The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Ieuan Vychan of Llanuwchllyn




Husband Ieuan Vychan of Llanuwchllyn 1

           Born:  - <Llanuwchllyn, Evionydd, > Wales
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         Father: Ieuan ap Gruffydd of Llanuwchllyn and Cevn Trevlaith (      -1370)
         Mother: Annesta verch Llewelyn ap Einion (      -      ) 2


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Children
1 M David of Llanuwchllyn

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Research Notes: Husband - Ieuan Vychan of Llanuwchllyn

Elder son of Ieuan ab Gruffydd and his second wife, Annesta.

From Wikipedia - Llanuwchllyn :

Llanuwchllyn is a village in Gwynedd , north Wales , near the southern end of Bala Lake (Llyn Tegid). Its population in the United Kingdom Census 2001 was 834[1], of which approximately 81% were Welsh-speaking.[2]
Llanuwchllyn railway station is the headquarters of the narrow gauge Bala Lake Railway , centred on the former Great Western Railway station on the standard-gauge line from Ruabon to Barmouth . The town was the birthplace of Welsh language author and educationalist Owen Morgan Edwards . Caer-gai, a Roman fort near Llanuwchllyn, was traditionally known as the home of Cei , the character in the Arthurian legend known in English as Sir Kay.[3] Poets of the 15th century recorded a story, ultimately deriving from the Prose Merlin included in the Lancelot-Grail and the Post-Vulgate Cycle , that King Arthur and Cei were raised at Caer-gai as foster brothers.

---

From History of the Princes, Lords Marcher,, vol. 6, pp. 121-122:

"Ieuan ab Gruffydd, of Llanuwchllyn and Cevn Trevlaith... married, secondly, Annesta, daughter of Llewelyn ab Einion ab Meilir Grûg, Lord of Trev Gynon..., by whom he had a younger son, Rhys of Cyn Llwyd, of whom hereafter, and an elder son--

"Ieuan Vychan of Llanuwchllyn, who married ......., daughter of Sir Gruffydd Vychan, Knight Banneret of Agincourt, and Lord of Burgedin, Garth and Garth Vawr, son of Gruffydd ab Ieuan ab Madog ab Gwenwys (sable, three horse's heads erased argent), by whom he had, besides other issue, a younger son, Howel, ancestor of Hugh Rowlands of Myllteyrn, whose eldest daughter and heiress married Simon Williams of Meillionydd, ancestor of the late Sir Robert Williams Vaughan of Nannau, Bart., and an elder son and heir--David of Llanuwchllyn..." 1


Research Notes: Child - David of Llanuwchllyn

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, Vol. 6, by J. Y. W. Lloyd, London, 1887, p. 122


Ifor




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Children
1 M Philip ap Ifor Lord of Is Coed

            AKA: Philip ap Ivor Lord of Iscoed
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         Spouse: Catherine verch Llewellyn Gryffyth (      -      )




Research Notes: Husband - Ifor

Which Ifor?


Research Notes: Child - Philip ap Ifor Lord of Is Coed

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 254-33 (Thomas ap Llewellyn)


Igor Grand Prince of Kiev and Olga of Kiev




Husband Igor Grand Prince of Kiev

            AKA: Ingvar
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           Died: 945


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Wife Olga of Kiev




            AKA: Saint Olga of Kiev, Olga Prekrasa
           Born: Abt 890


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           Died: 11 Jul 969 - Kiev, Ukraine
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Children
1 M Sviatoslav I of Kiev 3




           Born: Abt 942
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           Died: Mar 972
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         Spouse: Malusha (      -      )




Research Notes: Husband - Igor Grand Prince of Kiev

Source: Wikipedia - Sviatoslav I of Kiev

From Wikipedia - Igor, Grand Prince of Kiev :

Igor (Old East Slavic : , Old Norse : Ingvar, Ukrainian: ) was a Varangian ruler of Kievan Rus from 912 to 945 . Very little is known about him from the Primary Chronicle . It has been speculated that the chroniclers chose not to enlarge on his reign, as the region was dominated by Khazaria at that time. That he was Rurik 's son is also questioned on chronological grounds.
He twice besieged Constantinople , in 941 and 944 , and in spite of his fleet being destroyed by Greek fire , concluded with the Emperor a favourable treaty whose text is preserved in the chronicle. In 913 and 944 , the Rus plundered the Arabs in the Caspian Sea during the Caspian expeditions of the Rus , but it's not clear whether Igor had anything to do with these campaigns.
Drastically revising the chronology of the Primary Chronicle, Constantine Zuckerman argues that Igor actually reigned for three years, between summer 941 and his death in early 945. He explains the epic 33-year span of his reign in the chronicle by its author's faulty interpretation of Byzantine sources.[1] Indeed, none of Igor's activity are recorded in the chronicle prior to 941.
Igor was killed[2] while collecting tribute from the Drevlians in 945 and revenged by his wife, Olga of Kiev . The Primary Chronicle blames his death on his own excessive greed, indicating that he was attempting to collect tribute a second time in a month. As a result, Olga changed the system of tribute gathering (poliudie ) in what may be regarded as the first legal reform recorded in Eastern Europe.

[edit ] References
^ Zuckerman, Constantine. On the Date of the Khazars' Conversion to Judaism and the Chronology of the Kings of the Rus Oleg and Igor. A Study of the Anonymous Khazar Letter from the Genizah of Cairo. // Revue des études byzantines. 1995. 53. Pp. 237-270.
^ Leo the Deacon describes how Igor met his death: "They had bent down two birch trees to the prince's feet and tied them to his legs; then they let the trees straighten again, thus tearing the prince's body apart."[1]


Research Notes: Wife - Olga of Kiev

Source: Wikipedia - Igor, Grand Prince of Kiev

From Wikiepdia - Olga of Kiev :
Saint Olga (Russian and Ukrainian : also called Olga Prekrasa ( or Olga the Beauty, Old Norse : Helga; born c. 890 died July 11 , 969 , Kiev ) was a Pskov woman of Varangian extraction who married the future Igor of Kiev , arguably in 903 . The Primary Chronicle gives 879 as her date of birth, which is rather unlikely, given the fact that her only son was probably born some 65 years after that date. After Igor's death, she ruled Kievan Rus as regent (945 -c. 963 ) for their son, Svyatoslav .
At the start of her reign, Olga spent great effort to avenge her husband's death at the hands of the Drevlians , and succeeded in slaughtering many of them and interring some in a ship burial , while still alive. She is reputed to have scalded captives to death and another, probably apocryphal, story tells of how she destroyed a town hostile to her. She asked that each household present her with a dove as a gift, then tied burning papers to the legs of each dove which she then released to fly back to their homes. Each avian incendiary set fire to the thatched roof of their respective home and the town was destroyed. More importantly in the long term, Olga changed the system of tribute gathering (poliudie ) in what may be regarded as the first legal reform recorded in Eastern Europe.
She was the first Rus ruler to convert to Christianity , either in 945 or in 957 . The ceremonies of her formal reception in Constantinople were minutely described by Emperor Constantine VII in his book De Ceremoniis . Following her baptism she took the Christian name Yelena, after the reigning Empress Helena Lekapena. The Slavonic chronicles add apocryphal details to the account of her baptism, such as the story how she charmed and "outwitted" Constantine and how she spurned his matrimonial proposals. In truth, at the time of her baptism, Olga was an old woman, while Constantine had a wife.

Seven Latin sources document Olga's embassy to Emperor Otto I in 959 . The continuation of Regino of Prüm mentions that the envoys requested the Emperor to appoint a bishop and priests for their nation. The chronicler accuses the envoys of lies, commenting that their trick was not exposed until later. Thietmar of Merseburg says that the first archbishop of Magdeburg , before being promoted to this high rank, was sent by Emperor Otto to the country of the Rus (Rusciae) as a simple bishop but was expelled by pagans. The same data is duplicated in the annals of Quedlinburg and Hildesheim , among others.
Olga was one of the first people of Rus to be proclaimed saint, for her efforts to spread the Christian religion in the country. However, she failed to convert Svyatoslav , and it was left to her grandson and pupil Vladimir I to make Christianity the lasting state religion . During her son's prolonged military campaigns, she remained in charge of Kiev, residing in the castle of Vyshgorod together with her grandsons. She died soon after the city's siege by the Pechenegs in 968 .


Research Notes: Child - Sviatoslav I of Kiev

From Wikipedia - Sviatoslav I of Kiev :

Sviatoslav I of Kiev (Old East Slavic : ([1] (Sventoslav Igorevich), Russian : Ukrainian : Bulgarian : Greek : (Sfendoslavos) ) (c. 942 - March 972) was a warrior prince of Kievan Rus' . The son of Igor of Kiev and Olga , Sviatoslav is famous for his incessant campaigns in the east and south, which precipitated the collapse of two great powers of Eastern Europe-Khazaria and the First Bulgarian Empire ; he also subdued the Volga Bulgars , the Alans , and numerous East Slavic tribes, and at times was allied with the Pechenegs and Magyars . His decade-long reign over Rus' was marked by rapid expansion into the Volga River valley, the Pontic steppe and the Balkans . By the end of his short life, Sviatoslav carved out for himself the largest state in Europe , eventually moving his capital from Kiev to Pereyaslavets on the Danube in 969. In contrast with his mother's conversion to Christianity , Sviatoslav remained a staunch pagan all of his life. Due to his abrupt death in combat, Sviatoslav's conquests, for the most part, were not consolidated into a functioning empire, while his failure to establish a stable succession led to civil war among his successors.

Sviatoslav was the first ruler of Kievan Rus' whose name is indisputably Slavic in origin (as opposed to his predecessors, whose names are ultimately derived from Old Norse ). This name is not recorded in other medieval Slavic countries. Even in Rus', it was attested only among the members of the house of Rurik , as were the names of Sviatoslav's immediate successors: Vladimir , Yaroslav , Mstislav ).[2] Some scholars speculate that the name of Sviatoslav, composed of the Slavic roots for "holy" and "glory", was an artificial derivation combining those of his predecessors Oleg and Rurik (they mean "holy" and "glorious" in Old Norse, respectively).[3]

Virtually nothing is known about his childhood and youth, which he spent reigning in Novgorod . Sviatoslav's father, Igor , was killed by the Drevlians around 942 and his mother, Olga , ruled as regent in Kiev until Sviatoslav's majority (ca. 963).[4] His tutor was a Varangian named Asmud . "Quick as a leopard,"[5] Sviatoslav appears to have had little patience for administration. His life was spent with his druzhina (roughly, "troops") in permanent warfare against neighboring states. According to the Primary Chronicle .

" Upon his expeditions he carried with him neither wagons nor kettles, and boiled no meat, but cut off small strips of horseflesh, game or beef, and ate it after roasting it on the coals. Nor did he have a tent, but he spread out a horse-blanket under him, and set his saddle under his head, and all his retinue did likewise.[6] " Sviatoslav was noted by Leo the Deacon to be of average height and build. He shaved his head and his beard (or possibly just had a wispy beard) but wore a bushy mustache and a one or two sidelocks as a sign of his nobility. He preferred to dress in white, and it was noted that his garments were much cleaner than those of his men. He wore a single large gold earring bearing a ruby and two pearls .[7] [8]

His mother converted to Christianity at the court of Byzantine Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus in 945 or 957. However,[9] Sviatoslav continued to worship Perun , Veles , Svarog and the other gods and goddesses of the Slavic pantheon . He remained a stubborn pagan for all of his life; according to the Primary Chronicle, he believed that his warriors would lose respect for him and mock him if he became a Christian.[10] The allegiance of his warriors was of paramount importance in his conquest of an empire that stretched from the Volga to the Danube.

Family

Very little is known of Sviatoslav's family life. It is possible that Sviatoslav was not the only (and the eldest) son of his parents. The Russo-Byzantine treaty of 945 mentions a certain Predslava, Volodislav's wife, as the noblest of the Rus' women after Olga. George Vernadsky was among many historians to speculate that Volodislav was Igor's eldest son and heir who died at some point during Olga's regency. At the time of Igor's death, Sviatoslav was still a child and he was raised by his mother or at her instructions. Her influence, however, did not extend to his religious observance.

Sviatoslav, had several children, but the origin of his wives is not specified in the chronicle. By his wives, he had Yaropolk and Oleg .[11] By Malusha , a woman of indeterminate origins,[12] Sviatoslav had Vladimir , who would ultimately break with his father's paganism and convert Rus to Christianity . John Skylitzes reported that Vladimir had a brother named Sfengus ; whether this Sfengus was a son of Sviatoslav, a son of Malusha by a prior or subsequent husband, or an unrelated Rus' nobleman is unclear.[13]
When Sviatoslav went on campaign he left his various relations as regents in the main cities of his realm: his mother Olga and later Yaropolk in Kiev, Vladimir in Novgorod, and Oleg over the Drevlians...

Death and aftermath

Fearing that the peace with Sviatoslav would not endure, the Byzantine emperor induced the Pecheneg khan Kurya to kill Sviatoslav before he reached Kiev. This was in line with the policy outlined by Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus in De Administrando Imperio of fomenting strife between the Rus' and the Pechenegs.[35] According to the Slavic chronicle, Sveneld attempted to warn Sviatoslav to avoid the Dnieper cataracts , but the prince slighted his wise advice and was ambushed and slain by the Pechenegs when he tried to cross the cataracts near Khortitsa early in 972. The Primary Chronicle reports that his skull was made into a chalice by the Pecheneg khan, Kurya.[36]

Following Sviatoslav's death, tensions between his sons grew. A war broke out between Sviatoslav's legitimate sons, Oleg and Yaropolk , in 976, at the conclusion of which Oleg was killed. In 977 Vladimir fled Novgorod to escape Oleg's fate and went to Scandinavia , where he raised an army of Varangians and returned in 980. Yaropolk was killed and Vladimir became the sole ruler of Kievan Rus'.

Notes
^ E.g. in the Primary Chronicle under year 970
^ X-XVI [Choice of personal names for the Russian princes of the 10th-16th centuries.] Moscow: Indrik, 2006. ISBN 5-85759-339-5 . Page 43.
^ See in (Moscow, 1970).
^ If Olga was indeed born in 879, as the Primary Chronicle seems to imply, she should have been about 65 at the time of Svyatoslav's birth. There are clearly some problems with chronology.
^ Primary Chronicle entry for 968
^ Cross and Sherbowitz-Wetzor, Primary Chronicle, p. 84.
^ Vernadsky 276-277. The sidelock is reminiscent of Turkic hairstyles and practices and was later mimicked by Cossacks .
^ For the alternative translations of the same passage of the Greek original that say that Sviatoslav may have not shaven but wispy beard and not one but two sidelocks on each side of his head, see eg. Ian Heath "The Vikings (Elite 3)", Osprey Publishing 1985; ISBN: 9780850455656, p.60 or David Nicolle "Armies of Medieval Russia 750-1250 (Men-at-Arms 333)" Osprey Publishing 1999; ISBN: 9781855328488, p.44
^ Based on his analysis of De Ceremoniis Alexander Nazarenko hypothesizes that Olga hoped to orchestrate a marriage between Svyatoslav and a Byzantine princess. If her proposal was peremptorily declined (as it most certainly would have been), it is hardly surprising that Sviatoslav would look at Byzantium and her Christian culture with suspicion. Nazarenko 302.
^ Primary Chronicle _____.
^ Whether Yaropolk and Oleg were whole or half brothers, and who their mother or mothers were, is a matter hotly debated by historians.
^ She is traditionally identified in Russian historiography as Dobrynya 's sister; for other theories on her identity, see here .
^ Indeed, Franklin and Shepard advanced the hypothesis that Sfengus was identical with Mstislav of Tmutarakan . Franklin and Shepard 200-201.
^ "Rus", Encyclopaedia of Islam
^ Christian 345. It is disputed whether Svyatoslav invaded the land of Vyatichs that year. The only campaign against the Vyatichs explicitly mentioned in the Primary Chronicle is dated to 966.
^ Russian Primary Chronicle ( - 2. - 1908, ) for year 6472. The chronicler may have wished to contrast Sviatoslav's open declaration of war to stealthy tactics employed by many other early medieval conquerors.
^ For Sviatoslav's reliance on nomad cavalry, see, e.g., Franklin and Shepard 149; Christian 298; Pletneva 18.
^ Christian 298. The Primary Chronicle is very succinct about the whole campaign against Khazars, saying only that Sviatoslav "took their city and Belaya Vezha".
^ The town was an important trade center located near the portage between the Volga and Don Rivers . By the early 12th century, however, it had been destroyed by the Kipchaks .
^ See, generally Christian 297-298; Dunlop passim.
^ Logan (1992), p. 202
^ Artamonov 428; Christian 298.
^ The campaign against Ossetians is attested in the Primary Chronicle. The Novgorod First Chronicle specifies that Sviatoslav resettled the Ossetians near Kiev, but Sakharov finds this claim dubitable.
^ The Mandgelis Document refers to a Khazar potentate in the Taman Peninsula around 985, long after Sviatoslav's death. Kedrenos reported that the Byzantines and Rus' collaborated in the conquest of a Khazar kingdom in the Crimea in 1016 and still later, Ibn al-Athir reported an unsuccessful attack by al-Fadl ibn Muhammad against the Khazars in the Caucasus in 1030. For more information on these and other references, see Khazars#Late references to the Khazars .
^ Christian 298.
^ Most historians believe the Greeks were interested in the destruction of Khazaria. Another school of thought essentializes Yahya of Antioch 's report that, prior to the Danube campaign, the Byzantines and the Rus' were at war. See Sakharov, chapter I.
^ The exact date of Sviatoslav's Bulgarian campaign, which likely did not commence until the conclusion of his Khazar campaign, is unknown.
^ Mikhail Tikhomirov and Vladimir Pashuto, among others, assume that the Emperor was interested primarily in diverting Sviatoslav's attention from Chersonesos , a Byzantine possession in the Crimea . Indeed, Leo the Deacon three times mentions that Svyatoslav and his father Igor controlled Cimmerian Bosporus . If so, a conflict of interests in the Crimea was inevitable. The Suzdal Chronicle, though a rather late source, also mentions Sviatoslav's war against Chersonesos. In the peace treaty of 971 , Sviatoslav promised not to wage wars against either Constantinople or Chersonesos. Byzantine sources also report that Kalokyros attempted to persuade Sviatoslav to support Kalokyros in a coup against the reigning Byzantine emperor. As a remuneration for his help, Sviatoslav was supposed to retain a permanent hold on Bulgaria. Modern historians, however, assign little historical importance to this story. Kendrick 157.
^ All figures in this article, including the numbers of Svyatoslav's troops, are based on the reports of Byzantine sources, which may differ from those of the Slavonic chronicles. Greek sources report Khazars and "Turks" in Sviatoslav's army as well as Pechenegs. As used in such Byzantine writings as Constantine Porphyrogenitus' De Administrando Imperio , "Turks" refers to Magyars . The Rus'-Magyar alliance resulted in the Hungarian expedition against the second largest city of the empire, Thessalonika , in 968.
^ Boris II was captured by the Byzantines in 971 and carried off to Constantinople as a prisoner.
^ Kendrick 158
^ Simultaneously, Otto I attacked Byzantine possessions in the south of Italy. This remarkable coincidence may be interpreted as an evidence of the anti-Byzantine German-Russian alliance. See: Manteuffel 41.
^ Grekov 445-446. The Byzantine sources report the enemy casualties to be as high as 20,000, the figure modern historians find to be highly improbable.
^ Franklin and Shepard 149-150
^ Constantine VII pointed out that, by virtue of their controlling the Dnieper cataracts, the Pechenegs may easily attack and destroy the Rus' vessels sailing along the river.
^ The use of a defeated enemy's skull as a drinking vessel is reported by numerous authors through history among various steppe peoples, such as the Scythians . Kurya likely intended this as a compliment to Sviatoslav; sources report that Kurya and his wife drank from the skull and prayed for a son as brave as the deceased Rus' warlord. Christian 344; Pletneva 19; Cross and Sherbowitz-Wetzor 90.
^ E. A Lanceray. "Svyatoslav on the way to Tsargrad .", The Russian History in the Mirror of the Fine Arts (Russian)
^ Cooke, Raymond Cooke. Velimir Khlebnikov: A Critical Study. Cambridge University Press, 1987. Pages 122-123
^ London: Shapiro, Vallentine, 1926
^ (Moscow: Det. lit., 1989).
^
^ "The Federation of Jewish Communities protests against the presence of a Star of David in a new sculpture in Belgorod" , Interfax, November 21, 2005; Kozhevnikova, Galina, "Radical nationalism and efforts to oppose it in Russia in 2005" ; "FJC Russia Appeal Clarifies Situation Over Potentially Anti-Semitic Monument" (Federation of Jewish Communities of the CIS Press Release), November 23, 2005; Dahan, David, "Jews protest trampled Star of David statue", European Jewish Press, November 22, 2005

References
Artamonov, Mikhail Istoriya Khazar. Leningrad , 1962.
Barthold, W. . "Khazar". Encyclopaedia of Islam (Brill Online). Eds.: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill, 1996.
Chertkov A. D. Opisanie voin velikago kniazya Svyatoslava Igorevicha. Moscow, 1843.
Chlenov, A.M. ( "K Voprosu ob Imeni Sviatoslava." Lichnye Imena v proshlom, Nastoyaschem i Buduschem Antroponomiki (" ) (Moscow, 1970).
Christian, David . A History of Russia, Mongolia and Central Asia. Blackwell, 1999.
Cross, S. H., and O.P. Sherbowitz-Wetzor. The Russian Primary Chronicle: Laurentian Text. Cambridge, Mass.: Medieval Academy of America, 1953.
Dunlop, D.M. History of the Jewish Khazars. Princeton Univ. Press, 1954.
Golden, P.B. "Rus." Encyclopaedia of Islam (Brill Online). Eds.: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill, 2006.
Grekov, Boris . Kiev Rus. tr. Sdobnikov, Y., ed. Ogden, Denis. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1959
Kendrick, Thomas D. A History of the Vikings. Courier Dover Publications, 2004. ISBN 0-486-43396-X
Logan, Donald F. The Vikings in History 2nd ed. Routledge, 1992. ISBN 0-415-08396-6
Manteuffel Th. "Les tentatives d'entrainement de la Russie de Kiev dans la sphere d'influence latin". Acta Poloniae Historica. Warsaw, t. 22, 1970.
Nazarenko, A.N. ( Drevniaya Rus' na Mezhdunarodnykh Putiakh ( ). Moscow, Russian Academy of Sciences, World History Institute, 2001. ISBN 5-7859-0085-8 .
Pletneva, Svetlana . Polovtsy Moscow: Nauka, 1990.
Sakharov, Andrey . The Diplomacy of Svyatoslav. Moscow: Nauka , 1982. (online )
Subtelny, Orest . Ukraine: A History. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1988. ISBN 0-8020-5808-6
Vernadsky, G.V. The Origins of Russia. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. 3





Dorman Edwards and Ima Jean




Husband Dorman Edwards (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Ima Jean (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 F Sharon Edwards (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Gregory LeRoy Fish (living)





Imanuentius King of the Trinovantes




Husband Imanuentius King of the Trinovantes 5

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           Died: 0055 B.C.
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1 M Mandubracius King of the Trinovantes 6

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           Died: Abt 0030 BC
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         Spouse: Anna of Arimathea (      -      ) 7





Imma




Husband

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Wife Imma

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           Died: Abt 750
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   Other Spouse: Tassilo II of Bavaria (      -Abt 0719) 8 9


Children
1 F Swanachild

            AKA: Swanhilde
           Born: Abt 691 - Bavaria, (Germany)
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         Spouse: Charles Martel King of the Franks (Abt 0676-0741) 10 11 12 13 14




Research Notes: Wife - Imma

Source: Wikipedia.org - Tassilo II of Bavaria


Research Notes: Child - Swanachild

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872692

This source gives Swanhilde's parents as Grimaldo II (b. abt 665 in Bavaria) and Viltrude (b. abt 667)


Tassilo II of Bavaria and Imma




Husband Tassilo II of Bavaria 8 9

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           Died: Abt 719
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         Father: Theodo V Duke of Bavaria (Abt 0625-0716) 8 15
         Mother: Folchaide of Salzeburg (      -      ) 8


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Wife Imma

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           Died: Abt 750
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Children
1 F Swanachild

            AKA: Swanhilde
           Born: Abt 691 - Bavaria, (Germany)
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           Died: 
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         Spouse: Charles Martel King of the Franks (Abt 0676-0741) 10 11 12 13 14




Research Notes: Husband - Tassilo II of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Tassilo II of Bavaria :

Tassilo II (d.c.719 ) was the son, probably third, of Theodo and Folchaid. Sometime before 715 , Theodo divided his duchy and associated with its rule the eldest two of his four sons. The eldest, Theodbert , was co-ruling as early as 702 and the second, Theobald , from 711 . On Theodo's death (probably in 716 ), the division took full effect. It is not known if the was territorial (as with the Merovingians ) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua ). If the former, it seems to have followed the fourfold ecclesiastic division into diocese which Theodo had effected. If that is the case, it is most probably that Tassilo ruled the diocese of Passau with his capital there.
War broke out between the brothers soon after their father's death, but little in the way of details is known. About Tassilo's time as duke, next to nothing is known. His existence is confirmed in the "Codex of Salzburg" (Salzburger Verbrüderungsbuch) where he is listed as unmarried, though some surmise that a certain Waldrada, mentioned as a wife of Theobald , was in fact Tassilo's. On the other hand, he is attributed as the husband of Imma (d.c.750 ), by which he had Grimoald and Swanachild . Through Swanachild, Tassilo would be the father-in-law of Charles Martel . Because Swanachild is with certainty the niece of duke Odilo , one would be forced to assume that Odilo was brother or brother-in-law to Tassilo. Tassilo was dead by 719 , as were all his brothers save Grimoald . 8 9


Research Notes: Wife - Imma

Source: Wikipedia.org - Tassilo II of Bavaria


Research Notes: Child - Swanachild

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872692

This source gives Swanhilde's parents as Grimaldo II (b. abt 665 in Bavaria) and Viltrude (b. abt 667)


Ingelric of England




Husband Ingelric of England 16

           Born: Abt 1006 - <St. Martin's-Le-Grand, London, Middlesex, England>
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Wife

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Children
1 F Ingelrica 16

            AKA: Maud, Maud Ingelrica
           Born: Abt 1032 - <St. Martin's-Le-Grand, London, Middlesex, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ranulph Peverel (Abt 1030-      ) 16
           Marr: Abt 1072 - Hatfield, Essex, England





Ranulph Peverel and Ingelrica




Husband Ranulph Peverel 16

            AKA: Ranulph Peverell
           Born: Abt 1030 - <Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 1072 - Hatfield, Essex, England



Wife Ingelrica 16

            AKA: Maud, Maud Ingelrica
           Born: Abt 1032 - <St. Martin's-Le-Grand, London, Middlesex, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Ingelric of England (Abt 1006-      ) 16
         Mother: 




Children
1 M William "the Elder" Peverel of Nottingham 16

            AKA: William Peverell
           Born: Abt 1062 - <Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1113 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adeline of Lancaster (Abt 1054-1120) 16
           Marr: Abt 1071





Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots and Ingibiorg




Husband Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots 13 17




            AKA: Malcolm III King of Scotland, Malcolm III "Canmore" King of Scots, Máel Coluim mac Donnchada
           Born: Abt 1031
     Christened: 


           Died: 13 Nov 1093 - Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots (      -1040) 18
         Mother: < > [Daughter of Siward, Danish Earl of Northumbria] (      -      ) 19


       Marriage: 1059

   Other Spouse: Saint Margaret of Scotland (1045-1093) 20 21 - 1068 or 1069 - Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

Events

• Crowned: King of Scots, 17 Mar 1057 or 1058, Scone, (Perth and Kinross), Scotland.




Wife Ingibiorg 22

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Duncan II King of Scots 23

           Born: Abt 1060
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Nov 1094
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots

Slain while besieging Alnwick Castle.


Research Notes: Husband - Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots

From Wikipedia - Malcolm III of Scotland :

Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (Modern Gaelic : Maol Chaluim mac Dhonnchaidh),[1] called in most Anglicised regnal lists Malcolm III, and in later centuries nicknamed Canmore, "Big Head"[2][3] or Long-neck [4] (died 13 November 1093), was King of Scots . It has also been argued recently that the real "Malcolm Canmore" was this Malcolm's great-grandson Malcolm IV , who is given this name in the contemporary notice of his death.[5] He was the eldest son of King Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin). Malcolm's long reign, lasting 35 years, preceded the beginning of the Scoto-Norman age.

Malcolm's Kingdom did not extend over the full territory of modern Scotland : the north and west of Scotland remained in Scandinavian , Norse-Gael and Gaelic control, and the areas under the control of the Kings of Scots would not advance much beyond the limits set by Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) until the 12th century. Malcolm III fought a succession of wars against the Kingdom of England , which may have had as their goal the conquest of the English earldom of Northumbria . However, these wars did not result in any significant advances southwards. Malcolm's main achievement is to have continued a line which would rule Scotland for many years,[6] although his role as "founder of a dynasty" has more to do with the propaganda of his youngest son David, and his descendants, than with any historical reality.[7]

Malcolm's second wife, Saint Margaret of Scotland , was later beatified and is Scotland's only royal saint. However, Malcolm himself gained no reputation for piety. With the notable exception of Dunfermline Abbey he is not definitely associated with major religious establishments or ecclesiastical reforms.

Background
Malcolm's father Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin) became king in late 1034, on the death of Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda), Duncan's maternal grandfather. According to John of Fordun , whose account is the original source of part at least of William Shakespeare 's Macbeth , Malcolm's mother was a niece of Siward, Earl of Northumbria ,[8][9] but an earlier king-list gives her the Gaelic name Suthen.[10]

Duncan's reign was not successful and he was killed by Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findlaích) on 15 August 1040. Although Shakespeare's Macbeth presents Malcolm as a grown man and his father as an old one, it appears that Duncan was still young in 1040,[11] and Malcolm and his brother Donalbane (Domnall Bán) were children.[12] Malcolm's family did attempt to overthrow Macbeth in 1045, but Malcolm's grandfather Crínán of Dunkeld was killed in the attempt.[13]

Soon after the death of Duncan his two young sons were sent away for greater safety - exactly where is the subject of debate. According to one version, Malcolm (then aged about 9) was sent to England, and his younger brother Donalbane was sent to the Isles.[14][15] Based on Fordun's account, it was assumed that Malcolm passed most of Macbeth's seventeen year reign in the Kingdom of England at the court of Edward the Confessor .[16][17]
According to an alternative version, Malcolm's mother took both sons into exile at the court of Thorfinn Sigurdsson , Earl of Orkney , an enemy of Macbeth's family, and perhaps Duncan's kinsman by marriage.[18]

An English invasion in 1054, with Earl Siward in command, had as its goal the installation of Máel Coluim , "son of the King of the Cumbrians (i.e. of Strathclyde )". This Máel Coluim, perhaps a son of Owen the Bald , disappears from history after this brief mention. He has been confused with King Malcolm III.[19][20] In 1057 various chroniclers report the death of Macbeth at Malcolm's hand, on 15 August 1057 at Lumphanan in Aberdeenshire .[21][22] Macbeth was succeeded by his stepson Lulach , who was crowned at Scone , probably on 8 September 1057. Lulach was killed by Malcolm, "by treachery",[23] near Huntly on 23 April 1058. After this, Malcolm became king, perhaps being inaugurated on 25 April 1058, although only John of Fordun reports this.[24]

Malcolm and Ingibiorg

If Orderic Vitalis is to be relied upon, one of Malcolm's earliest actions as King may have been to travel south to the court of Edward the Confessor in 1059 to arrange a marriage with Edward's kinswoman Margaret , who had arrived in England two years before from Hungary .[25] If he did visit the English court, he was the first reigning King of Scots to do so in more than eighty years. If a marriage agreement was made in 1059, however, it was not kept, and this may explain the Scots invasion of Northumbria in 1061 when Lindisfarne was plundered.[26] Equally, Malcolm's raids in Northumbria may have been related to the disputed "Kingdom of the Cumbrians", reestablished by Earl Siward in 1054, which was under Malcolm's control by 1070.[27]

The Orkneyinga saga reports that Malcolm married the widow of Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Ingibiorg , a daughter of Finn Arnesson .[28] Although Ingibiorg is generally assumed to have died shortly before 1070, it is possible that she died much earlier, around 1058.[29] The Orkneyinga Saga records that Malcolm and Ingibiorg had a son, Duncan II (Donnchad mac Maíl Coluim), who was later king.[4] Some Medieval commentators, following William of Malmesbury , claimed that Duncan was illegitimate, but this claim is propaganda reflecting the need of Malcolm's descendants by Margaret to undermine the claims of Duncan's descendants, the Meic Uilleim .[30] Malcolm's son Domnall, whose death is reported in 1085, is not mentioned by the author of the Orkneyinga Saga. He is assumed to have been born to Ingibiorg.[31]

Malcolm's marriage to Ingibiorg secured him peace in the north and west. The Heimskringla tells that her father Finn had been an adviser to Harald Hardraade and, after falling out with Harald, was then made an Earl by Sweyn Estridsson , King of Denmark , which may have been another recommendation for the match.[32] Malcolm enjoyed a peaceful relationship with the Earldom of Orkney , ruled jointly by his stepsons, Paul and Erlend Thorfinnsson . The Orkneyinga Saga reports strife with Norway but this is probably misplaced as it associates this with Magnus Barefoot , who became king of Norway only in 1093, the year of Malcolm's death.[33]

Malcolm and Margaret

Although he had given sanctuary to Tostig Godwinson when the Northumbrians drove him out, Malcolm was not directly involved in the ill-fated invasion of England by Harald Hardraade and Tostig in 1066, which ended in defeat and death at the battle of Stamford Bridge .[34] In 1068, he granted asylum to a group of English exiles fleeing from William of Normandy , among them Agatha , widow of Edward the Confessor's nephew Edward the Exile , and her children: Edgar Ætheling and his sisters Margaret and Cristina . They were accompanied by Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria . The exiles were disappointed, however, if they had expected immediate assistance from the Scots.[35]

In 1069 the exiles returned to England, to join a spreading revolt in the north. Even though Gospatric and Siward's son Waltheof submitted by the end of the year, the arrival of a Danish army under Sweyn Estridsson seemed to ensure that William's position remained weak. Malcolm decided on war, and took his army south into Cumbria and across the Pennines , wasting Teesdale and Cleveland then marching north, loaded with loot, to Wearmouth . There Malcolm met Edgar and his family, who were invited to return with him, but did not. As Sweyn had by now been bought off with a large Danegeld , Malcolm took his army home. In reprisal, William sent Gospatric to raid Scotland through Cumbria. In return, the Scots fleet raided the Northumbrian coast where Gospatric's possessions were concentrated.[36] Late in the year, perhaps shipwrecked on their way to a European exile, Edgar and his family again arrived in Scotland, this time to remain. By the end of 1070, Malcolm had married Edgar's sister Margaret, the future Saint Margaret of Scotland .[37]

The naming of their children represented a break with the traditional Scots Regal names such as Malcolm, Cináed and Áed. The point of naming Margaret's sons, Edward after her father Edward the Exile , Edmund for her grandfather Edmund Ironside , Ethelred for her great-grandfather Ethelred the Unready and Edgar for her great-great-grandfather Edgar was unlikely to be missed in England, where William of Normandy's grasp on power was far from secure.[38] Whether the adoption of the classical Alexander for the future Alexander I of Scotland (either for Pope Alexander II or for Alexander the Great ) and the biblical David for the future David I of Scotland represented a recognition that William of Normandy would not be easily removed, or was due to the repetition of Anglo-Saxon Royal name-another Edmund had preceded Edgar-is not known.[39] Margaret also gave Malcolm two daughters, Edith , who married Henry I of England , and Mary, who married Eustace III of Boulogne .

In 1072, with the Harrying of the North completed and his position again secure, William of Normandy came north with an army and a fleet. Malcolm met William at Abernethy and, in the words of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle "became his man" and handed over his eldest son Duncan as a hostage and arranged peace between William and Edgar.[40] Accepting the overlordship of the king of the English was no novelty, previous kings had done so without result. The same was true of Malcolm; his agreement with the English king was followed by further raids into Northumbria, which led to further trouble in the earldom and the killing of Bishop William Walcher at Gateshead . In 1080, William sent his son Robert Curthose north with an army while his brother Odo punished the Northumbrians. Malcolm again made peace, and this time kept it for over a decade.[41]

Malcolm faced little recorded internal opposition, with the exception of Lulach's son Máel Snechtai . In an unusual entry, for the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle contains little on Scotland, it says that in 1078:
" Malcholom [Máel Coluim] seized the mother of Mælslæhtan [Máel Snechtai] ... and all his treasures, and his cattle; and he himself escaped with difficulty.[42] " Whatever provoked this strife, Máel Snechtai survived until 1085.[43]

Malcolm and William Rufus

When William Rufus became king of England after his father's death, Malcolm did not intervene in the rebellions by supporters of Robert Curthose which followed. In 1091, however, William Rufus confiscated Edgar Ætheling's lands in England, and Edgar fled north to Scotland. In May, Malcolm marched south, not to raid and take slaves and plunder, but to besiege Newcastle , built by Robert Curthose in 1080. This appears to have been an attempt to advance the frontier south from the River Tweed to the River Tees . The threat was enough to bring the English king back from Normandy , where he had been fighting Robert Curthose. In September, learning of William Rufus's approaching army, Malcolm withdrew north and the English followed. Unlike in 1072, Malcolm was prepared to fight, but a peace was arranged by Edgar Ætheling and Robert Curthose whereby Malcolm again acknowledged the overlordship of the English king.[44]

In 1092, the peace began to break down. Based on the idea that the Scots controlled much of modern Cumbria , it had been supposed that William Rufus's new castle at Carlisle and his settlement of English peasants in the surrounds was the cause. However, it is unlikely that Malcolm did control Cumbria, and the dispute instead concerned the estates granted to Malcolm by William Rufus's father in 1072 for his maintenance when visiting England. Malcolm sent messengers to discuss the question and William Rufus agreed to a meeting. Malcolm travelled south to Gloucester , stopping at Wilton Abbey to visit his daughter Edith and sister-in-law Cristina. Malcolm arrived there on 24 August 1093 to find that William Rufus refused to negotiate, insisting that the dispute be judged by the English barons. This Malcolm refused to accept, and returned immediately to Scotland.[45]


It does not appear that William Rufus intended to provoke a war,[46] but, as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports, war came:
" For this reason therefore they parted with great dissatisfaction, and the King Malcolm returned to Scotland. And soon after he came home, he gathered his army, and came harrowing into England with more hostility than behoved him ... " Malcolm was accompanied by Edward, his eldest son by Margaret and probable heir-designate (or tánaiste), and by Edgar.[47] Even by the standards of the time, the ravaging of Northumbria by the Scots was seen as harsh.[48]

Death
While marching north again, Malcolm was ambushed by Robert de Mowbray , Earl of Northumbria, whose lands he had devastated, near Alnwick on 13 November 1093. There he was killed by Arkil Morel, steward of Bamburgh Castle . The conflict became known as the Battle of Alnwick .[49] Edward was mortally wounded in the same fight. Margaret, it is said, died soon after receiving the news of their deaths from Edgar.[50] The Annals of Ulster say:

" Mael Coluim son of Donnchad, over-king of Scotland, and Edward his son, were killed by the French i.e. in Inber Alda in England. His queen, Margaret, moreover, died of sorrow for him within nine days.[51] " Malcolm's body was taken to Tynemouth Priory for burial, where it remains to this day. A body of a local farmer was sent north for burial in Dunfermline Abbey in the reign of his son Alexander or perhaps on Iona .[52]

On 19 June 1250, following the canonisation of Malcolm's wife Margaret by Pope Innocent IV , Margaret's remains were disinterred and placed in a reliquary. Tradition has it that as the reliquary was carried to the high altar of Dunfermline Abbey , past Malcolm's grave, it became too heavy to move. As a result, Malcolm's remains were also disinterred, and buried next to Margaret beside the altar.[53]

Issue
Malcolm and Ingebjorg had a son:
Duncan II of Scotland , suceeded his father as King of Scotland

Malcolm and Margaret had eight children, six sons and two daughters:
Edward, killed 1093.
Edmund of Scotland
Ethelred , abbot of Dunkeld
King Edgar of Scotland
King Alexander I of Scotland
King David I of Scotland
Edith of Scotland , also called Matilda, married King Henry I of England
Mary of Scotland , married Eustace III of Boulogne 13 17



Research Notes: Wife - Ingibiorg

Widow of Thorfill Sigurdso, Earl of Orkney. First wife of Malcolm III Canmore.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-21 (Malcolm III Canmore). 22


Sources


1 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog (Vol. 6. London: Whiting & Co., 1887.), pp. 121-122.

2 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog (Vol. 6. London: Whiting & Co., 1887.), p. 121.

3 Wikipedia.org, Sviatoslav I of Kiev.

4 Personal Documents, Family Bible of LeRoy & Carol Fish.

5 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317220 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

6 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105896 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

7 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #97877 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

8 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria.

9 Wikipedia.org, Tassilo II of Bavaria.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-11, 191-11, 50-11 (Rotrou).

11 Wikipedia.org, Charles Martel.

12 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91488 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

13 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

14 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871722.

15 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98935 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

16 http://www.familysearch.org.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-21, 171-21.

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-20.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), ine 170-20 (Duncan I MacCrinan).

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-21, 158-23 (Eustace III).

21 Wikipedia.org, Saint Margaret of Scotland.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 171-21 (Malcolm III Canmore).

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 171-22.


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