arises as to whether the Edward Darcy who signed the paper in 1667 was the Edward Darcy who bought and sold land in the 1650s. Caroline Kemper assumes that it is the same person and that a different, unrelated Edward Dorsey died in a boating accident in 1659. Other historians think that Edward Dorsey one bought and sold the property in the 1650s but that his son signed the papers in the 1670s.

From Maryland Genealogies, "The Identity of Edward Dorsey I," by Caroline Kemper Bulkley, 1938, pp. 398-399:

The record in the Land Office (Liber II, [Margin Liber G G] (98)) reads: '(125) Edward Dorsey assigns to George Yate 400 acres: Warrant XI November M.D.C.L. (1650); to Edward Dorsey for 200 acres of land the which he assigned away as followeth; as also 200 acres more part of a warrant for 400 acres granted John Norwood and Edward Dorsey dated xxiiij February MDCLi (1651); said Dorsey of County of Ann [sic] Arundell, Boatwright, consideration already received, all my right, title, interest, claim and demand of an--in a warrant for 200 acres of land bearing date sixteen hundred and fifty [so written out] and also to 200 acres more being the one half of a warrant for 400 acres, the one half belong to Capt. Norwood bearing date one thousand six hundred fifty one unto George Yate, etc.'"

The date of this assignment, duly signed and sealed, is April 23, 1667, and the witness is John Howard, eldest son of the Virginia Matthew and Ann Howard. A year later (August 24, 1668) there is a deed filed from Yate to Dorsey for sixty-eight acres of the above "Dorsey" tract. In the same year one James Connoway assigned back the "right for 1000 acres" to George Yate, who transfers sixty acres to "Darsy." . . . .

It is contended that the Edward Dorsey who signed the records of 1667-1668 may have been the son Edward. This is highly improbable, since Edward Dorsey the younger could not have had land in his own rights from warrants cited of 1650 and 1651, nor did he ever name himself as "boatwright" in the documents known to bear his signature.

Those who deny that the record quoted was signed by Edward Dorsey, Senior, argue from the story many times repeated that he was drowned in 1659. No evidence has ever been produced to prove this: there is an authentic record of an Edward Dorsey who was drowned, but who the person was, or whether the name may be mistakenly recorded cannot be determined.

It is clear that the signer of the 1667-1668 deeds was the father Edward Dorsey, and as further testimony that he was alive after 1659 is a document assigning land--the Bush-Manning tract-- bought by "My father Edward Dorsey from Thomas Marsh in 1661." This same land is later confirmed to Manning in a warrant and power of attorney to Sheriff Stockett from Colonel Edward Dorsey, the son, giving these facts.


Research Notes: Wife - Ann

Not to be confused with Ann Howard, daughter of Matthew Howard and Anne Hall, as the dates make such a relationship impossible.

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

Some researchers have inaccurately listed her as Ann, daughter of Matthew HOWARD. While Matthew HOWARD did have a daughter named Ann, there is record of her husband being James GRENEFFE, who mentions wife Ann, "brother John HOWARD" and "brother Samuel HOWARD" in his will. (1c) She may have been the daughter of Humphrey BACHE of London, and the aunt of Elizabeth HARRIS, of Quaker fame. (2) Bef. 1646. England.

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

37. Ann ---- was Quaker in 1658 in State of Virginia.27 A letter from 1658 "for Elizabeth Harris signifieing, a good fruite of hir labours there for the Lord, wch heare ensueth:" Elizabeth Harris, Deare hearte; I salute thee in ye tender love of the father wch mooved in thee towards ye goode of god in us wch had longe leynn hid and bin made a pray upon by the dragon (who) first made ware with ye lambes and by his subteleties overcame but when ye apoynted time of the father was come he fulfiled the good word of his grace wch he spake by his sperit concereining his sonn, yt he would not leave his soule in grave nor suffer his holy one to see corruption it being impossible yet he could be houlden under of deth but by the powre of his resurreccion in mee, hee hath brocken those bonds and hath manifested that blessed life in his son whome hee hath raysed from the ded, wherein the second deth has no powre..." The writer of the letter goes on ..."God hath made my wife partakers with mee and haith established our heartes in his feare, & likewise Ann Dorsey in a more larger measure, hir husband I hope abideth faithfull in his measure likewise." [P15] An (Ann) Dorcey had apparently been requested to "visett An James." [P16] "We read every particuler, thy letter & the rest of the letters from the others of our friends therein att ye reading where of the measures of God in us who were together then present who were Edward Dorcy & his wife..." Ann Dorsey, wife of Edward is thought to have outlived her husband, and to have returned to their former home in Virginia, for no further record is found of her in Maryland. It seems reasonable to suppose that their children were born in Virginia. Edward DORSEY and Ann ----



Birth Notes: Child - Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey"

Some sources have b. abt 1646 in Virginia


Death Notes: Child - Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey"

At the time of his death he was living on "Major's Choice," [now in Howard County?], Maryland.


Research Notes: Child - Major Edward Dorsey [Jr.] of "Dorsey"

Patented "Hockley-in-the-Hole" on the south side of the Severn with his brothers John and Joshua.

From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province.

"Major Edward Dorsey, later known as Colonel, Judge in the High Court of Chancery, and Keeper of the Great Seal, was active in military affairs, and was also a Gentleman Justice of Anne Arundel County. His house on Prince George's Street, Annapolis, was probably built when he disposed of his interest in Hockley to his youngest brother the 'Honorable John Dorsey.'

"Colonel Edward Dorsey's house in the ancient city was the largest mansion there when upon the removal of the capital from St. Mary's the seat of government was changed to what is now Annapolis, and so it became the home of the Royal Governor Sir Francis Nicholson, and the meeting place of the Assembly until permanent public buildings could be erected.

"...It was at the house on Prince George's Street that Major Edward Dorsey lived during the lifetime of his first wife, Sarah Wyatt, while the Honorable John Dorsey, captain of the Baltimore County militia in later years, took possession of Hockley, three miles from Annapolis, over which his wife, Madam Pleasance Ely, presided, of whom it has been noted--perhaps as a warning to her descendants, that her name was in no sense suggestive of her disposition.

"Certain it is that the amiable Sarah, wife of Major Edward Dorsey, died, after bearing six sons and two daughters to her liege lord, while 'Pleasance,' of austere memory, buried the 'Honorable John,' and was led a second time to the altar by Thomas Wainwright. Upon the death of Sarah Wyatt, his wife, Major Edward Dorsey keeper of the Great Seal, wooed and won young Margarey Larkin, who became the mother of four sons and one daughter.

"In the year 1692 Major Edward Dorsey was one of the committee appointed to read and inspect the laws of the Province, and a few years later we find him a commissioner in Chancery.

"He was one of the first to contribute to the fund for establishing free schools in Maryland, was a trustee of King William and Mary School, and was given authority to conduct the arrangements for the building of St. Anne's Church, of which he was a vestryman. On account of the inability to secure workmen he resigned the latter commission.

"Although referred to as Major in the Archives, the title of 'Colonel' is given Edward Dorsey in the settlement of his estate, indicating that he attained the higher military honor before his death.

"The inventory of Colonel Edward Dorsey's estate bears evidence of his manner of life, for the bequests of silver tankards and cordial cups, silver-hilted swords, chafing dish and other evidences of the convenience and elegancies, indicate that he kept up the dignity incident to a Provincial Justice and Keeper of the Great Seal and field officer of the Colonial troops in his county. His seal gold ring, which was left to his son, Edward, was probably the one used later by Edward and Joshua in sealing a joint deed. The impression of these seals has caused no little conuecture, because of the device and motto which must have belonged to a maternal line. The small shield has in the center a hand holding an upright unsheathed sword, with the motto 'An Por Peth' surrounding it. As both Breek scholars and those versed in old Gaelic have found this too hard a problem to solve, I give it as interesting study to the many who spring from the early Dorseys.

"...The Dorsey men have largely inclined to the law, and several of the descendants of the distinguished Judge of the High Court of Chancery, Major Edward Dorsey, have occupied seats on the Maryland bench..."

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From Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland, p. 610-611:

"In 1667, Edward Dorsey [Jr.] assigned to Cornelius Howard his right to land for transporting seven persons into the Province. 'Dorsey,' held by Edward Dorsey, gave the name to Dorsey's creek, upon which was located Thomas Gates, whose will of 1659 provided that 'Edward Dorsey's children shall have free outlet to the woods and spring, as formerly I have given them.' He therefore had children, although it is not known whether they followed him to the Province or traveled between the Province and England; but an early record read: 'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.' The record continues: 'August 24, 1664, patented to him (Edward Dorsey, Jr.) and to John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," originally 400 acres (later resurvey, 842 acres), near the site of Annapolis.' Edward Dorsey died prior to 1681, for on December 6th of that year, Edward Dorsey of Anne Arundel county, Gent., son of Edward Dorsey, late of said county, deceased, conveys his interest in 'Hockley-in-the-Hole' to his brother John Dorsey...

"Colonel Edward Dorsey, son of Edward Dorsey, the American ancestor, came to Maryland before 1664. He is doubtless the Edward Dorsey brought over by Robert Bullen in 1661; but whether this was his first trip across the sea is not known. He was a Justice for the County of Anne Arundel in 1679, again in 1686, and again in 1689; was styled 'Captain' in 1686, 'Major' in 1687; commissioned Major of Horse, of Anne Arundel county, September 4, 1689; Major of Anne Arundel county, October 9, 1694; was commissioned Associate Commissioner in Chancery, October 17, 1694; Burgess of Anne Arundel county in 1694, again in 1695, 1696, 1697, and for Baltimore county, 1701-1705. He was Commissioner, also Judge of High court of Chancery, March 2, 1695-96; and was styled 'Colonel' in 1702; was one of the committee in 1694 to lay out town lots and a common for Annapolis, Trustee of King William and Mary School in 1696, and a Commissioner for the erection of St. Anne's Church, Annapolis. The first session of the Legislature in Annapolis was held at the house of Major Edward Dorsey, commencing February 28, 1694-95. Prior to 1700, and after his marriage to his second wife, Margaret Larkin, Colonel Edward Dorsey removed from Annapolis to 'Major's Choice,' west of Waterloo, and north of the Old Brick Church. Colonel Dorsey's sons by Sarah Wyatt, his first wife, were located near him upon 'Long Beach' and Major's Choice.' Colonel Dorsey owned landed estates not only in Anne Arundel county, but also in Baltimore county. Colonel Edward Dorsey died at 'Major's Choice' (now Howard county), in 1705. His will is dated October 26, 1704, and was proved December 31, 1705...."

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From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 30:

"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., p. 57:

"From 1680 to 1705, Major Dorsey was in every movement looking to the development of the colony. From 1694 to 1696 he was Judge of the High Court of Chancery, during which time he was commissioned to hold the Great Seal. In 1694, he was a member of the House of Burgesses for Anne Arundel, and from 1697 to his death, in 1705, was a member from Baltimore County (now Howard). He was one of the subscribers and treasurer of the fund for building St. Anne's church, and a free school for the province also received his aid. He signed the protestant address from Baltimore County to the King's most gracious Majestie, upon the succession of King William III--an appeal in behalf of Charles Lord Baron of Baltimore, whose proprietary government had been wrested from the family through the influence of Captain John Coode. Though a Protestant, he was found in support of a government which left religious faith untouched."

Ibid., p. 58:
"As Major of the Horse, he joined Captain Edward Burgess, in asking for additional arms and ammunition for defense.

"In 1694, Major Dorsey was upon the committee with Major John Hammond, Hon. John Dorsey, Captain Philip Howard, Major Nicholas Greenberry and John Bennett, to layout town lots and a town common for 'the town of Proctor,' or Annapolis. In 1705, he sold a row of houses upon Bloomsbury Square, Annapolis, which had been entailed to his children, but which, for want of tenants, had greatly depreciated.

"At the time of his death, he was living on 'Major's Choice,' now Howard County."


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From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41176:

(1a) 1681, 6 Dec: Edward DORSY, "Son and heir of Edward DORSY late of the County of Ann Arundell" sold the parcel Hockley in the Hole granted to "the said Edward DORSY, Joshua DORSY and John DORSEY my brothers" on 20 Aug. 1664.


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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

130. Colonel Col. Edward Dorsey, born 1646 in Virginia25,26; died [estate probated] 31 Dec 1705 in Major's Choice, Baltimore Co., MD26. He was the son of 260. Edward D'Arcy and 261. Anne Howard. He married 131. Sarah Wyatt Bef. 1670 in Anne Arundel Co., MD27,28.
131. Sarah Wyatt28, born 1657 in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland29,30; died 1690 in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland31,32. She was the daughter of 262. Nicholas Wyatt and 263. Damaris Stockett.

Notes for Colonel Col. Edward Dorsey:
[Ancestors of Abednego Baker by Muriel Schulz.ged]

Anne Arimde Gentry, pp. 11ff]: January 4, 1700/01: [Provincial Court, Liber TL no. 2, folios 169, 279]

Edward Dorsey, of Baltimore County, and Margaret his wife, "for disposing of goods and chattels for advancement of our children after death" assigned to his "well-beloved friends, Major John Hammond, Captain Charles Hammond and my oldest son Edward Dorsey" four plantations bordering his dwelling-plantation at Elk Ridge and one on the south side of the Patapsco a little beyond the Falls with Negroes, livestock, household furniture whereon in trust for his five sons, that is, Samuel, Joshua, John, Nicholas, and Benjamin.
To son Samuel the Patapsco plantation with three Negroes and other personalty.
To son Joshua the plantation "where Black Dick lives" with 100 adjoining acres, Negroes, and other personalty.
[13] To son John plantation that Negro Bacon "now lives on" with 100 acres, Negroes.
To son Nicholas the plantation "that Negro Tom lives on" with 100 acres.
To son Benjamin piece of land between Dick and Bacon.

In the event that any of the said sons died without issue then their estates were to be divided equally among their lawful heirs, but if any son proved "rudely," then the trustees had the power to bind him to a trade.

On June 25, 1702, Edward Dorsey for 90 lbs. bought of Colonel John Larkin and Thomas Larkin, of Anne Arundel, a portion of "United Friendship" on the north side of the Patapsco in Baltimore County as laid out for 350 acres. [Testamentary Proceedings, Liber 6, folio 613]

1679 - Made a Justice of the Peace for Anne Arundel Co. And a Gentleman Justice of the Quorum. Continued to serve for several years.

1681 - Petitioned the Commissioner of Accounts to pay him for 15 days of service to the Province. Also received at one time 375 lbs. Tobacco and at another 390 lbs.

1683 - Placed on the Commission for the advancement of trade and for the laying out of ports in AA Co. Also was on a committee with Henry Ridgely, Nicholas Gassaway, and William Richardson to erect a building for the Courts and Assembly of the Province, and for the keeping of records of the Secretary's Office.

1686 - Styled Captain of His Lordship's Army; Gentleman Justice of the Quorum.

Later rose to Colonel of His Lordship's Army.

1694 - Entered the General Assembly as a delegate from Anne Arundel Co. And served in all succeeding sessions of the Lower House until his death. [14] As Major Dorsey was on the Commission to erect the court house and the free school for Anne Arundel Towne.

1695 - [13] Made a keeper of the Great Seal of the Province.

[14]
1696 - Granted the contract for the erection of the first church of St. Anne. Ultimately fined for failure to complete by the allotted date. [Extended discussion on page 14 of Anne Arundel Gentry.]

Nov. 28, 1689, he with other prominent men endorsed a petition to the "Most Gracious Majesty King William III" setting forth the privileges which they had received under the deposed Charles, Lord Baron of Baltimore, and protested against the intrigue of John Coode who with others undermined the Proprietary Government. [Document is in the London Public Records Office.]

He was a Jacobean and a supporter of the House of Stuart.

Probably his house at Annapolis no longer exists. Although the DAR has placed a plaque on a house alleged to have been his, it was built after his death.

[15] In 1698, Major Dorsey was on the commission to settle the boundary between Baltimore and Anne Arundel Counties.

1694 - One of the first subscribers for the founding of a free school in the province. Subscribed 2000 lbs. of tobacco and was made a trustee of the system.

1704 - After the state house, built in 1696, burnt, the General Assembly held its sessions in a house rented from Col. Edward Dorsey.

1705 - Sold 3 houses on "Bloomsbury Square" to Lord Baltimore for the storing of arms and ammunition.

26 Oct. 1704 - will dated, on file in Annapolis.
Witnessed by Katherine Organ, John Huntsmen, John Dorsey, and John Ball.
27 Dec. 1705 - Probated in Baltimore County.

The inventory and appraisement of Edward Dorsey's personal estate was made by Thomas Hammond and William Talbott. The inventory was taken at the "seated plantation," and also at the Upper Plantation, Elk Ridge Quarters, the Round Bay Plantation, in the Store House and in the Little Flat House. There were books, a gold seal ring, a silver seal ring, an ivory headed can, silver tobacco box, silver hilted sword, silver plate, and surveying chain. His wearing apparel was appraised at &7/10/- lbs. There were also 13 Negro slaves and 2 white indentured servants. Samuel Dorsey, the eldest surviving son, approved the valuation of 528/8/11 lbs. It was filed at court on April 1, 1706. [Wills, Liber 3, folio 725]

By Feb. 15, 1706/07 the widow had married John Israel. Both filed accounts on that date.

An account filed by John Israel on Oct. 24, 1710 reported that 8 Negroes had been given to Col. Dorsey's children in his lifetime.

From Lee Garlock:
Col Edward DORSEY was born about 1640 in Virginia. He died after 26 Oct 1704 in Anne Arundel Co., MD. In the estate of Thomas Chandler (Inn keeper of Anne Arundel Co) 2 Dec 1675, Edward Darsey is listed in the list of debts due estate. He was married to Sarah WYATT before Nov 1670 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.

Edward Dorsey practiced law and was a Justice of Anne Arundel Co from 1679 to 1685. In 1686, he was appointed Captain in the Militia. He was promoted to Major in 1687, served as field officer of Calvert Co in 1694, and was promoted to Colonel in 1702. He was Judge of the High Court of Chancery and Keeper of the Great Seal from 1695 to 1697. He was a member of the House of Burgesses from Anne Arundel Co from 1694 to 1697 and from Baltimore Co from 1701 to 1704. (KG Lindsay, 'Grandpas, Inlaws & Outlaws')

More About Colonel Col. Edward Dorsey:
Fact 1: Ship Builder during part of his life.33,34
Fact 2: A member of Jacobite Party.35,36
Fact 3: 1681, Hockley Deed - See notes for brother John36
Fact 4: 1689, Signed petition to King Wm. III supporting Lord Baltimore.37,38
Fact 5: 28 Feb 1694/95, First Assembly of MD met in his house.39,40
Fact 6: Bet. 1699 - 1705, Census - Tax Rolls41,42

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Confusion on the part of researchers about the death date of Edward Darcy, the colonist, and whether it was he or his son, Major Edward Dorsey, in a number of transactions and records after the shipwreck in 1659, in which an "Edward Darcy" drowned. Edward Darcy was a shipwright. His son Edward may have been one as well.

From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

April 1667 - Edward Darcy, of the County of Anne Arundell, boatwright, sold to George Yate 200 acres granted to Darcy in Nov 1650 and half a warrant of four hundred acres granted to him and Capt. Norwood in Feb. 1651. In Aug 1668, Yates reassigned to Dorsey 68 acres of above tract and later in the year assigned 60 more acres called "Darsy." Edward bought 300 acres of land in 1655 from Thomas Marsh/March. His son Edward sold this tract Nov 6, 1670 to Thomas Manniage of the Cliffs.


"A question arises as to whether the Edward Darcy who signed the paper in 1667 was the Edward Darcy who bought and sold land in the 1650s. Caroline Kemper assumes that it is the same person and that a different, unrelated Edward Dorsey died in a boating accident in 1659. Other historians think that Edward Dorsey one bought and sold the property in the 1650s but that his son signed the papers in the 1670s.

"From Maryland Genealogies, "The Identity of Edward Dorsey I," by Caroline Kemper Bulkley, 1938, pp. 398-399:

"The record in the Land Office (Liber II, [Margin Liber G G] (98)) reads: '(125) Edward Dorsey assigns to George Yate 400 acres: Warrant XI November M.D.C.L. (1650); to Edward Dorsey for 200 acres of land the which he assigned away as followeth; as also 200 acres more part of a warrant for 400 acres granted John Norwood and Edward Dorsey dated xxiiij February MDCLi (1651); said Dorsey of County of Ann [sic] Arundell, Boatwright, consideration already received, all my right, title, interest, claim and demand of an--in a warrant for 200 acres of land bearing date sixteen hundred and fifty [so written out] and also to 200 acres more being the one half of a warrant for 400 acres, the one half belong to Capt. Norwood bearing date one thousand six hundred fifty one unto George Yate, etc.'"

"The date of this assignment, duly signed and sealed, is April 23, 1667, and the witness is John Howard, eldest son of the Virginia Matthew and Ann Howard. A year later (August 24, 1668) there is a deed filed from Yate to Dorsey for sixty-eight acres of the above "Dorsey" tract. In the same year one James Connoway assigned back the "right for 1000 acres" to George Yate, who transfers sixty acres to "Darsy." . . . .

"It is contended that the Edward Dorsey who signed the records of 1667-1668 may have been the son Edward. This is highly improbable, since Edward Dorsey the younger could not have had land in his own rights from warrants cited of 1650 and 1651, nor did he ever name himself as "boatwright" in the documents known to bear his signature.

"Those who deny that the record quoted was signed by Edward Dorsey, Senior, argue from the story many times repeated that he was drowned in 1659. No evidence has ever been produced to prove this: there is an authentic record of an Edward Dorsey who was drowned, but who the person was, or whether the name may be mistakenly recorded cannot be determined.

"It is clear that the signer of the 1667-1668 deeds was the father Edward Dorsey, and as further testimony that he was alive after 1659 is a document assigning land--the Bush-Manning tract-- bought by "My father Edward Dorsey from Thomas Marsh in 1661." This same land is later confirmed to Manning in a warrant and power of attorney to Sheriff Stockett from Colonel Edward Dorsey, the son, giving these facts.

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From Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, pp. 193-194:

In 1694 Governor Nicholson met in Council at the Court House in Anne Arundel Town and issued an order for the removal of the records from the city of St. Mary's to Anne Arundel Town, to be conveyed in good, strong bags, to be secured with cordage and hides, and well packed, with guards to attend them night and day, and to be delivered to the Sheriff of Anne Arundel County, at Anne Arundel Town. This removal took place in the winter of 1694-5.

The first Assembly was held in a house of Major Edward Dorsey on 28th February 1694, O. S., and in 1695, the town became Annapolis, with a resident naval officer and a public ferry across the Severn...

The foundation of the first State House was laid April 30, 1696. In June, 1697, the building was so well advanced as to be set apart for public use... Struck by lightning in 1699 and entirely consumed by fire in 1704, the first State House had but a brief existence. This gav e Governor Seymour occasion to say, "I never saw any public building left solely to Providence but in Maryland."

Major Dorsey's house was again rented for the Assembly Hall until a new State House could be built...

A Commission, consisting of Major John Hammond, Major Edward Dorsey, Mr. John Bennett, Hon. John Dorsey, Mr. Andrew Norwood, Captain Philip Howard, Mr. James Saunders and Colonel Nicholas Greenberry laid out the town. Four of these were property holders on the North Severn side and four were residents of Middle Nick. They were authorized to buy, or condemn, all that parcel of land within the present Grave Yard Creek and Spa Creek, to be fenced in and called the Town Common, or Pasture; Governor Nicholson's lot was within this enclosure, which ran along East Street to State House Circle...

A picture is extant of a house, No. 83 Prince George Street, Anapolis, which tradition decides is a part of the house owned by Major Edward Dorsey, which became the first Governor's mansion, being later occupied by Governor Nicholson. The house is well preserved and is of solid architecture [as of 1905]....

In 1696 the Assembly of Annapolis appointed His Excellency, Sir Francis Nicholson, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Hon. Nicholas Greenberry, Hon. Thomas Tench, Major Hammond, Major Edward Dorsey, Mr. James Saunders and Captain Richard Hill a Commission "for keeping good rules and orders," making them a body corporate for the new capital. Mr. Richard Beard, surveyor, made a map of the place...

"That part of the land which lye on ye creeke by Major Dorsey's house, whereby His Excellency at present lives, to be sett aside for public buildings, and if in case the same happen to come within any of ye said Major's lotts--we proposed that land be given him elsewhere for it."

A forty-foot water front for warehouses was reserved, and a committee was appointed to consider the erection of a church. Major Edward Dorsey, of that committee, reported a fund already in "banck" amounting to £458. The carpenter's estimate was £250; brick maker, £90; bricklayer, having all stuff upon the place, £220. The entire charge would amount to £1,200. The Assembly imposed a three-pence tax on tobacco to be continued until May 12, 1698, to be appied to building a church at Annapolis...

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From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

i. Col. Edward DORSEY was born about 1662 in State of Virginia.20 He served in the military in 1686 in Anne Arundel Co, MD. He was Captain of the Militia of AA County. He was Major Dorsey in 1687. He was recommissioned major on September 4, 1689 and again October 9, 1694. He held office Member of the House of Burgesses representing Anne Arundel County, MD in 1694 in Anne Arundel Co, MD.28,29 "Major Edward Dorsey, by act of the Assembly in 1694, was appointed one of the first commissioners for the 'Town Land at Proctor,' now Annapolis." "It was at the house of Major Edward Dorsey that the first Assembly of Maryland held in the new capital of the Province met on February 28, 1695. The major was an avowed supporter of Charles, Third Lord Baltimore. In 1689 he signed a petition to King William III endorsed by many prominent men of Maryland, 'setting forth the privileges which they had received under the deposed Lord Baltimore and protested against the intrigue of John Coode who, with others, undermined the Proprietary Government.' He was a member of the Jacobite Party, and other accused Jacobites were Colonel Henry Darnall, a Roman Catholic, Samuel Chew II, a Quaker, and Mareen Duval, a Protestant." (Anne Arundel Gentry) He died in 1705 in State of Maryland.20 At the time of his death he was residing on "Major's Choice" (now in Howard County). His will is recorded both at Annapolis and at Baltimore. It mentions various tracts of land; Hockley on the Patapsco Falls, land on the north side of the Patapsco River, Barnes Folly, Major's Choice, Long Reach at Elkridge, and two other sections by the same name. There were also slaves and personal estate mentioned. His executrix was "My beloved wife, Margaret"... of whom he left five minor children, Charles, Larkin, Francis, Edward and Ann, also mentioned in his will. He held office Justice of Anne Arundel County, Maryland 1679 to 1685. He held office Member of House of Burgesses representing Howard County, Maryland 1679 to 1705. He held office Keeper of the Great Seal of the Province of Maryland 1681 and 1696. He held office Judge of the High Court of Chancery 1694 to 1698 in Anne Arundel Co, MD. He Migrated to Maryland.20 Major Edward Dorsey came up with his wife and family from Virginia to Maryland. Edward Dorsey was a man with many irons in the fire; he was a planter, boatwright, builder, lawyer and was much involved in the governmental affairs of the colony. He was a member of a committee commissioned to lay out town lots and a common and to build the court house and free school in Annapolis in 1694. Edward contributed 2,000 pounds of tobacco for the founding of the free-school in Annapolis. The school, then called "King William's School" was later to be known as St. John's College, one of the three oldest colleges in America. According to the records of the Archives of Maryland, Edward Dorsey represented Anne Arundel County rom 1694-1697 at the House of Burgesses, first legislative body for America convened at Jamestown in 1691. The first session of the Legislature in Annapolis was held in the home of Major Edward Dorsey, beginning February 28, 1694/95. From 1701-1705 he represented Baltimore County. He was a delegate to the Maryland Assembly from 1696 to 1704. He was active in military affairs rising through the ranks. In 1686 he was Captain of the Militia, a major in 1687, field officer in 1694, and colonel in 1702. (Maryland Archives Volumes, 5, 13-15, 19-20, 24, 26). He had large land holdings in both Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, some of which he had inherited from his father, including "Hockley-in-the-Hole" and "Major's Choice." These two parcels were handed down through many generations in the Dorsey line. He also owned "Major's Fancy," "Long Reach," "United Friendship," and "Owen's Adventure." In addition he held several parcels of land in and around the Port of Annapolis. His home in Annapolis was built of brick and materials from England. In its day this house was considered large and spacious, rising to two levels. Fine English gardens sloped down in the back to Prince George's Creek. It stands today on Prince George Street. The family lived prior to the building of the Annapolis home on the plantation at Elk Ridge in Baltimore County, located midway between Baltimore and Annapolis on a deep-water inlet at the mouth of the Patspsco River. Edward was a vestryman at St. Anne's Parish. He was a subscriber to and treasurer of the fund for building St. Anne's Church and was given authority to conduct arrangements for the building of the church but resigned due to inability to find workmen. In politics Edward Dorsey was a supporter of the Stuart Kings and the Jacobean Party. Once William of Orange dethroned the Stuart King, Dorsey was recommended in a letter written by Michajoh Perry to John Povey in London 17 Oct 1691. It says that Perry had met "a gentleman, one M. John Hammond, who presented him a list of Gentlemen in Maryland; good, honest, substantial Protestants, who are well affected." The list recommended "to be of their Majesty's Council...Major Edward Dorsey and Thomas Lawrence." (Maryland Archives Liber 8, folio 283-285). Edward was a Protestant but held in great esteem the Government that respected religious liberty. He was one of the signers of the Protestant Address from Baltimore County to King William III, an appeal on behalf of Charles, Lord Baron of Baltimore, the proprietary government having been siezed from the Calvert family through the influence of Capt. John Coode.
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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

"Although Edward was raised a Quaker, he was listed as "Protestant" as an adult. He was a planter, merchant, and contractor. After Edward sold his share of "Hockley-in-the-Hole" to his brother John, Edward probably built a large home on Prince George's Street in Annapolis; there is confusion over whether it became the home of Gov. Sir Francis NICKOLSON, where the Assembly met for a while. Edward was a judge in the Chancery court. His strong support of Lord Baltimore brought his dismissal from the bench and from the militia after 1689. He went to England to testify against the Protestant Associators in 1690. Two years later he was accused of being a Jacobite. He was quite active politically; referred to first as Col., more usually as Major. Edward was involved in contesting the will of Nicholas WYATT, father of his first wife, Sarah, in 1673. Edward was one of the original trustees for King William's School in Annapolis, founded in 1696. His estate inventory was valued at £721.9.8 sterling, and included 13 enslaved people and 2 servants.[16]"



Death Notes: Child - Honorable Capt. John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole"

1714/15.


Research Notes: Child - Honorable Capt. John Dorsey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole"

Youngest son of Edward, the colonist. Patented "Hockley-in-the-Hole" on the south side of the Severn with his brothers Edward and Joshua in 1664. Acquired "Troy" around 1699.
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From Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol. 2, pp. 87-91:

"Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, Joshua and John, the original patent bearing date August 20, 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681 'Edward Dorsey, Gent. of Ann Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of said County deceased' assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province.

"[Major Edward Dorsey's] house on Prince George's Street, Annapolis, was probably built when he disposed of his interest in Hockley to his youngest brother the 'Honorable John Dorsey.'

"... the Honorable John Dorsey, captain of the Baltimore County militia in later years, took possession of Hockley, three miles from Annapolis, over which his wife, Madam Pleasance Ely, presided, of whom it has been noted--perhaps as a warning to her descendants, that her name was in no sense suggestive of her disposition."
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From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels [sic] up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th [20th], 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now in the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

Ibid., p. 30:
"In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

Ibid., pp. 61-62:

"HON. JOHN DORSEY, OF 'HOCKLEY.'

"Coming into possession of 'Hockley,' in 1683, Hon. John Dorsey married Plesance Ely, who later took up a tract of land on Elk Ridge, which she named 'The Isle of Ely.' In 1694, Hon. John Dorsey, was a commissioner for the development of Annapolis. He was upon many important committees during his service in the Lower House of the Assembly. In 1711, he was advanced to the Upper House, and there remained until his death in 1714. During his life-time he was a surveyor of a vast estate of valuable lands. He left an exceedingly intelligent will of entail, which gives a summary of his large estate. It reads: 'My wife, Plesance, is to have one-third of my estate, and also the choice of my estate on South River, or my now dwelling place on Elk Ridge [Troy]. To my grandson, John Dorsey, son of my son, Edward Dorsey, deceased, my Patuxent plantation and lands thereunto adjoining called 'Dorsey's Search,' lying in Baltimore County. If no issue, to go to the three youngest grandchildren of my daughter, Deborah

'I give to my grandson, Edward Dorsey, son of my son, Edward Dorsey, de ceased, "Dorsey's Adventure" and "Whitaker's Purchase" adjoining it. If he leave no issue, then to John, of Edward, and if he leave none, then as above, to Deborah's youngest three children. To my grandsons, Charles and William Ridgely, of Deborah, my tract called "White Wine and Claret," south side of the middle branch of the Patuxent. If they leave no issue, to go to Martha, Elinor and Edward Clagett.

'I give to my two grandsons, Samuel and Richard, of Caleb, my son, my plantation on South River, called "South River Quarter," it being the remainder of a tract given to my son, Caleb. In case of no issue, the same to go to granddaughters, Achsah and Sophia of Caleb.

'To grandson, Basil, of Caleb, my plantation on Elk Ridge, called "Troy." If no issue, to my grandsons, John and Caleb, of Caleb. My son, Caleb, to be my administrator.--JOHN DORSEY. (Seal.'

"Mrs. Plesance Dorsey became Mrs Robert Wainwright. Her tract, 'The Isle of Ely,' was sold by her grandson, 'Patuxent John Dorsey,' to Basil Dorsey, of Caleb, whose homestead, 'Troy Hill,' was the former residence of Hon. John Dorsey."

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From http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html:

Notes for Captain John Dorsey:
[Ancestors of Abednego Baker by Muriel Schulz.ged]

From Anne Arundel Gentry, p. 10:
Edward Dorsey II before 1683 assigned to his brother, John, his portion of 400 acres for 24,000 lbs. Tobacco. Joshua, the second son, had conveyed his portion of "Hockley" for 8,000 lbs. Tobacco. In 1685 Caleb Dorsey, son of John, had the plantation resurveyed and found that it contained 843 acres instead of the original 400.

[Page 10]: 1681 - Deed from Edward Dorsey II, to John Dorsey:
Edward Dorsey of the County of Anne Arundel Gent son and heir of Edward Dorsey late of the County of Anne Arundel . . . deceased. . . whereas the Rt. Honorable Cecillius Lord Baron of Baltimore by his pattent bearing date the twentieth day of August one thousand six hundred and sixty four for ye Consideration therein mentioned Grant unto the said Edward Dorsey, Joshua Dorsey and John Dorsey my brothers a parcell of land Called Hockley in ye Hole lying in Anne Arundel County aforesaid on ye South side Seaverne River in ye Woods beginning at a marke Oake being a bound tree of the land of Cornelius and Samuell Howard . . . . the said four hundred Acres of land unto the said Edward Dorsey, John Dorsey and Joshua Dorsey . . . . Now know ye that I the said Edward Dorsey for & in consideration of Twenty four Thousand pounds of good sound merchantable leafe tobacco to me in hand paid by my said Brother John Dorsey the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge and thereof of every part & parcell thereof do acquitt and discharge the said John Dorsey . . . . . and quit claim unto my said brother John Dorsey now in possession of the said four hundred Acres of land . . . . by virtue of ye aforesaid pattent or grant of ye sa Lord Baltemore to me the said Edward Josua and John Dorsey in Joynt tenancy as aforesaid or by virtue of any with Same or demand that may or might demand or accrue from my said father Edward Dorsey deceased . . . . Sixth day of December in ye Yeare of our Lord One thousand Six hundred Eighty one."

The indenture was witnessed by Richard Hill and Nicholas Greenbury. Ref. A.A. Co. Deeds, Liber IH:, No. 3, folio 62-63, Hall of Records, Annapolis.


The inventory of his personal estate was taken on April 25, 1715 and filed by his son and executor, Caleb Dorsey. At the home-plantation there were 11 slaves and in "ye new Roome" were books and a pair of spectacles. His quarters at Elk Ridge had five slaves, the Patuxent Quarters four slaves, but none was listed at the South River Quarters. The entire estate was appraised at 1440/3/9 with credit due from merchants in London. Richard Clagett and John Dorsey approved as the next of kin.

He apparently had a state funeral and certainly one in which the mourners and friends enjoyed traditional Maryland hospitality. At an account filed on April 11, 1716, 10 gallons of rum and 30 gallons of cider were consumed as well as cakes costing 2 lbs. The Rev. Williams Tebbs who preached the funeral sermon was given 2 lbs. At that time the widow was allotted her third, that is 321/8/3 plus 4/154 lbs. tobacco.

------------

From http://www.eskimo.com/~bgudgel/gudgarc1 :

Sometime around 1658 Edward Dorsey took up a tract of land containing 400 acres, lying in Anne Arundel County on the south side of the Severn River and or a branch of Broad Creek. This tract was later patented by his three sons. See Patents 7, f.378. In the year 1664 there was granted to Edward, Joshua and John Dorsey, 2,000 acres of land lying on the Severn River, not far from where the city of Annapolis now stands. A part of this, called "Hockley-in-ye-Hole" (hole meaning valley) which remained interminably in the hands of the descendants of John Dorsey to the present time. In 1681, Major Edward Dorsey transferred his interest in Hockley-in-the-Hole to his brother John. The transfer reads: "To all Christian People To Whom This Writing Shall Come, be Heard or Seen: I, Edward Dorsey, of the county of Anne Arundel, son and heir of the late Edward Dorsey, gentleman, deceased, for the consideration of 24,000 pounds of good merchantable tobacco, transfer my right in a tract of land called "Hockley-in-the- Hole" granted to Edward, Joshua and John Dorsey in 1664 to my brother, John Dorsey; and I further covenant to guarantee his right to said land against any demand that may descend from my said Father, Edward Dorsey, for or by reason of any right due to him in his lifetime or by reason of any survey by him made, or warrant returned, or for any other reason or any other matter." "Hockley" in the valley had pleasant environments. To the east, toward Annapolis, was the Carroll estates; to the north was the home of Gen. John Hammond; to the northwest were the lands of Cornelius, Samuel and John Howard; to the southwest was "Todd's Gap" through which the road to Lancelot Todd's led, and to the south the ancient Dorsey "God's Acre" which has since been abandoned for the family burial spot within the charming gardens of "Hockley" itself.

----

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mrmarsha&id=I36906:

Dorsey, John, Honorable,Balto. Co.,26th Nov., 1714; 22nd Mch., 1714-15.
To wife Pleasance, 1/3 of estate, real and personal, she to make choice of plantation -- , on South R., or dwelling plantation -- , on Elk Ridge.
To grandson John, son of son Edward, deceased, and his hrs., the Patuxent plantation "Dorsey's Search," in Balto. Co.; he dying without issue, to pass to grandson Edward, son of son Edward, and he dying without issue, to 3 young. child., -- , of dau. Deborah Clegat.
To grandson Edward afsd., and hrs., plantation "Dorsey's Adventure" on Elk Ridge, Balto. County, also "Whiteaker's Purchase," bought of James Barley; He dying without issue, sd. land to pass to grandson John afsd. and hrs., and then to child. of dau. Deborah as afsd.
To grandsons Charles and Wm. Ridgley, sons of dau. Deborah, equally, and their hrs., "White Wine and Claret," on s. side Patuxent R., in Balto Co.; they dying without issue, sd. tract to pass to Martha, Elinor and Edward Clegatt, child. of dau. Deborah, and hrs.
To grandsons Sam'll and Rich'd Dorsey, sons of son Caleb, and hrs., plantation "South River Quarter," being residue of a tract given by deed of gift to son Caleb. Sd. land to be in possession of wife during life as afsd. should she so select; and should grandsons afsd. die without issue, to pass to granddaus. Acksah and Sophia and their hrs.
To grandson Bazill and hrs., son of son Caleb, plantation "Troy," in Balto. Co.; he dying without issue, to pass to grandsons Jno. and Caleb Dorsey, sons of son Caleb afsd.
To grandson John, son of Edward, deceased, personalty, to be held by his mother, -- , until he is 21 yrs. of age; and to grandchild. Charles, Ridgely, 2nd son of dau. Deborah, and other grandchild. afsd., personalty. Boys to receive their estate at 21 yrs.
To dau. Deborah Clegatt, personalty.
Son Caleb, ex. and residuary legatee of estate.
Test: Joseph Howard, Thos. Higgens, Sam'll Dorsey, Thos. Rogers, Jno. Beale, Vachel Denton. 14. 26.

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From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/dorsey.html:

John Dorsey2, was born ca. 1645 in Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, the son of Edward and his wife Ann, and died in 1715 in Maryland. He emigrated with his family in 1649 to Anne Arundel County, Maryland. John married in 1684 Pleasance ELY . One source identifies her as the step-daughter of Thomas WAINWRIGHT (d. 1729), while another states Thomas was her second husband. John is usually referred to in the records as "Hon." or Captain, a rank he held from 1695 until his death in 1714/5. Although raised as a Friend, he was later identified as Protestant, meaning neither Quaker or Anglican.[19]

"In 1663 John was living with his brothers at "Hockley in the Hole", Anne Arundel County, because it was surveyed for them on 27 January that year. This 400 acre plot had been taken up by their father sometime before 1658, on the south side of the Severn "and or a branch of Broad Creek". In 1681 John bought out his brothers' rights to it. He paid Edward 24,000 pounds of tobacco for it and additional land Edward had bought, and paid 8,000 pounds to Joshua. When it was resurveyed in 1683 (or 1685) it was found to contain 842 (or 843) acres (or resurveyed in 1685 and contained 1,842 acres).[20] The secondary accounts of the original records are a little hard to interpret in large part because they don't always differentiate among the multiplicity of bureaucratic steps necessary to secure title to a tract of land. The original patent was in the possession of a descendent, Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, who was still living in the old homestead in 1913. A photo of that date shows a relatively small house with two dormers on the roof, one chimney at the left end of the photo, and a narrow porch with a roof two storeys high suported on thin columns. The house was nearly obscured with shrubbery.[21] When we went to find it in April 2004, there was a white historical marker on the road, but the two houses that might conceivably have been a remnant of the old homestead both looked twentieth century, to me.

"John purchased significant amounts of land during his life. A list of them, by their names, includes:[22]

"Howard's Heirship" (150 acres) purchased from Cornelius and Elizabeth HOWARD on 4 August 1679; they were the brother and sister-in-law of our John Howard ;
"Hockley in the Hole", purchased Edward's and Joshua's rights in 1681; resurveyed in 1683 and found to contain 842 acres (see above);
"Orphan's Addition", near "Hockley in the Hole", on 10 March 1697, which he gave to his son Caleb on 6 August 1702;
"Dorsey's Adventure" (400 acres on Elk Ridge between the Patuxent and Patapsco) on 30 Feb [sic: perhaps April?] 1688; this tract with the next one were called "Patuxent Plantation", and were bequeathed to John's grandson, John Dorsey;
"Dorsey's Search" (479 acres) purchased on 6 December 1694 from James BAYLEY;
"Troy" (763 acres) on 12 October 1694;
"White Wine and Claret" (1,400 acres) on 6 January 1702;
"Whitaker's Purchase" (79 acres) in 1704;
"Roper's Increase" (100 acres) obtained on 14 February 1705 from Cornelius and Mary HOWARD;
"Mt. Gilboa" (245 acres) in 1706, which he conveyed the next year to Richard COLEGATE.

"On 12 June 1688 John and his brother Edward acquired land in what was then Baltimore County (now Howard County). Edward settled on his "Major's Choice", but John did not build on his "Dorsey's Adventure". Instead John commissioned surveyors to "go beyond Richard Warfield" in upper Anne Arundel County. There on 10 November 1695 he patented "Troy", 736 acres, between the present towns of Elkridge and Guilford, where he built his home. He also patented "Isle of Ely", named for his wife's family, and "Dorsey's Search". Another source says that Pleasance herself took up the tract after John's death, which she named "The Isle of Ely". The tax return of 1695 recorded, "John Dawsey's Quarter, on Elke Ridge, etc.", so John had a house there by that year. This makes "Troy" the oldest remaining house in Howard County, although it has been greatly altered. Originally "Troy" was a one-storey house with a front porch devoid of any ornamentation other than a simple ballustrade. Other floors were added later. The interior and exterior walls were about two feet thick. The old family burial ground was on one side of the house. The front porch now overlooks Meadowridge Cemetery (once part of the Dorsey estate) and route I-95. The entrance is from route 1 north of Dorsey Road.[23]

"John, like his brothers, probably opposed the Revolution of 1689. He gained his first appointed office from Governor Francis NICHOLSON who was sympathetic to the proprietor. From then on John had an active public career. He was appointed Justice of the Peace in Anne Arundel County in 1694 and 1696. In 1694 he was appointed to a commission charged with laying out the town and port of Anne Arundel in the County of the same name. On 17 May 1695 he petitioned the Assembly for a boat to carry the Burgesses of Anne Arundel County to St. Mary's. He was Captain in the Baltimore County militia in 1696. John served on a commission to oversee and direct construction of a Provincial prison in Annapolis. He was named to another commission to report on repairs to a house (purchased from his cousin Major Edward Dorsey) for the storage of public arms.[24]

"In 1692, after the consolidation of the reign of William and Mary in England, a new government was elected in Maryland that was very unsympathetic to Friends. They required an oath of allegiance in order to sit in the Assembly, and four Friends were immediately dismissed. The lower house tried to substitute an affirmation, but Governor Lionel COPLEY insisted on conforming to English practice. That year the Church of England was established, with a compulsary poll tax of forty pounds of tobacco. There were renewed efforts to force Friends to serve in the militia. The following year Friends were not permitted to give evidence in court unless they gave an oath. John Dorsey served as a member of the lower House of Assembly in 1692-93, and again in 1701-04 when a modified bill, rewritten by the Privy Council to meet some of the objections of Friends, was passed. It retained the 40 lb. tax to support the established church, and Friends continued up until the Revolution to suffer distraint of goods for refusing to pay it. In 1704 a bill was passed stipulating again that all office-holders must swear an oath.[25] I do not know how John felt about these attacks on his family's faith.

"John sat in the Lower House for Anne Arundel County in 1692-93 and 1701-04. He was appointed to the Provincial Council where he served from 1710/1 to 1714/5. On 18 January 1714 he described himself as "being lame and indisposed" and asked to be excused from the Council meeting. The following year the Council was said to consist of twelve "of the most able and discreet gentlemen" of the Province, including "John Dorsey, Esq., lately deceased."[26]

"John was a planter and merchant, somewhat more prosperous and less controversial than his older brother Edward. At the time of his first election, in 1692, John owned 1,242 acres. By 1696 he owned 2,484. In 1699 he was listed among the taxables on the South side of Patapsco, owning five slaves. Shortly thereafter he moved his family to "Troy", 763 acres at Elk Ridge, Baltimore County, which had been surveyed 12 October 1694. He took up 1,400 acres called "White Wine and Claret" between the present towns of Simpsonville and Clarksville in Howard County on 6 January 1702. The story goes that he sent out the surveyors with an ample supply of those liquid refreshments; when they returned with crooked lines, John figured that was the cause, and kept the name. The tax lists for Baltimore County sometimes indicate the number of slaves he owned at various plantations. In 1699 he had five on South Side Patapsco; in 1702 four, and in 1703 ten at Elk Ridge.[27]

"A few Friends were exercised about the institution of slavery, citing Jesus' injunction to do unto others as you would have them do unto you. But nothing was done at this time to rid the Society of Friends of this blemish. A few Friends were also exercised about the excessive use of tobacco. Hardshaw Monthly Meeting in Lancashire, Old England, minuted this advice 14 Fourth Month [June] 1691:

'It being considered that the too frequent use of smoking Tobacco is inconsistent with friends holy profession, it is desired that such as have occasion to make use thereof take it privately, neither too publicly in their own houses, nor by the highways, streets, or in alehouses or elsewhere, tending to the abetting the common excess.[27a]'

"Most Maryland Friends were oblivious of these movements that would impact so heavily on their economic and social well being.

"John signed his will in Baltimore County on 26 November 1714; it was witnessed by six men, one of whom signed with a mark. It was probated 22 March 1714/5. He left one third of his real and personal estate, after the payment of his debts, to his wife Pleasance as full payment of her dower. She was to be given her choice of either the plantation on South River or "my own dwelling plantation" on Elk Ridge. Her share of the estate included four human beings: Jacob and his wife Jenny, and two other Negro men, Lyman and Sambo. John's extensive real estate holdings and the remaining slaves were carefully apportioned to his grandchildren, with instructions for their further disposal if a given grandchild died with no heirs. His daughter Deborah was to be given £50, doled out at the rate of £8 per year "for her support", but no real estate. Her children were the third back-up to inherit if other grandchildren died without heirs. The residue went to his son Caleb, who was named executor. Nathaniell and Thomasin STINCHCOMB owed money to him.[28]

"An inventory of John's property was taken on 25 April 1715 by Thomas HAMMOND and John ISRAEL. The only values given in the Dorsey Family's copy were for the seventeen enslaved people. An odd assortment of items were listed "At the Home Plantation", "In the New Room", and "in the Kitchen". They included one silver tankard and one silver spoon; a dozen old leather chairs, six new leather chairs, and 4 "Turkey workt" chairs; an old sealskin trunk; a gun and 1/4 lb. of gunpowder; a small looking glass; one feather bed with canvas tick[ing], rug blanket, sheets, bedstead, and pillows; another feather bed and furniture, curtains and "vallens" [valence]; one pair Taylors Shears; a pair of money scales and weights; one parcel of new books; a pair of spectacles and case; 8 small brushes, 3 old combs, 3 pair sissors; 1 parcel of spice. There were lots of shoes, indicating the kind of merchandize with which John dealt: 2 dozen and 10 pair men's shoes, 3 pair women's shoes, 21 pair men's shoes. To go with them, 13 pair "large wove" stockings, 1 pair motheaten stockings, 20 pair of 4-thread hose, 5 pair women's thread stockings, 8 pair men's worsted hose, 1 pair large wove stockings. Then there was thread: 6.5 lbs. colored, 3 lbs. "Whited brown, coarse", 2 lbs. finer, 1 lb. brown, 1.5 lb. White and Brown, .5 lb. fine white, and about 1 lb. silk. John also had 6 gross Coat buttons and 6.5 gross Vest buttons, and about 5 gross fine thread [buttons?]. The only food mentioned was 1,692 lbs. of bacon. Negroes were listed "in the Kitchen": 2-year-old girl Beck; 6-year-old boy Sambo; 4-year-old boy Roger; 10-year-old girl Sarah, "much hurt by fire"; a "dropsical man" Jack; men named Jack and Tom, and one without a name; a woman, Beck, and young (unnamed) girl with child. The total value of these ten people was a mere £163 and 10d. At the Elk Ridge House there was ten lbs. of old pewter, a punch bowl, and more enslaved people: men named Simon, Sambo, Jack, and Toby; a woman named Jenny, a one-year old girl named Hagar and another girl (age not listed) named Juno. They were valued at £157. Other, unspecified items were at "Pattuxant Quarter", at South River, and at the "New Design". He probably owned about 5,000 acres; his estate was valued at £2,752.11.1.[29]

"Pleasance, "of austere memory" was described in family records: "between her name and her disposition there was no similarity." She married a second time, on 30 November 1722, Thomas WAINWRIGHT. With this marriage, "Troy" passed to her grandson Basil Dorsey, son of Caleb. Thomas died in 1729, leaving Pleasance the greater part of his estate. Pleasance apparently used her wealth to invest in land. A warrant was made out for her 17 December 1717 for 200 acres called "Isle of Ely" adjacent to "Troy". That year she also bought 100 acre "Oldman's Folly". In 1720 she bought 200 acre "Roper's Increase" (perhaps part of the original of which her husband had bought 79 acres in 1705), 50 acre "Howard's Addition", and 120 acre "Poplar Spring Garden" in Baltimore County at the head of the Patapsco River, adjacent to "Howard's Ridge".[30]

"Pleasance died in 1734. Her estate was appraised 14 August 1734, by Benjamin HOWARD and John HAMMOND, son of Charles. Her possessions included some items that had been in her first husband's inventory. Pleasance had wearing apparel, a silver tankard and cups, a silver spoon, thimble, and buckles, 3 silk handkerchiefs, taylor's shears, 2 small punch bowls, 4 ivory handled knives and forks, a pepper box, 1 caster, 1 tin baster, 1 flesh fork, 1 cutting knife and 1 pen knife, 2 chests, a pair of spectacles, 2 "Turkey-workt" chairs, 6 old books (unspecified), furniture and kitchen utensils, stock and feed, one old Negro man named Tom, one old Negro woman named Beck, and one Negro lad named George.[31]



Research Notes: Child - Joshua Dorsey of "Hockley"

Patented "Hockley-in-the-Hole" on the south side of the Severn with his brothers John and Edward.

From The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland, p. 56:

"The following record is taken from 'Our Early Settlers.'--A list of our early arrivels up to 1680.

"'Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661.'

"The same record adds, 'Aug. 25th, 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres.'

"In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed being old rents remaining new, whole now i the possession of Caleb Dorsey.

"Such is the record of 'Hockley' upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis."

Ibid., p. 30:
"South-side Severn settlements were increased in 1662. Matthew Howard, who had come up from Lower Norfolk, Virginia, in 1650, with his neighbor and relative, Edward Lloyd, had died before 1659, but his five sons now came. They were Captain Cornelius Howard, of 'Howard's Heirship and Chance'; Samuel Howard, of 'Howard's Hope'; John Howard, of 'Howard's Interest'' all adjoining near Round Bay. Philip and Matthew were on North Severn. In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650--relatives of the Howards--took up and patented their father's survey of 'Hockley-in-the-Hole.' They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements and representatives in legislative measures."

------
From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41179:

(1a) 1681, 6 Dec: Edward DORSY, "Son and heir of Edward DORSY late of the County of Ann Arundell" sold the parcel Hockley in the Hole granted to "the said Edward DORSY, Joshua DORSY and John DORSEY my brothers" on 20 Aug. 1664. (2) 1681: Edward DORSEY of Anne Arundel Co., son and heir of the late Edward DORSEY, gentleman, deceased, transfered to my brother John DORSEY, for 24,000 pounds of tobacco, my right in a tract of land called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," granted to Edward, Joshua, and John DORSEY in 1664. Joshua DORSEY deeded to his brother John DORSEY, for 8,000 pounds of tobacco, his right in the same tract.
(2) He located upon "Taunton," a tract taken up by Lawrence RICHARDSON and left by him to his sons, one of whom, Lawrence Jr., conveyed his interest to Joshua DORSEY.
(1b) 1687, 20 Feb: (2) 1687/8: (1b,2) Joshua DORSEY made his will. (1b) Made bequests to his "cousins" John, Samuel and Matthew HOWARD. (1) Though not stated, these were children of Matthew HOWARD, Jr. [who married Joshua's sister Sarah DORSEY]. (2) Granted one third of his estate to his widow, Sarah DORSEY, and made his brothers Edward and John DORSEY guardians for the education of his son John DORSEY, to whom he left his estate. Gave to loving cousin John HOWARD a grey gelding; to cousin Samuel HOWARD, two hogsheads of tobacco. Gave to cousin Sarah DORSEY 20 shillings to buy her a ring.
(1c) 1688, 3 May: John ACTON made his will. Sarah DORSEY called widow and relict of Joshua DORSEY.



Research Notes: Child - Ann Dorsey [uncertain]

From http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adgedge&id=I41174:

(1) Some researchers have attributed a daughter to Edward DORSEY a daughter Ann who married Nicholas GREENBERRY. There is no evidence that Edward DORSEY had a daughter named Ann. While Nicholas GREENBERRY's wife was named Ann, she could not have been a daughter of Edward DORSEY. Nicholas GREENBERRY did not emigrate from England to Maryland until 1674, at which time he arrived with his wife and two children. (Maryland Patent Liber 18 (Vol. 21):160 FHL microfilm 0,013,071.) Land was claimed in 1674 for Nicholas GREENBERRY, wife, and two children (not named) who were on the ship "Constant Friendship." His wife could not have been the daughter of Edward DORSEY, who had been living in the colonies for over 25 years.


Research Notes: Child - Sarah Dorsey

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdannear/firstfam/dorsey/d4320.htm#P4320:

From Side-Lights on Maryland History with Sketches of Early Maryland Families by Hester Dorsey Richard, Baltimore, Maryland, 1918, vol. 2, p. 91:

"Sarah Dorsey, the only sister of the three brothers of Hockley, married Matthew Howard, one of the original five Howards who came to Maryland in 1650, the same year in which Edward Darcy patented his first land. The sons and daughters of all the early Dorseys married the representatives of Colonial worthies of prominence and influence until it is almost impossible to name an early notable from whom the later generations do not descend, or a persn of eminence in Maryland and many out of the State who do not with pride claim their Dorsey forbears."


John Ewen and Ann




Husband John Ewen (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - John Ewen

Possibly the father of Major Richard Ewen.


Research Notes: Wife - Ann

Some sources have "Ann" as the mother of Major Richard Ewen


Sir Galfridus le Despencer and Ann




Husband Sir Galfridus le Despencer 37

            AKA: Geoffrey le Despencer
           Born: 1155 - Stanley, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1251 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Thurston le Despencer (1122-      ) 37
         Mother: Lucia Despencer (Abt 1125-      ) 38


       Marriage: 1177 - Lincolnshire, England



Wife Ann

           Born: 1157 - Stanley, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children


Rowland Thornborough and Ann?




Husband Rowland Thornborough

           Born: Abt 1662 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann?

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Ann Thornborough

            AKA: Ann Thornborough Stevenson, Ann Wells
           Born: 1690 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1773 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
         Buried: 
         Spouse: James Wells [Jr.] (1685-1771)
           Marr: 1708 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States



Research Notes: Husband - Rowland Thornborough

FamilySearch.org AFN: 1J9L-4JJ


Death Notes: Child - Ann Thornborough

Other sources have her death year as 1762.


Research Notes: Child - Ann Thornborough

FamilySearch.org AFN: 9ZKN-6T

From the book Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774 by Henry C. Peden, Jr., Westminster, Maryland, 1989, pp. 50-54:

"A LIST OF TAXABLES IN BACK RIVER UPPER HUNDRED IN 1773 TAKEN BY WILLIAM HUTSON

"... Cockey, John... Cockey, William... Cockey, Edward, Joshua Cockey; Negroes: Easter, Juday... Cockey, Thomas Sr.; Thomas Cockey;... Owings, Richard (of Stephen); Negro Jim... Owings, John Cockey;...Ridgley, Charles;... Ridgley, Charles, Captain at Northamton Qtr.;... Ridgley, Charles, Captain, and Company at the Northamton Fce.; Henry Howard; Benjamin Deaver; Caleb Warfield... Talbott, Edward; John Talbott; Benjamin Talbott; John Whethers; 4 negroes... Wells, Ann (widow); John Thomas Walker, Thomas; Negro Hannah...


Ibid., pp. 50-54:

"A LIST OF TAXABLES IN BACK RIVER UPPER HUNDRED IN 1773 TAKEN BY WILLIAM HUTSON"

[Among households and garrisons(?) listed are:]

Wells, Ann (widow); John Thomas





Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni and Anna of Arimathea




Husband Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni 39 40

            AKA: Tenefan King of Britain, Teneufan King of the Batuvellauni, Tenuantius King of Britain, Trahayant King of the Catuvellauni
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0009
         Buried: 


         Father: Private 41 42
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Acceded: 1st Chief of the Catuvellauni.




Wife Anna of Arimathea 43

           Born:  - Arimathea, Palestine
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes (      -      ) 44


Children
1 M Cunobelinus King of Britain 39 45

            AKA: Cunobelin King of Britain, Cymbeline, Cynfelyn, Kymbelinus
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 0040
         Buried: 



2 M Epaticcus 46

            AKA: Epaticus
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0035
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni

Numismatic evidence.

Became King of the Catuvellauni around 20 B.C., ruling from Verulamium (St. Albans)

From Wikipedia - Tasciovanus :

Tasciovanus was a historical king of the Catuvellauni tribe before the Roman conquest of Britain .

History
Tasciovanus is known only through numismatic evidence. He appears to have become king of the Catuvellauni ca. 20 BC, ruling from Verlamion (the site of modern-day St Albans ). He is believed to have moved the tribal capital to that site from an earlier settlement, near modern-day Wheathampstead .[citation needed ] For a brief period ca. 15-10 BC he issued coins from Camulodunum (Colchester), apparently supplanting Addedomarus of the Trinovantes . After this he once again issued his coins from Verulamium, now bearing the title Ricon, Brythonic for "great/divine king". Some of his coins bear other abbrieviated names such as "DIAS", "SEGO" and "ANDOCO": these are generally considered to be the names of co-rulers or subordinate kings, but may instead be mint-marks. He died ca. AD 9, succeeded by his son Cunobelinus , who ruled primarily from Camulodunum. Another son, Epaticcus , expanded his territory westwards into the lands of the Atrebates .[1]

Medieval traditions
A genealogy preserved in the medieval Welsh manuscript Harleian 3859 contains three generations which read "Caratauc map Cinbelin map Teuhant". This is the equivalent of "Caratacus , son of Cunobelinus, son of Tasciovanus", putting the three historical figures in the correct order, although the wrong historical context, the degree of linguistic change suggesting a long period of oral transmission. The remainder of the genealogy contains the names of a sequence of Roman emperors, and two Welsh mythological figures, Guidgen (Gwydion ) and Lou (Lleu ).[2]


He appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth 's Historia Regum Britanniae (1136) as the legendary king Tenvantius, son of Lud . When his father died, he and his older brother Androgeus were still minors, so the kingship of Britain was given to their uncle Cassibelanus . Tenvantius was made Duke of Cornwall , and participated in his uncle's defence of Britain against Julius Caesar . Androgeus went to Rome with Caesar, so when Cassibelanus died, Tenvantius succeeded him as king. He was in turn succeeded by his son Kimbelinus , who had been brought up at the court of Augustus Caesar .[3]


In Middle Welsh versions of Geoffrey's Historia his name appears as Teneufan and Trahayant.[4]


Research Notes: Child - Cunobelinus King of Britain

King of Britain, contemporary with Augustus.
----------
From A History of Wales, pp. 25-26:

"By about AD 30, Cunobelinus (the Cynfelyn of Welsh tradition) of the tribe of the Catuvellauni had brough the area from Essex to Surrey under his control. His kingdom, with its coinage, its wheel pottery, its livelyt trade, its prosperous agriculture and its suggestion of the beginnings of literacy, was highly develoed. In an arc around Cunobelinus's kingdom lived the Iceni, the Coritani and the Dubonni, tribes which had not been conquered by the Belgae but which had adopted some of their innovations, in particular coinage and wheel pottery. Beyond them dwelt the tribes of Wales -- the Silures, the Demetae, the Ordovices and Deceangli; although elements of the culture of the Belgae were rare among them, they also felt the effects of the new power in south-eastern Britain, as the strengthened fortifications of their hill-forts bear witness.

"Cunobelinus died about AD 40 and his kingdom was inherited by his sons, Caratacus and Togodumnus."
------
From Wikipedia - Cunobelinus :

Cunobelinus (also written Kynobellinus, in Greek, sometimes abbreviated to Cunobelin) (late 1st century BC - 40s AD) was a historical king in pre-Roman Britain , known from passing mentions by classical historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius , and from his many inscribed coins. He appears to have controlled a substantial portion of south-eastern England, and is called "Britannorum rex" ("king of the Britons ") by Suetonius. He also appears in British legend as Cynfelyn (Welsh), Kymbelinus (Medieval Brito-Latin) or Cymbeline (Shakespeare, et al.), in which form he is the subject of a play by William Shakespeare . His name is a compound made up of cuno- "hound" and "Belenos" (the god ) Belenus ".

History

From numismatic evidence Cunobelinus appears to have taken power around AD 9, minting coins from both Camulodunum (Colchester , capital of the Trinovantes ) and Verlamion (later the Roman town of Verulamium , now modern St Albans ), capital of the Catuvellauni . Some of the Verulamium coins name him as the son of Tasciovanus , a previous king of the Catuvellauni; unlike his father's, his coins name no co-rulers.[1] However his earliest issues are from Camulodunum, indicating that he took power there first,[2] and some have a palm or laurel wreath design, a motif borrowed from the Romans indicating a military victory. He may have been emboldened to act against the Trinovantes by the Roman defeat in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in Germania in AD 9. The Trinovantes were a Roman ally whose independence was protected by a treaty made by Julius Caesar in 54 BC, but problems in Germania severely discouraged Augustus 's territorial ambitions and ability to defend allies in Britain.[3]

Cunobelinus appears to have maintained quite good relations with the Roman Empire . He used the title Rex (Latin "king") and classical motifs on his coins, and his reign saw an increase in trade with the continent. Archaeology shows an increase in luxury goods imported from the continent, including Italian wine and drinking vessels, olive oil and fish sauces from Hispania , glassware, jewellery and Gallo-Belgic tableware, which from their distribution appear to have entered Britain via the port of Camulodunum.[4] He was probably one of the British kings that Strabo says sent embassies to Augustus. Strabo reports Rome's lucrative trade with Britain: the island's exports included grain, gold, silver, iron, hides, slaves and hunting dogs.[5]

Cunobelinus had three sons, Adminius , Togodumnus and Caratacus , and a brother, Epaticcus , known to history. Epaticcus expanded his influence into the territory of the Atrebates in the early 20s AD, taking the Atrebatan capital Calleva (Silchester ) by about 25. He continued to expand his territory until his death in about 35, when Caratacus took over from him and the Atrebates recovered some of their territory.

Adminius, judging by his coins, had control of Kent by this time. Suetonius tells us that in ca. 40 he was banished from Britain by his father and sought refuge with the emperor Caligula ; Caligula treated this as if the entire island had submitted to him. Caligula prepared an invasion of Britain, but abandoned it in farcical circumstances, ordering his soldiers to attack the waves and gather seashells as the spoils of victory.[6]

Cunobelinus died some time before 43. Caratacus completed the conquest of the Atrebates, and their king, Verica , fled to Rome, providing the new emperor, Claudius , with a pretext for the conquest of Britain . Caratacus and Togodumnus led the initial resistance to the invasion. Dio Cassius tells us that the "Bodunni", a tribe who were tributary to the Catuvellauni, changed sides and supported the Romans. This is probably a misspelling of the Dobunni of Gloucestershire , indicating that Cunobelinus's hegemony extended as far as the West Country.[7]

It is possible, based on epigraphic evidence, that Sallustius Lucullus , Roman governor of Britain in the late 1st century, was his grandson.[8]


Research Notes: Child - Epaticcus

From Wikipedia - Epaticcus :

Epaticcus or Epaticcu (d. c. AD 35) was a brother of Cunobelinus , king of the Catuvellauni , a tribe of Iron Age Britain .

Coins bearing his name begin to appear in the northern lands of the neighbouring Atrebates tribe and their capital, Calleva Atrebatum (Silchester ), probably fell to him around AD 25. It is likely that Epaticcus was permitted to govern the area by his brother as part of the Catuvellaunian hegemony that was expanding across south eastern Britain at the time.


Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes and Anna of Arimathea




Husband Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes 44

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0030 BC
         Buried: 


         Father: Imanuentius King of the Trinovantes (      -0055 B.C.) 47
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Anna of Arimathea 43

           Born:  - Arimathea, Palestine
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni (      -Abt 0009) 39 40


Children
1 M Addedomaros King of the Trinovantes 48

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0020 B.C.
         Buried: 





Louis III "the Blind" King of Provence and Italy and Anna of Byzantium




Husband Louis III "the Blind" King of Provence and Italy 49

           Born: Abt 883
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Jun 928
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 900



Wife Anna of Byzantium 50

           Born: Between 886 and 888
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 914
         Buried: 


         Father: Leo VI Emperor of Byzantium (0866-0912) 51
         Mother: Zoe Tzautzina (      -      ) 52




Children
1 M Charles Constantine Count of Vienne 53

           Born: Abt 901
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt Jan 962
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Teutberg (      -Abt 0960) 54




Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev




Husband Henry I of France 55 56




           Born: 4 May 1008 - Reims, (Marne), (Champagne-Ardenne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Aug 1060 - Vitry-en-Brie, France
         Buried:  - St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France


         Father: Robert II "the Pious" King of France (0972-1031) 57 58
         Mother: Constance of Provence (Abt 0986-1032) 59 60


       Marriage: 19 May 1051 - Cathédral de Rheims, Rheims, (Marne), Champagne, France

Events

• King of France: 1031-1060.

• Count of Paris:




Wife Anne of Kiev 61 62




            AKA: Agnes of Kiev, Anna of Kiev, Anna Yaroslavna
           Born: Between 1024 and 1032
     Christened: 
           Died: 1075
         Buried:  - Villiers Abbey, La-Ferte-Alais, Essonne, (Île-de-France), France


         Father: Yaroslav I of Kiev (Abt 0978-1054)
         Mother: Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden (Abt 1001-1050) 63 64




Children
1 M Philip I of France

           Born: 23 May 1052
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jul 1108
         Buried: 



2 F Emma 65

           Born: 1054
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 M Robert

           Born: Abt 1055
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1060
         Buried: 



4 M Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France 66 67

            AKA: Hugh of Vermandois, Hugues "le Grand" de France, Hugh Magnus, Hugh de Vermandois
           Born: 1057
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Oct 1102 - Tarsus, Cilicia, (Turkey)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois (Abt 1065-1120) 7 68 69
           Marr: Bef 1080



Research Notes: Husband - Henry I of France

From Wikipedia - Henry I of France :

Henry I (4 May 1008 - 4 August 1060 ) was King of France from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its lowest point in terms of size during his reign and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians . This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

A member of the House of Capet , Henry was born in Reims , the son of King Robert II (972-1031) and Constance of Arles (986-1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on May 14 , 1027 , in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert , with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025 ). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032 , he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016 .

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror ), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047 , Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen .

A few years later, when William, who was cousin to King Edward the Confessor of England (1042-66), married Matilda , the daughter of the count of Flanders , Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054 , and again in 1057 , Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor -all at Ivois . In early 1043 , he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou , the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048 , the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056 . It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night. But Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on August 4 , 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie , France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica . He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France , who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev , ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032 , when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet .

Marriages and family
Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of the Emperor Conrad II (1024-39), but she died prematurely in 1034 . Henry I then married Matilda , daughter of Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia, but she died in 1044 , following a Caesarean section. Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry I married Anne of Kiev on May 19 , 1051 . They had four children:
Philip I (May 23, 1052 - July 30, 1108)
Emma (1054-?)
Robert (c. 1055-c. 1060)
Hugh the Great (1057-1102)


Death Notes: Wife - Anne of Kiev

Ancestral Roots line 241-6 has d. aft. 1075


Research Notes: Wife - Anne of Kiev

3rd wife of Henry I of France.

From Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev :

Anne of Kiev or Anna Yaroslavna (between 1024 and 1032 - 1075 ), daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife Ingegerd Olofsdotter , was the queen consort of France as the wife of Henry I , and regent for her son Philip I .

After the death of his first wife, Matilda, King Henry searched the courts of Europe for a suitable bride, but could not locate a princess who was not related to him within illegal degrees of kinship. At last he sent an embassy to distant Kiev , which returned with Anne (also called Agnes or Anna). Anne and Henry were married at the cathedral of Reims on May 19 , 1051 .

They had three sons:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.
Hugh (1057 - October 18 , 1102 ) - called the Great or Magnus, later Count of Crépi, who married the heiress of Vermandois and died on crusade in Tarsus , Cilicia .
Robert (c. 1055 -c. 1060 )

For six years after Henry's death in 1060 , she served as regent for Philip, who was only seven at the time. She was the first queen of France to serve as regent. Her co-regent was Count Baldwin V of Flanders . Anne was a literate woman, rare for the time, but there was some opposition to her as regent on the grounds that her mastery of French was less than fluent.
A year after the king's death, Anne, acting as regent, took a passionate fancy for Count Ralph III of Valois , a man whose political ambition encouraged him to repudiate his wife to marry Anne in 1062 . Accused of adultery, Ralph's wife appealed to Pope Alexander II , who excommunicated the couple. The young king Philip forgave his mother, which was just as well, since he was to find himself in a very similar predicament in the 1090s . Ralph died in September 1074 , at which time Anne returned to the French court. She died in 1075 , was buried at Villiers Abbey , La-Ferte-Alais , Essonne and her obits were celebrated on September 5 .

Sources
Bauthier, Robert-Henri. Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe siècle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985
Retrieved from ""


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 241-6 has m. 20 Jan 1044 or 1045. Wikipedia has 19 May 1051. Was 1044/45 the betrothal?


Research Notes: Child - Philip I of France

Source: Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.


Research Notes: Child - Robert

Source: Anne of Kiev. Died in childhood


Death Notes: Child - Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France

Died on crusade.


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France

Duke of France and Burgundy, Marquis of Orleans, Count of Amiens, Chaumont, Paris, Valois, and Vermandois. He was a leader of the First Crusade.

First husband of Adelaide de Vermandois.

From Wikipedia - Hugh of Vermandois :

Hugh of Vermandois (1053 - October 18 , 1101 ), was son to King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev , and the younger brother of King Philip I of France . He was in his own right Count of Vermandois . William of Tyre called him "Hugh Magnus", Hugh the Great, but he was an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Sir Steven Runciman is certain that "Magnus" is a copyist's error, and should be "minus", "the younger" (referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France).

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris . Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated , Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11 , 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy , where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire , unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians , whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy , but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium .
Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople , where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus , according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098 , captured Antioch , Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem , went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101 , but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus .

Family and children
He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Valois .They had nine children:
Count Raoul I of Vermandois
Henry, senior of Chaumont-en-Vexin , (d. 1130 ).
Simon, Bishop of Noyon
Elizabeth de Vermandois , married
Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester ;
William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
Matilde de Vermandois, married Raoul I of Beaugency
Constance de Vermandois, married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaucher
Agnes de Vermandois, married Margrave Boniface del Vasto . Mother of Adelaide del Vasto .
Beatrix de Vermandois, married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray
Emma de Vermandois




John le Despencer and Anne




Husband John le Despencer 70

           Born: 1235 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1251 - Loughborough, Leicestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Lord Galfridus le Despencer of Marcheley (1180-1242) 71 72
         Mother: Emma de Harcourt (1187-1265) 73


       Marriage: 1260 - Defford, Worcestershire, England



Wife Anne

           Born: Abt 1240 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Sir William Spencer 74

           Born: 1263 - Belton, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1328 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Child - Sir William Spencer

May have been born in 1267.


Sources


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5. Richardson, Hester Dorsey, Side-Lights on Maryland History with Sketches of Early Maryland Families. (Vol. 2. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1913.), pp. 87-91.

6. Spencer, Richard Henry ed, Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland. (New York: American Historical Society, 1919.), pp. 610-611.

7. http://www.familysearch.org.

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9. Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, http://genforum.genealogy.com/norwood/messages/1247.html.

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49. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-17 (Anna of Byzantium).

50. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-17.

51. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-16.

52. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-16 (Leo VI).

53. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-18.

54. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A (Charles Constantine).

55. Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France; Elizabeth of Vermandois.

56. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-22, 101-22.

57. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 101-21.

58. Wikipedia.org, Robert II of France.

59. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-21, 101-21 (Robert II).

60. Wikipedia.org, Constance of Arles.

61. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 241-6.

62. Wikipedia.org, Anne of Kiev.

63. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

64. Wikipedia.org, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

65. Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France.

66. Wikipedia.org, Hugh of Vermandois.

67. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-23, 140-23 (Adelaide de Vermandois).

68. Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois.

69. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-23, 50-23.

70. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019016.

71. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019014.

72. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dunova73&id=I3599.

73. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019015.

74. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I018407.


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60 Wikipedia.org, Constance of Arles.

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68 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois.

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