The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Charles II "the Bald" of France and Holy Roman Emperor and Richildis




Husband Charles II "the Bald" of France and Holy Roman Emperor 1 2




            AKA: Charles the Bald King of West Francia and Holy Roman Emperor
           Born: 13 Jun 823 - Frankfurt-am-Main, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia (Germany)
     Christened: 


           Died: 5 Oct 877 - Mont Cenis, Brides-les-Bains, Bourgogne, (France)
         Buried:  - Church of Saint Peter, Abbey of Nantua, (Ain, Rhône-Alpes), Burgundy, (France)


         Father: Louis I Holy Roman Emperor and King of the Franks (0778-0840) 3 4 5 6
         Mother: Judith of Bavaria (Abt 0798-0843) 7 8 9


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Ermentrude of Orléans (0830-0869) 10 11 12 - 14 Dec 842 - Crécy, (Somme), Picardy, France

Events

• King of the Franks: 840-877.

• King of Western Francia: 843-877.

• Holy Roman Emperor: 25 Dec 875-5 Oct 877.




Wife Richildis

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Death Notes: Husband - Charles II "the Bald" of France and Holy Roman Emperor

Died near Mont Cenis in the Alps on 5 or 6 October 877.


Burial Notes: Husband - Charles II "the Bald" of France and Holy Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia: "According to the Annals of St-Bertin, Charles was hastily buried at the abbey of Nantua, Burgundy because the bearers were unable to withstand the stench of his decaying body. He was to have been buried in the Basilique Saint-Denis and may have been transferred there later. It was recorded that there was a memorial brass there that was melted down at the Revolution."


Research Notes: Husband - Charles II "the Bald" of France and Holy Roman Emperor

Name Suffix: Holy Roman Emperor
Also Known As: King of Lorraine
REFN: 831
King of France 843-877, King of Lorraine 869-877, crowned Holy Roman Emperor at Rome 25 December 875. In 840, Charles joined with his half-brother Louis in opposing their brother Lothair who attempted to secure the empire for himself upon the death of their father Louis.
----------
From Wikipedia - Charles the Bald :

Charles the Bald[1] (numbered Charles II of France and the Holy Roman Empire ) (French : Charles le Chauve; 13 June 823 - 6 October 877 ), Holy Roman Emperor (875 -877 ) and King of West Francia (840 -877 ), was the youngest son of Emperor Louis the Pious , by his second wife Judith .

Struggle against his brothers
He was born on 13 June 823 in Frankfurt , when his elder brothers were already adults and had been assigned their own regna, or subkingdoms, by their father. The attempts made by Louis the Pious to assign Charles a subkingdom, first Alemannia and then the country between the Meuse and the Pyrenees (in 832, after the rising of Pepin I of Aquitaine ) were unsuccessful. The numerous reconciliations with the rebellious Lothair and Pepin, as well as their brother Louis the German , King of Bavaria , made Charles's share in Aquitaine and Italy only temporary, but his father did not give up and made Charles the heir of the entire land which was once Gaul and would eventually be France. At a diet near Crémieux in 837, Louis the Pious bade the nobles do homage to Charles as his heir. This led to the final rising of his sons against him and Pepin of Aquitaine died in 838, whereupon Charles received that kingdom, finally once and for all. Pepin's son Pepin II would be a perpetual thorn in his side.

The death of the emperor in 840 led to the outbreak of war between his sons. Charles allied himself with his brother Louis the German to resist the pretensions of the new emperor Lothair I, and the two allies defeated Lothair at the Battle of Fontenay-en-Puisaye on June 25 , 841 . In the following year, the two brothers confirmed their alliance by the celebrated Oaths of Strasbourg . The war was brought to an end by the Treaty of Verdun in August 843. The settlement gave Charles the Bald the kingdom of the West Franks, which he had been up till then governing and which practically corresponded with what is now France, as far as the Meuse , the Saône , and the Rhône , with the addition of the Spanish March as far as the Ebro . Louis received the eastern part of the Carolingian Empire , known as the East Francia and later Germany . Lothair retained the imperial title and the Iron Crown of Lombardy . He also received the central regions from Flanders through the Rhineland and Burgundy as king of Middle Francia .

Reign in the West

The first years of Charles's reign, up to the death of Lothair I in 855 , were comparatively peaceful. During these years the three brothers continued the system of "confraternal government", meeting repeatedly with one another, at Koblenz (848 ), at Meerssen (851 ), and at Attigny (854 ). In 858 , Louis the German, invited by disaffected nobles eager to oust Charles, invaded the West Frankish kingdom. Charles was so unpopular that he was unable to summon an army, and he fled to Burgundy . He was saved only by the support of the bishops, who refused to crown Louis king, and by the fidelity of the Welfs , who were related to his mother, Judith. In 860 , he in his turn tried to seize the kingdom of his nephew, Charles of Provence , but was repulsed. On the death of his nephew Lothair II in 869 , Charles tried to seize Lothair's dominions, but by the Treaty of Mersen (870 ) was compelled to share them with Louis the German.

Besides these family disputes, Charles had to struggle against repeated rebellions in Aquitaine and against the Bretons . Led by their chiefs Nomenoë and Erispoë , who defeated the king at Ballon (845 ) and Juvardeil (851 ), the Bretons were successful in obtaining a de facto independence. Charles also fought against the Vikings , who devastated the country of the north, the valleys of the Seine and Loire , and even up to the borders of Aquitaine. Several times Charles was forced to purchase their retreat at a heavy price. Charles led various expeditions against the invaders and, by the Edict of Pistres of 864 , made the army more mobile by providing for a cavalry element, the predecessor of the French chivalry so famous during the next 600 years. By the same edict, he ordered fortified bridges to be put up at all rivers to block the Viking incursions. Two of these bridges at Paris saved the city during its siege of 885-886 .

Emperor

In 875 , after the death of the Emperor Louis II (son of his half-brother Lothair), Charles the Bald, supported by Pope John VIII , traveled to Italy, receiving the royal crown at Pavia and the imperial insignia in Rome on December 29 . Louis the German, also a candidate for the succession of Louis II, revenged himself by invading and devastating Charles' dominions, and Charles had to return hastily to Francia . After the death of Louis the German (28 August 876 ), Charles in his turn attempted to seize Louis's kingdom, but was decisively beaten at Andernach on October 8 , 876 . In the meantime, John VIII, menaced by the Saracens , was urging Charles to come to his defence in Italy. Charles again crossed the Alps , but this expedition was received with little enthusiasm by the nobles, and even by his regent in Lombardy , Boso , and they refused to join his army. At the same time Carloman , son of Louis the German, entered northern Italy. Charles, ill and in great distress, started on his way back to Gaul, but died while crossing the pass of Mont Cenis at Brides-les-Bain , on 6 October 877 .

According to the Annals of St-Bertin, Charles was hastily buried at the abbey of Nantua, Burgundy because the bearers were unable to withstand the stench of his decaying body. He was to have been buried in the Basilique Saint-Denis and may have been transferred there later. It was recorded that there was a memorial brass there that was melted down at the Revolution.

Legacy
Charles was succeeded by his son, Louis . Charles seems to have been a prince of education and letters, a friend of the church, and conscious of the support he could find in the episcopate against his unruly nobles, for he chose his councillors from among the higher clergy, as in the case of Guenelon of Sens , who betrayed him, and of Hincmar of Reims .
It has been suggested that Charles was not in fact bald, but that his epithet was applied ironically - that, in fact, he was extremely hairy. In support of this idea is the fact that none of his enemies commented on what would be an easy target. However, none of the voluble members of his court comments on his being hairy; and the Genealogy of Frankish Kings, a text from Fontanell dating from possibly as early as 869, and a text without a trace of irony, names him as Karolus Caluus ("Charles the Bald"). Certainly, by the end of the 10th century, Richier of Reims and Adhemar of Chabannes refer to him in all seriousness as "Charles the Bald".[2]

Family
Charles married Ermentrude , daughter of Odo I, Count of Orléans , in 842 . She died in 869 . In 870 , Charles married Richilde of Provence , who was descended from a noble family of Lorraine , but none of the children he had with her played a part of any importance.

With Ermentrude :
Judith (844 -870 ), married firstly with Ethelwulf of Wessex , secondly with Ethelbald of Wessex (her stepson) and thirdly with Baldwin I of Flanders
Louis the Stammerer (846 -879 )
Charles the Child (847 -866 )
Lothar (848 -865 ), monk in 861 , became Abbot of Saint-Germain
Carloman (849 -876 )
Rotrud (852 -912 ), a nun, Abbess of Saint-Radegunde
Ermentrud (854 -877 ), a nun, Abbess of Hasnon
Hildegard (born 856 , died young)
Gisela (857 -874 )
With Richilde:
Rothild (871 -929 ), married firstly with Hugues, Count of Bourges and secondly with Roger, Count of Maine
Drogo (872 -873 )
Pippin (873 -874 )
a son (born and died 875 )
Charles (876 -877 ) 1 2


Research Notes: Wife - Richildis

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872372


Charles III "the Simple" King of Western Francia and Ogiva of England




Husband Charles III "the Simple" King of Western Francia 10 13 14

            AKA: Charles III "the Straightforward" King of Western Francia, Charles the Simple King of France, Karolus Simplex King of France
           Born: 17 Sep 879 - <West Francia (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Oct 929 - Péronne, (Somme), Picardy, West Francia (France)
         Buried:  - St. Fursi, Péronne, (Somme), Picardy, West Francia (France)


         Father: Louis II "the Stammerer" King of West Francia (0846-0879) 10 15 16
         Mother: Adelaide of Paris (Abt 0855-After 0901) 10 17


       Marriage: 7 Oct 919



Wife Ogiva of England

            AKA: Edgifu, Edgiva of England, Ogive
           Born: 902 - Wessex, England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 955
         Buried: 


         Father: Edward I "the Elder" King of England (Between 0871/0875-0924/0925) 18 19 20
         Mother: Elfreda (Abt 0878-      ) 10 19 21



   Other Spouse: Herbert III Count of Vermandois (Between 0942/0953-0993) 10 22 - 951


Children
1 M Louis IV d'Outre-Mer, King of the West Franks 10 23

            AKA: Louis IV "Transmarinus" King of Western Francia
           Born: 10 Sep 920 - <Laon, (Aisne), Picardy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Sep 954 - Reims, (Marne), Champagne, France
         Buried:  - Abbaye de St. Rémy, Reims, (Marne), Champagne, (France)
         Spouse: Gerberga of Saxony (Abt 0914-0984) 10 24 25
           Marr: 939 or 940




Research Notes: Husband - Charles III "the Simple" King of Western Francia

From Wikipedia - Charles the Simple :

Charles III (17 September 879 - 7 October 929), called the Simple or the Straightforward (from the Latin Karolus Simplex), was the undisputed King of France from 898 until 922 and the King of Lotharingia from 911 until 919/23. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty , the third and posthumous son of Louis the Stammerer by his second wife, Adelaide of Paris .

As a child, Charles was prevented from succeeding to the throne at the time of the death in 884 of his half-brother Carloman . The nobles of the realm instead asked his uncle, Charles the Fat , to rule them. He was also prevented from succeeded the unpopular Charles, who was deposed in November 887 and died in January 888, although it is unknown if his deposition was accepted or even made known in West Francia before his death. The nobility elected Odo , the hero of the Siege of Paris , king, though there was a faction that supported Guy III of Spoleto . Charles was put under the protection of Ranulf II , the Duke of Aquitaine , who may have tried to claim the throne for him and in the end used the royal title himself until making peace with Odo. Finally, in 893 Charles was crowned by a faction opposed to Odo at Reims Cathedral . He only became the effectual monarch with the death of Odo in 898.[1]

In 911 Charles signed the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte with the Viking leader Rollo , thus enfeoffing him with the lower Seine basin, the heart of what would become Normandy , in hopes that Rollo would fend off future Viking raids in the Seine area. He also gave the Viking his daughter Gisela in marriage. In the same year as the treaty with the Vikings, Louis the Child , the King of Germany , died and the nobles of Lotharingia , who had been loyal to him, under the leadership of Regina Longneck , declared Charles their new king, breaking from Germans who had elected Conrad of Franconia king.[1] Charles tried to win their support by marrying a Lotharingian woman named Frederuna , who died in 917.

On 7 October 919 Charles re-married to Eadgifu , the daughter of Edward the Elder , King of England . By this time Charles' excessive favouritism towards a certain Hagano had turned the aristocracy against him. He endowed Hagano with monasteries which were already the benefices of other barons, alienating these barons. In Lotharingia he earned the enmity of the new duke, Gilbert , who declared for the German king Henry the Fowler in 919.[1] Opposition to Charles in Lotharingia was not universal, however, and he retained the support of Wigeric . In 922 some of the West Frankish barons, led by Robert of Neustria and Rudolph of Burgundy , revolted. Robert, who was Odo's brother, was elected by the rebels and crowned in opposition to Charles, who had to flee to Lotharingia. He returned the next year (923) with a Norman army but was defeated on 15 June near Soissons by Robert, who died in the battle.[1] Charles was captured and imprisoned in a castle at Péronne under the guard of Herbert II of Vermandois .[2] Rudolph was elected to succeed him. In 925 the Lotharingians accepted Rudolph as their king. Charles died in prison on 7 October 929 and was buried at the nearby abbey of Saint-Fursy . Though he had had many children by Frederuna, it his son by Eadgifu who would eventually be crowned in 936 as Louis IV of France . In the initial aftermath of Charles defeat, Eadgifu and Louis fled to England. 10 13 14


Research Notes: Wife - Ogiva of England

3rd wife of Charles II "the Simple"

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), Line 50-20 (Herbert III). Line 148-17 (Charles III) has d. 951

Source: Wikipedia - Edward the Elder and Eadgifu of England

From Wikipedia - Eadgifu of England :

Eadgifu (b. 902 , d. after 955 ) or Edgifu, was a daughter [1] of Edward the Elder , King of Wessex and England , and his second wife Aelffaed . She was born in Wessex .


Marriage to the French King
She was the second wife of King Charles III of France ,[1] whom she married in 919 after the death of his first wife, Frederonne ; she was mother to Louis IV of France .


Flight to England
In 922 Charles III was deposed and the next year taken prisoner by Count Herbert II of Vermandois , an ally of the present King. To protect her son's safety Eadgifu took him to England in 923 to the court of her half-brother, Athelstan of England .[2] Because of this, Louis IV of France became known as Louis d'Outremer of France. He stayed there until 936, when he was called back to France to be crowned King. Eadgifu accompanied him.
She retired to a convent in Laon. Then, in 951, she left the convent and married Herbert III, Count of Vermandois .[2]


Notes
^ a b Lappenberg, Johann ; Benjamin Thorpe, translator (1845). A History of England Under the Anglo-Saxon Kings. J. Murray, pp. 88-89.
^ a b Williams, Ann ; Alfred P. Smyth, D. P. Kirby (1991). A Biographical Dictionary of Dark Age Britain: England, Scotland, and Wales. Routledge, p. 112. ISBN 1852640472 .

References
Lappenberg, Johann ; Benjamin Thorpe, translator (1845). A History of England Under the Anglo-Saxon Kings. J. Murray, pp. 88-89.
Williams, Ann ; Alfred P. Smyth, D. P. Kirby (1991). A Biographical Dictionary of Dark Age Britain: England, Scotland, and Wales. Routledge, p. 112. ISBN 1852640472 .


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 148-17 (Charles III) has m. 918.


Research Notes: Child - Louis IV d'Outre-Mer, King of the West Franks

King of the West Franks 936-954

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 148-18 10 23


Charles Martel King of the Franks and Swanachild




Husband Charles Martel King of the Franks 26 27 28 29 30

            AKA: Carollus Martellus, Charles "the Hammer" King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 676 - Herstal, Liège, Austrasia (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Oct 741 - Ciersy Sur Oise, Austrasia (France)
         Buried:  - Monastery of St. Denis, Saint-Denis, [Île-de-France, France]


         Father: Pepin II of Heristal, Duke of Austrasia (Abt 0645-0714) 29 31
         Mother: Alpaida (      -      ) 32 33


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Rotrude of Treves (0690-0724) 34

Events

• Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia:

• Victory: over the Saracens at the Battle of Tours, 732, Tours near Poitiers, (Indre-et-Loire), France.




Wife Swanachild

            AKA: Swanhilde
           Born: Abt 691 - Bavaria, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Tassilo II of Bavaria (      -Abt 0719) 35 36
         Mother: Imma (      -Abt 0750)




         Father: 
         Mother: Imma (      -Abt 0750)




Children

Birth Notes: Husband - Charles Martel King of the Franks

Ancestral Roots has b. 676; Wikipedia has abt. 688


Research Notes: Husband - Charles Martel King of the Franks

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871722:

"Charles is particularly remembered in history for winning the battle of Tours in 732. The battle, near Poitiers on 11 October, ended the invasion of a 90,000 man Moorish [Saracen] army led by the Yemenite Abd ar-Rahman. The Moors had crossed the Pyrenees by 720 when they captured Narbonne. After sacking and burning Bordeaux, they defeated an army under Eudes, Duke of Aquitaine (RIN # 4056). Attracted by its riches, the Moors marched on Tours, but were defeated by Charles (afterwards called Charles the Hammer) then 44 years of age. Abd ar-Rahman is killed and the invaders retreated across the Pyrenees to Spain where they will not be driven from until 1492. In 735, Charles conquered Burgundy, adding its lands to the Kingdom of the Franks.
"!The People's Chronology; 65"
-------
From Wikipedia - Charles Martel :
Charles Martel (Latin : Carolus Martellus) (ca. 688 - 22 October 741),[1][2][3][4][5] called Charles the Hammer, was a Frankish military and political leader, who served as Mayor of the Palace under the Merovingian kings and ruled de facto during an interregnum (737-43) at the end of his life, using the title Duke and Prince of the Franks . In 739 he was offered the title of Consul by the Pope , but he refused.[6] He is perhaps best remembered for winning the Battle of Tours in 732, in which he defeated an invading Muslim army and halted northward Islamic expansion in western Europe.[7]

A brilliant general-he lost only one battle in his career (the Battle of Cologne )-he is a founding figure of the Middle Ages , often credited with a seminal role in the development of feudalism and knighthood , and laying the groundwork for the Carolingian Empire .[8] [9]

Birth and youth
Martel was born in Herstal , in present-day Belgium , the illegitimate son of the mayor and duke Pippin II and his concubine Alpaida .[10]

The following tale is told of Charles and of the origins of his name:[citation needed ] in 676, Pepin of Herstal and his wife Plectrude were talking together in a room when they were intruded upon by a messenger, bringing news that the Mayor's mistress, Alpaida , had given birth to a son at Herstal. The messenger, fearful of arousing the wrath of Plectrude, decided not to announce the news directly. Instead, he said: "Long live the king, it is a carl" ('man'). Pepin, equally cautious of his wife, dismissed the messenger as follows: "A carl, is it? Then let him be called that." This was done, and, so legend claims, the child was named "Carl". In Germany he's still called "Karl Martell". Alpaida also bore Pepin another son, Childebrand.

<<b>>Contesting for power<</b>>
In December 714, Pepin of Heristal died. Prior to his death, he had, at his wife Plectrude's urging, designated Theudoald , his grandson by their son Grimoald , his heir in the entire realm. This was immediately opposed by the nobles because Theudoald was a child of only eight years of age. To prevent Charles using this unrest to his own advantage, Plectrude had him gaoled in Cologne , the city which was destined to be her capital. This prevented an uprising on his behalf in Austrasia , but not in Neustria .

Death

Charles Martel died on October 22, 741, at Quierzy-sur-Oise in what is today the Aisne département in the Picardy region of France. He was buried at Saint Denis Basilica in Paris . His territories were divided among his adult sons a year earlier: to Carloman he gave Austrasia and Alemannia (with Bavaria as a vassal), to Pippin the Younger Neustria and Burgundy (with Aquitaine as a vassal), and to Grifo nothing, though some sources indicate he intended to give him a strip of land between Neustria and Austrasia.

Gibbon called him "the hero of the age" and declared "Christendom ... delivered ... by the genius and good fortune of one man, Charles Martel."

Family and children
Charles Martel married twice:

His first wife was Rotrude of Treves , (690-724) (daughter of St. Leutwinus, Bishop of Treves ). They had the following children:
Hiltrud (d. 754), married Odilo I , Duke of Bavaria
Carloman
Landrade (Landres), married Sigrand, Count of Hesbania
Auda, Aldana, or Alane, married Thierry IV, Count of Autun and Toulouse
Pippin the Short

His second wife was Swanhild . They had the following child:
Grifo
Charles Martel also had a mistress, Ruodhaid . They had the following children:
Bernard (b. before 732-787)
Hieronymus
Remigius , archbishop of Rouen (d. 771)
Ian (d. 783) 26 27 28 29 30


Research Notes: Wife - Swanachild

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872692

This source gives Swanhilde's parents as Grimaldo II (b. abt 665 in Bavaria) and Viltrude (b. abt 667)


Charles Martel King of the Franks and Rotrude of Treves




Husband Charles Martel King of the Franks 26 27 28 29 30

            AKA: Carollus Martellus, Charles "the Hammer" King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 676 - Herstal, Liège, Austrasia (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Oct 741 - Ciersy Sur Oise, Austrasia (France)
         Buried:  - Monastery of St. Denis, Saint-Denis, [Île-de-France, France]


         Father: Pepin II of Heristal, Duke of Austrasia (Abt 0645-0714) 29 31
         Mother: Alpaida (      -      ) 32 33


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Swanachild (Abt 0691-      )

Events

• Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia:

• Victory: over the Saracens at the Battle of Tours, 732, Tours near Poitiers, (Indre-et-Loire), France.




Wife Rotrude of Treves 34

            AKA: Rotrou
           Born: 690
     Christened: 
           Died: 724
         Buried: 


         Father: Saint Leutwinus Bishop of Treves (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Carloman Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia 37

           Born: abt 0711
     Christened: 
           Died: 754
         Buried: 



2 F Landrade

            AKA: Landres
           Born: Abt 713
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sigrand Count of Hesbania (Abt 0709-      )
           Marr: Abt 709



3 M Pepin III "the Short" King of the Franks 29 38 39 40




            AKA: Pippin the Short King of the Franks
           Born: 714 - Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Sep 768 - Saint-Denis, (Paris, Île-de-France), Neustria (France)
         Buried:  - Basilica of St. Denis, Saint-Denis, (Paris, Île-de-France), Neustria (France)
         Spouse: Berthe of Laon (      -0783) 41



4 F Hiltrud

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 754
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Odilo I Duke of Bavaria (      -      )



5 F Auda

            AKA: Alane, Aldana
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Thierry IV Count of Autun and Toulouse (      -      )



6 M Duke Bernard 42

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Husband - Charles Martel King of the Franks

Ancestral Roots has b. 676; Wikipedia has abt. 688


Research Notes: Husband - Charles Martel King of the Franks

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871722:

"Charles is particularly remembered in history for winning the battle of Tours in 732. The battle, near Poitiers on 11 October, ended the invasion of a 90,000 man Moorish [Saracen] army led by the Yemenite Abd ar-Rahman. The Moors had crossed the Pyrenees by 720 when they captured Narbonne. After sacking and burning Bordeaux, they defeated an army under Eudes, Duke of Aquitaine (RIN # 4056). Attracted by its riches, the Moors marched on Tours, but were defeated by Charles (afterwards called Charles the Hammer) then 44 years of age. Abd ar-Rahman is killed and the invaders retreated across the Pyrenees to Spain where they will not be driven from until 1492. In 735, Charles conquered Burgundy, adding its lands to the Kingdom of the Franks.
"!The People's Chronology; 65"
-------
From Wikipedia - Charles Martel :
Charles Martel (Latin : Carolus Martellus) (ca. 688 - 22 October 741),[1][2][3][4][5] called Charles the Hammer, was a Frankish military and political leader, who served as Mayor of the Palace under the Merovingian kings and ruled de facto during an interregnum (737-43) at the end of his life, using the title Duke and Prince of the Franks . In 739 he was offered the title of Consul by the Pope , but he refused.[6] He is perhaps best remembered for winning the Battle of Tours in 732, in which he defeated an invading Muslim army and halted northward Islamic expansion in western Europe.[7]

A brilliant general-he lost only one battle in his career (the Battle of Cologne )-he is a founding figure of the Middle Ages , often credited with a seminal role in the development of feudalism and knighthood , and laying the groundwork for the Carolingian Empire .[8] [9]

Birth and youth
Martel was born in Herstal , in present-day Belgium , the illegitimate son of the mayor and duke Pippin II and his concubine Alpaida .[10]

The following tale is told of Charles and of the origins of his name:[citation needed ] in 676, Pepin of Herstal and his wife Plectrude were talking together in a room when they were intruded upon by a messenger, bringing news that the Mayor's mistress, Alpaida , had given birth to a son at Herstal. The messenger, fearful of arousing the wrath of Plectrude, decided not to announce the news directly. Instead, he said: "Long live the king, it is a carl" ('man'). Pepin, equally cautious of his wife, dismissed the messenger as follows: "A carl, is it? Then let him be called that." This was done, and, so legend claims, the child was named "Carl". In Germany he's still called "Karl Martell". Alpaida also bore Pepin another son, Childebrand.

<<b>>Contesting for power<</b>>
In December 714, Pepin of Heristal died. Prior to his death, he had, at his wife Plectrude's urging, designated Theudoald , his grandson by their son Grimoald , his heir in the entire realm. This was immediately opposed by the nobles because Theudoald was a child of only eight years of age. To prevent Charles using this unrest to his own advantage, Plectrude had him gaoled in Cologne , the city which was destined to be her capital. This prevented an uprising on his behalf in Austrasia , but not in Neustria .

Death

Charles Martel died on October 22, 741, at Quierzy-sur-Oise in what is today the Aisne département in the Picardy region of France. He was buried at Saint Denis Basilica in Paris . His territories were divided among his adult sons a year earlier: to Carloman he gave Austrasia and Alemannia (with Bavaria as a vassal), to Pippin the Younger Neustria and Burgundy (with Aquitaine as a vassal), and to Grifo nothing, though some sources indicate he intended to give him a strip of land between Neustria and Austrasia.

Gibbon called him "the hero of the age" and declared "Christendom ... delivered ... by the genius and good fortune of one man, Charles Martel."

Family and children
Charles Martel married twice:

His first wife was Rotrude of Treves , (690-724) (daughter of St. Leutwinus, Bishop of Treves ). They had the following children:
Hiltrud (d. 754), married Odilo I , Duke of Bavaria
Carloman
Landrade (Landres), married Sigrand, Count of Hesbania
Auda, Aldana, or Alane, married Thierry IV, Count of Autun and Toulouse
Pippin the Short

His second wife was Swanhild . They had the following child:
Grifo
Charles Martel also had a mistress, Ruodhaid . They had the following children:
Bernard (b. before 732-787)
Hieronymus
Remigius , archbishop of Rouen (d. 771)
Ian (d. 783) 26 27 28 29 30


Research Notes: Wife - Rotrude of Treves

According to Ancestral Roots, line 190-11, "sister of a Wido, identified without proof by the Abbe Chaume as son of St. Lievin, Bishop of Treves." 34


Research Notes: Child - Carloman Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872691:
Mayor of the palace of Austrasia, it is probable that his wife was a
daughter of Alard. Upon the death of his father in 741, Carloman
succeeded to Austrasia, Alemannia, Thuringia and Bavaria. His brother Pepin (RIN # 570) recieves the other half of the realm and the title of King of Franks, when Carloman suddenly abdicated his lands and became a monk in 747. 37


Research Notes: Child - Landrade

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875391


Research Notes: Child - Pepin III "the Short" King of the Franks

From Ancestral Roots, Line 190-12, "deposed the last of the Faineant (Merovingian) kings and became himself the first king of the Franks of the second race, 751-768, d. 768."

From Wikipedia - Pepin the Short :

Pepin or Pippin (714 - 24 September 768 ), called the Short, and often known as Pepin the Younger or Pepin III,[1] was the Mayor of the Palace and Duke of the Franks from 741 and King of the Franks from 751 to 768. He was the father of Charlemagne .

He was the son of Charles Martel , mayor of the palace and duke of the Franks, and of Rotrude of Trier (690 -724 ).

Assumption of power
Pepin's father, Charles Martel, died in 741 . He divided the rule of the Frankish kingdom between Pepin and his elder brother, Carloman , his surviving sons by his first wife: Carloman became Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, Pepin became Mayor of the Palace of Neustria. Grifo , Charles' son by his second wife, Swanahild (aka Swanhilde), may also have been intended to receive an inheritance, but he was imprisoned in a monastery by his two half-brothers. Carloman, who by all evidence was a deeply pious man, retired to a monastery in 747 . This left Francia in the hands of Pepin as sole mayor of the palace and dux et princeps Francorum, a title originated by his grandfather and namesake Pepin of Heristal ...

Legacy
Pepin died during a campaign and was brought to Saint Denis to be buried near the saint in 768 and is interred there in the basilica with his wife Bertrada . Pepin was buried "outside that entrance [of Saint Denis Basilica ] according to his wishes, face down, for the sins of his father Charles Martel".[1] Historical opinion often seems to regard him as the lesser son and lesser father of two greater men, though a great man in his own right. He continued to build up the heavy cavalry which his father had begun. He maintained the standing army that his father had found necessary to protect the realm and form the core of its full army in wartime. He not only maintained his father's policy of containing the Moors , he drove them over and across the Pyrenees with the capture of Narbonne. He continued his father's expansion of the Frankish church (missionary work in Germany and Scandinavia ) and the infrastructure (feudalism ) that would prove the backbone of medieval Europe. His rule, while not as great as either his father's or son's, was historically important and of great benefit to the Franks as a people. It can certainly be argued that Pepin's assumption of the crown, and the title of Patrician of Rome , were harbingers of his son's imperial coronation which is usually seen as the founding of the Holy Roman Empire . He certainly made the Carolingians de jure what his father had made them de facto-the ruling dynasty of the Franks and the foremost power of Europe. While not known as a great general, he was undefeated during his lifetime.

Family
In 740 , Pepin married Bertrada of Laon , his second cousin. Her father, Charibert , was the son of Pepin II's brother, Martin of Laon . They are known to have had four children:
Charles (April 2 , 742 - January 28 , 814 ), (Charles the Great)
Carloman (751 - December 4 , 771 )
Gisela (757 - 810 )
Pepin, who died in infancy. 29 38 39 40




Research Notes: Child - Hiltrud

Source: Wikipedia - Charles Martel


Research Notes: Child - Auda

Source: Wikipedia - Charles Martel


Research Notes: Child - Duke Bernard

Younger brother of Pepin the Short. 42


Childebert King of Cologne




Husband Childebert King of Cologne 43 44 45

            AKA: Childebert I King of Paris, Choldebaud King of Cologne
           Born: Bef 440 - Rheims, (Marne, Champagne-Ardenne), Gaul, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 483 and 488
         Buried: 


         Father: Clovis "the Riparian" Frankish King of Cologne (Bef 0420-      ) 46 47
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Living: 450.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne 48 49

            AKA: Sigebert I "the Lame" King of Cologne, Sigobert "the Lame"
           Born: Bef 460
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 509
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Vultrogothe Princess of Orleans (      -      ) 50
           Marr: Bef 460




Death Notes: Child - Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne

Murdered by his son Cloderic, at the instigation of Clovis I, King of the Salic Franks, 481-511.


Research Notes: Child - Sigebert "the Lame" King of Cologne

From Wikipedia - Sigobert the Lame :

Sigobert the Lame (also Sigibert or Sigebert, d. ca. 509) was a king of the Franks in the area of Zülpich (Latin : Tolbiac) and Cologne .

He was presumably wounded at the knee at the Battle of Tolbiac against the Alamanni .

According to Gregory of Tours , he was murdered by his son Chlodoric upon the instigation of Clovis I , sometime after his victory on the Visigoths (507). Clovis then accused Chlodoric of murder and had him killed in his turn. In this way Clovis became king of Sigobert's and Chlodoric's people.

Gregory suggests that Chlodoric was murdered in the same campaign that also killed the Frankish King Chararic . Before, Clovis had killed Ragnachar and his brothers. After all these murders Gregory tells us that Clovis lamented that he had left no family anymore, implying that amongst his own casualties were close relatives. 48 49


Childebrand Duke of Swabia




Husband Childebrand Duke of Swabia 51

            AKA: Chidebrand Duke of Swabia
           Born: Abt 717
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Ermentrude 52

           Born: Abt 743 - Swabia, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isenbart Lord of Altdorf (Abt 0741-      ) 53





Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria and Fredegund




Husband Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria 54 55

           Born: Abt 539 - <Neustria>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Sep 584
         Buried: 


         Father: Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks (0497-0561) 56 57 58
         Mother: Arnégonde (Abt 0515-0573) 59 60 61


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Audovera (      -      )

Events

• King of Neustria: 561-584.

• King of Soissons: 561-584.




Wife Fredegund 62 63

            AKA: Frédégonde
           Born: 543
     Christened: 
           Died: 597
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks 62 64 65

            AKA: Chlothar "le Jeune" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Chlothar II "le Grand" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Lothair II King of Neustria, King of the Franks
           Born: 584 - <Neustria>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 629 - Paris, (Île-de-France), Neustria, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Haldertrude (0575-0604) 62
         Spouse: Bertrade (0582-0618) 66
         Spouse: Sichilde (      -      )




Death Notes: Husband - Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria

Stabbed when returning from the chase to his royal villa of Chelles.


Research Notes: Husband - Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria

King of Neustria 561-584.

King of Soissons, succeeding Chlothar I (Clotaire I).

From Wikipedia - Chilperic I :

Chilperic I (c. 539 - September 584 ) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons ) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of Clotaire I , sole king of the Franks , and Aregund.

Immediately after the death of his father in 561 , he endeavoured to take possession of the whole kingdom, seized the treasure amassed in the royal town of Berny and entered Paris . His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens , Arras , Cambrai , Thérouanne , Tournai , and Boulogne fell to Chilperic's share. His eldest brother Charibert received Paris , the second eldest brother Guntram received Burgundy with its capital at Orléans , and Sigebert received Austrasia . On the death of Charibert in 567 , his estates were augmented when the brothers divided Charibert's kingdom among themselves and agreed to share Paris.

Not long after his accession, however, he was at war with Sigebert, with whom he would long remain in a state of-at the very least-antipathy. Sigebert defeated him and marched to Soissons, where he defeated and imprisoned Chilperic's eldest son, Theudebert . The war flared in 567, at the death of Charibert. Chilperic immediately invaded Sigebert's new lands, but Sigbert defeated him. Chilperic later allied with Guntram against Sigebert (573 ), but Guntram changed sides and Chilperic again lost the war.
When Sigebert married Brunhilda , daughter of the Visigothic sovereign in Spain (Athanagild ), Chilperic also wished to make a brilliant marriage. He had already repudiated his first wife, Audovera , and had taken as his concubine a serving-woman called Fredegund . He accordingly dismissed Fredegund, and married Brunhilda's sister, Galswintha . But he soon tired of his new partner, and one morning Galswintha was found strangled in her bed. A few days afterwards Chilperic married Fredegund.

This murder was the cause of more long and bloody wars, interspersed with truces, between Chilperic and Sigebert. In 575 , Sigebert was assassinated by Fredegund at the very moment when he had Chilperic at his mercy. Chilperic then made war with the protector of Sigebert's wife and son, Guntram. Chilperic retrieved his position, took from Austrasia Tours and Poitiers and some places in Aquitaine , and fostered discord in the kingdom of the east during the minority of Childebert II .
In 578 , Chilperic sent an army to fight the Breton ruler Waroch of the Vannetais along the Vilaine . The Frankish army consisted of units from the Poitou , Touraine , Anjou , Maine , and Bayeux . The Baiocassenses (men from Bayeux) were Saxons and they in particular were routed by the Bretons.[1] The armies fought for three days before Waroch submitted, did homage for Vannes, sent his son as a hostage, and agreed to pay an annual tribute. He subsequently broke his oath, but Chilperic's dominion over the Bretons was relatively secure, as evidence by Venantius Fortunatus celebration of it in a poem.

He was detested by Gregory of Tours , who dubbed him as the Nero and Herod of his time (History of the Franks book vi.46): he had provoked Gregory's wrath by wresting Tours from Austrasia, seizing of ecclesiastical property, and appointing as bishops counts of the palace who were not clerics. His reign in Neustria also saw the introduction of the Byzantine punishment of eye-gouging. Yet, he was also a man of culture: he was a musician of some talent, and his verse (modeled on that of Sedulius ) is well-regarded; he reformed the Germanic alphabet; and he worked to reduce the worst effects of Salic law upon women.
It was one day in September of 584 , while returning from the chase to his royal villa of Chelles , that Chilperic was stabbed to death.

...Family
Chilperic's first marriage was to Audovera. They had four children:
Theudebert , died in the war of 575
Merovech (d.578 ), married the widow Brunhilda and became his father's enemy
Clovis , assassinated by Fredegund in 580
Basina , nun, led a revolt in the abbey of Poitiers
His short second marriage to Galswintha produced no children.
His concubinage and subsequent marriage to Fredegund produced four more legitimate offspring:
Samson, died young
Rigunth , betrothed to Reccared but never married
Theuderic, died young
Clotaire , his successor in Neustria, later sole king of the Franks 54 55


Research Notes: Wife - Fredegund

3rd wife of Chilperic I

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar II 62 63


Research Notes: Child - Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks

King of Neustria (584-629) and King of all the Franks (613-629)

---------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :
Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

Chlothar II defeated Brunhilda and her grandson, reunifying the kingdom. However, in 623, in order to appease particularistic forces and also to secure the borders, he gave the Austrasians his young son as their own king. His son and successor, Dagobert I , emulated this move by appointing a sub-king for Aquitaine, with a seat at Toulouse , in 629 and Austrasia in 634.


-------
From Wikipedia - Chlothar II :

Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 584 - 629 ), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria , and, from 613 to 629 , King of all the Franks , was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in 584. His mother, Fredegund , was regent until her death in 597 , at which time the thirteen-year old Clotaire began to rule for himself. As king, he continued his mother's feud with Brunhilda , queen of Austrasia , with equal viciousness and bloodshed.

In 599 , he made war with his cousins, Theuderic II of Burgundy and Theudebert II of Austrasia, who defeated him at Dormelles (near Montereau ). At this point, however, the two brothers took up arms against each other. In 605 , he invaded Theuderic's kingdom, but did not subdue it. He remained often at war with Theuderic and the latter died in Metz in late 613 while preparing a campaign against him. At that time, Warnachar , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, and Rado , mayor of the palace of Burgundy, abandoned the cause of Brunhilda and her great-grandson, Sigebert II , and the entire realm was delivered into Clotaire's hands. Brunhilda and Sigebert met Clotaire's army on the Aisne , but the Patrician Aletheus, Duke Rocco, and Duke Sigvald deserted the host and the grand old woman and her king had to flee. They got as far as the Orbe , but Clotaire's minions caught up with them by the lake Neuchâtel . Both of them and Sigebert's younger brother Corbo were executed by Clotaire's orders.
In that year, Clotaire II became the first king of all the Franks since his grandfather Clotaire I died in 561 by ordering the murder of the infant Sigebert II (son of Theuderic), whom the aging Brunhilda had attempted to set on the thrones of Austrasia and Burgundy , causing a rebellion among the nobility. This led to the delivery of Brunhilda into Clotaire's hands, his thirst for vengeance leading to his formidable old aunt enduring the agony of the rack for three whole days, before suffering a horrific death, chained between four horses that were goaded in separate directions, eventually tearing her apart.

In 615 , Clotaire II promulgated the Edict of Paris , a sort of Frankish Magna Carta that reserved many rights to the Frankish nobles while it excluded Jews from all civil employment for the Crown. The ban effectively placed all literacy in the Merovingian monarchy squarely under ecclesiastical control and also greatly pleased the nobles, from whose ranks the bishops were ordinarily exclusively drawn. Clotaire was induced by Warnachar and Rado to make the mayoralty of the palace a lifetime appointment at Bonneuil-sur-Marne , near Paris , in 617 . By these actions, Clotaire lost his own legislative abilities and the great number of laws enacted in his reign are probably the result of the nobles' petitions, which the king had no authority not to heed.
In 623 , he gave the kingdom of Austrasia to his young son Dagobert I . This was a political move as repayment for the support of Bishop Arnulf of Metz and Pepin I , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, the two leading Austrasian nobles, who were effectively granted semi-autonomy.
Clotaire II died in 629 after 45 years on the throne, longer than any other Merovingian dynast. He left the crown greatly reduced in power and prepared the way for the rise of the mayors and the rois fainéants.

Marriage and issue
First wife of Chlothar II was Haldertude (575-604). They had the following son:
Dagobert I
Second wife of Chlothar II was Bertrade.
Third wife of Chlothar II was Sichilde (Brynhilde). They had the following children:
Charibert_II
Oda 62 64 65


Garcia III King of Navarre and Chimine Queen of Navarre




Husband Garcia III King of Navarre 10

           Born: Abt 955 - <Spain>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1000
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Chimine Queen of Navarre 10

           Born: Abt 960 - <Navarre>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Sancho III King of Navarre 10

           Born: Abt 980 - <Navarre>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: Feb 1035
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Nunnia Princess of Castile (Abt 0985-      ) 10
           Marr: Abt 1001





Chintila Visigothic King of Hispania




Husband Chintila Visigothic King of Hispania 67

            AKA: Chinthila - King of the Visigoths
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 640
         Buried: 


         Father: Suintila Visigothic King of Hispania (Abt 0585-0633)
         Mother: Theodora Princess of the Visigoths (Abt 0601-      )


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Tulga King of the Visigoths

            AKA: Fulk King of the Visigoths
           Born: Bef 620 - Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 642 - France
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Chintila Visigothic King of Hispania

From Wikipedia - Chintila :

Chintila was Visigothic King of Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula ) (636 -639 /640 ). He succeeded Sisenand in a time of weakness and reigned until his death.
He was elected and confirmed by a convention of bishops and nobles in accordance with the 75th canon of the IV Council of Toledo . With his election, nothing changed and instability reigned. He never solved the many problems which plagued his time in office and, as the chroniclers of the age tell us, this included rebellions in Septimania and Gallaecia . In the three years of his reign, he permitted the bishops wide authority and they were the monarchs de facto, if not de jure.

He dedicated his time to councils, the V Council of Toledo in June 636 and the VI Council of Toledo in June 638 . They coverred many topics and legistaled many new regulations. The king had to be chosen from among the nobility; never a tonsurado (cleric), member of the servil classes (peasants), or foreigners. They dictated the penalties for insurrection and determined that property acquired justly by the king could not be confiscated by his successor. Finally, they outlawed noncatholics within the frontiers of the kingdom, which resulted in many forced conversions.

Chintila died in 639 or 640 of natural causes and was followed by Tulga . 67


Research Notes: Child - Tulga King of the Visigoths

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #105831
(submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer) has b. bef 620 in Spain, d. 642 in France.

From Wikipedia - Tulga :

Tulga (or Tulca) was Visigothic King of Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula ) from 640 to 642 , if his father died in December 640, as some sources state. Although some sources have his rule beginning as early as 639 or ending as early as 641 . He came after his father Chintila in another vain attempt to establish dynastic kingship.
In 642, Chindasuinth, a Gothic warlord, commenced a rebellion. He was already 79 years old. He had command of the frontier with the Basques . He saw the crown's weakness and a convention of nobles (landholding Goths) and the people (other Gothic inhabitants) at Pampalica (probably modern Pampliega ) proclaimed him king without the support of the church.
According to Sigibert of Gembloux , the rebel deposed Tulga in Toledo and tonsured him, sending him to a monastery to live out his days as a monk (since monks were ineligible for the elective throne). However, Saint Ildephonsus of Toledo says that the rebellion failed without the church's support and Chindasuinth succeeded only on the death of Tulga. From our vantage point, so far in the future, it is impossible to decipher the truth.


Chlodomer King of Orléans and Guntheuc




Husband Chlodomer King of Orléans 68

            AKA: Clodomer King of Orléans
           Born: Abt 495
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 69 70 71
         Mother: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 72 73 74 75


       Marriage: Bef 523



Wife Guntheuc

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks (0497-0561) 56 57 58 - Abt 524


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Chlodomer King of Orléans

Second of the four sons of Clovis I , King of the Franks

From Wikipedia - Chlodomer :

Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer (born c. 495) was the second of the four sons of Clovis I , King of the Franks . On the death of his father, in 511, he divided the kingdom of the Franks with his three brothers: Theuderic I , Childebert I , and Clotaire I . Although Theuderic, the eldest, had a better claim, Chlodomer divided half of the kingdom with his two other brothers. This was the kingdom of Orléans , taken from the former kingdom of Syagrius . This kingdom included, most notably, the bishoprics of Tours , Poitiers and Orléans . Chlodomer married Guntheuc , with whom he had three sons: Theodebald, Gunthar, and Clodoald .

In 523-24, possibly at the instigation of his mother Clotilde , who was eager to avenge her nephew who had been assassinated by Sigismund of Burgundy , Chlodomer joined with his brothers in an expedition against the Burgundians . After capturing Sigismund, Chlodomer returned to Orléans. However, Sigismund's brother Gondomar returned triumphantly to Burgundy at the head of the troops sent by his ally, the Ostrogothic king Theodoric the Great . There, he massacred the garrison the Franks had left behind.

Although victorious, Chlodomer had Sigismund and his sons Gisald and Gondebaud assassinated on 1 May 524. He then led a second expedition against the Burgundians. He was killed on this expedition, in the spring or summer of the same year, at the Battle of Vézeronce . His three sons were entrusted to his mother until his widow married Clotaire I . Clotaire, however, had Chlodomer's children killed, although Clodoald managed to escape. Better known as Saint Cloud, he later became abbot of Nogent , having given up his hair, the symbol of the Frankish royalty, rather than giving up his life. 68


Research Notes: Wife - Guntheuc

Source: Wiukipedia - Chlothar I


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 148-15, 162-16 (Judith).

2 Wikipedia.org, Charles the Bald.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-14, 148-14.

4 Wikipedia.org, Louis the Pious.

5 Wikipedia.org, Chasseneuil-du-Poitou.

6 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871724.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-14 (Louis I), 148-14 (Louis I).

8 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871879.

9 Wikipedia.org, Judith of Bavaria (795-843).

10 http://www.familysearch.org.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 148-15 (Charles II).

12 Wikipedia.org, Odo I, Count of Orléans.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 148-17.

14 Wikipedia.org, Charles the Simple.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 148-16.

16 Wikipedia.org, Louis the Stammerer.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 148-16 (Louis II), 143-16 (Louis II).

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-15, 45-16.

19 Wikipedia.org, Edward the Elder.

20 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872162.

21 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872375.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-20.

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 148-18.

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 142-18, 148-18, 151-18.

25 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f90/a0019006.htm.

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-11, 191-11, 50-11 (Rotrou).

27 Wikipedia.org, Charles Martel.

28 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91488 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

29 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

30 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871722.

31 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91670 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-10 (Pepin II of Heristal).

33 Wikipedia.org, Alpaida.

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-11.

35 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria.

36 Wikipedia.org, Tassilo II of Bavaria.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 191-12.

38 Wikipedia.org, Pepin the Short.

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-12.

40 http://www.familysearch.org, Disc #94 Pin #91489 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

41 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-12, 50-12 (Pepin III the Short).

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-14 (Pepin).

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-2.

44 Wikipedia.org, Childebert I; Clovis I.

45 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316468 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

46 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-1.

47 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140410.

48 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-3.

49 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #107702.

50 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316462.

51 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875371.

52 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875370.

53 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875369.

54 Wikipedia.org, Chilperic I.

55 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873575.

56 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99006 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

57 Wikipedia.org, Chlothar I; List of Frankish kings.

58 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873337.

59 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-4 (Clotaire I).

60 Wikipedia.org, Aregund.

61 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873001.

62 Wikipedia.org, Chlothar II.

63 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-5 (Chilpéric I).

64 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6.

65 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873573.

66 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6 (Clotaire II).

67 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105753 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

68 Wikipedia.org, Chlodomer; List of Frankish kings; Clovis I.

69 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99017 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

70 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873339.

71 Wikipedia.org, Clovis I; List of Frankish kings.

72 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-3 (Clovis I).

73 Wikipedia.org, Clotilde.

74 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105696 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

75 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873340.


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