The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Thomas Knollys and Jane




Husband Thomas Knollys 1

           Born: 1360 - London, Middlesex, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1435 - London, Middlesex, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Jane 1

           Born: 1365 - London, Middlesex, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thomas Knollys Mayor of London 1

           Born: 1390 - North, Hertfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1445 - London, Middlesex, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isabell (1380-1461) 1





John McWilliams and Jean




Husband John McWilliams




           Born: 1760 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died:  - Canada
         Buried: 
       Marriage:  - Scotland



Wife Jean 2 3

           Born: 1762 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died:  - Canada
         Buried: 


Children
1 M David McWilliams 4

           Born: 1780 - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp, Stormont, Lunenburg (Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry), Quebec (Ontario), Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 F Elizabeth McWilliams 5 6

           Born: 1784 - Montréal, Québec, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 1861 - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp, Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Johannes Papst (1777-1869) 7 8 9 10
           Marr: 10 Jun 1800 - Osnabruck Twp, Stormont, Eastern District (Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry), Ontario, Canada



3 M John McWilliams [Jr.] 3

           Born:  - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp, Stormont (Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry), Ontario, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



4 M Robert McWilliams

           Born:  - Cornwall Twp, Stormont (Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry), Ontario, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



5 M James McWilliams 2 11

           Born: 1790 - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp, Lunenburg (Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry), Quebec (Ontario), Canada
     Christened: 1 Aug 1790
           Died: 
         Buried: 



6 F Nancy McWilliams 12

           Born: 1799 - Osnabruck Centre, Osnabruck Twp, Stormont, Eastern District (Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry), Ontario, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - John McWilliams

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dmuir1&id=I2606


Research Notes: Wife - Jean

From George Cloakey email 21 Dec 2009:

We have some evidence that John McWilliams' wife's given name was Jean. From the Wesleyan Baptism Records we have:

McWilliam, Jean, witness at baptism of Maria, daughter of John & Catharina Philipps, 30 Jun. 1793

McWilliams, John & wife Jeane, baptised James, Aug. 1 1790, witness Johannes Rettig & wife Margarethe. Posted by Gord Adams 2 3


Research Notes: Child - Robert McWilliams

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dmuir1&id=I2612


Christening Notes: Child - James McWilliams

Witnesses: Johannes Rettig and wife Margarethe


Jean I Count of Ponthieu




Husband Jean I Count of Ponthieu 13

            AKA: John I of Ponthieu
           Born: Abt 1140
     Christened: 
           Died: 1191
         Buried: 


         Father: Guy II of Ponthieu (Abt 1120-1147) 14
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Count of Ponthieu: 1147-1191.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M William IV of Ponthieu 15

            AKA: William IV de Bellême, William IV Count of Ponthieu, William III Talvas
           Born: 1179
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Oct 1221
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Jean I Count of Ponthieu

From Wikipedia - John I, Count of Ponthieu :

John I of Ponthieu (c. 1140-1191) was the son of Guy II of Ponthieu and succeeded him as Count of Ponthieu in 1147. He married Beatrice of Saint-Pol , and was succeeded by his son William IV Talvas . 13


Research Notes: Child - William IV of Ponthieu

From Wikipedia - William IV, Count of Ponthieu :

William III Talvas (1179 - October 4 , 1221 ) was William III, Count of Ponthieu and William IV (of the house of Belleme/Montgomery). He was Count of Ponthieu , ruler of a small province in northern France that fell under the suzerainty of the dukes of Normandy (later also kings of England) since at least the mid 11th century. He was son and heir of John I, Count of Ponthieu (d 1191) by his third wife Beatrice de St Pol.

Family history and background
His father Jean I, Count of Ponthieu (d 1191 was the son of Guy II, Count of Ponthieu (who died on the Second Crusade 1147) and grandson of William III of Ponthieu , also frequently called William III Talvas, and who represented the senior line of the lords of Montgomery, once trusted vassals and allies of William the Conqueror .

Marriage to Alys, Countess of the Vexin
Talvas was married on August 20 , 1195 to Alys, Countess of the Vexin , the daughter of King Louis VII of France . She was some eighteen years older than he, and had previously been seduced by King Henry II of England while betrothed to his son, King Richard the Lion-Hearted . Richard sent her back to her brother, King Philip II of France , refusing to marry his father's mistress.

Philip then arranged for Alys to marry William Talvas, with the intent that the couple would be childless, and he would thus gain control of Ponthieu, a small but strategically important county. However, Alys then gave birth to a daughter and heiress, Marie , in 1197/1198. This daughter was the maternal grandmother of Eleanor of Castile , first wife of Edward I , King of England, to whom Ponthieu and the disputed Vexin inheritance would eventually pass as Eleanor's dowry. William Talvis died in 1221, his daughter Marie being his heiress. 15


Jean de Brienne of Acre and Jeanne de Châteaudun




Husband Jean de Brienne of Acre 8 16

           Born: Abt 1217 - <Acre, Palestine>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1296
         Buried: 


         Father: Jean de Brienne King of Jerusalem (Abt 1195-1237) 8 17
         Mother: Berenguela Princess of Leon and Castile (Abt 1199-1237) 8


       Marriage: 1251

Events

• Grand Butler of France: 1258.




Wife Jeanne de Châteaudun 8 18

           Born: Abt 1223
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Geoffrey VI Vicomte of Châteaudun (      -1249) 18
         Mother: Clemence (      -      ) 18




Children
1 F Blanche de Brienne Lady of Loupeland 8 19

           Born: Abt 1245 - <Courtrain, Mynn>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1302
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William de Fiennes (Abt 1245-1302) 8
           Marr: 1269 - Wigmore, Herefordshire, England




Research Notes: Wife - Jeanne de Châteaudun

Second wife of Jean de Brienne. 8 18


Death Notes: Child - Blanche de Brienne Lady of Loupeland

Ancestral Roots has d. after 1269. FamilySearch has d. 1302.


Research Notes: Child - Blanche de Brienne Lady of Loupeland

A second cousin of Eleanor of Castile. 8 19


Philip IV King of France and Jeanne of Navarre




Husband Philip IV King of France 20

            AKA: Philip "the Fair" King of France
           Born: 1268 - Fontainebleau
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Nov 1314
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 16 Aug 1284 - Paris, (Île-de-France), France

Events

• Crowned: King of France, 1285.




Wife Jeanne of Navarre 21

            AKA: Jeanne de Navarre
           Born: Jan 1272
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Apr 1305
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry III Count of Champagne and Brie, King of Navarre (      -1274) 22
         Mother: Blanche of Artois (Between 1245/1250-1302) 23




Children
1 F Isabella of France 24 25




           Born: Abt 1295 - Paris, (Île-de-France), France
     Christened: 


           Died: 22 Aug 1358
         Buried: 
         Spouse: King Edward II of England (1284-1327) 26 27
           Marr: 25 Jan 1308 - Boulogne-sur-Mer [Boulogne], (Pas-de-Calais), France



2 M Charles IV of France

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Philip IV King of France

Source: Wikipedia - Edward II of England

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 101-30 20


Research Notes: Wife - Jeanne of Navarre

Source: Wikipedia - Isabella of France.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 45-31. 21


Research Notes: Child - Isabella of France

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 101-31 has b. 1292, d. 27 Aug 1357, m. Boulogne, 28 Jan 1308. But see "Notes" from Wikipedia below.

From Wikipedia - Isabella of France :

Isabella of France (c.1295 - August 22 , 1358 ), Queen consort of England, known as the She-Wolf of France,[1] was the Queen consort of Edward II of England . She was a member of the House of Capet .


Biography

Isabella was born in Paris on an uncertain date - probably between May and November 1295 [2] - the daughter of King Philip IV of France and Queen Jeanne of Navarre , and the sister of three French kings. While still an infant, her father had promised her in marriage to Edward II to resolve the conflicts between France and England over the latter's continental possession of Gascony and claims to Anjou, Normandy and Aquitaine. Pope Boniface VIII had urged the marriage as early as 1298 but was delayed by wrangling over the terms of the marriage contract. The English king, Edward I had also attempted to break the engagement several times. Only after he died in 1307 did the wedding go forward.


Her groom, the new King Edward II , looked the part of a Plantagenet king to perfection. He was tall and athletic, and wildly popular at the beginning of his reign. She married Edward at Boulogne-sur-Mer on January 25 , 1308 . Since he had ascended the throne the previous year, Isabella never was titled Princess of Wales...

Edward and Isabella produced four children, and she suffered at least one miscarriage . The itineraries of Edward II and Queen Isabella also show that they were together 9 months prior to the births of all four surviving offspring. Their children were:
Edward of Windsor , born 1312
John of Eltham , born 1316
Eleanor of Woodstock , born 1318, married Reinoud II of Guelders
Joan of the Tower , born 1321, married David II of Scotland

... When her brother, King Charles IV of France , seized Edward's French possessions in 1325, she returned to France, initially as a delegate of the King charged with negotiating a peace treaty between the two countries. However, her presence in France became a focal point for the many nobles opposed to Edward's reign and she gathered an army to oppose Edward, in alliance with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March , who had become her lover. Enraged by this, Edward demanded that Isabella return to England. Her brother, King Charles, replied, "The queen has come of her own will and may freely return if she wishes. But if she prefers to remain here, she is my sister and I refuse to expel her."
Despite this public show of support by the King of France, Isabella and Mortimer left the French court in summer 1326 and went to William I, Count of Hainaut in Holland (his wife was Isabella's cousin). William provided them with eight men of war (ships) in return for a marriage contract between his daughter Philippa and Isabella's son, Edward . On September 21 , 1326 Isabella and Mortimer landed in Suffolk with an army (most of whom were mercenaries ). King Edward offered a reward for their deaths, and is rumoured to have even carried a knife in his hose with which to kill his wife. Isabella responded by offering twice as much money for the head of Hugh the younger Despenser (this reward was issued from Wallingford Castle ).

The invasion by Isabella and Mortimer was successful: King Edward's few allies deserted him without a battle; the Despensers were killed, and Edward himself was captured and forced to abdicate in favour of his eldest son, Edward III of England . Since the young king was only fourteen when he was crowned on 1 February 1327 , Isabella and Mortimer ruled as regents in his place.

... When Edward III attained his majority (at the age of 18) he, and a few trusted companions, staged a coup on October 19, 1330 and had both Isabella and Mortimer taken prisoner. Despite Isabella's cries of "Fair son, have pity on gentle Mortimer", Mortimer was executed for treason one month later in November of 1330.
Isabella's life was spared by her son and she was allowed to retire to Castle Rising in Norfolk . She did not, as legend would have it, go insane; she enjoyed a comfortable retirement and made many visits to her son's court, doting on her grandchildren. Isabella took the habit of the Poor Clares before she died on August 22 , 1358 , and her body was returned to London for burial at the Franciscan church at Newgate . She was buried in her wedding dress, with Edward's heart interred with her.

[edit ] Notes
^ A sobriquet appropriated from Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 3 , where it is used to refer to Henry 's Queen, Margaret of Anjou
^ She is referred to as born in 1292 in the Annals of Wigmore, and Piers Langtoft agrees, claiming that she was 7 years old in 1299. The French chronicler Guillaume de Nangis and Thomas Walsingham describe her as 12 years old at the time of her marriage in January 1308, placing her birth between the January of 1295 and of 1296. A Papal dispensation by Clement V in November 1305 permits her to marry by proxy immediately, despite not having reached age 12, and only being 10 years old - suggesting a birth-date between November 1294 and November 1295. Since she had to reach the canonical age of 7 before her betrothal in May 1303, and that of 12 before her marriage in January 1308, the above evidence suggests that she was born between May and November 1295. See Weir, Alison, Isabella

[edit ] Sources
Blackley, F.D. Isabella of France, Queen of England 1308-1358, and the Late Medieval Cult of the Dead. (Canadian Journal of History)
Doherty, P.C. Isabella and the Strange Death of Edward II, 2003
McKisack, May. The Fourteenth Century 1307-1399, 1959.
Woods, Charles T. Queens, Queans and Kingship, appears in Joan of Arc and Richard III: Sex, Saints and Government in the Middle Ages, 1988.
Weir, Alison. Queen Isabella:Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England, Balantine Books, 2005. 24 25



Research Notes: Child - Charles IV of France

Source: Wikipedia - Isabella of France


Llywelyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd and Joan Princess of Gwynedd




Husband Llywelyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd




            AKA: Llewellyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn Fawr Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn I of Wales, Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
           Born: Abt 1173 - <Dolwyddelan, Conwy>, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Apr 1240 - Cistercian Abbey of Aberconwy, Wales
         Buried:  - Llanrwst Parish Church, Wales


         Father: Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd Prince of North Wales (      -Abt 1174)
         Mother: Marared ferch Madog ap Maredudd (      -      )


       Marriage: 1205

   Other Spouse: Tangwystl verch Llywarch (Abt 1168-      ) 8 28 29

   Other Spouse: Crysten (      -      )

   Other Spouse: Gwenllian verch Ednyfed Vychan (      -      )



Wife Joan Princess of Gwynedd 30 31 32

            AKA: Joan Princess of North Wales, Joanna Lady of Wales, Siwan, Joan Plantagenet Princess of Gwynedd
           Born: Bef 1200
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 30 Mar 1236 and Feb 1237
         Buried: 


         Father: King John "Lackland" of England (1167-1216) 33 34
         Mother: Clemence (      -      )




Children
1 F Gwladys "Ddu" verch Llewellyn 8 28

            AKA: Gladys Dhu, Gwladus Ddu
           Born: Abt 1206 - Caernarvonshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 1251 - Windsor, Berkshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Reynold de Braose (Abt 1178-1228) 8 35
           Marr: Bef 1221 - Wales
         Spouse: Ralph de Mortimer Lord Mortimer of Wigmore (Abt 1190-1246) 8 36
           Marr: 1230



2 F Elen ferch Llywelyn Fawr 37 38

            AKA: Helene, Elen verch Llywelyn, Helen verch Llywelyn
           Born: Abt 1207
     Christened: 
           Died: 1253
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Robert II de Quincy (      -1257) 39 40
           Marr: After 1237



3 M Dafydd ap Llywelyn

           Born: Abt 1208
     Christened: 
           Died: 1246
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Llywelyn the Great Prince of Gwynedd

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 176B-27. "He had a number of mistresses, one of whom, Tangwystl, was the mother of [28. Gladys Dhu.]"

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p.80

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great :

Llywelyn the Great (Welsh Llywelyn Fawr...), full name Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, (c. 1173 - April 11 , 1240 ) was a Prince of Gwynedd in North Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. He is occasionally called Llywelyn I of Wales.[1] By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for forty years, and was one of only two Welsh rulers to be called 'the Great'. Llywelyn's main home and court throughout his reign was at Garth Celyn on the north coast of Gwynedd, between Bangor and Conwy, overlooking the port of Llanfaes. Throughout the thirteenth century, up to the Edwardian conquest, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn , was in effect the capital of Wales. (Garth Celyn is now known as Pen y Bryn , Bryn Llywelyn, Abergwyngregyn and parts of the medieval buildings still remain).

During Llywelyn's boyhood Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who had agreed to split the kingdom between them following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd , in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200, and made a treaty with King John of England the same year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's illegitimate daughter Joan , also known as Joanna, in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208 Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210 relations deteriorated and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all his lands east of the River Conwy, but was able to recover these lands the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216 he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor Henry III in 1218. During the next fifteen years Llywelyn was frequently involved in fighting with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several of the major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240, and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn .

Genealogy and early life
Llywelyn was born about 1173, the son of Iorwerth ap Owain and the grandson of Owain Gwynedd , who had been ruler of Gwynedd until his death in 1170. Llywelyn was a descendant of the senior line of Rhodri Mawr and therefore a member of the princely house of Aberffraw.[2] He was probably born at Dolwyddelan though he could not have been born in the present Dolwyddelan castle, which was built by Llywelyn himself. He may have been born in the old castle which occupied a rocky knoll on the valley floor.[3] Little is known about his father, Iorwerth Drwyndwn, who may have died when Llywelyn was an infant. There is no record of Iorwerth having taken part in the power struggle between some of Owain Gwynedd's other sons following Owain's death, although he was the eldest surviving son. There is a tradition that he was disabled or disfigured in some way that excluded him from power.[4]

By 1175 Gwynedd had been divided between two of Llywelyn's uncles. Dafydd ab Owain held the area east of the River Conwy and Rhodri ab Owain held the west. Dafydd and Rhodri were the sons of Owain by his second marriage to Cristin ferch Goronwy. This marriage was not considered valid by the church as Cristin was Owain's first cousin, a degree of relationship which according to Canon law prohibited marriage. Giraldus Cambrensis refers to Iorwerth Drwyndwn as the only legitimate son of Owain Gwynedd.[5] Following Iorwerth's death, Llywelyn was, at least in the eyes of the church, the legitimate claimant to the throne of Gwynedd.[6]
Llywelyn's mother was Marared, sometimes anglicized to Margaret, daughter of Madog ap Maredudd , prince of Powys . There is evidence that after Iorwerth's death Marared married into the Corbet family of Caux in Shropshire , and Llywelyn may have spent part of his boyhood there.[7]...

Marital problems 1230
Following his capture, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny decided to ally himself to Llywelyn, and a marriage was arranged between his daughter Isabella and Llywelyn's heir, Dafydd ap Llywelyn. At Easter 1230 William visited Llywelyn's court Garth Celyn , Aber Garth Celyn now known as Pen y Bryn , Abergwyngregyn . During this visit he was found in Llywelyn's chamber together with Llywelyn's wife Joan. On 2 May , De Braose was hanged in the marshland under Garth Celyn , the place now remembered as Gwern y Grog, Hanging Marsh, a deliberately humiliating execution for a nobleman, and Joan was placed under house arrest for a year. The Brut y Tywysogion chronicler commented:

" ... that year William de Breos the Younger, lord of Brycheiniog, was hanged by the lord Llywelyn in Gwynedd, after he had been caught in Llywelyn's chamber with the king of England's daughter, Llywelyn's wife.[42] " A letter from Llywelyn to William's wife, Eva de Braose, written shortly after the execution enquires whether she still wishes the marriage between Dafydd and Isabella to take place.[43] The marriage did go ahead, and the following year Joan was forgiven and restored to her position as princess.

Until 1230 Llywelyn had used the title princeps Norwalliæ 'Prince of North Wales', but from that year he changed his title to 'Prince of Aberffraw and Lord of Snowdon', possibly to underline his supremacy over the other Welsh princes.[44] He did not formally style himself 'Prince of Wales ' although as J.E. Lloyd comments "he had much of the power which such a title might imply".[45]...

Arrangements for the succession
In his later years Llywelyn devoted much effort to ensuring that his only legitimate son Dafydd would follow him as ruler of Gwynedd. Dafydd's older but illegitimate brother, Gruffydd , was excluded from the succession. This was a departure from Welsh custom, not as is often stated because the kingdom was not divided between Dafydd and Gruffydd but because Gruffydd was excluded from consideration as a potential heir owing to his illegitimacy. This was contrary to Welsh law which stipulated that illegitimate sons had equal rights with legitimate sons, provided they had been acknowledged by the father.[50]

In 1220 Llywelyn induced the minority government of King Henry to acknowledge Dafydd as his heir.[51] In 1222 he petitioned Pope Honorius III to have Dafydd's succession confirmed. The original petition has not been preserved but the Pope's reply refers to the "destestable custom ... in his land whereby the son of the handmaiden was equally heir with the son of the free woman and illegitimate sons obtained an inheritance as if they were legitimate". The Pope welcomed the fact that Llywelyn was abolishing this custom.[52] In 1226 Llywelyn persuaded the Pope to declare his wife Joan, Dafydd's mother, to be a legitimate daughter of King John, again in order to strengthen Dafydd's position, and in 1229 the English crown accepted Dafydd's homage for the lands he would inherit from his father.[53] In 1238 Llywelyn held a council at Strata Florida Abbey where the other Welsh princes swore fealty to Dafydd.[54] Llywelyn's original intention had been that they should do homage to Dafydd, but the king wrote to the other rulers forbidding them to do homage.[55]

Gruffydd was given an appanage in Meirionnydd and Ardudwy but his rule was said to be oppressive, and in 1221 Llywelyn stripped him of these territories.[56] In 1228 Llywelyn imprisoned him, and he was not released until 1234. On his release he was given part of Ll to rule. His performance this time was apparently more satisfactory and by 1238 he had been given the remainder of Ll and a substantial part of Powys.[57]

Death and the transfer of power
Joan died in 1237 and Llywelyn appears to have suffered a paralytic stroke the same year.[58] From this time on, his heir Dafydd took an increasing part in the rule of the principality. Dafydd deprived his brother Gruffydd of the lands given him by Llywelyn, and later seized him and his eldest son Owain and held them in Criccieth Castle . In 1240 the chronicler of Brut y Tywysogion records:

" ... the lord Llywelyn ap Iorwerth son of Owain Gwynedd, Prince of Wales, a second Achilles , died having taken on the habit of religion at Aberconwy, and was buried honourably.[59] "

Llywelyn died at the Cistercian abbey of Aberconwy , which he had founded, and was buried there. This abbey was later moved to Maenan near Llanrwst , and Llywelyn's stone coffin can now be seen in Llanrwst parish church. Among the poets who lamented his passing was Einion Wan:

"True lord of the land - how strange that today
He rules not o'er Gwynedd;
Lord of nought but the piled up stones of his tomb,
Of the seven-foot grave in which he lies."[60]

Dafydd succeeded Llywelyn as prince of Gwynedd, but King Henry was not prepared to allow him to inherit his father's position in the remainder of Wales. Dafydd was forced to agree to a treaty greatly restricting his power and was also obliged to hand his brother Gruffydd over to the king, who now had the option of using him against Dafydd. Gruffydd was killed attempting to escape from the Tower of London in 1244. This left the field clear for Dafydd, but Dafydd himself died without an heir in 1246 and was eventually succeeded by his nephew, Gruffydd's son, Llywelyn the Last ...

Children
The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children is uncertain. He was survived by nine children, two legitimate, one probably legitimate and six illegitimate. Elen ferch Llywelyn (c.1207-1253), his only certainly legitimate daughter, first married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester. This marriage was childless, and after John's death Elen married Sir Robert de Quincy , the brother of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester . Llywelyn's only legitimate son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c.1208-1246), married Isabella de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny , Lord of Abergavenny. William was the son of Reginald de Braose , who married another of Llywelyn's daughters. Dafydd and Isabella may have had one child together, Helen of Wales (1246-1295), but the marriage failed to produce a male heir.

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons.

The mother of most of Llywelyn's illegitimate children is known or assumed to have been Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch (c.1168-1198). Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c.1196-1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and is known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey . Their four sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffydd , who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death. Llywelyn had another son, Tegwared ap Llywelyn, by a woman known only as Crysten.
Marared ferch Llywelyn (c.1198-after 1263) married John de Braose of Gower, a nephew of Reginald de Braose, and after his death married Walter Clifford of Bronllys and Clifford. Other illegitimate daughters were Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn, who married William de Lacey, and Angharad ferch Llywelyn, who married Maelgwn Fychan. Susanna ferch Llywelyn was sent to England as a hostage in 1228, but no further details are known...

References

[edit ] Primary sources
Hoare, R.C., ed. 1908. Giraldus Cambrensis: The Itinerary through Wales; Description of Wales. Translated by R.C. Hoare. Everyman's Library. ISBN 0-460-00272-4
Jones, T., ed. 1941. Brut y Tywysogion: Peniarth MS. 20. University of Wales Press.
Pryce, H., ed. 2005. The Acts of Welsh rulers 1120-1283. University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-1897-5

[edit ] Secondary sources
Bartrum, P.C. 1966. Early Welsh Genealogical Tracts. University of Wales Press.
Carr, A. D. 1995. Medieval Wales. Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-54773-X
Davies, R. R. 1987. Conquest, Coexistence and Change: Wales 1063-1415 Clarendon Press, University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-19-821732-3
Lloyd, J. E. 1911. A History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest. Longmans, Green & Co..
Lynch, F. 1995. Gwynedd (A Guide to Ancient and Historic Wales series). HMSO. ISBN 0-11-701574-1
Maund, K. 2006. The Welsh Kings: Warriors, Warlords and Princes. Tempus. ISBN 0-7524-2973-6
Moore, D. 2005. The Welsh wars of independence: c.410-c.1415. Tempus. ISBN 0-7524-3321-0
Powicke, M. 1953. The Thirteenth Century 1216-1307 (The Oxford History of England). Clarendon Press.
Stephenson, D. 1984. The Governance of Gwynedd. University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-0850-3
Williams, G. A. 1964. "The Succession to Gwynedd, 1238-1247" Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies XX (1962-64) 393-413
Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700, lines: 27-27, 29A-27, 29A-28, 132C-29, 176B-27, 177-7, 184A-9, 236-7, 246-30, 254-28, 254-29, 260-31




Research Notes: Wife - Joan Princess of Gwynedd

Natural daughter of John, king of England. John had another, legitimate, daughter named Joan, who was Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland.
-----
From Ancestral Roots, Line 29A-27:
"JOAN, (nat. dau. by unknown mistress [of John "Lackland"]), Princess of North Wales, b. well bef. 1200, d. 30 Mar. 1236 or Feb. 1237..."
-----------
Source - Wikipedia - John of England and Llywelyn the Great.

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great:

"During Llywelyn's boyhood Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who had agreed to split the kingdom between them following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd , in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200, and made a treaty with King John of England the same year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's illegitimate daughter Joan , also known as Joanna, in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208 Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210 relations deteriorated and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all his lands east of the River Conwy, but was able to recover these lands the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216 he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes...

Children
The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children is uncertain. He was survived by nine children, two legitimate, one probably legitimate and six illegitimate. Elen ferch Llywelyn (c.1207-1253), his only certainly legitimate daughter, first married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester. This marriage was childless, and after John's death Elen married Sir Robert de Quincy , the brother of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester . Llywelyn's only legitimate son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c.1208-1246), married Isabella de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny , Lord of Abergavenny. William was the son of Reginald de Braose , who married another of Llywelyn's daughters. Dafydd and Isabella may have had one child together, Helen of Wales (1246-1295), but the marriage failed to produce a male heir.

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons.

The mother of most of Llywelyn's illegitimate children is known or assumed to have been Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch (c.1168-1198). Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c.1196-1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and is known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey . Their four sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffydd , who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death. Llywelyn had another son, Tegwared ap Llywelyn, by a woman known only as Crysten.

Marared ferch Llywelyn (c.1198-after 1263) married John de Braose of Gower, a nephew of Reginald de Braose, and after his death married Walter Clifford of Bronllys and Clifford. Other illegitimate daughters were Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn, who married William de Lacey, and Angharad ferch Llywelyn, who married Maelgwn Fychan. Susanna ferch Llywelyn was sent to England as a hostage in 1228, but no further details are known." 30 31 32


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 29A-27 has m. 1206. Wikipedia has m. 1205.


Research Notes: Child - Gwladys "Ddu" verch Llewellyn

Widow of Reynold de Braose

From Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great :

Another daughter, Gwladus Ddu (c.1206-1251), was probably legitimate. Adam of Usk states that she was a legitimate daughter by Joan, although some sources claim that her mother was Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch.[64] She first married Reginald de Braose of Brecon and Abergavenny, but had no children by him. After Reginald's death she married Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore and had several sons. 8 28


Research Notes: Child - Elen ferch Llywelyn Fawr

If Robert II de Quincy was the husband of Hawise of Chester, Elen was his second wife. Magna Charta Barons lists only Elen and has her as the mother of his 3 daughters. Magna Charta Barons is not a reliable source.

From Wikipedia - Elen ferch Llywelyn :

Elen ferch Llywelyn (c. 1206 - 1253) was the daughter of Llywelyn the Great of Gwynedd in north Wales .

The records of Llywelyn's family are confusing, and it is not certain which of his children were illegitimate, but Elen appears to have been his legitimate daughter by Joan , illegitimate daughter of King John of England .

Elen married John de Scotia, Earl of Chester , in about 1222. He died aged thirty in 1237, and she re-married, her second husband being Sir Robert de Quincy . Their daughter, Hawise , was married to Baldwin Wake , Lord Wake of Lidel. Hawise and Baldwin's granddaughter, Margaret Wake , was the mother of Joan of Kent , later Princess of Wales. Thus the blood of Llywelyn Fawr passed into the English royal family through King Richard II .

There is also a record of a "Helen" daughter of "Llywelyn of Wales" who married Mormaer Maol Choluim II, Earl of Fife and later married Domhnall I, Earl of Mar . The dates appear to rule out this being Elen, since Maol Chaluim II did not die until 1266 while Elen's death is recorded in 1253. Some genealogists propose the existence of another Elen, an illegitimate daughter born towards the end of Llywelyn's life, but there is no clear evidence for this. Another possibility is that this Helen might have been an illegitimate daughter of Llywelyn the Last born when he was a young man, but there is also no evidence of the theory being true. More likely this lady was Susannah ferch Llywelyn ab Iorwerth , who was sent to England in 1228 and married the earl of Fife in the summer of 1237.[1] 37 38


Research Notes: Child - Dafydd ap Llywelyn

Source: Wikipedia - Llywelyn the Great


Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and Joan of Acre




Husband Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford 8 41 42

            AKA: Gilbert "the Red" de Clare 9th Earl of Clare
           Born: 2 Sep 1243 - Christchurch, Hampshire (Dorset), England
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Dec 1295 - Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Buried: 22 Dec 1295 - Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England


         Father: Sir Richard de Clare 8th Earl of Clare (1222-1262) 43 44 45
         Mother: Maud de Lacy Countess of Lincoln (1223-Bef 1289) 46 47 48


       Marriage: Abt 30 Apr 1290 - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England

   Other Spouse: Alice de Lusignan (      -1256) 49 - 2 Feb 1253

Events

• 3rd Earl of Gloucester:

• 7th Earl of Hertford:

• Knighted: 14 May 1264.




Wife Joan of Acre 50 51

            AKA: Joanna of Acre
           Born: 1272 - Acre, Palestine (Israel)
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Apr 1307
         Buried: 


         Father: King Edward I of England (1239-1307) 52 53
         Mother: Eleanor of Castile, Countess of Ponthieu (1241-1290) 54 55




Children
1 F Eleanor de Clare 8 56 57

            AKA: Alianore de Clare, Eleanore de Clare
           Born: 3 Oct 1292 - Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jun 1337
         Buried:  - Tewkesbury, Wiltshire, England
         Spouse: Sir Hugh le Despenser Baron Despenser (1286-1326) 8 58 59
           Marr: After 14 Jun 1306
         Spouse: William La Zouche (      -1337) 60
           Marr: 1327




Research Notes: Husband - Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford

First husband of Joan of Acre.

From Wikipedia - Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford :

Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243 , at Christchurch , Hampshire - 7 December 1295 ) was a powerful English noble. Also known as "Red" Gilbert de Clare, probably because of his hair colour.

Lineage
Gilbert de Clare was the son of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, and Maud de Lacy , Countess of Lincoln , daughter of John de Lacy and Margaret de Quincy . Gilbert inherited his father's estates in 1262. He took on the titles, including Lord of Glamorgan , from 1263.

Being under age at his father's death, he was made a ward of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford .

Massacre of the Jews at Canterbury
In April 1264, Gilbert de Clare led the massacre of the Jews at Canterbury [1], as Simon de Montfort had done in Leicester .

Gilbert de Clare's castles of Kingston and Tonbridge were taken by the King, Henry III . However, the King allowed de Clare's Countess Alice de Lusignan , who was in the latter, to go free because she was his niece; but on 12 May de Clare and de Montfort were denounced as traitors.

The Battle of Lewes
Two days later, just before the Battle of Lewes , on 14 May , Simon de Montfort knighted the Earl and his brother Thomas. The Earl commanded the second line of the battle and took the King prisoner, having hamstrung his horse. As Prince Edward had also been captured, Montfort and the Earl were now supreme and de Montfort in effect de facto King of England.

Excommunication
On 20 October 1264 , de Gilbert and his associates were excommunicated by Guy Foulques , and his lands placed under an interdict .

In the following month, by which time they had obtained possession of Gloucester and Bristol , the Earl was proclaimed to be a rebel. However at this point he changed sides as he fell out with de Montfort and the Earl, in order to prevent de Montfort's escape, destroyed ships at the port of Bristol and the bridge over the River Severn at Gloucester .

Having changed sides, de Clare shared the Prince's victory at Kenilworth on 16 July , and in the Battle of Evesham , 4 August , in which de Montfort was slain, he commanded the second division and contributed largely to the victory.

On 24 June 1268 he took the Cross at Northampton in repentance and contrition for his past misdeeds.

Activities as a Marcher Lord
In October 1265, as a reward for supporting Prince Edward, Gilbert was given the castle and title of Abergavenny and honour and castle of Brecknock .

At Michaelmas his disputes with Llewelyn the Last were submitted to arbitration, but without a final settlement. Meanwhile he was building Caerphilly Castle into a fortress. At the end of the year 1268 he refused to obey the King's summons to attend parliament, alleging that, owing to the constant inroads of Llewelyn the Last , his Welsh estates needed his presence for their defence.

At the death of Henry III , 16 November 1272 , the Earl took the lead in swearing fealty to Edward I , who was then in Sicily on his return from the Crusade . The next day, with the Archbishop of York , he entered London and proclaimed peace to all, Christians and Jews , and for the first time, secured the acknowledgment of the right of the King's eldest son to succeed to the throne immediately.

Thereafter he was joint Guardian of England, during the King's absence, and on the new King's arrival in England, in August 1274, entertained him at Tonbridge Castle .

The Welsh war in 1282
During Llywelyn the Last 's Welsh rebellion in 1282, de Clare insisted on leading an attack into southern Wales. King Edward thus made de Clare the commander of the southern army invading Wales. However de Clare's army faced disaster after being heavily defeated at the Battle of Llandeilo Fawr . Following this defeat, de Clare was relieved of his position as the southern commander and was replaced by William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (who's son had died during the battle).

Marriage and succession
Gilbert's first marriage was to Alice de Lusignan , also known as Alice de Valence, the daughter of Hugh XI of Lusignan and of the family that had now succeeded the Marshal family to the title of the Earl of Pembroke in the person of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke. They were married in 1253, when Gilbert was ten-years-old. She was of high birth, being a niece of King Henry , but the marriage floundered.

Gilbert and Alice separated in 1267; allegedly, Alice's affections lay with her cousin, Prince Edward . Previous to this, Gilbert and Alice had produced two daughters:
Isabel de Clare (10 March 1262 -1333), married (1) Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick ; (2) Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley
Joan de Clare (1264-after 1302), married (1) Duncan Macduff, 7th Earl of Fife ; (2) Gervase Avenel
After his marriage to Alice de Lusignan was finally annulled in 1285, Gilbert was to be married to Joan of Acre , a daughter of King Edward I of England and his first wife Eleanor of Castile . King Edward sought to bind de Clare, and his assets, more closely to the Crown by this means. By the provisions of the marriage contract, their joint possessions and de Clare's extensive lands could only be inherited by a direct descendant, i.e. close to the Crown, and if the marriage proved childless the lands would pass to any children Joan may have by further marriage.

On 3 July 1290 the Earl gave a great banquet at Clerkenwell to celebrate his marriage of 30 April 1290 with Joan of Acre (1272 - 23 April 1307 ). The delay was in getting the Pope to facilitate and agree the arrangement.

Thereafter Gilbert and Joan are said to have taken the Cross and set out for the Holy Land , but in September he signed the Barons' letter to the Pope, and on 2 November surrendered to the King his claim to the advowson of the Bishopric of Llandaff .

Gilbert and Joan had one son - his successor Gilbert, Earl of Gloucester (1291-1314) who was killed at Bannockburn, and 3 daughters: Eleanor (1292-1337) who married firstly Hugh Despencer (The Younger, favourite of her uncle Edward II)-he was executed in 1326, and she married secondly William de la Zouche; Margaret (1293-1342) who married firstly Piers Gaveston (executed in 1312) and then Hugh Audeley; and the youngest Elizabeth de Clare (16 Sep 1295 -04 Nov 1360), who married John de Burgh , 30th Sept 1308, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England, then Theobald of Verdun in 1316, and finally Roger Damory in 1317. Each marriage was brief, produced one child (a son by the 1st, daughters by the 2nd and 3rd), and left her a widow.

Private Marcher War
In the next year, 1291, he quarrelled with the Earl of Hereford , Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford , grandson of his onetime guardian, about the Lordship of Brecknock , where de Bohun accused de Clare of building a castle on his land culminated in a private war between them. Although it was a given right for Marcher Lords to wage private war the King tested this right in this case, first calling them before a court of their Marcher peers, then realising the outcome would be coloured by their likely avoidance of prejudicing one of their greatest rights they were both called before the superior court, the Kings own. At this both were imprisoned by the King, both sentenced to having their lands forfeit for life and de Clare, the Earl of Gloucester , as the aggressor, was fined 10,000 marks, and the Earl of Hereford 1,000 marks.

They were released almost immediately and both of their lands completely restored to them - however they had both been taught a very public lesson and their prestige diminished and the King's authority shown for all.

Death & Burial
He died at Monmouth Castle on 7 December 1295 , and was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey , on the left side of his grandfather Gilbert de Clare .
His extensive lands were enjoyed by his surviving wife Joan of Acre until her death in 1307. Gilbert and Joan had a descendant named Ursula Hildyard of Yorkshire, who in 1596 married (Sir) Richard Jackson of Killingwoldgraves, near Beverley in the East Riding. Jackson died in 1610 and was interred at Bishop Burton. In 1613, James posthumously awarded a coat of arms and a knighthood to Richard for meretorious military service in the Lowlands of Scotland. 8 41 42


Research Notes: Wife - Joan of Acre

Second wife of Sir Gilbert de Clare.

From Wikipedia - Joan of Acre :
Joan of Acre (April 1272 - April 23 , 1307 ) was the daughter of King Edward I of England and Queen Eleanor . She is most notable for her marriage to Ralph de Monthermer and the claim that miracles have allegedly taken place at her grave. She is also notable for the multiple references of her in literature.

Birth and Childhood
Joan, or Joanna, of Acre as she is sometimes referred to, was born in the spring of 1272 in Syria, while her parents, King Edward I and Queen Eleanor of Castille, were on the crusade .[2] She was the only English princess to be born outside of her native land, in the city of Acre, where her name derives from.[3] Her parents departed from Acre shortly after her birth, traveling to Sicily and Spain[4] before leaving Joan with her grandmother in Ponthieu, France.[5] Joan lived for several years in France where she spent her time being educated by a bishop and "being thoroughly spoiled by an indulgent grandmother."[6] Joan was free to play among the "vine clad hills and sunny vales"[7] surrounding her grandmother's home, although she required "judicious surveillance."[8]

As Joan was growing up with her grandmother, her father was back in England, already arranging marriages for his daughter. He wanted to gain both political power and more wealth with his daughter, so he conducted the arrangement in a very "business like style".[9] He finally found a man suitable to marry Joan (aged 5 at the time), Hartman, son of King Rudoph I, of Germany. Edward then brought her home from France for the first time to meet him.[10] As she had spent her entire life away from Edward and Eleanor, when she returned she "stood in no awe of her parents"[11] and had a fairly distanced relationship with them.

Unfortunately for King Edward, his daughter's suitor died before he was able to meet or marry Joan. The news reported that Hartman had fallen through a patch of shallow ice while "amusing himself in skating" while a letter sent to the King himself stated that Hartman had set out on a boat to visit his father amidst a terrible fog and the boat had smashed into a rock, drowning him.[12]

First Marriage
Edward arranged a second marriage almost immediately after the death of Hartman.[13] Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, who was almost thirty years older than Joan and newly divorced was his first choice.[14] The earl resigned his lands to Edward upon agreeing to get them back when he married Joan, as well as agreed on a dower of two thousand silver marks.[15] By the time all of these negotiations were finished, Joan was twelve years old.[16] Gilbert de Clare became very enamored with Joan, and even though she had to marry him regardless of how she felt, he still tried to woo her.[17] He bought her expensive gifts and clothing to try to win favor with her.[18] The couple were married on April 30th, 1290 at Westminster Abbey, and had four children together.[19]

They were:
Gilbert de Clare, 8th Earl of Hertford
Eleanor de Clare
Margaret de Clare
Elizabeth de Clare
Joan's first husband, Gilbert de Clare died on December 7th, 1295.[20]

Secret Second Marriage
Joan had been a widow for only a little over a year when she caught the eye of Ralph de Monthermer , a squire in Joan's father's household.[21] Joan fell in love and convinced her father to have Monthermer knighted. It was unheard of in European royalty for one in power to even converse with a man who had not won or acquired importance in the household. However, in January during the year of 1297, the couple was secretly married.[22] Ralph de Monthermer, 1st Baron Monthermer, and Joan of Acre blind-sided her father with this secret while he was already planning another marriage for his daughter to Amadeus V, Count of Savoy.[23] The arrangements for this marriage were quickly made through written letters. The date was to be March 16th, 1297. Joan of Acre was in dangerous predicament, as she was already a wedded wife, unbeknownst to her father. She sent her son and little daughters over to Edward I, their grandfather, in hopes that their sweetness would serve in her favor. However, her plan did not work.[24] He soon found out the intentions his daughter had, but did not realize she had already committed them.[25]
Upon finding out, he took all of Joan's lands into his own hands and continued on with his planning of the arranged marriage between Joan and Amadeus of Savoy.[26]
Soon after the seizure of her lands, Joan told her father of the official marriage between her and Monthermer. He was enraged and retaliated by immediately throwing Monthermer in prison at Bristol Castle .[27] The people of the land had differing opinions on the princess' matter, however, and has been argued that ones who were most upset were those who wanted Joan's hand in marriage.[28]

With regard to the matter, Joan famously said, "It is not considered ignominious, nor disgraceful for a great earl to take a poor and mean woman to wife; neither, on the other hand, is it worthy of blame, or too difficult a thing to promote to honor a gallant youth."[29] It is said that not only this claim, but the possibility of the appearance of a pregnant stomach seemed to soften Edward's attitude towards the situation.[30]
At last, her father relented for the sake of his daughter and released Monthermer from prison in August 1297.[31] Monthermer paid homage August 2nd and getting the title of Earl of Gloucester and Earl of Hertford , rose to favor with the King during Joan's lifetime. [32]. Monthermer and Joan had four children:

Mary de Monthermer, born October 1297. In 1306 her grandfather King Edward I arranged for her to wed Duncan Macduff, 8th Earl of Fife .
Joan de Monthermer, born 1299, became a nun at Amesbury .
Thomas de Monthermer , 2nd Baron Monthermer, born 1301.
Edward de Monthermer, born 1304 and died 1339.

Relationship With Family
Acre was the seventh child of Edward I and Eleanor's fourteen children. Most of her older siblings died before the age of seven, and many of her younger siblings died before adulthood.[33] Of the survivors, included were Joan, four of her sisters, and her younger brother, Edward (later Edward II , King of England). [34]

Acre, like her siblings, was raised outside her family's household. She lived with her grandmother while her parents were on the crusade.[35] Edward I did not have a close relationship with most of his children while they were growing up, yet "he seemed fonder of his daughters than his sons."[36] In fact, most of the children who made it to adulthood were Edward's daughters.[37]

However, Acre's independent nature caused numerous conflicts between her and her father. Her father disapproved of her leaving court after her marriage to the Earl of Gloucester, and in turn "seized seven robes that had been made for her."[38] He also strongly disapproved of her second marriage to Ralph de Monthermer, a squire in her household, even to the point of attempting to force her to marry someone else.[39][40] While Edward ultimately developed a cordial relationship with Monthermer, even giving him the title of Earl [41], there appears to have been a notable difference in the Edward's treatment of Joan as compared to the treatment of the rest of her siblings. For instance, her father famously paid messengers substantially when they brought news of the birth of grandchildren, but did not do this upon birth of Acre's daughter.[42]

In terms of her siblings, Acre kept a fairly tight bond. She and Monthermer both maintained a close relationship with her brother, Edward II, which was maintained through letters. After Edward II became estranged from his parents and lost his royal seal, "Joan offered to lend him her seal" instead.[43]

Death
Joan of Acre died on April 23, 1307.[44] The cause of her death remains unclear, though one popular theory is that she died during childbirth, a common cause of death at the time. However, historians have not confirmed this to be her cause of death.[45]

Less than four months after her death, Joan's father, Edward I died. Ralph de Monthermer was stripped of his title of Earl soon after the deaths of his wife and father in law, and the title was given to Joan's son from her first marriage, Gilbert.[46]
Joan's burial place has been the cause of some interest and debate. Allegedly, in 1357, Joan's daughter, Elizabeth De Burgh, claimed to have "inspected her mother's body and found the corpse to be intact,"[47]an indication of sanctity. Some sources claim that miracles have taken place at her tomb, from a cure of the toothache to the fever, which was often fatal at the time. [48] 50 51


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor de Clare

Wikipedia - Eleanor de Clare :

Eleanor de Clare (3 October 1292 - June 30 , 1337 ) was the wife of the powerful Hugh Despenser the younger . She was born in 1292 at Caerphilly in Glamorgan , Wales . She was the eldest daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester , and Joan of Acre , daughter of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile ; thus she was a granddaughter to Edward I of England . With her sisters, Elizabeth de Clare and Margaret de Clare , she inherited her father's estates after the death of her brother, Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Gloucester at Bannockburn in 1314.

Marriage to Hugh Desepenser the younger
In May 1306 at Westminster , Eleanor married Hugh Despenser the younger , the son of Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester and Isabel Beauchamp , daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick . Her grandfather, King Edward I of England , granted Eleanor a maritagium of 2,000 pounds sterling. Eleanor and Hugh had nine children:
Hugh le Despenser III (1308-1349)
Gilbert le Despenser , (1309- 1381).
Edward le Despenser , (1310 - 1342), soldier, killed at the siege of Vannes [1]; father of Edward II le Despenser , Knight of the Garter
John le Despenser , (1311 - June 1366).
Isabel le Despenser (1312-1356), married Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel
Eleanor le Despenser , (c. 1315 - 1351), nun at Sempringham Priory
Joan le Despenser , (c. 1317 - 1384), nun at Shaftesbury Abbey
Margaret le Despenser , (c. 1319 - 1337, nun at Whatton Priory
Elizabeth le Despenser , born 1325, died July 13 , 1389 , married Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley .
Eleanor's husband rose to prominence as the new favourite of her uncle, King Edward II of England . The king strongly favoured Hugh and Eleanor, visiting them often and granting them many gifts. One foreign chronicler even alleged that Edward was involved in a ménage à trois with his niece and her husband. Whatever the truth, Eleanor's fortunes changed drastically after the invasion of Isabella of France and Roger Mortimer . Hugh le Despenser was gruesomely executed.

Imprisonment
In November 1326, Eleanor was confined to the Tower of London . The Despenser family's fortunes also suffered with the executions of Eleanor's husband and father-in-law. Eleanor and Hugh's eldest son, another Hugh, who held Caerphilly Castle against the queen's forces until the spring of 1327, was spared his life when he surrendered the castle but remained a prisoner until July 1331, after which he was slowly restored to royal favor. Three of Eleanor's daughters were forcibly veiled as nuns. Only the eldest daughter, Isabel, and the youngest daughter, Elizabeth, escaped the nunnery, Isabel because she was already married and Elizabeth on account of her infancy.
In February 1328 Eleanor was freed from imprisonment. In April 1328, she was allowed possession of her own lands, for which she did homage.

Marriage to William de la Zouche
Eleanor was abducted from Hanley Castle in January, 1329, by William de la Zouche , who had been one of her husband's captors and who had led the siege of Caerphilly Castle. The abduction may in fact have been an elopement; in any case, Eleanor's lands were seized by the King, Edward III , and the couple was ordered to be arrested. At the same time, Eleanor was accused of stealing jewels from the Tower. Sometime after February 1329, she was imprisoned a second time in the Tower of London; later, she was moved to Devizes Castle . In January 1330, she was released and pardoned after agreeing to sign away the most valuable part of her share of the lucrative Clare inheritance to the crown. She could recover her lands only on the condition that she pay the enormous sum of 50,000 pounds in a single day.
Within the year, however, the young Edward III overthrew Queen Isabella's paramour, Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, and had him executed. Eleanor was among those who benefited from the fall of Mortimer and Isabella. She petitioned Edward III for the restoration of her lands, claiming that she had signed them away after being threatened by Roger Mortimer that she would never be freed if she did not. In 1331, Edward III granted her petition "to ease the king's conscience" and allowed her to recover the lands on the condition that she pay a fine of 10,000 pounds, later reduced to 5,000 pounds, in installments. Eleanor made payments on the fine, but the bulk of it was outstanding at the time of her death.
Eleanor's troubles were by no means over, however. After Eleanor's marriage to Zouche, Sir John Grey, 1st Baron Grey claimed that he had married her first. Grey was still attempting to claim Eleanor in 1333; the case was appealed to the Pope several times. Ultimately, Zouche won the dispute. Eleanor remained with him until his death in February 1337, only a few months before Eleanor's own death. Eleanor and William had children:
William de la Zouche, born 1330, died after 1360, a monk at Glastonbury Abbey .
Joyce Zouche, born 1331, died after 4 May 1372 , married John de Botetourt, 2nd Lord Botetourt.

Tewkesbury Abbey Renovations
Hugh le Despenser the younger and Eleanor are generally credited with beginning the renovations to Tewkesbury Abbey that transformed it into the fine example of the decorated style of architecture that it is today. The famous fourteenth-century stained-glass windows in the choir, which include the armor-clad figures of Eleanor's ancestors, brother, and two husbands, were most likely Eleanor's own contribution, although she probably did not live to see them put in place. The nude, kneeling woman watching the Last Judgment in the choir's east window may represent Eleanor. 8 56 57



Geoffrey FitzRobert de Neville and Joan




Husband Geoffrey FitzRobert de Neville 8

            AKA: Geoffrey FitzRobert de Neville
           Born: Abt 1197 - Raby, Durham, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 29 Sep 1242
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert FitzMaldred (Abt 1170-Abt 1245) 8
         Mother: Isabel de Neville (Abt 1176-Bef 1254) 8


       Marriage: Abt 1222 - Raby with Keverstone, Staindrop, Durham, England



Wife Joan 8

            AKA: Margaret
           Born: Abt 1201 - <Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop>, Durham, England
     Christened: 
           Died: After Nov 1247
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Robert Neville 8

           Born: Abt 1223 - <Raby With Keverstone, Staindrop>, Durham, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Aug 1282
         Buried:  - Church Of The Friars, Minor, Yorkshire, England





Thomas Tuchet and Joan




Husband Thomas Tuchet

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Aug 1349
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Tuchet (1264-Bef 1341)
         Mother: Agnes (      -      ) 61


       Marriage: 



Wife Joan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M John Tuchet

           Born: 25 Jul 1327
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 10 Jan 1361
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Joan de Audley (Abt 1332-      )




Research Notes: Husband - Thomas Tuchet

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 176C-32


Research Notes: Wife - Joan

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 176C (Thomas Tuchet)


Research Notes: Child - John Tuchet

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 176C-33


William Count of Hainaut, Holland & Zeeland and Joan




Husband William Count of Hainaut, Holland & Zeeland

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Joan

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Charles of France, Count of Valois (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Philippa of Hainault 62 63




            AKA: Philippa of Hainaut
           Born: 24 Jun 1311
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Aug 1369 - Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Edward III King of England (1312-1377) 63 64 65
           Marr: 24 Jan 1328 - York, Yorkshire, England




Research Notes: Husband - William Count of Hainaut, Holland & Zeeland

Count of Hainaut and of Holland and Zeeland

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 1-29 (Edward III)


Research Notes: Wife - Joan

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 1-29 (Edward III)


Death Notes: Child - Philippa of Hainault

Died from the Black Death


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20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 101-30, 45-31 (Jeanne of Navarre).

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-31.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-30 (Blanche of Artois).

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-30.

24 Wikipedia.org, Isabella of France.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 101-31, 1-28 (Edward II).

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-28.

27 Wikipedia.org, Edward II of England.

28 Wikipedia.org, Llywelyn the Great.

29 Powys-Land Club, Collections Historical & Archæological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and Its Borders. (Vol. 13. London: Thomas Richards, 1880.), p. 121.

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31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 29A-27.

32 Wikipedia.org, John of England; Llywelyn the Great.

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 1-25, 29A-26.

34 Wikipedia.org, Line 1-25.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu).

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-29, 176B-28 (Gladys Dhu).

37 Wikipedia.org, Elen ferch Llywelyn.

38 Wikipedia.org, Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester.

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 54-28.

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41 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-30.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lin3 63-29, 54-30 (Maud de Lacy).

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46 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 54-30.

47 Wikipedia.org, Maud de Lacy.

48 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 103.

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50 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 8-29.

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52 Wikipedia.org, Edward I of England.

53 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-27.

54 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 110-30.

55 Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of Castile.

56 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 8-30.

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58 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 74-32, 8-30 (Eleanor de Clare).

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62 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 103-34, 1-29 (Edward III).

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65 Wikipedia.org, Edward III of England.


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