The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Adalbertus Duke of Alsatia




Husband Adalbertus Duke of Alsatia 1

           Born: Abt 663
     Christened: 
           Died: 741
         Buried: 


         Father: Adalricus Duke of Alsatia (Abt 0637-0720) 2
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Everhard Duke of Alsatia 1

           Born: Abt 689
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





Adalbertus Duke of Moselle




Husband Adalbertus Duke of Moselle 3

           Born: Abt 457 - Belgium
     Christened: 
           Died: 491
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Wambertus Duke of Moselle 4

           Born: Abt 483
     Christened: 
           Died: 528
         Buried: 





Aldebert I Count of La Marche and Périgord and Adalemode of Limoges




Husband Aldebert I Count of La Marche and Périgord 5 6

            AKA: Adalbert I Count of La Marche and Périgord
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 997
         Buried: 


         Father: Boso I "le Vieux" Count of La Marche and Périgord (      -0988) 5 7
         Mother: Emma of Périgord (      -      ) 8


       Marriage: 

Events

• Count of La Marche: 988-997, Poitou, France.

• Count of Périgord: 988-997.




Wife Adalemode of Limoges 9 10

            AKA: Aisceline de Limoges
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1007 and 1010
         Buried: 


         Father: Geraud Vicomte de Limoges (      -      ) 11
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: William V Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (0969-1030) 10 - After 997


Children
1 M Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord 5 12 13

            AKA: Bernard I Comte de la Marche
           Born: Abt 970 - <Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1047 - <La Marche, (France)>
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Amélie Countess of Aubnay (Abt 0974-Abt 1072) 12 14




Research Notes: Husband - Aldebert I Count of La Marche and Périgord

First husband of Adalemode of Limoges (Adalmode, Aisceline), according to Wikipedia (William V, Duke of Aquitaine).

According to Ancestral Roots, line 185A-3, his wife may have been Aisceline(?) de Limoges. 5 6


Research Notes: Wife - Adalemode of Limoges

From Wikipedia - William V, Duke of Aquitaine :

He [William V] was married three times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche . They had one son:
William , his successor 9 10


Death Notes: Child - Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord

May have died about 1041.


William V Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou and Adalemode of Limoges




Husband William V Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou 10

            AKA: William "the Great" Duke of Aquitaine
           Born: 969
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 Jan 1030 - Maillezais Abbey
         Buried:  - Maillezais Abbey
       Marriage: After 997

Events

• Count of Poitou: 990-1030.




Wife Adalemode of Limoges 9 10

            AKA: Aisceline de Limoges
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1007 and 1010
         Buried: 


         Father: Geraud Vicomte de Limoges (      -      ) 11
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: Aldebert I Count of La Marche and Périgord (      -0997) 5 6


Children

Research Notes: Husband - William V Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou

Second husband of Adalemode of Limoges.

From Wikipedia - William V, Duke of Aquitaine :

William V (969 - 31 January 1030 ), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois . He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres , who found in him another Maecenas , and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers . He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche . Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra , count of Anjou . He had to give up Confolens , Ruffec , and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulęme , but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church . He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey . He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II , Alfonso V of León , Canute the Great , and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024-1025, an embassy from Italy , sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin , came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus , co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.

The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes .

Family
He was married three times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche . They had one son:
William , his successor

His second wife was Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William . She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:
Odo , later duke also
Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac
Theobald, died young

His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy . Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou . They had two sons and a daughter also:
Peter William , later duke as William VII
Guy Geoffrey , later duke as William VIII
Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043) 10


Research Notes: Wife - Adalemode of Limoges

From Wikipedia - William V, Duke of Aquitaine :

He [William V] was married three times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche . They had one son:
William , his successor 9 10


Adalrich




Husband Adalrich 15

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Amalgar (      -      ) 15
         Mother: Aquilina (      -      ) 15


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Adalrich Duke of Alsace 15 16

            AKA: Adalric Duke of Alsace, Ethic, Eticho Duke of Alsace
           Born: Abt 645
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Feb 690
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Berswinde (Abt 0647-      ) 17




Research Notes: Husband - Adalrich

From Wikipedia - Adalrich, Duke of Alsace

Adalrich's family originated in the pagus Attoariensis[2] around Dijon in northern Burgundy . In the mid-seventh century they began to be major founders and patrons of monasteries in the region under a duke named Amalgar and his wife Aquilina.[3] They founded a convent at Brégille and an abbey for men at Bčze , installing children in both abbacies. They were succeeded by their third child, Adalrich 15


Research Notes: Child - Adalrich Duke of Alsace

Founder of the family of the Etichonids

From Wikipedia - Adalrich, Duke of Alsace :

Adalrich (died after 683), also known as Eticho,[1] was the Duke of Alsace , the founder of the family of the Etichonids , and an important and influential figure in the power politic of late seventh-century Austrasia .

Adalrich's family originated in the pagus Attoariensis[2] around Dijon in northern Burgundy . In the mid-seventh century they began to be major founders and patrons of monasteries in the region under a duke named Amalgar and his wife Aquilina.[3] They founded a convent at Brégille and an abbey for men at Bčze , installing children in both abbacies. They were succeeded by their third child, Adalrich,[4] who was the father of Adalrich, Duke of Alsace.

Civil war of 675-679
Adalrich first enters history as a member of the faction of nobles which invited Childeric II to take the kingship of Neustria and Burgundy in 673 after the death of Chlothar III . He married Berswinda, a relative of Leodegar , the famous Bishop of Autun , whose party he supported in the civil war which followed Childeric's assassination two years later (675). Adalrich was duke by March 675, when Childeric had granted him honores in Alsace with the title of dux and asked him to transfer some land to the recently-founded (c. 662) abbey at Gregoriental[5] on behalf of Abbot Valedio. This grant was most probably the result of his support for Childeric in Burgundy, which had often disputed possession of Alsace with Austrasia. Later writers saw Adalrich as the successor in Alsace of Duke Boniface . After Childeric's assassination, Adalrich threw his support behind Dagobert II for the Austrasian throne.

Adalrich abandoned Leodegar and went over to Ebroin , the mayor of the palace of Neustria, sometime before 677, when he appears as an ally of Theuderic, who granted him the monastery of Bčze.[6] Taking advantage of the assassination of Hector of Provence in 679 to bid for power in Provence, he marched on Lyon but failed to take it and, returning to Alsace, switched his support to the Austrasians once more, only to find himself dispossessed of his lands in Alsace by King Theuderic III , an ally (and puppet) of Ebroin's who had opposed Dagobert in Austrasia since 675, who gave them to the Abbey of Bčze that year (679).

Power in Alsace
Adalrich maintained his power in a restricted dukedom which did not encompass land west of the Vosges as it had under Boniface and his predecessors. This land was a part of the kingdoms of Neustria and Burgundy, and only the land between the Vosges and the Rhine south to the Sornegau , later Alsace proper, remained with Austrasia under Adalrich. The west of Vosges was under duke Theotchar .

In Alsace, however, the civil war had resulted in a curtailed royal power and Adalrich's influence and authority, though restricted in territory, was augmented in practical scope. After the war, parts of the Frankish kingdom saw a more powerful viceregal hand under the exercise of the mayors of the palaces, while other regions were even less directly affected by the royal prerogative. The Merovingian palace at Marlenheim in Alsace was never visited by a royal figure again in Adalrich's lifetime. While southern Austrasia had been the centre of Wulfoald 's power, the Arnulflings were a north Austrasian family, who took scarce interest in Alsatian affairs until the 730s and 740s.

Adalrich had initially made his allies counts, but in 683 he granted the comital office to his son and eventual successor Adalbert . By controlling monasteries and counties in the family, Adalrich built up a powerful regional duchy to pass on to his Etichonid heirs.

Relationship with monasteries
Adalrich had a rocky relationship with the monasteries of his realm, upon which he relied for his power. He is infamous for the suppression of that of Grandval and for lording it over monasteries, including his own foundations. According to the Life of Germanus of Grandval, Adalrich "wickedly began oppressing the people in the vicinity [Sornegau] of the monastery and to allege that they had always been rebels against his predecessors." He removed the centenarius ruling in the region and replaced him with his own man, Count Ericho. He exiled the people of the Sornegau, who denied being rebels against previous dukes. Many of the people exiled from the valley were attached to Grandval and could not thus be exiled. Adalrich marched into the valley of the Sornegau with a large army of Alemanni at one end while his lieutenant Adalmund entered with a host by the other. The abbot, Germanus himself, and his provost Randoald met Adalrich with books and relics in order to persuade him not to make violence. The duke granted a wadium,[7] a device of recompense or promise, and offered thus to spare the valley devastation, but for unknown reasons Germanus refused it. The region was ravaged.

Perhaps as penance for his relationship to the deaths of two future saints, Leodegar and Germanus of Grandval, or perhaps out of a secret desire - disclosed it is said to his intimate friends - to found a place to the service of God and take up the religious life, Adalrich founded two monasteries in north central Alsace between 680 and 700: Ebersheim in honour of Saint Maurice and Hohenburg on the site of an old Roman fort (of the emperor Maximian ) discovered by his huntsmen and which he appropriated for his own military uses. Adalrich's daughter Odilia served as Hohenburg's first abbess and was later named patron saint of Alsace by Pope Pius VII in 1807.

Veneration as a saint
His daughter Odilia was reputedly born blind, which Adalrich took as a punishment for some offence done to God. In order to save face with his retainers, he tried to persuade his wife to kill the infant child in secret. Berswinda instead sent the child into hiding with a maid at the monastery of Palma . According to the Life of Odilia, a bishop named Erhard baptised the adolescent girl and smeared a chrism on her eyes, which miraculously restored her sight.

The bishop tried to restore the duke's relationship with his daughter, but Adalrich, fearing the effect of admitting to having a daughter hiding in poverty in a monastery would have on his subjects, refused. A son of his, ignoring Adalrich's orders, brought his sister back to Hohenburg, where Adalrich was holding court. When Odilia arrived, Adalrich, in a rage, struck a blow with his sceptre to his son's head, accidentally killing him. Disgraced, he reluctant allowed Odilia to live in the monastery, which had not abbess, with a minimal wage under a British nun.

Towards the end of his life he was reconciled to her and made her the first abbess of his foundation, handing the abbey over as if it were private property.[8] Through his daughter Adalrich was reconciled to God and as early as the twelfth century was regarded as a saint with a local cult. His burial garments were displayed to pilgrims in his foundation at Hohenburg and a feast day was celebrated annually by the nuns. The portrayal of Adalrich as a nobleman who became holy while retaining his noble status and rank was very popular in the Rhineland and as far away as Bavaria in the Middle Ages. The Life probably sought to show how by simply maltreating a blind daughter in order to save face, Adalrich ended up far more dishonoured than he otherwise would have. 15 16


Adalrich Duke of Alsace and Berswinde




Husband Adalrich Duke of Alsace 15 16

            AKA: Adalric Duke of Alsace, Ethic, Eticho Duke of Alsace
           Born: Abt 645
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Feb 690
         Buried: 


         Father: Adalrich (      -      ) 15
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Obtained: Duchy of Alsace, 662.

• Duke of Alsace: 662-690.




Wife Berswinde 17

           Born: Abt 647 - France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Siegbert III King of Austrasia (Abt 0615-0656) 18 19
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Adelbert Duke of Alsace 20 21

           Born: Abt 688 - Alsace, Austrasia, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 722
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Adalrich Duke of Alsace

Founder of the family of the Etichonids

From Wikipedia - Adalrich, Duke of Alsace :

Adalrich (died after 683), also known as Eticho,[1] was the Duke of Alsace , the founder of the family of the Etichonids , and an important and influential figure in the power politic of late seventh-century Austrasia .

Adalrich's family originated in the pagus Attoariensis[2] around Dijon in northern Burgundy . In the mid-seventh century they began to be major founders and patrons of monasteries in the region under a duke named Amalgar and his wife Aquilina.[3] They founded a convent at Brégille and an abbey for men at Bčze , installing children in both abbacies. They were succeeded by their third child, Adalrich,[4] who was the father of Adalrich, Duke of Alsace.

Civil war of 675-679
Adalrich first enters history as a member of the faction of nobles which invited Childeric II to take the kingship of Neustria and Burgundy in 673 after the death of Chlothar III . He married Berswinda, a relative of Leodegar , the famous Bishop of Autun , whose party he supported in the civil war which followed Childeric's assassination two years later (675). Adalrich was duke by March 675, when Childeric had granted him honores in Alsace with the title of dux and asked him to transfer some land to the recently-founded (c. 662) abbey at Gregoriental[5] on behalf of Abbot Valedio. This grant was most probably the result of his support for Childeric in Burgundy, which had often disputed possession of Alsace with Austrasia. Later writers saw Adalrich as the successor in Alsace of Duke Boniface . After Childeric's assassination, Adalrich threw his support behind Dagobert II for the Austrasian throne.

Adalrich abandoned Leodegar and went over to Ebroin , the mayor of the palace of Neustria, sometime before 677, when he appears as an ally of Theuderic, who granted him the monastery of Bčze.[6] Taking advantage of the assassination of Hector of Provence in 679 to bid for power in Provence, he marched on Lyon but failed to take it and, returning to Alsace, switched his support to the Austrasians once more, only to find himself dispossessed of his lands in Alsace by King Theuderic III , an ally (and puppet) of Ebroin's who had opposed Dagobert in Austrasia since 675, who gave them to the Abbey of Bčze that year (679).

Power in Alsace
Adalrich maintained his power in a restricted dukedom which did not encompass land west of the Vosges as it had under Boniface and his predecessors. This land was a part of the kingdoms of Neustria and Burgundy, and only the land between the Vosges and the Rhine south to the Sornegau , later Alsace proper, remained with Austrasia under Adalrich. The west of Vosges was under duke Theotchar .

In Alsace, however, the civil war had resulted in a curtailed royal power and Adalrich's influence and authority, though restricted in territory, was augmented in practical scope. After the war, parts of the Frankish kingdom saw a more powerful viceregal hand under the exercise of the mayors of the palaces, while other regions were even less directly affected by the royal prerogative. The Merovingian palace at Marlenheim in Alsace was never visited by a royal figure again in Adalrich's lifetime. While southern Austrasia had been the centre of Wulfoald 's power, the Arnulflings were a north Austrasian family, who took scarce interest in Alsatian affairs until the 730s and 740s.

Adalrich had initially made his allies counts, but in 683 he granted the comital office to his son and eventual successor Adalbert . By controlling monasteries and counties in the family, Adalrich built up a powerful regional duchy to pass on to his Etichonid heirs.

Relationship with monasteries
Adalrich had a rocky relationship with the monasteries of his realm, upon which he relied for his power. He is infamous for the suppression of that of Grandval and for lording it over monasteries, including his own foundations. According to the Life of Germanus of Grandval, Adalrich "wickedly began oppressing the people in the vicinity [Sornegau] of the monastery and to allege that they had always been rebels against his predecessors." He removed the centenarius ruling in the region and replaced him with his own man, Count Ericho. He exiled the people of the Sornegau, who denied being rebels against previous dukes. Many of the people exiled from the valley were attached to Grandval and could not thus be exiled. Adalrich marched into the valley of the Sornegau with a large army of Alemanni at one end while his lieutenant Adalmund entered with a host by the other. The abbot, Germanus himself, and his provost Randoald met Adalrich with books and relics in order to persuade him not to make violence. The duke granted a wadium,[7] a device of recompense or promise, and offered thus to spare the valley devastation, but for unknown reasons Germanus refused it. The region was ravaged.

Perhaps as penance for his relationship to the deaths of two future saints, Leodegar and Germanus of Grandval, or perhaps out of a secret desire - disclosed it is said to his intimate friends - to found a place to the service of God and take up the religious life, Adalrich founded two monasteries in north central Alsace between 680 and 700: Ebersheim in honour of Saint Maurice and Hohenburg on the site of an old Roman fort (of the emperor Maximian ) discovered by his huntsmen and which he appropriated for his own military uses. Adalrich's daughter Odilia served as Hohenburg's first abbess and was later named patron saint of Alsace by Pope Pius VII in 1807.

Veneration as a saint
His daughter Odilia was reputedly born blind, which Adalrich took as a punishment for some offence done to God. In order to save face with his retainers, he tried to persuade his wife to kill the infant child in secret. Berswinda instead sent the child into hiding with a maid at the monastery of Palma . According to the Life of Odilia, a bishop named Erhard baptised the adolescent girl and smeared a chrism on her eyes, which miraculously restored her sight.

The bishop tried to restore the duke's relationship with his daughter, but Adalrich, fearing the effect of admitting to having a daughter hiding in poverty in a monastery would have on his subjects, refused. A son of his, ignoring Adalrich's orders, brought his sister back to Hohenburg, where Adalrich was holding court. When Odilia arrived, Adalrich, in a rage, struck a blow with his sceptre to his son's head, accidentally killing him. Disgraced, he reluctant allowed Odilia to live in the monastery, which had not abbess, with a minimal wage under a British nun.

Towards the end of his life he was reconciled to her and made her the first abbess of his foundation, handing the abbey over as if it were private property.[8] Through his daughter Adalrich was reconciled to God and as early as the twelfth century was regarded as a saint with a local cult. His burial garments were displayed to pilgrims in his foundation at Hohenburg and a feast day was celebrated annually by the nuns. The portrayal of Adalrich as a nobleman who became holy while retaining his noble status and rank was very popular in the Rhineland and as far away as Bavaria in the Middle Ages. The Life probably sought to show how by simply maltreating a blind daughter in order to save face, Adalrich ended up far more dishonoured than he otherwise would have. 15 16


Adalricus Duke of Alsatia




Husband Adalricus Duke of Alsatia 2

           Born: Abt 637
     Christened: 
           Died: 720
         Buried: 


         Father: Lendifius (Abt 0611-0680) 22
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Adalbertus Duke of Alsatia 1

           Born: Abt 663
     Christened: 
           Died: 741
         Buried: 





Addedomaros King of the Trinovantes




Husband Addedomaros King of the Trinovantes 23

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 0020 B.C.
         Buried: 


         Father: Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes (      -      ) 24
         Mother: Anna of Arimathea (      -      ) 25


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Antedois King of the Iceni 26

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





Herbert IV Count of Vermandois and Valois and Adela of Valois and Vexin




Husband Herbert IV Count of Vermandois and Valois 12 27

           Born: Abt 1032 - <Vermandois, (Picardy)>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1080 - France
         Buried: 


         Father: Otto of Vermandois (Abt 1000-1045) 12 28
         Mother: Parvie (      -      ) 29


       Marriage: Bef 1068



Wife Adela of Valois and Vexin 30 31

            AKA: Adele of Valois, Adele of Vexin, Adelle of Vermandois
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Raoul III "the Great" Count of Valois and Vexin (      -      ) 32
         Mother: Adele de Bar-sur-Aube (      -      ) 33




Children
1 F Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois 12 34 35

            AKA: Adele of Vermandois
           Born: Abt 1065 - <Valois, Île-de-France, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Sep 1120 - <Vermandois, (Picardy)>, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France (1057-1102) 36 37
           Marr: Bef 1080



2 M Eudes "l'Insensé"

            AKA: Odo "l'Insensé"
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Herbert IV Count of Vermandois and Valois

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-22

Also Source: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois 12 27


Research Notes: Wife - Adela of Valois and Vexin

Ancestral Roots, Line 50-22 (Herbert IV) - has Adela of Vexin, a dau. of Raoul III "the Great," Count of Valois and Vexin.

Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois - Has Adele of Vexin
Wikipedia - Hugh of Vermandois - Has Adele of Valois
Wikipedia - Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois - Has Adele of Valois 30 31


Death Notes: Child - Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois

Possibly d. 1124


Research Notes: Child - Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

[Adele of Vermandois] was the heiress of the county of Vermandois, and descendant of a junior patrilineal line of descent from Charlemagne . The first Count of Vermandois was Pepin of Vermandois . He was a son of Bernard of Italy , grandson of Pippin of Italy and great-grandson of Charlemagne and Hildegard .

As such, Elizabeth had distinguished ancestry and connections. Her father was a younger brother of Philip I of France and her mother was among the last Carolingians . She was also distantly related to the Kings of England , the Dukes of Normandy , the Counts of Flanders and through her Carolingian ancestors to practically every major nobleman in Western Europe . 12 34 35


Research Notes: Child - Eudes "l'Insensé"

Source: Wikipedia - Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois


Arnold II Count of Chiny and Adela de Rameru




Husband Arnold II Count of Chiny

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1106
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Adela de Rameru 38

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Hilduin III de Rameru Count of Montdidier (Between 1010/1021-Abt 1063) 39 40
         Mother: Adčle de Roucy (Abt 1014-Abt 1062) 41 42




Children
1 M Otto II Count of Chiny

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Mar 1125
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelaide of Namur (1068-1124) 43




Research Notes: Husband - Arnold II Count of Chiny

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-23 (Adelaide of Namur)


Research Notes: Child - Otto II Count of Chiny

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-23 (Adelaide of Namur)


Sources


1 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875374.

2 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875376.

3 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875368.

4 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875384.

5 Wikipedia.org, County of La Marche.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-3.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-2.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-2 (Boso I).

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A (Adalbert I).

10 Wikipedia.org, William V, Duke of Aquitaine.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-3 (Adalbert I).

12 http://www.familysearch.org.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 185A-4, 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-4 (Bernard I).

15 Wikipedia.org, Adalrich, Duke of Alsace.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 181-1.

17 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872411.

18 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873571.

19 Wikipedia.org, Sigebert III.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 181-2.

21 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872409.

22 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875377.

23 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317221 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

24 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105896 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

25 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #97877 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

26 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317222 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-22, 140-22.

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-21, 140-21.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-21 (Otho).

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 50-22 (Herbert IV).

31 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois; Hugh of Vermandois; Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois.

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-22 (Herbert IV), 140-22 (Herbert IV).

33 Wikipedia.org, Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois.

34 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-23, 50-23.

36 Wikipedia.org, Hugh of Vermandois.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-23, 140-23 (Adelaide de Vermandois).

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 149-23 (Adelaide of Namur).

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 151A-22, 151-22 (Adele de Roucy), 149-23 (Adelaide of Namur).

40 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f92/a0019295.htm.

41 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 151-22, 246-22, 149-23 (Adela de Rameru), 151A-22 (Hilduin III de Rameru).

42 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019619.htm.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-23.


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