The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




William "the Elder" Peverel of Nottingham and Adeline of Lancaster




Husband William "the Elder" Peverel of Nottingham 1

            AKA: William Peverell
           Born: Abt 1062 - <Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1113 - England
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulph Peverel (Abt 1030-      ) 1
         Mother: Ingelrica (Abt 1032-      ) 1


       Marriage: Abt 1071



Wife Adeline of Lancaster 1

            AKA: Adelina of Lancaster, Adeliza
           Born: Abt 1054 - Nottinghamshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Jan 1120 - England
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Adelise Peverel 1

            AKA: Adelaide Peverel, Adeliza Peverel
           Born: Abt 1069 - Nottinghamshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 27 May 1156
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Richard de Reviers (Abt 1060-1107) 1 2
           Marr: Abt 1089 - Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England


2 M William "the Younger" Peverel of Peveril Castle, Derbyshire 1 3

           Born: Abt 1080 - <Nottingham, Nottinghamshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1155 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Avice de Lancaster (Abt 1088-After 1149) 1
           Marr: Abt 1112 - La Marche, Normandy, France




Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England and Adeliza of Louvain




Husband Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England 4 5

            AKA: Henry I King of England, Henry I Beauclerc King of England
           Born: Between May 1068 and May 1069 - <Selby, Yorkshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Dec 1135 - St. Denis-le-Ferment, (Eure), Normandy, France
         Buried: 


         Father: William the Conqueror Duke of Normandy, King of England (Abt 1028-1087) 6 7
         Mother: Matilda of Flanders (Abt 1032-1083) 8 9


       Marriage: 1120

   Other Spouse: Matilda of Scotland (1079-1118) - 11 Nov 1100 - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England

   Other Spouse: Sybilla Corbet of Alcester (1077-After 1157) 5

   Other Spouse: Elizabeth de Beaumont (      -      ) 10

Events

King of England: 1100-1135.




Wife Adeliza of Louvain 11

            AKA: Adela of Louvain
           Born: Abt 1103
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 23 Apr 1151 - Abbey of Affligem, Affligem, (Flemish Brabant), Flanders (Belgium)


         Father: Godefroi de Louvain Duc de Basse-Lorraine (Abt 1060-1139) 12 13
         Mother: Ida of Chiny and Namur (Abt 1083-Between 1117/1122) 13 14



   Other Spouse: William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel (Abt 1109-1176) 15 16 - 1138


Children

Birth Notes: Husband - Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England

Ancestral Roots line 124-25 has b. 1070.


Research Notes: Husband - Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England

Fourth son of William the Conqueror.

From Wikipedia - Henry I of England :

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 - 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror . He succeeded his elder brother William II as King of England in 1100 and defeated his eldest brother, Robert Curthose , to become Duke of Normandy in 1106. He was called Beauclerc for his scholarly interests and Lion of Justice for refinements which he brought about in the administrative and legislative machinery of the time.

Henry's reign is noted for its political opportunism. His succession was confirmed while his brother Robert was away on the First Crusade and the beginning of his reign was occupied by wars with Robert for control of England and Normandy. He successfully reunited the two realms again after their separation on his father's death in 1087. Upon his succession he granted the baronage a Charter of Liberties , which formed a basis for subsequent challenges to rights of kings and presaged Magna Carta , which subjected the King to law.

The rest of Henry's reign was filled with judicial and financial reforms. He established the biannual Exchequer to reform the treasury . He used itinerant officials to curb abuses of power at the local and regional level, garnering the praise of the people. The differences between the English and Norman populations began to break down during his reign and he himself married a daughter of the old English royal house. He made peace with the church after the disputes of his brother's reign, but he could not smooth out his succession after the disastrous loss of his eldest son William in the wreck of the White Ship . His will stipulated that he was to be succeeded by his daughter, the Empress Matilda , but his stern rule was followed by a period of civil war known as the Anarchy .

Early life
Henry was born between May 1068 and May 1069, probably in Selby in Yorkshire . His mother, Queen Matilda , was descended from Alfred the Great (but not through the main West Saxon Royal line). Queen Matilda named the infant Prince Henry, after her uncle, Henry I of France . As the youngest son of the family, he was almost certainly expected to become a Bishop and was given rather more extensive schooling than was usual for a young nobleman of that time. The Chronicler William of Malmesbury asserts that Henry once remarked that an illiterate King was a crowned ass. He was certainly the first Norman ruler to be fluent in the English language .

William I's second son Richard was killed in a hunting accident in 1081, so William bequeathed his dominions to his three surviving sons in the following manner:
Robert received the Duchy of Normandy and became Duke Robert II
William Rufus received the Kingdom of England and became King William II
Henry Beauclerc received 5,000 pounds in silver

The Chronicler Orderic Vitalis reports that the old King had declared to Henry: "You in your own time will have all the dominions I have acquired and be greater than both your brothers in wealth and power."

Henry tried to play his brothers off against each other but eventually, wary of his devious manoeuvring, they acted together and signed an Accession Treaty. This sought to bar Prince Henry from both Thrones by stipulating that if either King William or Duke Robert died without an heir, the two dominions of their father would be reunited under the surviving brother.

Seizing the throne of England

When, on 2 August 1100 , William II was killed by an arrow in yet another hunting accident in the New Forest, Duke Robert had not yet returned from the First Crusade . His absence allowed Prince Henry to seize the Royal Treasury at Winchester, Hampshire , where he buried his dead brother. There are suspicions that, on hearing that Robert was returning alive from his crusade with a new bride, Henry decided to act and arranged the murder of William by the French Vexin Walter Tirel .[1] Thus he succeeded to the throne of England, guaranteeing his succession in defiance of William and Robert's earlier agreement. Henry was accepted as King by the leading Barons and was crowned three days later on 5 August at Westminster Abbey . He secured his position among the nobles by an act of political appeasement: he issued a Charter of Liberties which is considered a forerunner of the Magna Carta .

First marriage

On 11 November 1100 Henry married Edith , daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland. Since Edith was also the niece of Edgar Atheling and the great-granddaughter of Edward the Confessor 's paternal half-brother Edmund Ironside , the marriage united the Norman line with the old English line of Kings. The marriage greatly displeased the Norman Barons, however, and as a concession to their sensibilities Edith changed her name to Matilda upon becoming Queen. The other side of this coin, however, was that Henry, by dint of his marriage, became far more acceptable to the Anglo-Saxon populace.

The chronicler William of Malmesbury described Henry thus: "He was of middle stature, greater than the small, but exceeded by the very tall; his hair was black and set back upon the forehead; his eyes mildly bright; his chest brawny; his body fleshy."

Conquest of Normandy
In the following year, 1101, Robert Curthose , Henry's eldest brother, attempted to seize the crown by invading England. In the Treaty of Alton , Robert agreed to recognise his brother Henry as King of England and return peacefully to Normandy , upon receipt of an annual sum of 2000 silver marks, which Henry proceeded to pay.

In 1105, to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert and the drain on his fiscal resources from the annual payment, Henry led an expeditionary force across the English Channel .

Battle of Tinchebray
On the morning of 28 September 1106, exactly 40 years after William had made his way to England, the decisive battle between his two surviving sons, Robert Curthose and Henry Beauclerc, took place in the small village of Tinchebray. This combat was totally unexpected and unprepared. Henry and his army were marching south from Barfleur on their way to Domfront and Robert was marching with his army from Falaise on their way to Mortain. They met at the crossroads at Tinchebray and the running battle which ensued was spread out over several kilometres. The site where most of the fighting took place is the village playing field today. Towards evening Robert tried to retreat but was captured by Henry's men at a place three kilometres (just under two miles) north of Tinchebray where a farm named "Prise" (taken) stands today on the D22 road. The tombstones of three knights are nearby on the same road.

King of England and Ruler of Normandy
After Henry had defeated his brother's Norman army at Tinchebray he imprisoned Robert, initially in the Tower of London , subsequently at Devizes Castle and later at Cardiff. One day whilst out riding Robert attempted to escape from Cardiff but his horse was bogged down in a swamp and he was recaptured. To prevent further escapes Henry had Robert's eyes burnt out. Henry appropriated the Duchy of Normandy as a possession of the Kingdom of England and reunited his father's dominions. Even after taking control of the Duchy of Normandy he didn't take the title of Duke, he chose to control it as the King of England.

In 1113, Henry attempted to reduce difficulties in Normandy by betrothing his eldest son, William Adelin , to the daughter of Fulk of Jerusalem (also known as Fulk V), Count of Anjou, then a serious enemy. They were married in 1119. Eight years later, after William's untimely death, a much more momentous union was made between Henry's daughter, (the former Empress) Matilda and Fulk's son Geoffrey Plantagenet , which eventually resulted in the union of the two Realms under the Plantagenet Kings.


Activities as a King

Henry's need for finance to consolidate his position led to an increase in the activities of centralized government. As King, Henry carried out social and judicial reforms, including:
issuing the Charter of Liberties
restoring the laws of Edward the Confessor .

Between 1103 and 1107 Henry was involved in a dispute with Anselm , the Archbishop of Canterbury , and Pope Paschal II in the investiture controversy , which was settled in the Concordat of London in 1107. It was a compromise. In England, a distinction was made in the King's chancery between the secular and ecclesiastical powers of the prelates. Employing the distinction, Henry gave up his right to invest his bishops and abbots, but reserved the custom of requiring them to come and do homage for the "temporalities " (the landed properties tied to the episcopate), directly from his hand, after the bishop had sworn homage and feudal vassalage in the ceremony called commendatio, the commendation ceremony , like any secular vassal.

Henry was also known for some brutal acts. He once threw a treacherous burgher named Conan Pilatus from the tower of Rouen; the tower was known from then on as "Conan's Leap". In another instance that took place in 1119, Henry's son-in-law, Eustace de Pacy, and Ralph Harnec, the constable of Ivry , exchanged their children as hostages. When Eustace blinded Harnec's son, Harnec demanded vengeance. King Henry allowed Harnec to blind and mutilate Eustace's two daughters, who were also Henry's own grandchildren. Eustace and his wife, Juliane, were outraged and threatened to rebel. Henry arranged to meet his daughter at a parley at Breteuil, only for Juliane to draw a crossbow and attempt to assassinate her father. She was captured and confined to the castle, but escaped by leaping from a window into the moat below. Some years later Henry was reconciled with his daughter and son-in-law.

Legitimate children
He had two children by Matilda (Edith), who died on 1 May 1118 at the palace of Westminster. She was buried in Westminster Abbey.
Matilda . (c. February 1102 - 10 September 1167 ). She married firstly Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor , and secondly, Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou , having issue by the second.
William Adelin , (5 August 1103 - 25 November 1120 ). He married Matilda (d.1154), daughter of Fulk V, Count of Anjou .

Second marriage
On 29 January 1121 he married Adeliza , daughter of Godfrey I of Leuven , Duke of Lower Lotharingia and Landgrave of Brabant , but there were no children from this marriage. Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Empress Matilda , widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor , as his heir.

Death and legacy

Henry visited Normandy in 1135 to see his young grandsons, the children of Matilda and Geoffrey. He took great delight in his grandchildren, but soon quarrelled with his daughter and son-in-law and these disputes led him to tarry in Normandy far longer than he originally planned.

Henry died on 1 December 1135 of food poisoning from eating "a surfeit of lampreys " (of which he was excessively fond) at Saint-Denis-en-Lyons (now Lyons-la-Fort ) in Normandy. His remains were sewn into the hide of a bull to preserve them on the journey, and then taken back to England and were buried at Reading Abbey , which he had founded fourteen years before. The Abbey was destroyed during the Protestant Reformation . No trace of his tomb has survived, the probable site being covered by St James' School. Nearby is a small plaque and a large memorial cross stands in the adjoining Forbury Gardens .

Although Henry's barons had sworn allegiance to his daughter as their Queen, her gender and her remarriage into the House of Anjou , an enemy of the Normans, allowed Henry's nephew Stephen of Blois , to come to England and claim the throne with popular support.

The struggle between the former Empress and Stephen resulted in a long civil war known as the Anarchy . The dispute was eventually settled by Stephen's naming of Matilda's son, Henry Plantagenet , as his heir in 1153.

Illegitimate children
King Henry is famed for holding the record for the largest number of acknowledged illegitimate children born to any English king, with the number being around 20 or 25. He had many mistresses, and identifying which mistress is the mother of which child is difficult. His illegitimate offspring for whom there is documentation are:
Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester . Often, said to have been a son of Sybil Corbet.
Maud FitzRoy, married Conan III, Duke of Brittany
Constance FitzRoy, married Richard de Beaumont
Mabel FitzRoy, married William III Gouet
Aline FitzRoy, married Matthieu I of Montmorency
Gilbert FitzRoy, died after 1142. His mother may have been a sister of Walter de Gand.
Emma, born c. 1138; married Gui de Laval, Lord Laval. [Uncertain, born 2 years after Henry died.][2]

With Edith
Matilda, married in 1103 Count Rotrou II of Perche. She perished 25 Nov 1120 in the wreck of the White Ship . She left two daughters; Philippa who married Helie of Anjou (son of Fulk V) and Felice.

With Gieva de Tracy
William de Tracy

With Ansfride
Ansfride was born c. 1070. She was the wife of Anskill of Seacourt, at Wytham in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire ).
Juliane de Fontevrault (born c. 1090); married Eustace de Pacy in 1103. She tried to shoot her father with a crossbow after King Henry allowed her two young daughters to be blinded.
Fulk FitzRoy (born c. 1092); a monk at Abingdon .
Richard of Lincoln (c. 1094 - 25 November 1120 ); perished in the wreck of the White Ship .

With Sybil Corbet
Lady Sybilla Corbet of Alcester was born in 1077 in Alcester in Warwickshire . She married Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Herbert 'the Chamberlain' of Winchester and Emma de Blois. She died after 1157 and was also known as Adela (or Lucia) Corbet. Sybil was definitely mother of Sybil and Rainald, possibly also of William and Rohese. Some sources suggest that there was another daughter by this relationship, Gundred, but it appears that she was thought as such because she was a sister of Reginald de Dunstanville but it appears that that was another person of that name who was not related to this family.
Sybilla de Normandy , married Alexander I of Scotland .
William Constable, born before 1105. Married Alice (Constable); died after 1187.
Reginald de Dunstanville, 1st Earl of Cornwall .
Gundred of England (1114-46), married 1130 Henry de la Pomeroy, son of Joscelin de la Pomerai.
Rohese of England, born 1114; married William de Tracy (b. 1040 in Normandy, France d. 1110 in Barnstaple, Devon, England)son of Turgisus de Tracy. They married in 1075. They had four children 1)Turgisus II de Tracy b. 1066, 2) Henry de Tracy b. 1068, 3) Gieva de Tracy b. 1068 d. 1100, 4)Henry of Barnstaple Tracy b. 1070 d.1170.

With Edith FitzForne
Robert FitzEdith, Lord Okehampton, (1093-1172) married Dame Maud d'Avranches du Sap. They had one daughter, Mary, who married Renaud, Sire of Courtenay (son of Miles, Sire of Courtenay and Ermengarde of Nevers).
Adeliza FitzEdith. Appears in charters with her brother Robert.

With Princess Nest
Nest ferch Rhys was born about 1073 at Dinefwr Castle , Carmarthenshire , the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr of Deheubarth and his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhywallon. She married, in 1095, to Gerald de Windsor (aka Geraldus FitzWalter) son of Walter FitzOther, Constable of Windsor Castle and Keeper of the Forests of Berkshire . She had several other liaisons - including one with Stephen of Cardigan, Constable of Cardigan (1136) - and subsequently other illegitimate children. The date of her death is unknown.
Henry FitzRoy , 1103-1158.

With Isabel de Beaumont
Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont (after 1102 - after 1172), daughter of Robert de Beaumont , sister of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester . She married Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke , in 1130. She was also known as Isabella de Meulan.
Isabel Hedwig of England
Matilda FitzRoy , abbess of Montvilliers, also known as Montpiller


Research Notes: Wife - Adeliza of Louvain

2nd wife of Henry I


William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel and Adeliza of Louvain




Husband William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel 15 16

            AKA: William d' Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel
           Born: Abt 1109
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Sep 1176
         Buried: 


         Father: William d'Aubigny Pincerna of Buckenham Castle (      -      ) 17
         Mother: Maud Bigod (      -      ) 18


       Marriage: 1138



Wife Adeliza of Louvain 11

            AKA: Adela of Louvain
           Born: Abt 1103
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 23 Apr 1151 - Abbey of Affligem, Affligem, (Flemish Brabant), Flanders (Belgium)


         Father: Godefroi de Louvain Duc de Basse-Lorraine (Abt 1060-1139) 12 13
         Mother: Ida of Chiny and Namur (Abt 1083-Between 1117/1122) 13 14



   Other Spouse: Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England (Between 1068/1069-1135) 4 5 - 1120


Children
1 M William d'Aubigny 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex 19 20

            AKA: William d' Aubigny 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Dec 1193
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maud de St. Hilary (1132-1193) 1 21 22
           Marr: After 1173



Death Notes: Husband - William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel

Ancestral Roots has 12 Oct 1176. That may be burial date.


Research Notes: Husband - William d'Aubigny 1st Earl of Arundel

1st Earl of Arundel, 1141-1176

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-25 (Adeliza of Louvain)

From Wikipedia - William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel :

William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (c. 1109 - September 25 , 1176 ) was son of William d'Aubigny Pincerna (Master Butler of the Royal household) of Buckenham Castle and Maud Bigod , daughter of Roger Bigod .


Marriage to the King's Widow
The younger William was an important member of Henry I of England 's household. After Henry's death he married the widow Queen consort Adeliza in 1138, and became Lord of Arundel in her right.

Titles
He was loyal to Stephen of England , who made him first Earl of Lincoln and then Earl of Arundel (more precisely, Earl of Sussex ).
In 1143 as Earl of Lincoln he made two charters confirming a donation of land around Arundel in Sussex to the abbey of Affligem in Brabant (representing his wife Adeliza of Louvain ), with William's brother Olivier present.

Mediator
He fought loyally for King Stephen , but in 1153 helped arrange the truce between Stephen and Henry Plantagenet , known as the Treaty of Wallingford , which brought an end to The Anarchy .
When the latter ascended the throne as Henry II , he confirmed William's Earldom and gave him direct possession of Arundel Castle (instead of the possession in right of his wife he had previously had). She had died in 1151. He remained loyal to the king during the 1173 revolt of Henry the Young King , and helped defeat the rebellion.

Issue
He and Adeliza were parents to William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel and grandparents to William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel .

Sources
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 1-22, 18A-22, 139-26, 194-25, 149-26.
Remfry, P.M., Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649 (ISBN 1-899376-28-3 )


Research Notes: Wife - Adeliza of Louvain

2nd wife of Henry I


Research Notes: Child - William d'Aubigny 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex

Crusader.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-26


Adolfus Count of Gunes and Maud de Bologne




Husband Adolfus Count of Gunes 23

           Born: Abt 937 - Gunes, (Pas-de-Calais), Flanders (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 996
         Buried: 


         Father: Sigfred "The Dane" First Count of Gunes (Abt 0910-0965) 24 25
         Mother: Elstrude (Abt 0912-      ) 26 27 28


       Marriage: 



Wife Maud de Bologne 29

           Born: Abt 944
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Raoul Count of Gunes 30

           Born: Abt 978 - Gunes, (Pas-de-Calais), Flanders (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 1036
         Buried: 





Adolph Count of Saffenberg




Husband Adolph Count of Saffenberg 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Matilda of Saffenberg

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Henry II Count of Limbourg (Abt 1111-1167) 31 32




Adrastus King of Argos [Mythological]




Husband Adrastus King of Argos [Mythological] 33

            AKA: Adrestus King of Argos
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Talaus King of Argos [Mythological] (      -      ) 34
         Mother: Lysimache [Mythological] (      -      ) 35


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Eurydice of Troy [Mythological] 36

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Private



Research Notes: Husband - Adrastus King of Argos [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Adrastus :

Adrastus (Greek : Adrastos) or Adrestus (Ionic Greek : Adr), traditionally translated as "nonparticipant" or "uncooperative",[1] was a legendary king of Argos during the war of the Seven Against Thebes .

Mythological tradition
He was a son of Talaus and Lysimache .[2] Pausanias calls his mother Lysianassa ,[3] and Hyginus calls her Eurynome .[4][5] He was one of the three kings at Argos , along with Iphis and Amphiaraus , who was married to Adrastus's sister Eriphyle . He was married to either Amphithea , daughter of Pronax , or to Demonassa . His daughters Argea and Deipyle married Polynices and Tydeus , respectively. His other children include Aegiale , Aegialeus , and Cyanippus.

During a feud between the most powerful houses in Argos , Talaus was slain by Amphiaraus , and Adrastus being expelled from his dominions fled to Polybus, then king of Sicyon . When Polybus died with-out heirs, Adrastus succeeded him on the throne of Sicyon, and during his reign he is said to have instituted the Nemean Games .[6][7][8][3]

According to "Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece" by Edward E. Barthell, he states that Adrastus is the son of Talaus and Lysimache (daughter of Abas). He married Amphitheia, daughter of his brother Pronax, and became the father of a son, Aegialeus, and four daughters: Aegialeia, who became the wife of Diomedes (son of Tydeus); Argeia, who became the wife of Polyneices (son of Oedipus); Deipyle, who became the wife of Tydeus (son of Oeneus); and Eurydice, who became the wife of the Trojan king, Ilus (son of Tros).[9]

Seven against Thebes
Afterwards, however, Adrastus became reconciled to Amphiaraus , gave him his sister Eriphyle in marriage, and returned to his kingdom of Argos upon the swift immortal horse Arion , a gift of Heracles . During the time he reigned there it hap-pened that Tydeus of Calydon and Polynices of Thebes , both fugitives from their native countries, met at Argos near the palace of Adrastus, and came to words and from words to blows.[10] On hearing the noise, Adrastus hastened to them and separated the combatants, in whom he immediately recognised the two men that had been promised to him by an oracle as the future husbands of two of his daughters; for one bore on his shield the figure of a boar, and the other that of a lion, and the oracle was that one of his daughters was to marry a boar and the other a lion. Adras-tus therefore gave his daughter Deipyle to Tydeus, and Argeia to Polynices, and at the same time promised to lead each of these princes back to his own country. Adrastus now prepared for war against Thebes, although Amphiaraus foretold that all who should engage in it should perish, with the exception of Adrastus.[11][12]


Thus arose the celebrated war of the Seven against Thebes , in which Adrastus was joined by six other heroes, Polynices , Tydeus , Amphiaraus , Capaneus , Hippomedon , and Parthenopaeus . Instead of Tydeus and Polynices other legends mention Eteoclos and Mecisteus . This war ended as unfortunately as Amphiaraus had predicted, and Adrastus alone was saved by the swiftness of his horse Arion.[13][14][15]


After the battle, Creon , king of Thebes, ordered that none of the fallen enemies were to be given funeral rites. Against his order, Antigone buried Polynices and was put to death, but Adrastus escaped to Athens to petition Theseus , the city's king, to attack Thebes and force the return of the bodies of the remaining five. Theseus initially refused but was convinced by his mother, Aethra , who had been beseeched by the mothers of the fallen, to put the matter to a vote of the citizens. The Athenians marched on Thebes and conquered the city but inflicted no additional damage, taking only what they came for, the five bodies. They were laid upon a funeral pyre and Adrastus eulogized each.[16][17]


Second war against Thebes
Ten years after this Adrastus persuaded the seven sons of the heroes who had fallen in the war against Thebes to make a new attack upon that city, and Amphiaraus now declared that the gods approved of the undertaking, and promised success.[18][19] This war is celebrated in ancient story as the War of the Epigoni . Thebes was taken and razed to the ground, after the greater part of its inhabitants had left the city on the advice of Tiresias .[20][21][22] The only Argive hero that fell in this war was Aegialeus , the son of Adras-tus. After having built a temple of Nemesis in the neighborhood of Thebes, he set out on his return home. But weighed down by old age and grief at the death of his son he died at Megara and was buried there.[23] After his death he was worshipped in several parts of Greece, as at Megara,[24] at Sicyon where his memory was celebrated in tragic cho-ruses,[8] and in Attica .[25]


The legends about Adrastus and the two wars against Thebes have furnished ample materials for the epic as well as tragic poets of Greece,[26] and some works of art relating to the stories about Adrastus are mentioned in Pausanias.[27]


From Adrastus the female patronymic "Adrastine" was formed.[28]


Research Notes: Child - Eurydice of Troy [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Eurydice of Troy :

In Greek Mythology , Eurydice was the daughter of Adrastus , wife of Ilus , and mother of King Laomedon .
--------
From Wikipedia - Adrastus :

According to "Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece" by Edward E. Barthell, he states that Adrastus is the son of Talaus and Lysimache (daughter of Abas). He married Amphitheia, daughter of his brother Pronax, and became the father of a son, Aegialeus, and four daughters: Aegialeia, who became the wife of Diomedes (son of Tydeus); Argeia, who became the wife of Polyneices (son of Oedipus); Deipyle, who became the wife of Tydeus (son of Oeneus); and Eurydice, who became the wife of the Trojan king, Ilus (son of Tros).[9]



Adulphus of the Visigoths




Husband Adulphus of the Visigoths 37

           Born: Abt 480 - Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Theodora 38 39

            AKA: Theodora of the Visigoths
           Born: Abt 503 - Italy
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Severinus Count of Cartagena (Abt 0501-      ) 40 41




Berenger Viscount de Rodes and Adyle




Husband Berenger Viscount de Rodes 1

           Born: Abt 1029 - <Rodes, Pyrenes-Orientales>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1073
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard II Viscount de Rodes (Abt 1003-Bef 1051) 1
         Mother: Rixinde de Narbonne (Abt 1005-      ) 1


       Marriage: 



Wife Adyle 1

           Born: Abt 1031 - <Carlat, Cantal>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Gilbert II Viscomte de Carlat (Abt 1005-      ) 1
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Gilbert Count of Gevaudan 1 42

            AKA: Gilbert Milhaud
           Born: Abt 1055 - <Milhaud, (Gard)>, (Languedoc-Roussillon), France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1107
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Gerberga of Provence, Countess of Arles (Abt 1057-      ) 1 42




ed Find "the White King of Dl Riata




Husband ed Find "the White King of Dl Riata 1 43 44

            AKA: ed the White King of Dl Riata, Aodh Hugh Fionn, ed mac Echdach King of Dl Riata
           Born: Bef 733 - (Scotland)
     Christened: 
           Died: 778
         Buried: 


         Father: Eochaid III King of Dl Riata (      -Abt 0733)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

Crowned: King of Dalriada, Abt 748.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Eochaid "the Poisonous" King of Dl Riata 45

            AKA: Eochaid IV King of Dl Riata
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 781
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Fergusa (Abt 0755-      ) 1



Research Notes: Husband - ed Find "the White King of Dl Riata

From Wikipedia - ed Find :

ed Find (ed the White) or ed mac Echdach (before 736-778) was king of Dl Riata (modern western Scotland ). ed was the son of Eochaid mac Echdach , a descendant of Domnall Brecc in the main line of Cenl nGabrin kings.

According to later genealogies, ed was the great-grandfather of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cined mac Ailpn) who is traditionally counted as the first king of Scots . This descent ran through ed's son Eochaid mac eda Find and Eochaid's son Alpn mac Echdach . The evidence for the existence of Eochaid and Alpn is late and uncompelling, and shows signs of fabrication in the High Middle Ages .

The Annals of Ulster in 768 report "Bellum i Fortrinn iter Aedh & Cinaedh": a battle in Fortriu between ed and Cined. This is usually read as meaning ed Find and the Pictish king Ciniod , who is called "Cinadhon" in the notice of his death in 775. The Annals of the Four Masters , a less reliable source, give a different version, placing this battle in Leinster and naming the victor as Cined mac Flainn of the U Failgi and his defeated enemy as one ed.

ed's death in 778 is noted by the Annals of Ulster. He appears to have been followed as king by his brother Fergus mac Echdach .
The "Laws of ed Eochaid's son" are mentioned by the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba in the reign of ed's supposed great-grandson Donald MacAlpin (Domnall mac Ailpn): "In his time the Gaels with their king made the rights and laws of the kingdom [that are called the laws] of ed Eochaid's son, in Forteviot ." What these laws concerned is not known.

References
For primary sources, see also External links below
Anderson, Alan Orr , Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500-1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
Bannerman, John, "The Scottish Takeover of Pictland" in Dauvit Broun & Thomas Owen Clancy (eds.) Spes Scotorum: Hope of Scots. Saint Columba, Iona and Scotland. T & T Clark, Edinburgh, 1999. ISBN 0-567-08682-2
Broun, Dauvit, The Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots. Boydell, Woodbridge, 1999. ISBN 0-85115-375-5
Broun, Dauvit, "Pictish Kings 761-839: Integration with Dl Riata or Separate Development" in Sally M. Foster (ed.), The St Andrews Sarcophagus: A Pictish masterpiece and its international connections. Four Courts, Dublin, 1998. ISBN 1-85182-414-6



Research Notes: Child - Eochaid "the Poisonous" King of Dl Riata

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-11


thelhelm Ealdorman of Wiltshire and Aedburgh




Husband thelhelm Ealdorman of Wiltshire 46 47

            AKA: Aethelan "the Great" Earl of Mercia and Eadberg
           Born: Abt 823
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Aedburgh 48

           Born: Abt 825 - Mercia, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - thelhelm Ealdorman of Wiltshire

From Wikipedia - Edward the Elder :

When he became king in 899 , Edward set Ecgwynn aside and married lffld , a daughter of thelhelm, the ealdorman of Wiltshire . [7] Their son was the future king, lfweard , and their daughter Eadgyth married Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor . The couples other children included five more daughters: Edgiva aka Edgifu, whose first marriage was to Charles the Simple ; Eadhild, who married Hugh the Great , Duke of Paris; lfgifu who married Conrad King of Burgundy; and two nuns Eadfld and Eadhild. According to the entry on Boleslaus II of Bohemia , the daughter Adiva (referred to in the entry for Eadgyth ) was his wife. A son, Edwin theling who drowned in 933[8] was possibly lffld's child, but that is not clear.


Sources


1. http://www.familysearch.org.

2. Wikipedia.org, Richard de Redvers.

3. Wikipedia.org, "William Peverel the Younger."

4. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121-25, 121B-26 (Elizabeth).

5. Wikipedia.org, Henry I of England.

6. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121-24, 169-23 (Maud of Flanders).

7. Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

8. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 162-23, 169-23.

9. Wikipedia.org, Matilda of Flanders.

10. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121B-26 (Elizabeth).

11. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25.

12. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-23.

13. Wikipedia.org, Godfrey I of Leuven.

14. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-23 (Godfrey I).

15. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

16. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25 (Adeliza of Louvain).

17. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (his son).

18. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (her son).

19. Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (his son).

20. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26.

21. Wikipedia.org, John FitzGeoffrey; Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford.

22. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26 (William d'Aubigny).

23. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874986.

24. Wikipedia.org, Gunes.

25. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872021.

26. Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872022.

27. Wikipedia.org, Arnulf I, Count of Flanders.

28. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872022.

29. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874987.

30. Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874984.

31. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-25 (Godfrey III).

32. Wikipedia.org, Henry II of Limburg.

33. Wikipedia.org, Adrastus.

34. Wikipedia.org, Talaus.

35. Wikipedia.org, Lysimache.

36. Wikipedia.org, Eurydice of Troy; Themiste; Adrastus.

37. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319840 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

38. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875424.

39. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319839 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

40. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875423.

41. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319838 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

42. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 111-26 (Petronilla of Aragon).

43. Wikipedia.org, ed Find.

44. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-10.

45. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-11.

46. Wikipedia.org, Edward the Elder.

47. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872375.

48. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874542.


Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org.

2 Wikipedia.org, Richard de Redvers.

3 Wikipedia.org, "William Peverel the Younger."

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121-25, 121B-26 (Elizabeth).

5 Wikipedia.org, Henry I of England.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121-24, 169-23 (Maud of Flanders).

7 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 162-23, 169-23.

9 Wikipedia.org, Matilda of Flanders.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121B-26 (Elizabeth).

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-23.

13 Wikipedia.org, Godfrey I of Leuven.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-23 (Godfrey I).

15 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-25 (Adeliza of Louvain).

17 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (his son).

18 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (her son).

19 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (his son).

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26.

21 Wikipedia.org, John FitzGeoffrey; Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26 (William d'Aubigny).

23 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874986.

24 Wikipedia.org, Gunes.

25 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872021.

26 Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872022.

27 Wikipedia.org, Arnulf I, Count of Flanders.

28 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872022.

29 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874987.

30 Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874984.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-25 (Godfrey III).

32 Wikipedia.org, Henry II of Limburg.

33 Wikipedia.org, Adrastus.

34 Wikipedia.org, Talaus.

35 Wikipedia.org, Lysimache.

36 Wikipedia.org, Eurydice of Troy; Themiste; Adrastus.

37 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319840 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

38 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875424.

39 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319839 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

40 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875423.

41 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319838 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 111-26 (Petronilla of Aragon).

43 Wikipedia.org, ed Find.

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-10.

45 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-11.

46 Wikipedia.org, Edward the Elder.

47 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872375.

48 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874542.


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