The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Adam Eamon and Ann




Husband Adam Eamon

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Rhoda A. Eamon

           Born: Abt 1847
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William Ezra Poaps (1848-1929)
           Marr: 30 Dec 1871 - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp, Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada




Research Notes: Child - Rhoda A. Eamon

From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~poaps/Notices.htm :

(Stormont Co): William E. POAPST, 23, engineer, Osnabruck, same,
s/o Jacob & Eliza,
married Rhoda EAMON, 24, Russell, Osnabruck,
c/o Adam & Ann,
witn: Jacob A. POAPST & William ANDERS?,
both of Osnabruck, 30 Dec 1871 at Osnabruck.


John Ewen and Ann




Husband John Ewen (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children


Thomas Sprigg and Ann




Husband Thomas Sprigg 2

           Born: 1604 - Banbury, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died:  - London, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann 3

           Born: 1610 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thomas Sprigg Lord of Northhampton Manor

           Born: 1630 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Dec 1704 - Prince George's Co., Maryland, (United States)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eleanor Nuthall (1645-1701) 4
           Marr: 1 Sep 1668 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England




Research Notes: Child - Thomas Sprigg Lord of Northhampton Manor

From: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I631844474 :

Thomas Sprigg, a well to-do planter, arrived in America in about 1650.

On 18 Jan 1658, a patent was issued to Thomas Sprigg who had transported to Maryland "Himself, Catherine, his wife, Verlinda Roger, Edward Bushell, Nathaiel Sprigge and Hugh Johnson." The patent was for a tract of 600 acres, called "Sprigley," on Chester River. Thomas Sprigg called one of the tracts he took up "Kittering" and another "Northampton." Ultimately, Thomas Sprigg owned nearly 1000 acres of land and is considered instrumental in developing Prince George County, MD.

His year of birth has been placed based on a deposition made in 1665 in which he gave his age as 35 years. Another deposition made in 1694 gave his age as 64 years.

His first wife, Kathryn, was living on 17 Aug 1661; she was probably a sister of Governor Stone of Maryland, who in his will, dated 3 Dec 1659 and proved 21 Dec 1660, mentions "my brother Sprigg;" and Thomas Stone, son of the governor, executes an assignment, 3 Aug 1662, 'to my uncle Thomas Sprigg."

In 1651 Thomas Sprigg was living in Northampton County, VA, but by 1660-61 he had settled in Calvert County, MD, on or near "Resurrection Manor," and later at "Northampton," Prince George County. In 1661 he and John Nuthall signed the "Submission to Parliament."

Thomas Sprigg fought against the Nanticoke Indians. He was Justice of the Peace and of the Quorum for Calvert County in 1658-67-68-69-70-74. Com. High Sheriff of Calvert County, 1 Apr 1664 to May 1665; he was also one of the first gentlemen to be made Justice of the Peace and Gentleman Justice of the Quorum for Prince George County, 1696.

"Lt." Thomas Sprigg was a signer of the Association Address to King William III congratulating him upon his escape from "Conspiracy and Assassination."

In 1696 he endorsed a round-robin letter from ship-owners and commanders of the fleet excusing delay in sailing to England on the ground of "illness among the men, backward crops, and desertions to Penna."

Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 3, pg 48
Sprigg, Thomas, Sr.,Prince George's Co., dated 9 May 1704;
Proved 29 Dec 1704.
To son Thomas, ex., plantation and land of Northamton and Kellering, which have not been disposed of; also 1/3 of patent 500 A. in manor of Colington.
To dau. Martha Prather and hrs., 1/3 of residue of 500 A. lying near Jonathan Prather's.
To dau. Oliver Nutthall, residue of afsd. patent lying near Jonathan Prather's.
To Thomas Stockett, grandson Thomas Stockett, Oliver Stockett, and each of sd. Thos. Stockett's child.,
To daus. Elizabeth Wade and her child., Ann Gittens and her child., Oliver Nutthall and her child., and Martha Prather and her child., personalty.
To daus. afsd., residue of estate; division to be made by Sam'l Magruder, Sr., Edward Willett and John Smith at Mattapany.
In event of death of son Thomas, sons-in-law Robert Wade, Phillip Gittens and Thomas Prather to assume executorship.
Test: Thomas Lucas, Sr., Thomas Lucas, Jr., Dorothy Lucas. 3. 443.
==
Thomas Shepard 19,139 1 PG £3,2.8 Mar 16 1698 Apr 6 1699
Appraisers: Thomas Sprigg, William Affotts.
List of debts: James Beale.
Administrator: James Beale,
===
Coughing, Thomas, (nunc. ) 15th Aug., 1662;
27th Oct., 1662.
Character of estate not shown.
Exs.: Matthew Stone, Thos. Sprigg, Thos. Trueman.
Test: Wm. Calvert. 1. 161


Sir Galfridus le Despencer and Ann




Husband Sir Galfridus le Despencer 5

            AKA: Geoffrey le Despencer
           Born: 1155 - Stanley, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1251 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Thurston le Despencer (1122-      ) 5
         Mother: Lucia Despencer (Abt 1125-      ) 6


       Marriage: 1177 - Lincolnshire, England



Wife Ann

           Born: 1157 - Stanley, Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children


Rowland Thornborough and Ann?




Husband Rowland Thornborough

           Born: Abt 1662 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Ann?

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Ann Thornborough

            AKA: Ann Thornborough Stevenson, Ann Wells
           Born: 1690 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1773 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
         Buried: 
         Spouse: James Wells [Jr.] (1685-1771)
           Marr: 1708 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States




Research Notes: Husband - Rowland Thornborough

FamilySearch.org AFN: 1J9L-4JJ


Death Notes: Child - Ann Thornborough

Other sources have her death year as 1762.


Research Notes: Child - Ann Thornborough

FamilySearch.org AFN: 9ZKN-6T

From the book Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774 by Henry C. Peden, Jr., Westminster, Maryland, 1989, pp. 50-54:

"A LIST OF TAXABLES IN BACK RIVER UPPER HUNDRED IN 1773 TAKEN BY WILLIAM HUTSON

"... Cockey, John... Cockey, William... Cockey, Edward, Joshua Cockey; Negroes: Easter, Juday... Cockey, Thomas Sr.; Thomas Cockey;... Owings, Richard (of Stephen); Negro Jim... Owings, John Cockey;...Ridgley, Charles;... Ridgley, Charles, Captain at Northamton Qtr.;... Ridgley, Charles, Captain, and Company at the Northamton Fce.; Henry Howard; Benjamin Deaver; Caleb Warfield... Talbott, Edward; John Talbott; Benjamin Talbott; John Whethers; 4 negroes... Wells, Ann (widow); John Thomas Walker, Thomas; Negro Hannah...


Ibid., pp. 50-54:

"A LIST OF TAXABLES IN BACK RIVER UPPER HUNDRED IN 1773 TAKEN BY WILLIAM HUTSON"

[Among households and garrisons(?) listed are:]

Wells, Ann (widow); John Thomas





Louis III "the Blind" King of Provence and Italy and Anna of Byzantium




Husband Louis III "the Blind" King of Provence and Italy 7

           Born: Abt 883
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Jun 928
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 900



Wife Anna of Byzantium 8

           Born: Between 886 and 888
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 914
         Buried: 


         Father: Leo VI Emperor of Byzantium (0866-0912) 9
         Mother: Zoe Tzautzina (      -      ) 10




Children
1 M Charles Constantine Count of Vienne 11

           Born: Abt 901
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt Jan 962
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Teutberg (      -Abt 0960) 12





Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni and Anna of Arimathea




Husband Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni 13 14

            AKA: Tenefan King of Britain, Teneufan King of the Batuvellauni, Tenuantius King of Britain, Trahayant King of the Catuvellauni
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0009
         Buried: 


         Father: Private 15 16
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Acceded: 1st Chief of the Catuvellauni.




Wife Anna of Arimathea 17

           Born:  - Arimathea, Palestine
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes (      -      ) 18


Children
1 M Cunobelinus King of Britain 13 19

            AKA: Cunobelin King of Britain, Cymbeline, Cynfelyn, Kymbelinus
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 0040
         Buried: 



2 M Epaticcus 20

            AKA: Epaticus
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0035
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni

Numismatic evidence.

Became King of the Catuvellauni around 20 B.C., ruling from Verulamium (St. Albans)

From Wikipedia - Tasciovanus :

Tasciovanus was a historical king of the Catuvellauni tribe before the Roman conquest of Britain .

History
Tasciovanus is known only through numismatic evidence. He appears to have become king of the Catuvellauni ca. 20 BC, ruling from Verlamion (the site of modern-day St Albans ). He is believed to have moved the tribal capital to that site from an earlier settlement, near modern-day Wheathampstead .[citation needed ] For a brief period ca. 15-10 BC he issued coins from Camulodunum (Colchester), apparently supplanting Addedomarus of the Trinovantes . After this he once again issued his coins from Verulamium, now bearing the title Ricon, Brythonic for "great/divine king". Some of his coins bear other abbrieviated names such as "DIAS", "SEGO" and "ANDOCO": these are generally considered to be the names of co-rulers or subordinate kings, but may instead be mint-marks. He died ca. AD 9, succeeded by his son Cunobelinus , who ruled primarily from Camulodunum. Another son, Epaticcus , expanded his territory westwards into the lands of the Atrebates .[1]

Medieval traditions
A genealogy preserved in the medieval Welsh manuscript Harleian 3859 contains three generations which read "Caratauc map Cinbelin map Teuhant". This is the equivalent of "Caratacus , son of Cunobelinus, son of Tasciovanus", putting the three historical figures in the correct order, although the wrong historical context, the degree of linguistic change suggesting a long period of oral transmission. The remainder of the genealogy contains the names of a sequence of Roman emperors, and two Welsh mythological figures, Guidgen (Gwydion ) and Lou (Lleu ).[2]


He appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth 's Historia Regum Britanniae (1136) as the legendary king Tenvantius, son of Lud . When his father died, he and his older brother Androgeus were still minors, so the kingship of Britain was given to their uncle Cassibelanus . Tenvantius was made Duke of Cornwall , and participated in his uncle's defence of Britain against Julius Caesar . Androgeus went to Rome with Caesar, so when Cassibelanus died, Tenvantius succeeded him as king. He was in turn succeeded by his son Kimbelinus , who had been brought up at the court of Augustus Caesar .[3]


In Middle Welsh versions of Geoffrey's Historia his name appears as Teneufan and Trahayant.[4] 13 14


Research Notes: Child - Cunobelinus King of Britain

King of Britain, contemporary with Augustus.
----------
From A History of Wales, pp. 25-26:

"By about AD 30, Cunobelinus (the Cynfelyn of Welsh tradition) of the tribe of the Catuvellauni had brough the area from Essex to Surrey under his control. His kingdom, with its coinage, its wheel pottery, its livelyt trade, its prosperous agriculture and its suggestion of the beginnings of literacy, was highly develoed. In an arc around Cunobelinus's kingdom lived the Iceni, the Coritani and the Dubonni, tribes which had not been conquered by the Belgae but which had adopted some of their innovations, in particular coinage and wheel pottery. Beyond them dwelt the tribes of Wales -- the Silures, the Demetae, the Ordovices and Deceangli; although elements of the culture of the Belgae were rare among them, they also felt the effects of the new power in south-eastern Britain, as the strengthened fortifications of their hill-forts bear witness.

"Cunobelinus died about AD 40 and his kingdom was inherited by his sons, Caratacus and Togodumnus."
------
From Wikipedia - Cunobelinus :

Cunobelinus (also written Kynobellinus, in Greek, sometimes abbreviated to Cunobelin) (late 1st century BC - 40s AD) was a historical king in pre-Roman Britain , known from passing mentions by classical historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius , and from his many inscribed coins. He appears to have controlled a substantial portion of south-eastern England, and is called "Britannorum rex" ("king of the Britons ") by Suetonius. He also appears in British legend as Cynfelyn (Welsh), Kymbelinus (Medieval Brito-Latin) or Cymbeline (Shakespeare, et al.), in which form he is the subject of a play by William Shakespeare . His name is a compound made up of cuno- "hound" and "Belenos" (the god ) Belenus ".

History

From numismatic evidence Cunobelinus appears to have taken power around AD 9, minting coins from both Camulodunum (Colchester , capital of the Trinovantes ) and Verlamion (later the Roman town of Verulamium , now modern St Albans ), capital of the Catuvellauni . Some of the Verulamium coins name him as the son of Tasciovanus , a previous king of the Catuvellauni; unlike his father's, his coins name no co-rulers.[1] However his earliest issues are from Camulodunum, indicating that he took power there first,[2] and some have a palm or laurel wreath design, a motif borrowed from the Romans indicating a military victory. He may have been emboldened to act against the Trinovantes by the Roman defeat in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in Germania in AD 9. The Trinovantes were a Roman ally whose independence was protected by a treaty made by Julius Caesar in 54 BC, but problems in Germania severely discouraged Augustus 's territorial ambitions and ability to defend allies in Britain.[3]

Cunobelinus appears to have maintained quite good relations with the Roman Empire . He used the title Rex (Latin "king") and classical motifs on his coins, and his reign saw an increase in trade with the continent. Archaeology shows an increase in luxury goods imported from the continent, including Italian wine and drinking vessels, olive oil and fish sauces from Hispania , glassware, jewellery and Gallo-Belgic tableware, which from their distribution appear to have entered Britain via the port of Camulodunum.[4] He was probably one of the British kings that Strabo says sent embassies to Augustus. Strabo reports Rome's lucrative trade with Britain: the island's exports included grain, gold, silver, iron, hides, slaves and hunting dogs.[5]

Cunobelinus had three sons, Adminius , Togodumnus and Caratacus , and a brother, Epaticcus , known to history. Epaticcus expanded his influence into the territory of the Atrebates in the early 20s AD, taking the Atrebatan capital Calleva (Silchester ) by about 25. He continued to expand his territory until his death in about 35, when Caratacus took over from him and the Atrebates recovered some of their territory.

Adminius, judging by his coins, had control of Kent by this time. Suetonius tells us that in ca. 40 he was banished from Britain by his father and sought refuge with the emperor Caligula ; Caligula treated this as if the entire island had submitted to him. Caligula prepared an invasion of Britain, but abandoned it in farcical circumstances, ordering his soldiers to attack the waves and gather seashells as the spoils of victory.[6]

Cunobelinus died some time before 43. Caratacus completed the conquest of the Atrebates, and their king, Verica , fled to Rome, providing the new emperor, Claudius , with a pretext for the conquest of Britain . Caratacus and Togodumnus led the initial resistance to the invasion. Dio Cassius tells us that the "Bodunni", a tribe who were tributary to the Catuvellauni, changed sides and supported the Romans. This is probably a misspelling of the Dobunni of Gloucestershire , indicating that Cunobelinus's hegemony extended as far as the West Country.[7]

It is possible, based on epigraphic evidence, that Sallustius Lucullus , Roman governor of Britain in the late 1st century, was his grandson.[8] 13 19


Research Notes: Child - Epaticcus

From Wikipedia - Epaticcus :

Epaticcus or Epaticcu (d. c. AD 35) was a brother of Cunobelinus , king of the Catuvellauni , a tribe of Iron Age Britain .

Coins bearing his name begin to appear in the northern lands of the neighbouring Atrebates tribe and their capital, Calleva Atrebatum (Silchester ), probably fell to him around AD 25. It is likely that Epaticcus was permitted to govern the area by his brother as part of the Catuvellaunian hegemony that was expanding across south eastern Britain at the time. 20


Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes and Anna of Arimathea




Husband Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes 18

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0030 BC
         Buried: 


         Father: Imanuentius King of the Trinovantes (      -0055 B.C.) 21
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Anna of Arimathea 17

           Born:  - Arimathea, Palestine
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Tasciovanus King of Britain, King of the Catuvellauni (      -Abt 0009) 13 14


Children
1 M Addedomaros King of the Trinovantes 22

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0020 B.C.
         Buried: 





Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev




Husband Henry I of France 23 24




           Born: 4 May 1008 - Reims, (Marne), (Champagne-Ardenne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Aug 1060 - Vitry-en-Brie, France
         Buried:  - St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France


         Father: Robert II "the Pious" King of France (0972-1031) 25 26
         Mother: Constance of Provence (Abt 0986-1032) 27 28


       Marriage: 19 May 1051 - Cathédral de Rheims, Rheims, (Marne), Champagne, France

Events

• King of France: 1031-1060.

• Count of Paris:




Wife Anne of Kiev 29 30




            AKA: Agnes of Kiev, Anna of Kiev, Anna Yaroslavna
           Born: Between 1024 and 1032
     Christened: 
           Died: 1075
         Buried:  - Villiers Abbey, La-Ferte-Alais, Essonne, (Île-de-France), France


         Father: Yaroslav I of Kiev (Abt 0978-1054)
         Mother: Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden (Abt 1001-1050) 31 32




Children
1 M Philip I of France

           Born: 23 May 1052
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jul 1108
         Buried: 



2 F Emma 33

           Born: 1054
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 M Robert

           Born: Abt 1055
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1060
         Buried: 



4 M Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France 34 35

            AKA: Hugh of Vermandois, Hugues "le Grand" de France, Hugh Magnus, Hugh de Vermandois
           Born: 1057
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Oct 1102 - Tarsus, Cilicia, (Turkey)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois (Abt 1065-1120) 36 37 38
           Marr: Bef 1080




Research Notes: Husband - Henry I of France

From Wikipedia - Henry I of France :

Henry I (4 May 1008 - 4 August 1060 ) was King of France from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its lowest point in terms of size during his reign and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians . This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

A member of the House of Capet , Henry was born in Reims , the son of King Robert II (972-1031) and Constance of Arles (986-1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on May 14 , 1027 , in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert , with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025 ). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032 , he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016 .

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror ), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047 , Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen .

A few years later, when William, who was cousin to King Edward the Confessor of England (1042-66), married Matilda , the daughter of the count of Flanders , Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054 , and again in 1057 , Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor -all at Ivois . In early 1043 , he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou , the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048 , the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056 . It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night. But Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on August 4 , 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie , France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica . He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France , who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev , ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032 , when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet .

Marriages and family
Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of the Emperor Conrad II (1024-39), but she died prematurely in 1034 . Henry I then married Matilda , daughter of Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia, but she died in 1044 , following a Caesarean section. Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry I married Anne of Kiev on May 19 , 1051 . They had four children:
Philip I (May 23, 1052 - July 30, 1108)
Emma (1054-?)
Robert (c. 1055-c. 1060)
Hugh the Great (1057-1102) 23 24


Death Notes: Wife - Anne of Kiev

Ancestral Roots line 241-6 has d. aft. 1075


Research Notes: Wife - Anne of Kiev

3rd wife of Henry I of France.

From Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev :

Anne of Kiev or Anna Yaroslavna (between 1024 and 1032 - 1075 ), daughter of Yaroslav I of Kiev and his wife Ingegerd Olofsdotter , was the queen consort of France as the wife of Henry I , and regent for her son Philip I .

After the death of his first wife, Matilda, King Henry searched the courts of Europe for a suitable bride, but could not locate a princess who was not related to him within illegal degrees of kinship. At last he sent an embassy to distant Kiev , which returned with Anne (also called Agnes or Anna). Anne and Henry were married at the cathedral of Reims on May 19 , 1051 .

They had three sons:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.
Hugh (1057 - October 18 , 1102 ) - called the Great or Magnus, later Count of Crépi, who married the heiress of Vermandois and died on crusade in Tarsus , Cilicia .
Robert (c. 1055 -c. 1060 )

For six years after Henry's death in 1060 , she served as regent for Philip, who was only seven at the time. She was the first queen of France to serve as regent. Her co-regent was Count Baldwin V of Flanders . Anne was a literate woman, rare for the time, but there was some opposition to her as regent on the grounds that her mastery of French was less than fluent.
A year after the king's death, Anne, acting as regent, took a passionate fancy for Count Ralph III of Valois , a man whose political ambition encouraged him to repudiate his wife to marry Anne in 1062 . Accused of adultery, Ralph's wife appealed to Pope Alexander II , who excommunicated the couple. The young king Philip forgave his mother, which was just as well, since he was to find himself in a very similar predicament in the 1090s . Ralph died in September 1074 , at which time Anne returned to the French court. She died in 1075 , was buried at Villiers Abbey , La-Ferte-Alais , Essonne and her obits were celebrated on September 5 .

Sources
Bauthier, Robert-Henri. Anne de Kiev reine de France et la politique royale au Xe siècle, revue des Etudes Slaves, Vol. 57, 1985
Retrieved from "" 29 30


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 241-6 has m. 20 Jan 1044 or 1045. Wikipedia has 19 May 1051. Was 1044/45 the betrothal?


Research Notes: Child - Philip I of France

Source: Wikipedia - Anne of Kiev:

Philip (May 23 , 1052 - July 30 , 1108 ) - Anne is credited with bringing the name Philip to Western Europe . She imported this Greek name (Philippos, from philos (love) and hippos (horse), meaning "the one that love horses") from her Eastern Orthodox culture.


Research Notes: Child - Robert

Source: Anne of Kiev. Died in childhood


Death Notes: Child - Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France

Died on crusade.


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France

Duke of France and Burgundy, Marquis of Orleans, Count of Amiens, Chaumont, Paris, Valois, and Vermandois. He was a leader of the First Crusade.

First husband of Adelaide de Vermandois.

From Wikipedia - Hugh of Vermandois :

Hugh of Vermandois (1053 - October 18 , 1101 ), was son to King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev , and the younger brother of King Philip I of France . He was in his own right Count of Vermandois . William of Tyre called him "Hugh Magnus", Hugh the Great, but he was an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Sir Steven Runciman is certain that "Magnus" is a copyist's error, and should be "minus", "the younger" (referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France).

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris . Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated , Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11 , 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy , where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire , unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians , whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy , but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium .
Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople , where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus , according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098 , captured Antioch , Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem , went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101 , but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus .

Family and children
He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Valois .They had nine children:
Count Raoul I of Vermandois
Henry, senior of Chaumont-en-Vexin , (d. 1130 ).
Simon, Bishop of Noyon
Elizabeth de Vermandois , married
Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester ;
William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
Matilde de Vermandois, married Raoul I of Beaugency
Constance de Vermandois, married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaucher
Agnes de Vermandois, married Margrave Boniface del Vasto . Mother of Adelaide del Vasto .
Beatrix de Vermandois, married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray
Emma de Vermandois 34 35




John le Despencer and Anne




Husband John le Despencer 39

           Born: 1235 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1251 - Loughborough, Leicestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Lord Galfridus le Despencer of Marcheley (1180-1242) 40 41
         Mother: Emma de Harcourt (1187-1265) 42


       Marriage: 1260 - Defford, Worcestershire, England



Wife Anne

           Born: Abt 1240 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Sir William Spencer 43

           Born: 1263 - Belton, Worcestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1328 - Defford, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Child - Sir William Spencer

May have been born in 1267.


Sources


1 Website:, http://thecityobserver.org/scarborough/b27402.htm#P27402.

2 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I631844488.

3 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I631844489.

4 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I631844475.

5 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019011.

6 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dunova73&id=I3609.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-17 (Anna of Byzantium).

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-17.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-16.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-16 (Leo VI).

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-18.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A (Charles Constantine).

13 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105893 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

14 Wikipedia.org, Tasciovanus.

15 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105895 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

16 Wikipedia.org, Lud son of Heli; Tasciovanus.

17 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #97877 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

18 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105896 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

19 Wikipedia.org, Cunobelinus.

20 Wikipedia.org, Epaticcus.

21 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317220 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317221 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23 Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France; Elizabeth of Vermandois.

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-22, 101-22.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 101-21.

26 Wikipedia.org, Robert II of France.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-21, 101-21 (Robert II).

28 Wikipedia.org, Constance of Arles.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 241-6.

30 Wikipedia.org, Anne of Kiev.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

32 Wikipedia.org, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

33 Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France.

34 Wikipedia.org, Hugh of Vermandois.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-23, 140-23 (Adelaide de Vermandois).

36 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-23, 50-23.

38 http://www.familysearch.org.

39 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019016.

40 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019014.

41 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dunova73&id=I3599.

42 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I019015.

43 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbryant6&id=I018407.


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