The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Ferreolus of Moselle




Husband Ferreolus of Moselle 1

           Born: 428
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         Father: Sigimerus I d'Auverigne (Abt 0414-      ) 2
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Children
1 M Tonantius Ferreolus of Moselle 3

           Born:  - Westphalia, Germany
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           Died: After 475 - Rome, Latium, (Italy)
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         Spouse: Papinilla Avitus of Rome (Abt 0415-      ) 4





Finn [Mythological]




Husband Finn [Mythological] 5

           Born: Abt 130 - <Asgard or Asia or East Europe>
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         Father: Flocwald [Mythological] (Abt 0100-      ) 6
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Wife

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Children
1 M Freothalaf [Mythological] 7

           Born: Abt 160 - <Asgard or Asia or East Europe>
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Finnvid "Fundni"




Husband Finnvid "Fundni" 8

            AKA: Fundni
           Born: Abt 857 - <Norway>
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Children
1 M Thorarinn "Bullifak" Finnvidsson 8

           Born: Abt 881 - Norway
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Fjölnir King in Sweden [Mythological]




Husband Fjölnir King in Sweden [Mythological] 8 9

            AKA: Fjolne King of Sweden, Fjolner King of Sweden, Fjölner King of Sweden, Fjolnir Yngvi-Freysson King in Sweden
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1 M Sveigðir Fjölnarsson King in Sweden [Mythological] 8 10

            AKA: Sveigder King of Sweden, Swegde King of Sweden, Svegdi Fjolnarsson King in Sweden
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         Spouse: Vana of Vanaheim [Mythological] (      -      ) 10




Research Notes: Husband - Fjölnir King in Sweden [Mythological]

Mythological Swedish king, of the House of Ynglings, in the 1st century BC to the early 1st century AD.

From Wikipedia - Fjölnir :
Fjölnir, Fjölner, Fjolner or Fjolne (1st century BC - early 1st century AD) was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling , at Gamla Uppsala . He appears in a semi-mythological context as the son of Freyr and Gerd .

Fjölnir drowned in a vat of mead visiting Peace-Fróði, an equally mythological king of Zealand , where Denmark later appeared. Fjölnir was then succeeded by his son Sveigðir .

Grottasöngr
Grottasöngr informs that Fjölnir was the contemporary of Caesar Augustus (63 BC - AD 14). He was a mighty king and the crops were bountiful and peace was maintained. At his time, king Fróði , the son of Friðleifr , ruled in Lejre in Zealand . Grottasöngr relates that when Fróði once visited Uppsala he bought two giantesses, Fenja and Menja :
Fróði konungr sótti heimboð í Svíþjóð til þess konungs, er Fjölnir er nefndr. Þá keypti hann ambáttir tvær, er hétu Fenja ok Menja. Þær váru miklar ok sterkar.[1]
However, the two giantesses were to be his undoing (see Grottasöngr ).

Ynglinga saga
The Ynglinga saga tells that Fjölnir was the son of Freyr himself and the giantess Gerd , but he was the first of his house who was not to be deified.

Frey took the kingdom after Njord , and was called drot by the Swedes, and they paid taxes to him. He was, like his father, fortunate in friends and in good seasons. Frey built a great temple at Upsal , made it his chief seat, and gave it all his taxes, his land, and goods. Then began the Upsal domains , which have remained ever since. Then began in his days the Frode- peace; and then there were good seasons, in all the land, which the Swedes ascribed to Frey, so that he was more worshipped than the other gods, as the people became much richer in his days by reason of the peace and good seasons. His wife was called Gerd, daughter of Gymis , and their son was called Fjolne.[4][5] Then Snorri tells that after Freyr's death, Fjölnir became the king of Sweden. However, he drowned in a vat of mead visiting Peace-Fróði (Friðfróði), the king of Zealand .

Fjolne, Yngve Frey's son, ruled thereafter over the Swedes and the Upsal domains . He was powerful, and lucky in seasons and in holding the peace. Fredfrode ruled then in Leidre , and between them there was great friendship and visiting. Once when Fjolne went to Frode in Sealand , a great feast was prepared for him, and invitations to it were sent all over the country. Frode had a large house, in which there was a great vessel many ells high, and put together of great pieces of timber; and this vessel stood in a lower room. Above it was a loft, in the floor of which was an opening through which liquor was poured into this vessel. The vessel was full of mead, which was excessively strong. In the evening Fjolne, with his attendants, was taken into the adjoining loft to sleep. In the night he went out to the gallery to seek a certain place, and he was very sleepy and exceedingly drunk. As he came back to his room he went along the gallery to the door of another left, went into it, and his foot slipping, he fell into the vessel of mead and was drowned.[4][5]

Ynglingatal

Snorri also quoted some lines of Ynglingatal , composed in the 9th century:

In Frode's hall the fearful word, The death-foreboding sound was heard: The cry of fey denouncing doom, Was heard at night in Frode's home. And when brave Frode came, he found Swithiod's dark chief, Fjolne, drowned. In Frode's mansion drowned was he, Drowned in a waveless, windless sea.[4][6] The Historia Norwegiæ provides a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, which precedes Snorri's quotation. It also informs that Fjölnir was the son of Freyr, the father of Svegder and that he drowned in a vat of mead:

Frøy engendered Fjolne, who was drowned in a tun of mead. His son, Sveigde, [...][8] The even earlier source Íslendingabók cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and also gives Fjölnir as the successor of Freyr and the predecessor of Svegðir . In addition to this it summarizes that Fjölnir died at Friðfróði 's (i.e. Peace-Fróði): iii Freyr. iiii Fjölnir. sá er dó at Friðfróða. v Svegðir:[9].

Gesta Danorum
In Gesta Danorum , Book 1, Frodi corresponds to Hadingus and Fjölnir to Hundingus , but the story is a little different. It relates how King Hundingus of Sweden believed a rumor that King Hadingus of Denmark had died and held his obsequies with ceremony, including an enormous vat of ale. Hundingus himself served the ale, but accidentally stumbled and fell into the vat, choked, and drowned. When word of this came to King Hadingus of this unfortunate death, King Hadingus publicly hanged himself (see Freyr ).

Ballad of Veraldur
Dumézil (1973, Appendix I) cites a Faroese ballad recorded in 1840 about Odin and his son Veraldur. It is believed that this Veraldur is related to Fjölnir and Freyr, as per Snorri's statement that Freyr was veraldar goð ("god of the world").

In this ballad Veraldur sets off to Zealand to seek the king's daughter in marriage despite Odin's warnings. The king of Zealand mislikes Veraldur and tricks him into falling into a brewing vat in a "hall of stone" where Veraldur drowns. When Odin hears the news, he decides to die and go to Asgard where his followers will be also be welcomed after death.
The tale is similar to that of the death of Fjölnir, son of Freyr, who accidentally fell into a vat of mead and drowned while paying a friendly visit to Fridfródi the ruler of Zealand.

Other mentions
Fjölnir is also another name for Odin , found in Grímnismál when the god revealed himself to Geirröd , and in Reginsmál when he was standing on a mountain addressing Sigurd and Regin . Snorri also mentions it as an Odinic name in Gylfaginning . 8 9


Research Notes: Child - Sveigðir Fjölnarsson King in Sweden [Mythological]

Mythological Swedish king, of the House of Ynglings.

From Wikipedia - Sveigðir :

Sveigðir, Sveigder or Swegde was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling in Norse mythology . He was the son of Fjölner , whom he succeeded as king, and he married Vana of Vanaheim , probably one of the Vanir .

Lured by a dwarf , Sveigðir disappeared into a stone and never came back. He was succeeded by his son Vanlandi .

Snorri Sturluson wrote of Sveigðir in his Ynglinga saga (1225):

Swegde took the kingdom after his father, and he made a solemn vow to seek Godheim and Odin . He went with twelve men through the world, and came to Turkland , and the Great Svithiod , where he found many of his connections. He was five years on this journey; and when he returned home to Sweden he remained there for some time. He had got a wife in Vanheim , who was called Vana, and their son was Vanlande . Swegde went out afterwards to seek again for Godheim, and came to a mansion on the east side of Swithiod called Stein , where there was a stone as big as a large house. In the evening after sunset, as Swegde was going from the drinking-table to his sleeping-room, he cast his eye upon the stone, and saw that a dwarf was sitting under it. Swegde and his man were very drunk, and they ran towards the stone. The dwarf stood in the door, and called to Swegde, and told him to come in, and he should see Odin. Swegde ran into the stone, which instantly closed behind him, and Swegde never came back.[3][4]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal written in the late 12th century and consequently older than Snorri's quotation:

Frøy engendered Fjolne, who was drowned in a tun of mead. His son, Sveigde, is supposed to have pursuded a dwarf into a stone and never to have returned, but this is plainly to be taken as a fairy-tale. He sired Vanlande, [...][7] The even earlier source Íslendingabók from the early 12th century, cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and also gives Svegðir as the successor of Fjölnir and the predecessor of Vanlandi : iiii Fjölnir. sá er dó at Friðfróða. v Svegðir. vi Vanlandi[8]. 8 10



Flocwald [Mythological]




Husband Flocwald [Mythological] 6

           Born: Abt 100 - <Asgard or Asia or East Europe>
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         Father: Godwulf [Mythological] (      -      ) 11
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Wife

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Children
1 M Finn [Mythological] 5

           Born: Abt 130 - <Asgard or Asia or East Europe>
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Kenneth W. Talbot and Flora




Husband Kenneth W. Talbot 12 13

           Born: 28 Jan 1887 - Illinois, United States
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           Died: Dec 1966 - <Montana, United States>
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         Father: Absolom Owen Talbot Jr. (1852-1925) 14 15 16
         Mother: Margaret Burrows (1857-1935) 8 12 14 15


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Ethel (      -After 1975) 12

Events

• Census: 12 Jun 1900, Pleasant Home Precinct, Polk, Nebraska, United States.

• Residence: 1942, Montana, United States.




Wife Flora

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Children
1 F Genevieve Talbot (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Carl Shannon (living)




Research Notes: Husband - Kenneth W. Talbot

SSN 517-20-5679
issued Kent, King, Washington. 12 13


Theodo V Duke of Bavaria and Folchaide of Salzeburg




Husband Theodo V Duke of Bavaria 17 18

            AKA: Theodo II Duke of Bavaria, Theodo of Bavaria, Theodon V Duke of Bavaria, Theudon II Duke of Bavaria
           Born: Abt 625 - Bavaria, (Germany)
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           Died: 11 Dec 716
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         Father: Theodo IV Duke of Bavaria (      -Abt 0680) 18 19
         Mother: Fara of Bavaria (Abt 0600-0641) 20 21


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Regintrude of Austrasia (      -      ) 18 22

Events

• Duke of Bavaria: 670 or 680.




Wife Folchaide of Salzeburg 18

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Children
1 M Theodbert 18

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2 M Theobald 18

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3 M Tassilo II of Bavaria 18 23

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           Died: Abt 719
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         Spouse: Imma (      -Abt 0750)



4 M Grimoald Duke of Bavaria 18 24 25

            AKA: Grimaldo II Duke of Bavaria, Grimwald Duke of Bavaria
           Born: Abt 665 - Bavaria, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 725
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         Spouse: Viltrude (Abt 0667-      )




Research Notes: Husband - Theodo V Duke of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Theodo of Bavaria :

Theodo (about 625 - 11 December c. 716 ) also known as Theodo V and Theodo II, was the Duke of Bavaria from 670 or, more probably, 680 to his death.

It is with Theodo that the well-sourced history of Bavaria begins. He strengthened Bavaria internally and externally and, according to Arbeo of Freising , he was a prince of great power whose fame extended beyond his borders.

His father was Theodo IV, Duke of Bavaria and his mother was probably Fara of Bavaria (b: 600), daughter of Chrodaold of the Lombards (575 - 624) and (her mother) Daughter of Gisulf (b: 577).

Theodo established his capital at Ratisbon (modern Regensburg ). He married Folchaid, of the aristocracy of Alemannia , to build diplomatic ties there. He intervened in Lombard affairs by harbouring the refugees Ansprand and Liutprand , whom he assisted militarily on his return to claim the Iron Crown . Liutprand later married his daughter Guntrude. Theodo also defended his duchy ably from the Avars (with some failure in the east).

Theodo is the patron to the four great missionaries of Bavaria: Saint Rupert , Saint Erhard , Saint Emmeram , and probably Saint Corbinian . He was the first to draw up plans for the Bavarian church, aiming both at a deeper cultivation of the countryside as well as greater independence from the Frankish Kingdom by a closer association with the Pope. He was the first Bavarian duke to travel to Rome , where he conferred with Pope Gregory II . The diocesan seats were placed in the few urban centres, which served as the Duke's seats: Regensburg, Salzburg, Freising and Passau.

Two of his children are involved with the death of Saint Emmeram . Theodo's daughter Uta had become pregnant by her lover. Fearing her father's wrath, she confided to Emmeram and the saint promised bear the blame, as he was about to travel to Rome. Soon after his departure, Uta's predicament became known and in keeping with the agreement she named Emmeram as the father. Her brother Lantpert went after Emmeram and greeted him as "bishop and brother-in-law" (Aie, episcope et gener noster!) Then he had Emmeram cut and torn into pieces. Theodo had the remains of the saint moved to Regensburg. Nothing more is known of Lantpert and Uta.

Ordinals
Some historians have distinguished between a Duke Theodo I, ruling around 680, and a Duke Theodo II, reigning in the early eight century. Theodo I is attributed with the events involving Saint Emmeram, Uta and Lantpert, while Theodo II is associated with Saints Corbinian and Rupert, the ecclesiastical organisation and the division of the Duchy. However, no contemporary source indicates a distinction between different Dukes of that name.

To complicate matters even further, Bavarian tradition has referred to Theodo I and Theodo II as Theodo IV and Theodo V respectively to differentiate them from legendary Agilolfing ancestors Theodo I to III, all who would have reigned before 550.

Marriage and issue
He married Regintrude of Austrasia , daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude . They had the following:
Daughter of Theodo , married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia

He also married Folchiade of Salzeburg . They had the following:
Theodbert
Grimoald
Theobald
Tassilo

Theodo was eventually succeeded by his four other sons, among which he divided his duchy sometime before 715.

As early as 702 , Theodbert had been ruling from Salzburg and from 711 or 712 , Theobald was co-reigning. It is impossible to see if this division was territorial (as with the Merovingians ) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua ). If so, Theodbert's capital was probably Salzburg and the Vita Corbiniani informs that Grimoald had his seat there. References to Theobald and the Thuringii implies perhaps a capital at Regensburg and this leaves Tassilo at Passau. All of this is educated conjecture. 17 18


Research Notes: Wife - Folchaide of Salzeburg

From Wikipedia -:

[Theodo of Bavaria] also married Folchiade of Salzeburg . They had the following:
Theodbert
Grimoald
Theobald
Tassilo
Theodo was eventually succeeded by his four other sons, among which he divided his duchy sometime before 715. 18


Research Notes: Child - Tassilo II of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Tassilo II of Bavaria :

Tassilo II (d.c.719 ) was the son, probably third, of Theodo and Folchaid. Sometime before 715 , Theodo divided his duchy and associated with its rule the eldest two of his four sons. The eldest, Theodbert , was co-ruling as early as 702 and the second, Theobald , from 711 . On Theodo's death (probably in 716 ), the division took full effect. It is not known if the was territorial (as with the Merovingians ) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua ). If the former, it seems to have followed the fourfold ecclesiastic division into diocese which Theodo had effected. If that is the case, it is most probably that Tassilo ruled the diocese of Passau with his capital there.
War broke out between the brothers soon after their father's death, but little in the way of details is known. About Tassilo's time as duke, next to nothing is known. His existence is confirmed in the "Codex of Salzburg" (Salzburger Verbrüderungsbuch) where he is listed as unmarried, though some surmise that a certain Waldrada, mentioned as a wife of Theobald , was in fact Tassilo's. On the other hand, he is attributed as the husband of Imma (d.c.750 ), by which he had Grimoald and Swanachild . Through Swanachild, Tassilo would be the father-in-law of Charles Martel . Because Swanachild is with certainty the niece of duke Odilo , one would be forced to assume that Odilo was brother or brother-in-law to Tassilo. Tassilo was dead by 719 , as were all his brothers save Grimoald . 18 23


Death Notes: Child - Grimoald Duke of Bavaria

Killed in battle against Charles Martel.


Research Notes: Child - Grimoald Duke of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Grimoald of Bavaria :

Grimoald (or Grimwald) (d.725 ) was the duke of Bavaria from about 715 to his death. He is the youngest of four sons of Theodo of Bavaria and Folchaid and the uncle of Swanachild , the second wife of Charles Martel . At first, he co-reigned with his brothers Theodbert , Theobald , and Tassilo II and then, from around 719 , alone. His father divided the principality, after associated his elder two sons with him in the government, in 715 . Upon Theodo's death in 716 , the divided duchy was plunged into civil war and all the brothers save Grimoald were dead by 719 . It is not certain if the division of the duchy was territorial or a powersharing scheme, but if the former, it seems most probable that Grimoald's capital was either Freising , which he later favoured as a diocesan seat, or Salzburg , which he later treated as a capital of sorts (Vita Corbiniani).

It was Grimoald who induced Saint Corbinian to come to Bavaria in 724 to evangelise. Grimoald had married his brother's widow, Biltrude (Pilitrud), and by canon law this was incest. Corbinian promptly denounced the duke, who had already repented and relapsed. His anger was now raised and Corbinian had to flee. The next year (725 ), Charles Martel marched against Bavaria and carried off Biltrude and Swanachild, killing Grimoald in battle. 18 24 25


Folmar III Count of Bliesgau and Metz




Husband Folmar III Count of Bliesgau and Metz 26

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Children
1 F Richilde 27

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         Spouse: Thierry I Duc de la Haute Lorraine, Comte de Bar (Abt 0965-Between 1026/1027) 27
           Marr: 985





Reginald Lord of the Isles and Fonia of Moray




Husband Reginald Lord of the Isles 8 28

            AKA: Reginald Sumarlidasson Lord of the Isles, Rognvald Sumarlidasson Lord of the Isles
           Born: Abt 1148 - <Morven, Argyleshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1207 - Kintyre, Argyleshire, Scotland
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         Father: Somerled King of the Isles (Abt 1113-1164) 8
         Mother: Ragnhild Olafsdatter (Abt 1117-      ) 8


       Marriage: 1185



Wife Fonia of Moray 8

           Born: Abt 1145 - <Moray, Scotland>
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         Father: Ranulf of Moray (Abt 1120-After 1165) 8
         Mother: Bethoc (Abt 1124-      ) 8




Children
1 F Helen de L'Isle 8 28

            AKA: Helen de l'Isle
           Born: Abt 1174 - <Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1212
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         Spouse: Alan Lord of Galloway (Abt 1186-1234) 8
           Marr: Abt 1205 - Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland




Research Notes: Child - Helen de L'Isle

Said to be a daughter of Reginald, Lord of the Isles 8 28


Fornjotur King in Kvenland [Mythological]




Husband Fornjotur King in Kvenland [Mythological] 8

           Born: Abt 160 - Kvenland, (Finland & Sweden)
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Children
1 M Kara Fornjotsson King in Kvenland [Mythological] 8

            AKA: Kara Fornjotursson King in Kvenland
           Born: Abt 185 - Kvenland, (Finland & Sweden)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
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Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140484.

2 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140482.

3 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140488.

4 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140486 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

5 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f54/a0025413.htm.

6 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f54/a0025414.htm.

7 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f54/a0025408.htm.

8 http://www.familysearch.org.

9 Wikipedia.org, Fjölnir.

10 Wikipedia.org, Sveigðir.

11 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f54/a0025416.htm.

12 Personal Documents, DeWayne B. Johnson family documents & photographs.

13 Social Security Death Index.

14 Johnson, DeWayne B. and Lorna Wallace Johnson, Johnson/Wallace Family Tree.

15 Census, 1880 U.S. Census.

16 Personal Documents, Letter from Genevieve Talbot Shannon 6/11/1975.

17 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98935 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

18 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria.

19 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99001 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

20 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria; Agilofings.

21 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #308135 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98936 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23 Wikipedia.org, Tassilo II of Bavaria.

24 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875392.

25 Wikipedia.org, Grimoald of Bavaria.

26 Wikipedia.org, "Theodoric I, Duke of Upper Lorraine."

27 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thierry_I,_Duke_of_Upper_Lorraine.

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-26 (Alan).


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