The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Sancho III of Castile and Blanca Garcés of Navarre




Husband Sancho III of Castile 1 2

            AKA: Sancho "el Deseado" of Castile
           Born: 1134
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Aug 1158
         Buried: 


         Father: Alfonso VII King of Castile and Léon (1105-1157) 3 4 5
         Mother: Berenguela of Barcelona (Abt 1116-1149) 5 6


       Marriage: 30 Jan 1151 - Catahorra, Logroño

Events

• King of Castile and Toledo: 1157-1158.




Wife Blanca Garcés of Navarre 7 8

            AKA: Blanca of Navarre, Blanche of Navarre, Sancha of Navarre
           Born: After 1133
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Aug 1156
         Buried:  - Monastery of Santa Maria la Real of Najera


         Father: Garcia VII of Navarre (      -1150) 9 10
         Mother: Marguerite de l'Aigle (      -1141) 11 12


Events

• Betrothal: to Sancho III, 15 Oct 1140.


Children
1 M Alfonso VIII "the Noble" King of Castile 13 14

            AKA: Alfonso VIII "the Good" King of Castile, El de las Navas
           Born: 11 Nov 1155
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Oct 1214
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eleanor of England (1162-1214) 15 16
           Marr: Sep 1180



Research Notes: Husband - Sancho III of Castile

From Wikipedia - Sancho III of Castile :

Sancho III of Castile (1134 - 31 August 1158) was King of Castile and Toledo for one year, from 1157 to 1158. During the Reconquista , in which he took an active part, he founded the Order of Calatrava . He was called el Deseado (the Desired) due to his position as the first child of his parents, born after eight years of childless marriage.
He was the eldest son of King Alfonso VII of Castile and Berenguela of Barcelona . During his father's reign, he appears as "king of Nájera " as early as 1149. His father's will partitioned the kingdom between his two sons: Sancho inherited the kingdoms of Castile and Toledo, and Fernando inherited Leon. The two brothers had just signed a treaty when Sancho suddenly died in the summer of 1158, being buried at Toledo. He had married in 1151 to Blanca of Navarre , daughter of García Ramírez of Navarre , having two sons, his successor Alfonso VIII of Castile , and infante García, who died at birth in 1156, apparently also resulting in the death of Blanca. There may also have been an older son who died in infancy.


Research Notes: Child - Alfonso VIII "the Noble" King of Castile

From Wikipedia - Alfonso VIII of Castile :
Alfonso VIII (11 November 1155 - 5 October 1214 ), called the Noble or el de las Navas, was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo [1]. He is most remembered for his part in the Reconquista and the downfall of the Almohad Caliphate . After having suffered a great defeat with his own army at Alarcos against the Almohads, he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohads in the Battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212, an event which marked the arrival of an irreversible tide of Christian supremacy on the Iberian peninsula .
His reign saw the domination of Castile over León and, by his alliance with Aragon, he drew those two spheres of Christian Iberia into close connection.


Regency and civil war
Alfonso was born to Sancho III of Castile and Blanca , daughter of García Ramírez of Navarre , in Soria on 11 November 1155. He was named after his grandfather Alfonso VII . His early life resembled that of other medieval kings. His father died in 1158 when his mother was also dead. Though proclaimed king when only three years of age, he was regarded as a mere name by the unruly nobles to whom a minority was convenient. Immediately, Castile was plunged into conflicts between the various noble houses vying for ascendancy in the inevitable regency. The devotion of a squire of his household, who carried him on the pommel of his saddle to the stronghold of San Esteban de Gormaz , saved him from falling into the hands of the contending factions. The noble houses of Lara and Castro both claimed the regency, as did the boy's uncle, Ferdinand II of León . In March 1160 the former two families met at the Battle of Lobregal and the Castro were victorious.
Alfonso was put in the custody of the loyal village Ávila . At barely fifteen, he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras.

[edit ] Reconquista
In 1174, he ceded Uclés to the Order of Santiago and afterwards this became the order's principal seat. From Uclés, he began a campaign which culminated in the reconquest of Cuenca in 1177. The city surrendered on 21 September , the feast of Saint Matthew , ever afterwards celebrated by the citizens of the town.
Alfonso took the initiative to ally all the major Christian kingdoms of the peninsula - Navarre , León , Portugal , and Aragon - against the Almohads . By the Treaty of Cazola of 1179, the zones of expansion of each kingdom were defined.
After founding Plasencia (Cáceres ) in 1186, he embarked on a major initiative to unite the Castilian nobility around the Reconquista. In that year, he recuperated part of La Rioja from the Kingdom of Navarre .
In 1195, after the treaty with the Almohads was broken, he came to the defence of Alarcos on the river Guadiana , then the principal Castilian town in the region. At the subsequent Battle of Alarcos , he was roundly defeated by the caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf al-Mansur . The reoccupation of the surrounding territory by the Almohads was quickly commenced with Calatrava falling first. For the next seventeen years, the frontier between Moor and Castilian was fixed in the hill country just outside Toledo.
Finally, in 1212, through the mediation of Pope Innocent III , a crusade was called against the Almohads. Castilians under Alfonso, Aragonese and Catalans under Peter II , Navarrese under Sancho VII , and Franks under the archbishop Arnold of Narbonne all flocked to the effort. The military orders also lent their support. Calatrava first, then Alarcos, and finally Benavente were captured before a final battle was fought at Las Navas de Tolosa near Santa Elena on 16 July . The caliph Muhammad an-Nasir was routed and Almohad power broken.

[edit ] Cultural legacy

Tombs of Alfonso and Eleanor
Alfonso was the founder of the first Spanish university, a studium generale at Palencia , which, however, did not survive him. His court also served as an important instrument for Spanish cultural achievement. His marriage (Burgos , September 1180) with Eleanor (Leonora), daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine , brought him under the influence of the greatest governing intellect of his time. Troubadours and sages were always present, largely due to the influence of Eleanor.
Alfonso died at Gutierre-Muñoz and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Henry I , named after his maternal grandfather.


[edit ] Children
With Eleanor, (Leonora of England ) he had 11 children:
Berenguela , or Berengaria, (August 1180 - 8 November 1246 ), married Alfonso IX of Leon
Sancho (1181)
Sancha (1182 - 3 February 1184 )
Henry (1184)
Urraca (1186 - 1220), married Alfonso II of Portugal
Blanch (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252 ), married Louis VIII of France
Ferdinand (29 September 1189 - 1211), on whose behalf Diego of Acebo and the future Saint Dominic travelled to Denmark in 1203 to secure a bride[2]
Mafalda (1191 - 1204)
Constance (1195 - 1243), abbess of Santa María la Real of Las Huelgas
Eleanor (1200 - 1244), married James I of Aragon
Henry I (14 April 1204 - 1217), successor



Gabriel Merritt and Sarah




Husband Gabriel Merritt 17

           Born: 23 Jan 1782
     Christened: 
           Died: Aug 1831 - Sampson, North Carolina, United States
         Buried: 


         Father: Nathiel Merritt (Bef 1755-1819) 17
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Sarah 17

           Born: Abt 1800
     Christened: 
           Died: Oct 1855 - Baker, Georgia, United States
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Jacob Henry Merritt 17

           Born: 26 Jun 1830 - Sampson, North Carolina, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Angeline Smith (      -1893) 17



Death Notes: Child - Jacob Henry Merritt

Died during the Civil War.


Anthony Arnold and Sarah




Husband Anthony Arnold

           Born: Abt 1678 - Baltimore, Maryland, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Jul 1721
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 1699 ? - Maryland, United States



Wife Sarah

           Born: Abt 1678 - <Maryland, United States>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Anthony Arnold

FamilySearch.org AFN: 19J4-2LW


Research Notes: Wife - Sarah

FamilySearch.org AFN: 19J4-2M4


Abel Smith and Sarah




Husband Abel Smith 18

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: John (Blue) Smith (      -      ) 19
         Mother: Sarah Strickland (      -      ) 19


       Marriage: 



Wife Sarah

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Elizabeth Blue Smith 20

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John Flewelling (      -      ) 20




Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Private
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Seisyll King of Britain [Legendary]

From Wikipedia - Sisillius I :

Sisillius I (Welsh : Seisyll) was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth . He was preceded by Gurgustius and succeeded by Jago . He was the father of Kinmarc , king of the Britons. [1]


Severinus Count of Cartagena and Theodora




Husband Severinus Count of Cartagena 21 22

           Born: Abt 501 - Cartagena, Murcia, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Theodora 23 24

            AKA: Theodora of the Visigoths
           Born: Abt 503 - Italy
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Theodoric King of Italy (Abt 0467-0526)
         Mother: Theodora (Abt 0478-      ) 25




         Father: Adulphus of the Visigoths (Abt 0480-      ) 26
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Theodosia of Cartagena

           Born: Abt 525 - Cartagena, Murcia, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Liuvigild King of the Visigoths (Abt 0519-0586) 27 28



Research Notes: Child - Theodosia of Cartagena

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #105743 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer) has b. abt 525 in Cartagena, Spain.

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875422 has b. abt 532.
Theodosia was a sister of St. Isidore.


Robert I de Ewyas Lord of Ewyas Harold and Sibil




Husband Robert I de Ewyas Lord of Ewyas Harold

            AKA: Robert I de Ewias
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1147
         Buried: 


         Father: Harold de Ewyas of Ewyas Harold, Hereford (      -After 1115)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Sibil

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Robert II de Ewyas of Ewyas Harold, Hereford

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1198
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Pernel (      -After 1204)



Research Notes: Husband - Robert I de Ewyas Lord of Ewyas Harold

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 255-26


Research Notes: Wife - Sibil

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 255-26 (Robert I de Ewyas)


Research Notes: Child - Robert II de Ewyas of Ewyas Harold, Hereford

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 255-27


John "the Marshall" FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury




Husband John "the Marshall" FitzGilbert 5 29 30

            AKA: John le Maréchal, John FitzGilbert, John FitzGilbert the Marshal, John the Marshal
           Born: Abt 1105 - <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1165
         Buried: 


         Father: Gilbert "the Marshal" FitzRobert (Abt 1075-Bef 1130) 5 29 30
         Mother: < > de Venuz (Abt 1105-      ) 5


       Marriage: 

Events

• Lord Marshal: 1170-1165.




Wife Sibyl of Salisbury 5 29

            AKA: Sibilla of Salisbury, Sybilla of Salisbury, Sibyl de Salisbury
           Born: Abt 1139 - <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>
     Christened: 
           Died: 3 Jun
         Buried: 


         Father: Walter FitzEdward of Salisbury (Abt 1100-1147) 5 29
         Mother: Sibyl de Chaworth (Abt 1112-Bef 1147) 5




Children
1 M John Marshal 30

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1194
         Buried: 



2 M William Marshall 5

           Born: Abt 1144 - <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>
     Christened: 12 May 1146
           Died: 14 May 1219 - Caversham Manor, England
         Buried: May 1219 - Round Chapel Of Knight's Temple, London, Middlesex, England



3 M Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke 5 31 32

            AKA: Guillaume le Maréchal, William the Marshal, William the Marshal, William Marshall 1st Earl of Pembroke
           Born: Abt 1146
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 May 1219 - Caversham, England
         Buried: May 1219 - Round Chapel Of Knight's Temple, London, Middlesex, England
         Spouse: Isabel de Clare (Abt 1172-1220) 5 33
           Marr: Aug 1189 - London, England



Research Notes: Husband - John "the Marshall" FitzGilbert

From Wikipedia - John Marshal (Earl Marshal) :

John FitzGilbert the Marshal (Marechal) (c. 1105 - 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen , and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of the Empress Matilda . Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I . When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, Wiltshire during this time. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire . Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey . The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

In 1152, John had a legendary confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle . After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke , a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

The office of Lord Marshal , which originally related to the keeping of the King's horses, and later, the head of his household troops, was won as a hereditary title by John, and was passed to his eldest son, and later claimed by William. John also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, married Ralph de Somery , son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

Family
John was the son of Gilbert Giffard (Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I). In 1141, John arranged an annullment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury , the sister of Patrick of Salisbury , who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert and Walter. Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

John's eldest son by Sybilla of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (d. 1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to his second son by Sybilla, William, who made the name and title famous. Though he had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry, who went on to become Bishop of Exeter , and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche .



Research Notes: Wife - Sibyl of Salisbury

2nd wife of John FitzGilbert (John the Marshal).

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 66-27 (Isabel de Clare)


Research Notes: Child - Sir William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke

From <i>Ancestral Roots</i>, Line 66-27:
"3rd Earl of Pembroke, Marshal of England, Protector, Regent of the Kingdom, 1216-1219, son of John Fitz Gilbert (styled John the Marshal) (son of Gilbert Marshal), by his 2nd wife, Sibyl of Salisbury, dau. of Walter of Salisbury, d. 1147, of Chitterne, co. Wilts, sheriff of Wiltshire, founder of Bradenstock Priory."

--------

From Wikipedia - William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke :


William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Guillaume le Maréchal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman. He has been described as the "greatest knight that ever lived" (Stephen Langton ). He served four kings - Henry II , Richard the Lionheart , John and Henry III - and rose from obscurity to become a regent of England and one of the most powerful men in Europe. Before him, the hereditary title of "Lord Marshal " designated a sort of head of household security for the king of England; by the time he died, people throughout Europe (not just England) referred to him simply as "the Marshal".

Early life
In 1152, when William was probably about six years old, his father John Marshal switched sides in the civil war between King Stephen and Empress Matilda . According to one chronicler, when King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle , Stephen used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept a promise to surrender the castle. John broke his word, and when Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or watch as he hanged William in front of the castle, John replied that he go ahead, for "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to hang young William.

Knight-Errant
As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. As a youth he was sent to Normandy to serve in the household of William de Tancarville , where he began his training to become a knight. Through William de Tancarville, he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick , Earl of Salisbury . In 1168 William's uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy of Lusignan . William was injured and captured in the same battle, but was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine , who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery. He had been knighted in 1167 and soon found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments . At that time tournaments were dangerous, often deadly, staged battles, not the jousting contests that would come later, and money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents. His record is legendary: he supposedly fought in 500 such bouts in his life and never lost once.

Royal favour
Upon his return William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father through the many rebellions of his remaining sons (Richard , Geoffrey , and John ). In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. After Henry's death, he was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was not foolish enough to exclude a man whose legend, and power, just kept growing.

In August 1189, when he was 43, King Richard arranged for him to marry the second-richest heiress in England, Isabel de Clare (1172-1240), the 17-year-old daughter of Strongbow . Her father had been Earl of Pembroke , and this title was granted to William, along with large estates in England, Wales , Normandy and Ireland. The marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and though every one of them survived into adulthood, their family line went no further (see below). William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle .

William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of Prince John when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp , from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon the prince. Richard forgave Marshal his first error of judgement, and allowed him to succeed his brother, John Marshal, in the hereditary marshalship , and on his death-bed designated him as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.

King John and Magna Carta
William supported King John when he became king in 1199, but they had a falling out when William paid homage to King Philip II of France for his Norman lands. William left for Leinster in 1207 and stayed in Ireland until 1212, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[1]. In 1212 he was summoned to fight in the Welsh wars. Despite these differences, it was William on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede who dealt with the barons who made King John agree to the Magna Carta , and he was one of the few English noblemen to remain loyal to the royal side through the First Barons' War . It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne.

On 11 November 1216, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War ) to serve as both regent of the 9 year old King Henry III , and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. He was criticized for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the key-notes of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons. Without his presence England might not have survived the disastrous reign of John; where the French and the rebels would not trust the English king's word, they would trust William.

Death and legacy

William Marshal's health finally failed him in February 1219. In March 1219 he realized that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Oxfordshire, near Reading , where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the papal legate, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh ), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his effigy can still be seen.

After his death, his eldest son, also named William, commissioned a biography of his father to be written called L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal . This book, written so soon after his death, has preserved (and probably enhanced) the legend of William Marshal for posterity. While his knightly achievements may be debatable, there is no doubt of his impact on the history and politics of England, from his stalwart defence of the realm to his support of the Magna Carta.


Lineage of William Marshal & Isabel de Clare


William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190 - 6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Betun, daughter of Earl of Albemarle ; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet , daughter of King John I of England . They had no children.
Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191 - 16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
Mahelt Marshal (1194 - 27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk , they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey , they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197 - 27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland , youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland
Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan .
Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 - November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester . No children.
Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 - 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford ; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201 - 27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby - they had seven daughters.
Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.
Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298)
Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun, an ancestor of American pioneer Daniel Boone .
Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh .
Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:
Lady Eva Marshal (c. 1204 - 1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny - from whom was descended Queen Jane Seymour
Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn . She died childless.
Maud de Braose (1224 -1301 , in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore .
Eleanor de Braose (1226 -1251 ). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Humphrey de Bohun.
Eve de Braose (1227 - 28 July 1255 ), married William de Cantelou.
Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208 - 22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford . They had no children.
Joan Marshal (1210 - 1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
Joan de Munchensi (1230 - September 20, 1307) married William of Valence , the fourth son of King John 's widow, Isabella of Angoulême , and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan , Count of La Marche . Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I 's uncle.

The Fate of the Marshal Family
During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk , and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence , the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi ; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke .


Siegbert III King of Austrasia




Husband Siegbert III King of Austrasia 34 35

           Born: Abt 615 - <Austrasia>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Feb 656
         Buried: 


         Father: Dagobert I King of Austrasia, King of the Franks (Abt 0603-0639) 36 37 38
         Mother: Ragintrudis (      -      )


       Marriage: 

Events

• King of Austrasia: 634-656.




Wife

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Berswinde 39

           Born: Abt 647 - France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adalrich Duke of Alsace (Abt 0645-0690) 40 41



Birth Notes: Husband - Siegbert III King of Austrasia

May have been born later (e.g. c. 630)


Research Notes: Husband - Siegbert III King of Austrasia

From Wikipedia - Sigebert III :

Sigebert III (c. 630-656/660) was the king of Austrasia from 634 to his death probably on 1 February 656 , or maybe as late as 660. He was the eldest son of Dagobert I .

To satisfy the Austrasian aristocracy, who exercised a certain autonomy, Sigebert's father gave him the kingdom of Austrasia although it remained part of the larger Frankish realm. On the death of Dagobert, Sigebert ruled Austrasia independently, and free from any subjection to Neustria . Under the tutelage of Blessed Pepin of Landen and other saints of the time, the young king grew into pious adulthood.

He tried in vain to add Thuringia to his kingdom, but was defeated by Duke Radulph in 640. Though only ten years of age, he was the leader of his army. The Chronicle of Fredegar records that the rout left him weeping in his saddle. From this, we can surmise that, at least in part, the downfall of the Merovingian dynasty was a result of child rule, for both Sigebert and his younger brother Clovis II , who ruled in Neustria , were prepubescent children who could not fight on the field and whose regents had their own interests at heart.

It was under his reign that the mayor of the palace began to play the most important role in the political life of Austrasia. That mayor, Grimoald , the son of Pepin I , managed to convince the king to adopt his son Childebert . When Sigebert finally had a son of his own, the future Dagobert II , the mayor of the palace felt threatened, and on the death of Sigebert (at the age of 25) he exiled the young Dagobert to Ireland . Sigebert's remains, defiled during the French Revolution , are preserved in the cathedral at Nancy .

Though not a success as a king, he was revered as the founder of numerous monasteries, hospitals, and churches. He is regarded as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church and is the patron saint of Nancy.

He has been described as the first roi fainéant -do-nothing king-of the Merovingian dynasty .


Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne and Vultrogothe Princess of Orleans




Husband Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne 42 43

            AKA: Sigebert I "the Lame" King of Cologne, Sigobert "the Lame"
           Born: Bef 460
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 509
         Buried: 


         Father: Childebert King of Cologne (Bef 0440-Between 0483/0488) 44 45 46
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Bef 460

Events

• King of the Franks: [Area of Zülpich].

• King of the Franks: Cologne.




Wife Vultrogothe Princess of Orleans 47

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne 48 49 50

            AKA: Chlodoric "the Parricide," Clothaire I "the Patricide" King of Cologne
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 509
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Chroma of the Burgundians (      -      ) 51



Death Notes: Husband - Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne

Murdered by his son Cloderic, at the instigation of Clovis I, King of the Salic Franks, 481-511.


Research Notes: Husband - Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne

From Wikipedia - Sigobert the Lame :

Sigobert the Lame (also Sigibert or Sigebert, d. ca. 509) was a king of the Franks in the area of Zülpich (Latin : Tolbiac) and Cologne .

He was presumably wounded at the knee at the Battle of Tolbiac against the Alamanni .

According to Gregory of Tours , he was murdered by his son Chlodoric upon the instigation of Clovis I , sometime after his victory on the Visigoths (507). Clovis then accused Chlodoric of murder and had him killed in his turn. In this way Clovis became king of Sigobert's and Chlodoric's people.

Gregory suggests that Chlodoric was murdered in the same campaign that also killed the Frankish King Chararic . Before, Clovis had killed Ragnachar and his brothers. After all these murders Gregory tells us that Clovis lamented that he had left no family anymore, implying that amongst his own casualties were close relatives.


Death Notes: Child - Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne

Murdered by agents of his kinsman, Clovis I, King of the Salic Franks.


Research Notes: Child - Cloderic "the Parricide" King of Cologne

Killed his own father in 509, at the instigation of Clovis I, King of the Salic Franks, 481-511.

From Wikipedia - Chlodoric the Parricide :

Chlodoric (or Chloderic) the Patricide (died c. 509) murdered his own father, Sigobert the Lame , in order to take his kingdom. Chlodoric acted upon the instigation of Clovis I a rival king of the Salian Franks . After Sigobert's death Clovis then accused Chlodoric of the murder and had him killed in his turn for the crime. In this way Clovis became king of Sigobert's and Chlodoric's people.

Gregory suggest that Chlodoric was murdered in the same campaign that also killed the Frankish King Chararic . Before, Clovis had killed King Ragnachar and his brothers. After all these murders Gregory tells us that Clovis lamented that he had no family left anymore, implying that amongst his own casualties were close relatives.


Sources


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2. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-26.

3. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-25, 114-25.

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5. http://www.familysearch.org.

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7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-26, 113-26 (Sancho III).

8. Wikipedia.org, Blanca Garcés of Navarre.

9. Wikipedia.org, García Ramírez of Navarre.

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11. Wikipedia.org, Marguerite de l'Aigle.

12. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-25 (Garcia VII).

13. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-27.

14. Wikipedia.org, Alfonso VIII of Castile.

15. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 110-27, 113-27 (Alfonso VIII).

16. Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of England.

17. Fish, Karen Johnson.

18. Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc14/wc14_069.htm.

19. Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc14/wc14_073.htm.

20. Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc14/wc14_067.htm.

21. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875423.

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24. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319839 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

25. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875426.

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27. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105742 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875282.

29. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 66-27 (Isabel de Clare).

30. Wikipedia.org, John Marshal (Earl Marshal).

31. Wikipedia.org, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke.

32. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-29 (Sir Gilbert de Clare), 66-27 (Isabel de Clare).

33. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 66-27.

34. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873571.

35. Wikipedia.org, Sigebert III.

36. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7.

37. Wikipedia.org, Dagobert I.

38. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873572.

39. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872411.

40. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 181-1.

41. Wikipedia.org, Adalrich, Duke of Alsace.

42. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-3.

43. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #107702.

44. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-2.

45. Wikipedia.org, Childebert I; Clovis I.

46. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316468 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

47. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316462.

48. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-4.

49. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #107703.

50. Wikipedia.org, Chlodoric the Parricide.

51. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316473 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).


Sources


1 Wikipedia.org, Sancho III of Castile.

2 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-26.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-25, 114-25.

4 Wikipedia.org, Alfonso VII of León and Castile.

5 http://www.familysearch.org.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-25 (Alfonso VII).

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-26, 113-26 (Sancho III).

8 Wikipedia.org, Blanca Garcés of Navarre.

9 Wikipedia.org, García Ramírez of Navarre.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-25.

11 Wikipedia.org, Marguerite de l'Aigle.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-25 (Garcia VII).

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-27.

14 Wikipedia.org, Alfonso VIII of Castile.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 110-27, 113-27 (Alfonso VIII).

16 Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of England.

17 Fish, Karen Johnson.

18 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc14/wc14_069.htm.

19 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc14/wc14_073.htm.

20 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc14/wc14_067.htm.

21 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875423.

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319838 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875424.

24 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319839 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

25 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875426.

26 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319840 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

27 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105742 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875282.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 66-27 (Isabel de Clare).

30 Wikipedia.org, John Marshal (Earl Marshal).

31 Wikipedia.org, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke.

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-29 (Sir Gilbert de Clare), 66-27 (Isabel de Clare).

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 66-27.

34 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873571.

35 Wikipedia.org, Sigebert III.

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7.

37 Wikipedia.org, Dagobert I.

38 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873572.

39 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872411.

40 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 181-1.

41 Wikipedia.org, Adalrich, Duke of Alsace.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-3.

43 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #107702.

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-2.

45 Wikipedia.org, Childebert I; Clovis I.

46 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316468 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

47 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316462.

48 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-4.

49 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #107703.

50 Wikipedia.org, Chlodoric the Parricide.

51 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316473 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).


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