The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




William III Count of AngoulÍme and Vitapoi de Bezaume




Husband William III Count of AngoulÍme 1 2

            AKA: Guillaume d'AngoulÍme
           Born: Abt 1084
     Christened: 
           Died: 1120 - Deutz, (Cologne, Germany)
         Buried: 1120 - Saint-Heribert, Deutz, (Cologne, Germany)


         Father: Foulques "Taillefer" Comte d'AngoulÍme (      -1087) 3
         Mother: Condoha d'Eu (      -      ) 4


       Marriage: 1108

Events

ē Count of AngoulÍme: 1089-1118.




Wife Vitapoi de Bezaume 1 5

            AKA: Vitapoy de Benauges
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Guillaume Amanieu Vicomte de Bezaume (      -Bef 1103) 6
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme 7 8 9

            AKA: Wulgrin II Count of AngoulÍme and Ponce de la Marche, Bougrin Taillifer
           Born: Abt 1108 - AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Sep 1140 - Ch‚teau de Bouteville, Bouteville, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
         Buried:  - Saint-…parche, AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
         Spouse: Pontia de la Marche (      -      ) 7



Death Notes: Husband - William III Count of AngoulÍme

May have died in 1118.


Research Notes: Husband - William III Count of AngoulÍme

From Wikipedia - William III, Count of AngoulÍme :

William III of AngoulÍme was the twelfth count of AngoulÍme .
William III was a fifth generation descendant of Count Arnold I . He was born in 1084, the son of Count Fulk of AngoulÍme and the grandson of Geoffrey of AngoulÍme and Petronille De Archiac . William III's reign lasted from 1089 until 1118. In 1108 he married Vitapoy De Benauges . Their son, Wulgrin II of AngoulÍme , was born in 1108 and succeeded William III as the thirteenth count of AngoulÍme .


Research Notes: Wife - Vitapoi de Bezaume

From http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm :
Web Reference: Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands, Vitapoi de Bezuaume .
Vitapoi's married to Guillaume V, comtť d'AngoulÍme is recorded in the Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensis which states "filia Amani seu Amaniei Gasconis . . . Vitapoi"


Birth Notes: Child - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have been born about 1089 in Angouleme.


Death Notes: Child - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have died on 16 Nov 1140 (burial date?).


Research Notes: Child - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

From Wikipedia - Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme :

Wulgrin II (also Vulgrin or Bougrin), called Taillifer or Rudel, was the Count of AngoulÍme from 1120 to his death on 16 November 1140.[1] He was a son of Count William III and he married Pontia de la Marche, daughter of Roger the Poitevin and Almodis, the daughter of count Aldebert II of La Marche. They had only one son, William IV of AngoulÍme . After the death of his first wife, Wulgrin remarried to Amable de Ch‚tellerault and had three children: Fulk, Geoffrey "Martel" and an unnamed daughter.

He retook Blaye from William X of Aquitaine in 1127 and reconstructed the castle there in 1140.[2]

The troubadour Jaufrť Rudel may be possibly his son or his son-in-law.[2]


Vladimir I of Kiev




Husband Vladimir I of Kiev 10 11




            AKA: Saint Vladimir of Kiev, Vladimir the Great, Saint Vladimir Svyatoslavich the Great
           Born: Abt 958


     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1015 - Berestovo, Berestove, Kiev, Ukraine
         Buried: 


         Father: Sviatoslav I of Kiev (Abt 0942-0972) 12
         Mother: Malusha (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Yaroslav I of Kiev




            AKA: Jarisleif "the Lame," Yaroslav I "the Wise" of Kiev
           Born: Abt 978
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Feb 1054 - Kiev, Ukraine
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden (Abt 1001-1050) 13 14
           Marr: 1019



Research Notes: Husband - Vladimir I of Kiev

From Wikipedia - Vladimir I of Kiev

Saint Vladimir Svyatoslavich the Great (c. 958 - 15 July 1015 , Berestovo ) was the grand prince of Kiev who converted to Christianity in 988, and proceeded to baptise the whole Kievan Rus . His name may be spelled in different ways: in Old East Slavic as Volodimir (), in modern Ukrainian as Volodymyr (), in Old Church Slavonic and modern Russian as Vladimir (), in Old Norse as Valdamarr and the modern Scandinavian languages as Valdemar.

Way to the throne

Vladimir was the youngest son of Sviatoslav I of Kiev by his housekeeper Malusha , described in the Norse sagas as a prophetess who lived to the age of 100 and was brought from her cave to the palace to predict the future. Malusha's brother Dobrynya was Vladimir's tutor and most trusted advisor. Hagiographic tradition of dubious authenticity also connects his childhood with the name of his grandmother, Olga Prekrasa , who was Christian and governed the capital during Sviatoslav's frequent military campaigns.

Transferring his capital to Preslavets in 969, Sviatoslav designated Vladimir ruler of Novgorod the Great but gave Kiev to his legitimate son Yaropolk . After Sviatoslav's death (972), a fratricidal war erupted (976) between Yaropolk and his younger brother Oleg , ruler of the Drevlians . In 977 Vladimir fled to his kinsmen Haakon Sigurdsson , ruler of Norway in Scandinavia , collecting as many of the Viking warriors as he could to assist him to recover Novgorod, and on his return the next year marched against Yaropolk.

On his way to Kiev he sent ambassadors to Rogvolod (Norse: Ragnvald), prince of Polotsk , to sue for the hand of his daughter Rogneda (Norse: Ragnhild). The well-born princess refused to affiance herself to the son of a bondswoman, but Vladimir attacked Polotsk, slew Rogvolod, and took Ragnhild by force. Actually, Polotsk was a key fortress on the way to Kiev, and the capture of Polotsk and Smolensk facilitated the taking of Kiev (980), where he slew Yaropolk by treachery, and was proclaimed konung , or kagan , of all Kievan Rus .

Years of pagan rule
In addition to his father's extensive domain, Vladimir continued to expand his territories. In 981 he conquered the Cherven cities, the modern Galicia ; in 983 he subdued the Yatvingians , whose territories lay between Lithuania and Poland ; in 985 he led a fleet along the central rivers of Russia to conquer the Bulgars of the Kama , planting numerous fortresses and colonies on his way.

Though Christianity had won many converts since Olga's rule, Vladimir had remained a thorough going pagan, taking eight hundred concubines (besides numerous wives) and erecting pagan statues and shrines to gods. It is argued that he attempted to reform Slavic paganism by establishing thunder-god Perun as a supreme deity.

Baptism of Rus

The Primary Chronicle reports that in the year 987 , as the result of a consultation with his boyars , Vladimir sent envoys to study the religions of the various neighboring nations whose representatives had been urging him to embrace their respective faiths. The result is amusingly described by the chronicler Nestor . Of the Muslim Bulgarians of the Volga the envoys reported there is no gladness among them; only sorrow and a great stench, and that their religion was undesirable due to its taboo against alcoholic beverages and pork ; supposedly, Vladimir said on that occasion: "Drinking is the joy of the Rus'." Russian sources also describe Vladimir consulting with Jewish envoys (who may or may not have been Khazars ), and questioning them about their religion but ultimately rejecting it, saying that their loss of Jerusalem was evidence of their having been abandoned by God . Ultimately Vladimir settled on Christianity . In the churches of the Germans his emissaries saw no beauty; but at Constantinople , where the full festival ritual of the Byzantine Church was set in motion to impress them, they found their ideal: "We no longer knew whether we were in heaven or on earth," they reported, describing a majestic Divine Liturgy in Hagia Sophia , "nor such beauty, and we know not how to tell of it." If Vladimir was impressed by this account of his envoys, he was yet more so by political gains of the Byzantine alliance.

In 988 , having taken the town of Chersonesos in Crimea , he boldly negotiated for the hand of the emperor Basil II 's sister, Anna. Never had a Greek imperial princess, and one "born-in-the-purple" at that, married a barbarian before, as matrimonial offers of French kings and German emperors had been peremptorily rejected. In short, to marry the 27-year-old princess off to a pagan Slav seemed impossible. Vladimir, however, was baptized at Cherson, taking the Christian name of Basil out of compliment to his imperial brother-in-law; the sacrament was followed by his wedding with Anna . Returning to Kiev in triumph, he destroyed pagan monuments and established many churches, starting with the splendid Church of the Tithes (989) and monasteries on Mt. Athos .

Arab sources, both Muslim and Christian, present a different story of Vladimir's conversion. Yahya of Antioch , al-Rudhrawari , al-Makin , al-Dimashki , and ibn al-Athir [1] all give essentially the same account. In 987, Bardas Sclerus and Bardas Phocas revolted against the Byzantine emperor Basil II . Both rebels briefly joined forces, but then Bardas Phocas proclaimed himself emperor on September 14 , 987 . Basil II turned to the Kievan Rus' for assistance, even though they were considered enemies at that time. Vladimir agreed, in exchange for a marital tie; he also agreed to accept Orthodox Christianity as his religion and bring his people to the new faith. When the wedding arrangements were settled, Vladimir dispatched 6,000 troops to the Byzantine Empire and they helped to put down the revolt.[2]


Christian reign
He now formed a great council out of his boyars, and set his twelve sons over his subject principalities. With his neighbors he lived at peace, the incursions of the Pechenegs alone disturbing his tranquillity. After Anna's death, he married again, most likely to a granddaughter of Otto the Great .
He died at Berestovo, near Kiev, while on his way to chastise the insolence of his son, Prince Yaroslav of Novgorod . The various parts of his dismembered body were distributed among his numerous sacred foundations and were venerated as relics . One of the largest Kievan cathedrals is dedicated to him. The University of Kiev was named after the man who both civilized and Christianized Kievan Rus. There is the Order of St. Vladimir in Russia and Saint Vladimir's Orthodox Theological Seminary in the United States . The Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate the feast day of St. Vladimir on 15 July .

His memory was also kept alive by innumerable Russian folk ballads and legends, which refer to him as Krasno Solnyshko, that is, the Fair Sun. With him the Varangian period of Eastern Slavic history ceases and the Christian period begins.

-------------

From Wikipedia - Family life and children of Vladimir I :

Until his baptism, Vladimir I of Kiev (c.958 -1015 ) was described by Thietmar of Merseburg as a great profligate (Latin : fornicator maximus). He had a few hundred concubines in Kiev and in the country residence of Berestovo . He also had official pagan wives, the most famous being Rogneda of Polotsk . His other wives are mentioned in the Primary Chronicle , with various children assigned to various wives in the different versions of the document. Hence, speculations abound.

Norse wife
Norse sagas mention that, while ruling in Novgorod in his early days, Vladimir had a Varangian wife named Olava or Allogia. This unusual name is probably a feminine form of Olaf . According to Snorri Sturluson the runaway Olaf Tryggvason was sheltered by Allogia in her house; she also paid a large fine for him.

Several authorities, notably Rydzevskaya ("Ancient Rus and Scandinavia in 9-14 cent.", 1978), hold that later skalds confused Vladimir's wife Olava with his grandmother and tutor Olga , with Allogia being the distorted form of Olga's name. Others postulate Olava was a real person and the mother of Vysheslav, the first of Vladimir's sons to reign in Novgorod, as behooves the eldest son and heir. On the other hand, there is no evidence that the tradition of sending the eldest son of Kievan monarch to Novgorod existed at such an early date.

Those scholars who believe that this early Norse wife was not fictitious, suppose that Vladimir could have married her during his famous exile in Scandinavia in the late 970s. They usually refer an account in Ingvars saga (in a part called Eymund's saga ) which tells that Eric VI of Sweden married his daughter to a 'konung of fjord lying to the East from Holmgard '. This prince may have been Vladimir the Great.

Polotsk wife
Main article: Rogneda of Polotsk
Rogneda of Polotsk is the best known of Vladimir's pagan wives, although her ancestry has fuelled the drollest speculations. See this article for extensive but tenuous arguments for her Yngling royal descent.
The Primary Chronicle mentions three of Rogneda's sons - Izyaslav of Polotsk (+1001), Vsevolod of Volhynia (+ca 995), and Yaroslav the Wise . Following an old Yngling tradition, Izyaslav inherited the lands of his maternal grandfather, i.e., Polotsk . According to the Kievan succession law, his progeny forfeited their rights to the Kievan throne, because their forefather had never ruled in Kiev supreme. They, however, retained the principality of Polotsk and formed a dynasty of local rulers, of which Vseslav the Sorcerer was the most notable.

Greek wife
During his unruly youth, Vladimir begot his eldest son, Sviatopolk , relations with whom would cloud his declining years. His mother was a Greek nun captured by Svyatoslav I in Bulgaria and married to his lawful heir Yaropolk I . Russian historian Vasily Tatischev , invariably erring in the matters of onomastics, gives her the fanciful Roman name of Julia. When Yaropolk was murdered by Vladimir's agents, the new sovereign raped his wife and she soon (some would say, too soon) gave birth to a child. Thus, Sviatopolk was probably the eldest of Vladimir's sons, although the issue of his parentage has been questioned and he has been known in the family as "the son of two fathers".

Bohemian wife
Vladimir apparently had a Czech wife, whose name is given by Vasily Tatishchev as Malfrida. Historians have gone to extremes in order to provide a political rationale behind such an alliance, as the Czech princes are assumed to have backed up Vladimir's brother Yaropolk rather than Vladimir. His children by these marriage were probably Svyatoslav of Smolensk, killed during the 1015 internecine war, and Mstislav of Chernigov . Some chronicles, however, report that Rogneda was Mstislav's mother.

Bulgarian wife
Another wife was a Bulgarian lady, whose name is given by Tatishchev as Adela. Historians have disagreed as to whether she came from Volga Bulgaria or from Bulgaria on the Danube . According to the Primary Chronicle , both Boris and Gleb were her children. This tradition, however, is viewed by most scholars as a product of later hagiographical tendency to merge the identity of both saints. Actually, they were of different age and their names point to different cultural traditions. Judging by his Oriental name, Boris could have been Adela's only offspring.

Anna Porphyrogeneta
Anna Porphyrogeneta, daughter of Emperor Romanos II and Theophano , was the only princess of the Makedones to have been married to a foreigner. The Byzantine emperors regarded the Franks and Russians as barbarians, refusing Hugues Capet 's proposals to marry Anna to his son Robert I , so the Baptism of Kievan Rus was a prerequisite for this marriage. Following the wedding, Vladimir is said to have divorced all his pagan wives, although this claim is disputed. Regarded by later Russians as a saint, Anna was interred with her husband in the Church of the Tithes .

Anna is not known to have had any children. Either her possible barrenness or the Byzantine house rule could account for this. Had she had any progeny, the prestigious and much sought imperial parentage would have certainly been advertised by her descendants. Hagiographic sources, contrary to the Primary Chronicle , posit Boris and Gleb as her offspring, on the understanding that holy brothers should have had a holy mother.

German wife
Anna is known to have predeceased Vladimir by four years. Thietmar of Merseburg , writing from contemporary accounts, mentions that Boleslaw I of Poland captured Vladimir's widow during his raid on Kiev in 1018 . The historians long had no clue as to identity of this wife. The emigre historian Nicholas Baumgarten, however, pointed to the controversial record of the "Genealogia Welforum" and the "Historia Welforum Weingartensis" that one daughter of Count Kuno von Oenningen (future Duke Konrad of Swabia ) by "filia Ottonis Magni imperatoris" (Otto the Great 's daughter; possibly Rechlinda Otona [Regelindis], claimed by some as illegitimate daughter and by others legitimate, born from his first marriage with Edith of Wessex) married "rex Rugorum" (king of Russia). He interpreted this evidence as pertaining to Vladimir's last wife.

It is believed that the only child of this alliance was Dobronega, or Maria, who married Casimir I of Poland between 1038 and 1042 . As her father Vladimir died about 25 years before that marriage and she was still young enough to bear at least five children, including two future Polish dukes (Boleslaw II of Poland , who later became a king, and Wladyslaw Herman ), it is thought probable that she was Vladimir's daughter by the last marriage.

Some sources claimed Agatha , the wife of Edward the Exile of England, was another daughter of this marriage and full-sister of Dobronegra. Their marriage took place by the same time of Dobronegra's wedding (the date of birth of her first child support this) and this maybe because was double wedding of both sisters. This can resolve the question about the conection between Agatha and the Holy Roman Empire claimed by several medieval sources.

Yaroslav's parentage
There is also a case for Yaroslav 's descent from Anna. According to this theory, Nestor the Chronicler deliberately represented Yaroslav as Rogneda's son, because he systematically removed all information concerning Kievan ties with Byzantium , spawning pro-Varangian bias (see Normanist theory for details). Proponents allege that Yaroslav's true age was falsified by Nestor, who attempted to represent him as 10 years older than he actually had been, in order to justify Yaroslav's seizure of the throne at the expense of his older brothers.

The Primary Chronicle , for instance, states that Yaroslav died at the age of 76 in 1054 (thus putting his birth at 978 ), while dating Vladimir's encounter and marriage to Yaroslav's purported mother, Rogneda, to 980 . Elsewhere, speaking about Yaroslav's rule in Novgorod (1016), Nestor says that Yaroslav was 28, thus putting his birth at 988 . The forensic analysis of Yaroslav's skeleton seems to have confirmed these suspicions, estimating Yaroslav's birth at ca. 988-990, after both the Baptism of Kievan Rus and Vladimir's divorce of Rogneda. Consequently, it is assumed that Yaroslav was either Vladimir's natural son born after the latter's baptism or his son by Anna.

Had Yaroslav an imperial Byzantine descent, he likely would not have stinted to advertise it. Some have seen the willingness of European kings to marry Yaroslav's daughters as an indication of this imperial descent. Subsequent Polish chroniclers and historians, in particular, were eager to view Yaroslav as Anna's son. Recent proponents envoke onomastic arguments, which have often proven decisive in the matters of medieval prosopography . It is curious that Yaroslav named his elder son Vladimir (after his own father) and his eldest daughter Anna (as if after his own mother). Also, there is a certain pattern in his sons having Slavic names (as Vladimir), and his daughters having Greek names only (as Anna). However, in the absence of better sources, Anna's maternity remains a pure speculation.

Obscure offspring
Vladimir had several children whose maternity cannot be established with certainty. These include two sons, Stanislav of Smolensk and Sudislav of Pskov, the latter outliving all of his siblings. There is also one daughter, named Predslava, who was captured by Boleslaw I in Kiev and taken with him to Poland as a concubine. Another daughter, Premyslava, is attested in numerous (though rather late) Hungarian sources as the wife of Duke Ladislaus, one of the early Arpadians .


Research Notes: Child - Yaroslav I of Kiev

Possibly not the father of Agatha, the wife of Edward the Exile.

From Wikipedia - Yaroslav I the Wise :

Yaroslav I the Wise (c. 978 , Kiev -20 February 1054 , Kiev ) (East Slavic: ; Christian name: George; Old Norse : Jarizleifr) was thrice Grand Prince of Novgorod and Kiev , uniting the two principalities for a time under his rule. During his lengthy reign, Kievan Rus' reached a zenith of its cultural flowering and military power.

Early years of Yaroslav's life are enshrouded in mystery. He was one of the numerous sons of Vladimir the Great , presumably his second by Rogneda of Polotsk , although his actual age (as stated in the Primary Chronicle and corroborated by the examination of his skeleton in the 1930s) would place him among the youngest children of Vladimir. It has been suggested that he was a child begotten out of wedlock after Vladimir's divorce with Rogneda and his marriage to Anna Porphyrogeneta , or even that he was a child of Anna Porphyrogeneta herself. Yaroslav figures prominently in the Norse Sagas under the name of Jarisleif the Lame; his legendary lameness (probably resulting from an arrow wound) was corroborated by the scientists who examined his relics...

<<b>>Family life and posterity<</B>>
In 1019, Yaroslav married Ingegerd Olofsdotter , daughter of the king of Sweden , and gave Ladoga to her as a marriage gift. There are good reasons to believe that before that time he had been married to a woman named Anna, of disputed extraction.[citation needed ]

In the Saint Sophia Cathedral , one may see a fresco representing the whole family: Yaroslav, Irene (as Ingigerd was known in Rus), their five daughters and five sons. Yaroslav married three of his daughters to foreign princes who lived in exile at his court: Elizabeth to Harald III of Norway (who had attained her hand by his military exploits in the Byzantine Empire ); Anastasia to the future Andrew I of Hungary , and the youngest daughter Anne of Kiev married Henry I of France and was the regent of France during their son's minority. Another daughter may have been the Agatha who married Edward the Exile , heir to the throne of England and was the mother of Edgar ∆theling and St. Margaret of Scotland .


Yaroslav had one son from the first marriage (his Christian name being Ilya), and 6 sons from the second marriage. Apprehending the danger that could ensue from divisions between brothers, he exhorted them to live in peace with each other. The eldest of these, Vladimir of Novgorod , best remembered for building the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod , predeceased his father. Three other sons-Iziaslav , Sviatoslav , and Vsevolod -reigned in Kiev one after another. The youngest children of Yaroslav were Igor of Volynia and Vyacheslav of Smolensk .


Vratislav I Duke of Bohemia and Drahombira ze Stodor




Husband Vratislav I Duke of Bohemia 15

           Born: Abt 877 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Feb 921
         Buried: 


         Father: Borijov I Duke of Bohemia (Abt 0842-Abt 0894) 15
         Mother: Lidmila ze Psova (Abt 0853-0921) 15


       Marriage: 



Wife Drahombira ze Stodor 15

           Born: Abt 881 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 937
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Boleslav I Duke of Bohemia 15

           Born: Abt 900 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 967
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Bozena (Abt 0901-      ) 15




Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme and Pontia de la Marche




Husband Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme 7 8 9

            AKA: Wulgrin II Count of AngoulÍme and Ponce de la Marche, Bougrin Taillifer
           Born: Abt 1108 - AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Sep 1140 - Ch‚teau de Bouteville, Bouteville, Angoumois, (Charente, France)
         Buried:  - Saint-…parche, AngoulÍme, Angoumois, (Charente, France)


         Father: William III Count of AngoulÍme (Abt 1084-1120) 1 2
         Mother: Vitapoi de Bezaume (      -      ) 1 5


       Marriage: 

Events

ē Count of AngoulÍme: 1118-1140.




Wife Pontia de la Marche 7

            AKA: Pontia de la Marche
           Born:  - <La Marche, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger "the Poitevin" Montgomery (Abt 1058-Between 1122/1140) 15 16
         Mother: Almodis Countess of La Marche (Abt 1062-      ) 15




Children
1 M William IV Taillifer Count of AngoulÍme 17 18

            AKA: Guillaume "Taillifer" Comtť d'AngoulÍme
           Born:  - <AngoulÍme, Angoumois (Charente, France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Aug 1179 - Messina, Sicily
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Marguerite de Turenne (      -      ) 19
           Marr: Abt 1147



Birth Notes: Husband - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have been born about 1089 in Angouleme.


Death Notes: Husband - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

May have died on 16 Nov 1140 (burial date?).


Research Notes: Husband - Vulgrin II Comte d'AngoulÍme

From Wikipedia - Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme :

Wulgrin II (also Vulgrin or Bougrin), called Taillifer or Rudel, was the Count of AngoulÍme from 1120 to his death on 16 November 1140.[1] He was a son of Count William III and he married Pontia de la Marche, daughter of Roger the Poitevin and Almodis, the daughter of count Aldebert II of La Marche. They had only one son, William IV of AngoulÍme . After the death of his first wife, Wulgrin remarried to Amable de Ch‚tellerault and had three children: Fulk, Geoffrey "Martel" and an unnamed daughter.

He retook Blaye from William X of Aquitaine in 1127 and reconstructed the castle there in 1140.[2]

The troubadour Jaufrť Rudel may be possibly his son or his son-in-law.[2]


Research Notes: Child - William IV Taillifer Count of AngoulÍme

3rd husband of Marguerite de Turenne.

From Wikipedia - William IV of AngoulÍme :

William IV of AngoulÍme, inherited the territory of Count of Angouleme from his father, Wulgrin II of AngoulÍme .

It is from him, that the territory was split between the three brothers all sons of William IV: Wulgrin III of AngoulÍme who was the eldest, William V of AngoulÍme and Aymer of AngoulÍme .

After the death of Aymer, the territory did not pass to Aymer's daughter, Isabella of Angouleme , Queen consort to John of England , but rather to the daughter of Wulgrim III, Mathilde of AngoulÍme , who had married Hugh IX of Lusignan , father of Hugh X of Lusignan .


Waldemar Duke of Russia




Husband Waldemar Duke of Russia 15

           Born: Abt 995 - <Russia>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Arlogia 15

           Born: Abt 1015 - <Russia>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ragnvald Brusesson (Abt 1011-1046) 15
           Marr: Abt 1034 - <Russia>




Waleran I Count of Meulan and Oda de Conteville




Husband Waleran I Count of Meulan

           Born: Abt 990
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1069
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Count of Meulan (Abt 0965-      ) 15
         Mother: Alix de Vexin (Abt 0970-      ) 15


       Marriage: Abt 1017 - France



Wife Oda de Conteville 20 21

           Born: Abt 998 - Conteville, <(Eure)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Jean de Conteville Earl of Comyn, Sieur de Tonsburgh (Abt 0965-      ) 22 23 24
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Adeline of Meulan 15 21

            AKA: Adeliza Meulent
           Born: Abt 1014 - <Pont-Audemer, (Eure)>, Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1081
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Roger de Beaumont Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer (Abt 1015-1094) 15 21
           Marr: Abt 1048


2 M Hugh Count of Meulan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Waleran I Count of Meulan

Source: Wikipedia - Roger de Beaumont (Waleran III) and Counts of Meulan (Waleran I)


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Count of Meulan

Source: Wikipedia - Counts of Meulan


Waltheof of Bamburgh




Husband Waltheof of Bamburgh 15 25

            AKA: Walroef, Waltheof I of Bamburgh
           Born: Abt 960
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Osulf I of Bamburgh (      -Bef 0963) 26
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Uchtred the Bold Earl of Northumbria 15 27 28

            AKA: Ughtred of Northumbria, Uhtred of Bamburgh, Uhtred Earl of Northumbria
           Born: Abt 971
     Christened: 
           Died: 1016
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ecgfrida (Abt 0973-      ) 15 29
         Spouse: ∆lfgifu (Abt 0997-      ) 15 30



Research Notes: Husband - Waltheof of Bamburgh

From Wikipedia - Waltheof of Bamburgh :

Waltheof was high-reeve or ealdorman of Bamburgh (fl. 994). He was the son of Osulf I . His name is Scandinavian and implies that he had Viking ancestors. It remained in his family when Earl Siward married his great-granddaughter and named his son Waltheof. This son of Siward became Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria . Nothing is known about Waltheof's period in office.


Death Notes: Child - Uchtred the Bold Earl of Northumbria

Assassinated by Thurbrand the Hold


Research Notes: Child - Uchtred the Bold Earl of Northumbria

3rd husband of ∆lfgifu

From Wikipedia - Uhtred of Bamburgh :
Uchtred or Uhtred, called the Bold, was the ealdorman of all Northumbria from 1006 to 1016, when he was assassinated. He was the son of Waltheof I , ealdorman of Bamburgh , whose ancient family had ruled from the castle of Bamburgh on the Northumbrian coast.

In 995, according to Symeon of Durham , when the remains of St Cuthbert were transferred from Chester-le-Street to Durham , Uhtred helped the monks clear the site of the new cathedral. The new cathedral was founded by Bishop Aldhun , and Uhtred married Aldhun's daughter, Ecgfrida, probably at about this time. From his marriage he received several estates that had belonged to the church. [1]

In 1006 Malcolm II of Scotland invaded Northumbria and besieged the newly founded episcopal city of Durham . At that time the Danes were raiding southern England and King Ethelred was unable to send help to the Northumbrians. Ealdorman Waltheof was too old to fight and remained in his castle at Bamburgh . Ealdorman ∆lfhelm of York also took no action. Uhtred, acting for his father, called together an army from Bernicia and Yorkshire and led it against the Scots. The result was a decisive victory for Uhtred. Local women washed the severed heads of the Scots, receiving a payment of a cow for each, and the heads were fixed on stakes to Durham's walls. Uhtred was rewarded by King Ethelred II with the ealdormanry of Bamburgh even though his father was still alive. In the mean time, Ethelred had had Ealdorman ∆lfhelm of York murdered, and he allowed Uhtred to succeed ∆lfhelm as ealdorman of York, thus uniting northern and souther Northumbria under the house of Bamburgh. It seems likely that Ethelred did not trust the Scandinavian population of southern Northumbria and wanted an Anglo-Saxon in power there. [2]

After receiving these honours Uhtred dismissed his wife, Ecgfrida, and married Sige, daughter of Styr, son of Ulf. Styr was a rich citizen of York. It appears that Uhtred was trying to make political allies amongst the Danes in Deira. [2]

In 1013 King Sweyn of Denmark invaded England, sailing up the Humber and Trent to the town of Gainsborough . Uhtred submitted to him there, as did all of the Danes in the north. In July 1013 Ethelred was forced into exile in Normandy. After London had finally submitted to him, Swein was accepted as king by Christmas 1013. However he only reigned for five weeks, for he died at, or near, Gainsborough on 2 February 1014. At Sweyn's death, Ethelred was able to return from exile and resume his reign. Uhtred, along with many others, transferred his allegiance back to Ethelred, on his return. Uhtred also married Ethelred's daughter ∆lfgifu about this time. [2]

In 1016 Uhtred campaigned with Ethelred's son Edmund Ironside in Cheshire and the surrounding shires. While Uhtred was away from his lands, Sweyn's son, Cnut , invaded Yorkshire. Cnut's forces were too strong for Uhtred to fight, and so Uhtred did homage to him as King of England . Uhtred was summoned to a meeting with Cnut, and on the way there, he and forty of his men were murdered by Thurbrand the Hold, with the connivance of Cnut. Uhtred was succeeded in Bernicia by his brother Eadwulf Cudel . Cnut made the Norwegian, Eric of Hlathir , ealdorman ("earl" in Scandinavian terms) in southern Northumbria. [1]

The killing of Uhtred by Thurbrand the Hold started a blood feud that lasted for many years. Uhtred's son Ealdred subsequently avenged his father by killing Thurbrand, but Ealdred in turn was killed by Thurbrand's son, Carl. Eadred's vengeance had to wait until the 1070s, when Waltheof , Eadred's grandson had his soldiers kill most of Carl's sons and grandsons. This is an example of the notorious Northumbrian blood feuds that were common at this time. [3]

Uhtred's dynasty continued to reign in Bernicia through Ealdred (killed 1038) his son from his marriage to Ecgfrida, and Eadulf (killed 1041) his son from his marriage to Sige, and briefly Eadulf's son Osulf held the earldom of northern Northumbria 1067 until he too was killed. Uhtred's marriage to ∆lfgifu produced a daughter, Ealdgyth, who married Maldred, brother of Duncan I of Scotland and who gave birth to a son, Gospatric , who was Earl of Northumbria from 1068 to 1072. [4]




Walther King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional]




Husband Walther King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 31 32

            AKA: Walter King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 215
     Christened: 
           Died: 306
         Buried: 


         Father: Clodius III King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] (Abt 0200-0298) 33 34
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Dagobert I King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 35 36

           Born: Abt 264
     Christened: 
           Died: 317
         Buried: 





Wambertus Duke of Moselle




Husband Wambertus Duke of Moselle 37

           Born: Abt 483
     Christened: 
           Died: 528
         Buried: 


         Father: Adalbertus Duke of Moselle (Abt 0457-0491) 38
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ausbertus Duke of Moselle 39

           Born: Abt 514
     Christened: 
           Died: 570
         Buried: 





Chief Black Fish and Watmeme




Husband Chief Black Fish

            AKA: Chief Blackfish, Chiungulla "Black Fish," Cot-ta-wa-ma-go, Mkah-day-way-may-qua, Chinugalla Blackfish, Pah-e-a-ta-hea-se-ka Chinugalla
           Born: 1725
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Oct 1779 - Chillicothe, Shawnee Territory (Ohio), (United States)
         Buried: 
       Marriage: by 1745



Wife Watmeme

           Born: 1730
     Christened: 
           Died: 1797 - Missouri, (United States)
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Chinwa Blackfish

           Born: Abt 1745
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M Young Blackfish

            AKA: Young Black Fish
           Born: 1750
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1794
         Buried: 



3 F Pimegeezhigoqua Blackfish 40

           Born: Abt 1759
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Joseph Duquesne (Abt 1750-      )


4 M William Jackson "Captain" Fish 41 42

            AKA: Paschal Fish Sr, William Jackson
           Born: Abt 1760
     Christened: 
           Died: Late Oct 1833
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elizabeth Bishop (      -      )
           Marr: Abt 1780
         Spouse: < > [Shawnee Woman] (      -      )
           Marr: Abt 1789
         Spouse: Polly Rogers (1782-1848/1849) 43
           Marr: Abt 1798


5 M Black Fish Jr.

           Born: Abt 1760
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



6 F Chelatha Blackfish

           Born: Abt 1761
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Captain Henry Rogers (      -Abt 1803) 44 45


7 F Lemateshe Blackfish

            AKA: Lamateshe-Launateshe-Auqualanaux Blackfish
           Born: 1765
     Christened: 
           Died: 1800
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Joseph Duquesne (Abt 1750-      )



Research Notes: Husband - Chief Black Fish

Shawnee, war chief of the Chillicothe division of the Shawnee tribe.

From Wikipedia - Chief Blackfish :

Blackfish (c. 1729 -1779 ), known in his native tongue as Cot-ta-wa-ma-go or Mkah-day-way-may-qua, was a Native American leader, war chief of the Chillicothe division of the Shawnee tribe. Little is known about him, since he only appears in written historical records during the last three years of his life, primarily because of his interactions with the famous American frontiersmen Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton .

When the Shawnees were defeated by Virginia in Dunmore's War in 1774, the resulting peace treaty made the Ohio River the boundary between western Virginia (what is now Kentucky and West Virginia ) and American Indian lands in the Ohio Country . Although this treaty was agreed to by Shawnee leaders such as Cornstalk , Blackfish and a number of other leaders refused to acknowledge the loss of their traditional hunting grounds in Kentucky.

Violence along the border escalated with the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War in 1775. As a result, the Chillicothe Shawnees moved their town on the Scioto River further west to the Little Miami River , near what is now Xenia, Ohio . Encouraged and supplied by British officials in Detroit , Blackfish and others launched raids against American settlers in Kentucky, hoping to drive them out of the region. In revenge for the murder of Cornstalk by American militiamen in November 1777, Blackfish set out on an unexpected winter raid in Kentucky, capturing American frontiersman Daniel Boone and a number of others on the Licking River on February 7 , 1778 . Boone, respected by the Shawnees for his extraordinary hunting skills, was taken back to Chillicothe and adopted into the tribe. The traditional tale is that Boone was adopted by Blackfish himself, although historian John Sugden suggests that Boone was probably adopted by another family.

Boone escaped in June 1778 when he learned that Blackfish was launching a siege of the Kentucky settlement of Boonesborough , which commenced in September of that year. The siege of Boonesborough was unsuccessful, and the Kentuckians, led by Colonel John Bowman , counterattacked Chillicothe the following spring. This raid was also unsuccessful, but Blackfish was shot in the leg, a wound which became infected and was eventually fatal.


Research Notes: Wife - Watmeme

Shawnee



Birth Notes: Child - William Jackson "Captain" Fish

http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html has b. abt 1760


Death Notes: Child - William Jackson "Captain" Fish

www.wyandot.org/emigrant.htm has late October, 1833.
http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html has d. 1833
Another source states that he died at the Shawnee Mission in 1834. Burial?


Research Notes: Child - William Jackson "Captain" Fish

May have been 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware (see below).
--------------
From text accompanying a photograph from the Smithsonian Institution archives:

"[Leander] Jackson Fish's father [Paschal Fish] was half Shawnee, one eighth Miami and one sixteenth Delaware. "
----------
If the math is correct and Paschal Fish's mother was 100% Shawnee, then his father [William Jackson] was probably 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware. On the other hand, if Paschal Fish's mother was Polly Rogers, either Polly was 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware with William Jackson Fish identifying himself as Shawnee, or Polly was 100% Shawnee and William Jackson Fish was 1/4 Miami and 1/8 Delaware.

---------
From Historic Shawnee Names of the 1700s - http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html

"Fish aka William Jackson - Adopted-white born about 1760-died 1833 - adopted son of Black Fish before 1778, raiding Ohio River valley 1788, Little Turtle War, move to MO 1828, husband 1st about 1780 of Elizabeth Bishop-white, 2nd about 1789 of Shawnee Woman, 3rd 1798 of Polly Rogers-1/2 Shawnee Metis (granddaughter of Black Fish), father with Shawnee Woman of Arch/90, Pascal/92, Isaac/94, Andrew/95, Jesse/96-all 1/2 Shawnee Metis, no children of record with Elizabeth, with Polly of Elizabeth Nakease/98, John/99, William Jr/1800-all 1/4th Shawnee Metis"

See notes under Joseph Jackson. It is unlikely that the Joseph Jackson captured by the Shawnee with Daniel Boone in 1778 was this William Jackson's father since records show this William adopted by the Shawnee before that Joseph was captured.

---------------------

See KHC, vol. 9, pp. 166,167. Historian Rodney Staab of Shawnee Mission, Kansas, has furnished me with an excellent account of Chief Fish written by Fern Long. Her information conflicts somewhat with other sources, but it should not be missed by anyone doing research on the Jackson/Fish family. According to her 1978 article on Chief Fish, she agrees that [William Jackson Fish] was captured as a youth and raised by the Shawnees in the band of Lewis Rogers whose daughter he married. Paschal Fish was "a large-framed man" who "also acquired the Indian ways seeming to be totally Indian." but at the same time, she says "these Shawnees had associated with white people for generations and desired a settled life with homes, schools, churches, ___and agriculture."

----------------
From Kansas State Historical Society
Letter 13 Jan 1831 from Richard W. Cummins, U.S. Ind. Agt., Delaware & Shawnee Agency to William Clark, S.I.A., St. Louis:
"Chiefs of Fish's or Jackson's band of Shawnees have agreed to allow a school to be started. Revd. Mr. McAllister & Thomas Johnson hope to have school in operation early in spring."


Research Notes: Child - Black Fish Jr.




Sources


1. Wikipedia.org, William III, Count of AngoulÍme.

2. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/3455.htm.

3. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4539.htm.

4. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4563.htm.

5. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm.

6. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4708.htm.

7. Wikipedia.org, Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme.

8. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 153A-25 (Marguerite de Turenne).

9. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1121.htm.

10. Wikipedia.org, Vladimir I of Kiev.

11. Wikipedia.org, Family life and children of Vladimir I.

12. Wikipedia.org, Sviatoslav I of Kiev.

13. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

14. Wikipedia.org, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

15. http://www.familysearch.org.

16. Wikipedia.org, Roger the Poitevin.

17. Wikipedia.org, William IV of AngoulÍme.

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19. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1112.htm.

20. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593877461.

21. Wikipedia.org, Roger de Beaumont.

22. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #103113 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874656.

24. Website - Genealogy, http://www.geni.com/people/Jean-de-Conteville/6000000007605652998.

25. Wikipedia.org, Waltheof of Bamburgh.

26. Wikipedia.org, Osulf I of Bamburgh.

27. Wikipedia.org, Uhtred of Bamburgh.

28. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 34-20 (∆lfgifu).

29. Wikipedia.org, Ealdred, Earl of Bamburgh.

30. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176A-3 (Aelfgar).

31. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99027 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

32. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873351.

33. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99028 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

34. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873352.

35. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873350.

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39. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875383.

40. Website - Genealogy, http://www.geocities.com/sam_cook_53/grpf2433.html?200821.

41. Website:, http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html.

42. Museum or other archive, Smithsonian Institution archives.

43. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kearns_family_2&id=I5812.

44. edited by George W. Martin, Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, Vol. X (Topeka, 1908.), p. 402.

45. Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.rogers/1099.1112/mb.ashx.


Sources


1 Wikipedia.org, William III, Count of AngoulÍme.

2 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/3455.htm.

3 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4539.htm.

4 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4563.htm.

5 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4377.htm.

6 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4708.htm.

7 Wikipedia.org, Wulgrin II, Count of AngoulÍme.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 153A-25 (Marguerite de Turenne).

9 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1121.htm.

10 Wikipedia.org, Vladimir I of Kiev.

11 Wikipedia.org, Family life and children of Vladimir I.

12 Wikipedia.org, Sviatoslav I of Kiev.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-20 (Edward "the Atheling").

14 Wikipedia.org, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden; Anne of Kiev.

15 http://www.familysearch.org.

16 Wikipedia.org, Roger the Poitevin.

17 Wikipedia.org, William IV of AngoulÍme.

18 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1111.htm.

19 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1112.htm.

20 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593877461.

21 Wikipedia.org, Roger de Beaumont.

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #103113 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

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25 Wikipedia.org, Waltheof of Bamburgh.

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27 Wikipedia.org, Uhtred of Bamburgh.

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 34-20 (∆lfgifu).

29 Wikipedia.org, Ealdred, Earl of Bamburgh.

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176A-3 (Aelfgar).

31 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99027 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

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33 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99028 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

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38 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875368.

39 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875383.

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41 Website:, http://www.shawnee-traditions.com/Names-7.html.

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43 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kearns_family_2&id=I5812.

44 edited by George W. Martin, Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, Vol. X (Topeka, 1908.), p. 402.

45 Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.rogers/1099.1112/mb.ashx.


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