The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Philip III "the Bold" King of France and Isabella of Aragon




Husband Philip III "the Bold" King of France

           Born: 1245
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Oct 1285 - Perpignan, Roussillon, Majorca, (Pyrénées-Orientales), Catalonia, France
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 28 May 1262

   Other Spouse: Marie of Brabant (      -1321) - 21 Aug 1274



Wife Isabella of Aragon

           Born: 1247
     Christened: 
           Died: 1271
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Philip III "the Bold" King of France

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 101-29


Research Notes: Wife - Isabella of Aragon

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 101-29 (Philip III)


Notes: Marriage

with Papal dispensation


King John "Lackland" of England and Isabella of Angoulême




Husband King John "Lackland" of England 1 2




            AKA: John King of England, John "Lackland" King of England
           Born: 24 Dec 1167 - Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Oct 1216 - Newark Castle, Lincolnshire, England
         Buried:  - Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England


         Father: Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England (1132-1189)
         Mother: Eleanor of Aquitaine (Abt 1124-1204)


       Marriage: 10 May 1200

   Other Spouse: Clemence (      -      )

Events

• Crowned: King of England, 1199.




Wife Isabella of Angoulême

            AKA: Isabel d'Angoulême, Isabella Taillefer of Angoulême
           Born: Abt 1186 - <Angoulême, Angoumois (Charente, France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 May 1246 - Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France
         Buried:  - Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France


         Father: Aymar "Taillifer" de Valence, Comté d'Angoulême (Abt 1160-1202) 3 4
         Mother: Alix de Courtenay (      -1218) 5 6



   Other Spouse: Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême (Between 1183/1195-1249) 6 7 8 - Mar or Apr 1220

Marriage Events

• Marriage: possibly, 24 Aug 1200, Bordeaux, (Gironde), Aquitaine, France.


Children
1 M King Henry III of England 9 10




           Born: 1 Oct 1207 - Winchester Castle, Winchester, (Hampshire), England
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Nov 1272 - Westminster Palace, London, England
         Buried:  - Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England
         Spouse: Eleanor of Provence (Abt 1223-1291) 11 12
           Marr: 14 Jan 1237 - Canterbury, Kent, England


2 M Richard 1st Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans

           Born: 5 Jan 1209
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Apr 1272
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Joan de Valletort (      -      )


3 F Joan Queen Consort of Scotland 13

           Born: 1210
     Christened: 
           Died: 1238
         Buried: 



4 F Isabella

           Born: 1214
     Christened: 
           Died: 1241
         Buried: 



5 F Eleanor

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet, Elinor Plantagenet
           Born: 1215
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Apr 1275
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William Marshal Earl of Pembroke (      -1231)
           Marr: 23 Apr 1224
         Spouse: Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester (Abt 1208-1265)
           Marr: 7 Jan 1238 or 1239



Research Notes: Husband - King John "Lackland" of England

From Wikipedia - John of England :

John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216 [1]) reigned as King of England from 6 April 1199 , until his death. He succeeded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I (known in later times as "Richard the Lionheart"). John acquired the nicknames of "Lackland" (French : Sans Terre) for his lack of an inheritance as the youngest son and for his loss of territory to France , and of "Soft-sword" for his alleged military ineptitude.[2] He was a Plantagenet or Angevin king.

Apart from entering popular legend as the enemy of the fictional Robin Hood , he is also known for acquiescing to the nobility and signing Magna Carta , a document that limited his power and that is popularly regarded as an early first step in the evolution of modern democracy .

Born at Beaumont Palace , Oxford , John was the fifth son and last of eight children born to Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine . He was almost certainly born in 1166 instead of 1167, as is sometimes claimed.[3]
He was a younger maternal half-brother of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France , his mother's children by her first marriage to Louis VII of France , which was later annulled. He was a younger brother of William, Count of Poitiers ; Henry the Young King ; Matilda, Duchess of Saxony ; Richard I of England ; Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany ; Leonora, Queen of Castile ; and Joan, Queen of Sicily


Early life
While John was his father's favourite son, as the youngest he could expect no inheritance . His family life was tumultuous, as his older brothers all became involved in repeated rebellions against Henry . Eleanor was imprisoned by Henry in 1173, when John was a small boy.

As a child, John was betrothed to Alys (pronounced 'Alice'), daughter and heiress of Humbert III of Savoy . It was hoped that by this marriage the Angevin dynasty would extend its influence beyond the Alps , because John was promised the inheritance of Savoy , the Piemonte , Maurienne , and the other possessions of Count Humbert. King Henry promised his young son castles in Normandy which had been previously promised to his brother Geoffrey, which was for some time a bone of contention between King Henry and his son Geoffrey. Alys made the trip over the Alps and joined Henry's court, but she died before being married.

Gerald of Wales relates that King Henry had a curious painting in a chamber of Winchester Castle , depicting an eagle being attacked by three of its chicks, while a fourth chick crouched, waiting for its chance to strike. When asked the meaning of this picture, King Henry said:

The four young ones of the eagle are my four sons, who will not cease persecuting me even unto death. And the youngest, whom I now embrace with such tender affection, will someday afflict me more grievously and perilously than all the others.

Before his accession, John had already acquired a reputation for treachery, having conspired sometimes with and sometimes against his elder brothers, Henry, Richard and Geoffrey. In 1184, John and Richard both claimed that they were the rightful heir to Aquitaine, one of many unfriendly encounters between the two. In 1185, John became the ruler of Ireland , whose people grew to despise him, causing John to leave after only eight months...

Death

Retreating from the French invasion, John took a safe route around the marshy area of the Wash to avoid the rebel held area of East Anglia . His slow baggage train (including the Crown Jewels ), however, took a direct route across it and was lost to the unexpected incoming tide. This dealt John a terrible blow, which affected his health and state of mind. Succumbing to dysentery and moving from place to place, he stayed one night at Sleaford Castle before dying on 18 October (or possibly 19 October ) 1216 , at Newark Castle (then in Lincolnshire , now on Nottinghamshire 's border with that county). Numerous, possibly fictitious, accounts circulated soon after his death that he had been killed by poisoned ale, poisoned plums or a "surfeit of peaches".

He was buried in Worcester Cathedral in the city of Worcester .
His nine-year-old son succeeded him and became King Henry III of England (1216-72), and although Louis continued to claim the English throne, the barons switched their allegiance to the new king, forcing Louis to give up his claim and sign the Treaty of Lambeth in 1217.

Legacy

King John's reign has been traditionally characterised as one of the most disastrous in English history: it began with defeats-he lost Normandy to Philip Augustus of France in his first five years on the throne-and ended with England torn by civil war and himself on the verge of being forced out of power. In 1213, he made England a papal fief to resolve a conflict with the Roman Catholic Church , and his rebellious barons forced him to sign Magna Carta in 1215, the act for which he is best remembered...


Marriage and issue
In 1189, John was married to Isabel of Gloucester , daughter and heiress of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (she is given several alternative names by history, including Avisa, Hawise, Joan, and Eleanor). They had no children, and John had their marriage annulled on the grounds of consanguinity , some time before or shortly after his accession to the throne, which took place on 6 April 1199 , and she was never acknowledged as queen. (She then married Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex as her second husband and Hubert de Burgh as her third).
John remarried, on 24 August 1200 , Isabella of Angoulême , who was twenty years his junior. She was the daughter of Aymer Taillefer , Count of Angouleme. John had kidnapped her from her fiancé, Hugh X of Lusignan .
Isabella bore five children:
Henry III (1207-1272), King of England.
Richard (1209-1272), 1st Earl of Cornwall.
Joan (1210-1238), Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland .
Isabella (1214-1241), Consort of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor .
Eleanor (1215-1275), who married William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke , and later married Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester .

John is given a great taste for lechery by the chroniclers of his age, and even allowing some embellishment, he did have many illegitimate children. Matthew Paris accuses him of being envious of many of his barons and kinsfolk, and seducing their more attractive daughters and sisters. Roger of Wendover describes an incident that occurred when John became enamoured of Margaret, the wife of Eustace de Vesci and an illegitimate daughter of King William I of Scotland . Eustace substituted a prostitute in her place when the king came to Margaret's bed in the dark of night; the next morning, when John boasted to Vesci of how good his wife was in bed, Vesci confessed and fled.
John had the following illegitimate children:
Joan, Lady of Wales , the wife of Prince Llywelyn Fawr of Wales , (by a woman named Clemence)
Richard Fitz Roy , (by his cousin, Adela, daughter of his uncle Hamelin de Warenne )
Oliver FitzRoy, (by a mistress named Hawise) who accompanied the papal legate Pelayo to Damietta in 1218, and never returned.
By an unknown mistress (or mistresses) John fathered:
Geoffrey FitzRoy, who went on expedition to Poitou in 1205 and died there.
John FitzRoy, a clerk in 1201.
Henry FitzRoy, who died in 1245.
Osbert Gifford, who was given lands in Oxfordshire, Norfolk, Suffolk , and Sussex , and is last seen alive in 1216.
Eudes FitzRoy, who accompanied his half-brother Richard on Crusade and died in the Holy Land in 1241.
Bartholomew FitzRoy, a member of the order of Friars Preachers .
Maud FitzRoy, Abbess of Barking , who died in 1252.
Isabel FitzRoy, wife of Richard Fitz Ives .
Philip FitzRoy, found living in 1263.
(The surname of FitzRoy is Norman-French for son of the king.)




Research Notes: Wife - Isabella of Angoulême

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-27 has b. abt. 1189, d. 3 or 4 June 1246, but line 153A-28 (new to 8th edition) has b. 1187, d. 31 May 1246.

From Wikipedia - Isabella of Angoulême :

Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 - May 31 , 1246 ) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England .
She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême , by Alix de Courtenay ; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France . She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202 , by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24 , 1200 , at Bordeaux , a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen " of the Middle Ages by historians.
It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan [1], son of the then Count of La Marche . As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.
When John died in 1216 , Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé.
Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244 ; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey , where she died on May 31 , 1246 , and was buried there. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.


Issue
With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
King Henry III of England (b. 1207 - d. 1272 )
Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (b. 1209 - d. 1272 )
Joan (b. 1210 - d. 1238 ), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland
Isabella (b. 1214 - d. 1241 ), the wife of Emperor Frederick II
Eleanor (b. 1215 - d. 1275 ), who would marry William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
With Hugh X of Lusignan , the Count of La Marche : 9 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
Hugh XI of Lusignan (b. 1221 - d.1250 ), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême
Aymer de Valence (b. 1222 - d. 1260 ), Bishop of Winchester
Agnès de Lusignan (b. 1223 - d. 1269 ), married William II de Chauvigny
Alice de Lusignan (b. 1224 - d. February 9 , 1256 ), married John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey
Guy de Lusignan (b. 1225 ? - d. 1264 ), killed at the Battle of Lewes . (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269)
Geoffrey de Lusignan (b. 1226 ? - d. 1274 ), married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Châtellerault and had issue
William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (b. 1228 ? - d. 1296 )
Marguerite de Lusignan (b. 1229 ? - d. 1288 ), married 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse , married c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars
Isabelle de Lusignan (1234 - January 14 , 1299 ), married Geoffrey de Rancon

References
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 1-25, 80-29, 117-27, 153A-28, 154-28, 258-27, 260-29, 275-27
Isabelle d'Angoulême, Reine d'Angleterre, by Sophie Fougère
Isabella: Queen Without a Conscience, by Rachel Bard (historical novel)


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 153A-28 has m. John 10 May 1200, but line 117-27 has m. 24 Aug 1200.


Research Notes: Child - King Henry III of England

From Wikipedia - Henry III of England :

Henry III (1 October 1207 - 16 November 1272 ) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as King of England , reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. Mediaeval English monarchs did not use numbers after their names, and his contemporaries knew him as Henry of Winchester. He was the first child king in England since the reign of Ethelred the Unready . Despite his long reign, his personal accomplishments were slim and he was a political and military failure. England, however, prospered during his century and his greatest monument is Westminster , which he made the seat of his government and where he expanded the abbey as a shrine to Edward the Confessor .

He assumed the crown under the regency of the popular William Marshal , but the England he inherited had undergone several drastic changes in the reign of his father. He spent much of his reign fighting the barons over the Magna Carta [citation needed ] and the royal rights, and was eventually forced to call the first "parliament " in 1264. He was also unsuccessful on the Continent, where he endeavoured to re-establish English control over Normandy , Anjou , and Aquitaine .

Coronation
Henry III was born in 1207 at Winchester Castle . He was the son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême . After his father's death in 1216, Henry, who was nine at the time, was hastily crowned in Gloucester Cathedral ; he was the first child monarch since the Norman invasion of England in 1066. The coronation was a simple affair, attended by only a handful of noblemen and three bishops. None of his father's executors was present, and in the absence of a crown a simple golden band was placed on the young boy's head, not by the Archbishop of Canterbury (who was at this time supporting Prince Louis of France , the newly-proclaimed king of England) but rather by the Bishop of Gloucester . In 1220, a second coronation was ordered by Pope Honorius III who did not consider that the first had been carried out in accordance with church rites. This occurred on 17 May 1220 in Westminster Abbey .[1]

Under John's rule, the barons had supported an invasion by Prince Louis because they disliked the way that John had ruled the country. However, they quickly saw that the young prince was a safer option. Henry's regents immediately declared their intention to rule by Magna Carta , which they proceeded to do during Henry's minority. Magna Carta was reissued in 1217 as a sign of goodwill to the barons and the country was ruled by regents until 1227...

Death
Henry's reign ended when he died in 1272, after which he was succeeded by his son, Edward I . His body was laid, temporarily, in the tomb of Edward the Confessor while his own sarcophagus was constructed in Westminster Abbey ...


Marriage and children
Married on 14 January 1236 , Canterbury Cathedral , Canterbury , Kent , to Eleanor of Provence , with at least five children born:
Edward I (b. 17 January 1239 - d. 8 July 1307 )
Margaret (b. 29 September 1240 - d. 26 February 1275 ), married King Alexander III of Scotland
Beatrice (b. 25 June 1242 - d. 24 March 1275 ), married to John II, Duke of Brittany
Edmund (16 January 1245 - d. 5 June 1296 )
Katharine (b. 25 November 1253 - d. 3 May 1257 ), deafness was discovered at age 2. [1]

There is reason to doubt the existence of several attributed children of Henry and Eleanor.
Richard (b. after 1247 - d. before 1256 ),
John (b. after 1250 - d. before 1256 ), and
Henry (b. after 1253 - d. young)

Are known only from a 14th century addition made to a manuscript of Flores historiarum , and are nowhere contemporaneously recorded.
William (b. and d. ca. 1258 ) is an error for the nephew of Henry's half-brother, William de Valence .
Another daughter, Matilda, is found only in the Hayles abbey chronicle, alongside such other fictitious children as a son named William for King John , and a bastard son named John for King Edward I . Matilda's existence is doubtful, at best. For further details, see Margaret Howell, The Children of King Henry III and Eleanor of Provence (1992).

Personal details
His Royal Motto was qui non dat quod habet non accipit ille quod optat (He who does not give what he has, does not receive what he wants).
His favorite wine was made with the Loire Valley red wine grape Pineau d'Aunis which Henry first introduced to England in the thirteenth century. [2]
His favourite oath was "By the face of Lucca", referring to the Volto Santo di Lucca .
He built a Royal Palace in the town of Cippenham , Slough , Berkshire named "Cippenham Moat ".

In 1266, Henry III of England granted the Lübeck and Hamburg Hansa a charter for operations in England, which contributed to the emergence of the Hanseatic League .


Research Notes: Child - Richard 1st Earl of Cornwall, King of the Romans

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 258-27

Source also: Wikipedia - John of England


Research Notes: Child - Joan Queen Consort of Scotland

Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland
Source: Wikipedia - John of England


Research Notes: Child - Isabella

Source: Wikipedia - John of England


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30

Source also: Wikipedia - John of England


Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême and Isabella of Angoulême




Husband Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême 6 7 8




            AKA: Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, Hugh I de Lusignan Count of Angoulême, Hugh V de Lusignan Count of La Marche, Hugh X de Lusignan Count of la Marche and of Angoulême
           Born: Between 1183 and 1195
     Christened: 
           Died: by 5 Jun 1249 - Angoulême, (Charente), France
         Buried:  - Angoulême, (Charente), France


         Father: Hugh IX "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of La Marche (1163/1168-1219) 14 15
         Mother: Mahaut de Angoulême (      -After 1233)




         Father: Hugh IX "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of La Marche (1163/1168-1219) 14 15
         Mother: Agatha de Preuilly (      -Bef 1194) 16


       Marriage: Mar or Apr 1220

Events

• Count of La Marche: 1219-1249, Poitou, France.




Wife Isabella of Angoulême

            AKA: Isabel d'Angoulême, Isabella Taillefer of Angoulême
           Born: Abt 1186 - <Angoulême, Angoumois (Charente, France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 May 1246 - Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France
         Buried:  - Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France


         Father: Aymar "Taillifer" de Valence, Comté d'Angoulême (Abt 1160-1202) 3 4
         Mother: Alix de Courtenay (      -1218) 5 6



   Other Spouse: King John "Lackland" of England (1167-1216) 1 2 - 10 May 1200


Children
1 F Alice de Lusignan 17

            AKA: Alfais de Lusignan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Feb 1256
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John de Warenne 7th Earl of Surrey (1231-1304) 18 19 20 21
           Marr: Aug 1247
         Spouse: Sir Gilbert de Clare 9th Earl of Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford (1243-1295) 22 23 24
           Marr: 2 Feb 1253


2 M Hugh XI "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of Ponthieu, la Marche and Angoulême 25 26

            AKA: Hugh II de Lusignan Count of Angoulême, Hugh VI de Lusignan Count of La Marche, Hugues XI "le Brun" de Lusignan
           Born: 1221
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Apr 1250 - Faruskur, Egypt
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Yolande de Dreux of Brittany, Comtesse de Penthievre et de Porhoet (1218-1272)
           Marr: 1238


3 M Sir William de Valence Lord of Valence, titular Earl of Pembroke

            AKA: Sir William de Lusignan Lord of Valence, titular Earl of Pembroke
           Born: Bef 1225
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 18 May 1296
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Hugues X "le Brun" de Lusignan Comté de La Marche et d'Angoulême

His mother was either Agathe de Preuilly or Mahaut de Angoulême.

From Wikipedia - Hugh X of Lusignan :

Hugh X of Lusignan, Hugh V of La Marche or Hugh I of Angoulême or Hugues X & V & I de Lusignan (c. 1183 [1] or c. 1195 - c.June 5 , 1249 , Angoulême ) succeeded his father Hugh IX as Seigneur de Lusignan and Count of La Marche in November , 1219 and was Count of Angoulême by marriage.

It is unclear whether it was Hugh IX or Hugh X who was betrothed to Isabella of Angoulême when, in 1200 , King John of England took her for his Queen, an action which resulted in the entire de Lusignan family rebelling against the English king.

Following John's death, Isabella returned to France. By his marriage to Isabelle d'Angoulême (1186 - Fontrevault Abbey, France , May 31 , 1246 and buried there) in March 10 -May 22 , 1220 , Hugh X also became Count of Angoulême , until her death in 1246 . Together they founded the abbey of Valence . They had nine children:
Hugues XI & III & II de Lusignan , Seigneur de Lusignan, Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême (1221 -1250 )
Aymer de Lusignan , Bishop of Winchester c. 1250 (c. 1222 - Paris , December 5 , 1260 and buried there)
Agnés/Agathe de Lusignan (c. 1223 - aft. April 7 , 1269 ), married Guillaume II de Chauvigny, Seigneur de Chateauroux (1224 - Palermo , January 3 , 1271 )
Alice le Brun de Lusignan (c. 1224 - at childbirth February 9 , 1256 ), married 1247 John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey
Guy de Lusignan (d. 1264 ), Seigneur de Couhe, de Cognac et d'Archiac in 1249 , killed at the Battle of Lewes . (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269)
Geoffroi de Lusignan (d. 1274 ), Seigneur de Jarnac, married secondly in 1259 Jeanne de Châtellerault, Viscountess of Châtellerault (d. May 16 , 1315 ) and had issue:
Eustachie de Lusignan (d. Carthage , Tunisia , 1270 ), married 1257 Dreux III de Mello (d. 1310 )
William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (d. 1296 )
Marguerite de Lusignan (ca 1226 /1228 - 1288 ), married firstly 1240 /1241 Raymond VII of Toulouse (1197 - 1249 ), married secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars (d. 1256 ), and married thirdly Geoffrey V de Chateaubriant, Seigneur de Chateubriant
Isabelle de Lusignan (1234 - January 14 , 1299 ), Dame de Beauvoir-sur-Mer et de Mercillac, married firstly Geoffrey de Rancon, Seigneur de Taillebourg, and married secondly c. 1255 Maurice IV de Craon (1224 /1239 - soon before May 27 , 1250 /1277 )

Hugh X was succeeded by his eldest son, Hugh XI of Lusignan .
According to explanations in the manuscripts of Gaucelm Faidit 's poems, this troubadour was a rival of Hugh X of Lusignan for the love of Marguerite d'Aubusson.

He was buried at Angoulême .


Research Notes: Wife - Isabella of Angoulême

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 117-27 has b. abt. 1189, d. 3 or 4 June 1246, but line 153A-28 (new to 8th edition) has b. 1187, d. 31 May 1246.

From Wikipedia - Isabella of Angoulême :

Isabella of Angoulême (Fr. Isabelle d'Angoulême ; c. 1187 - May 31 , 1246 ) was countess of Angoulême and queen consort of England .
She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillifer, Count of Angoulême , by Alix de Courtenay ; her maternal great-grandfather was King Louis VI of France . She became Countess of Angoulême in her own right in 1202 , by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on August 24 , 1200 , at Bordeaux , a year after he annulled his first marriage. At the time of this marriage Isabella was aged about thirteen, and her beauty was renowned; she is sometimes called the "Helen " of the Middle Ages by historians.
It could not be said to have been a successful marriage, as Isabella was much younger than her husband and had a fiery character to match his. Before their marriage, she had been betrothed to Hugh X of Lusignan [1], son of the then Count of La Marche . As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all his French lands, and armed conflict ensued.
When John died in 1216 , Isabella was still in her twenties. She returned to France and in 1220 proceeded to marry Hugh X of Lusignan, now Count of La Marche, her former fiancé.
Isabella was accused of plotting against the French king in 1244 ; she fled to Fontevrault Abbey , where she died on May 31 , 1246 , and was buried there. Afterwards most of her many children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of their half-brother King Henry III.


Issue
With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
King Henry III of England (b. 1207 - d. 1272 )
Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (b. 1209 - d. 1272 )
Joan (b. 1210 - d. 1238 ), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland
Isabella (b. 1214 - d. 1241 ), the wife of Emperor Frederick II
Eleanor (b. 1215 - d. 1275 ), who would marry William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
With Hugh X of Lusignan , the Count of La Marche : 9 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
Hugh XI of Lusignan (b. 1221 - d.1250 ), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême
Aymer de Valence (b. 1222 - d. 1260 ), Bishop of Winchester
Agnès de Lusignan (b. 1223 - d. 1269 ), married William II de Chauvigny
Alice de Lusignan (b. 1224 - d. February 9 , 1256 ), married John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey
Guy de Lusignan (b. 1225 ? - d. 1264 ), killed at the Battle of Lewes . (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269)
Geoffrey de Lusignan (b. 1226 ? - d. 1274 ), married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Châtellerault and had issue
William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke (b. 1228 ? - d. 1296 )
Marguerite de Lusignan (b. 1229 ? - d. 1288 ), married 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse , married c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars
Isabelle de Lusignan (1234 - January 14 , 1299 ), married Geoffrey de Rancon

References
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 1-25, 80-29, 117-27, 153A-28, 154-28, 258-27, 260-29, 275-27
Isabelle d'Angoulême, Reine d'Angleterre, by Sophie Fougère
Isabella: Queen Without a Conscience, by Rachel Bard (historical novel)


Research Notes: Child - Hugh XI "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of Ponthieu, la Marche and Angoulême

From Wikipedia - Hugh XI of Lusignan :

Hugh XI of Lusignan, Hugh VI of La Marche or Hugh II of Angoulême or Hugues XI & VI & II de Lusignan ( 1221 - 1250 ) succeeded his father Hugh X as Seigneur de Lusignan, Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulême on June 5 , 1249 , and was Comte de Penthievre et de Porhoet by marriage.

He was the eldest of Henry III's half-brothers. He had a daughter, Mary in 1242 .[1]

By his marriage in 1235 to Yolande de Dreux (1218 - October 10 , 1272 , buried at Villeneuve-lez-Nantes), Comtesse de Penthievre et de Porhoet, he had two children:
Hugues XII & IV & III de Lusignan
Alice de Lusignan married Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford


Research Notes: Child - Sir William de Valence Lord of Valence, titular Earl of Pembroke

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 154-29


Simon de Beauchamp and Isabella




Husband Simon de Beauchamp 27

           Born: Abt 1150 - Bedfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1237 - Bedford, Bedfordshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Payne de Beauchamp (Abt 1118-1157) 24
         Mother: Rohese de Vere (Abt 1103-1166) 24 28


       Marriage: 



Wife Isabella 29

           Born: Abt 1150 - Bedfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1207 - Bedfordshire, England
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Simon Valletort Beauchamp 24 30

           Born: Abt 1165 - <Hatch, Somerset, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1208 - Bedfordshire, England
         Buried: 





Isanbart




Husband Isanbart 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Hedwig Duchess of Bavaria 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Welf I of Metz (      -Abt 0825) 31



Research Notes: Child - Hedwig Duchess of Bavaria

Abbess of Chelles.


Rutpert II Count of Wormgau and Rheingau and Isengard




Husband Rutpert II Count of Wormgau and Rheingau 24 32 33 34

            AKA: Chrodobert Count of Worms and Rheingau, Robert of Hesbaye, Robert II Count of Worms and Rheingau, Rodbert II Count of Wormgau and Rheingau
           Born: Abt 750 - (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Jul 807
         Buried: 


         Father: Thuringbert (Abt 0724-After 0770) 24 35 36
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Theoderata of Wormgau (Abt 0752-Between 0785/0789) 24 37

Events

• Count in the Upper Rhine and Wormsgau:




Wife Isengard 38

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 789
         Buried: 


Children

Birth Notes: Husband - Rutpert II Count of Wormgau and Rheingau

Wikipedia has b. abt 770.


Research Notes: Husband - Rutpert II Count of Wormgau and Rheingau

From Wikipedia - Robert of Hesbaye :

Robert II, Rodbert or Chrodobert (770-807) was a Frank , count of Worms and Rheingau and duke of Hesbaye around the year 800. His family is known as Robertians . His son is Robert of Worms and his grandson is Robert the Strong , the namegiver of the Robertians. Robert of Hesbaye is the oldest known ancestor in the line of Robertians that is thought to be certain. He is the great-grandfather of two Frankish kings, Odo and Robert , that ruled in the kingdom of Western Francia . One of his descendants is Hugh Capet , who was the "last Frankish king" and the "first king of France ". The descendants of Hugh Capet ruled France until the French Revolution , with a junior line having ruled Spain since 1700.

Ingerman and Cancor are possibly his brothers. Landrada, mother of Saint Chrodogang , archbishop of Metz , is likely his sister. His father may have been named Rodbert or, Chrodobert. He was likely the son of Thuringbert of Worms and Rheingau and grandson of Robert I of Worms and Rheingau, who died in 764.

Ermengarde , wife of emperor Louis the Pious was most likely his niece.



Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I Prince of Powys Fadog and Isota




Husband Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I Prince of Powys Fadog 39

           Born: Abt 1191
     Christened: 
           Died: 1236
         Buried: 


         Father: Gruffudd Maelor I ap Madog ap Maredudd Prince of Powys Fadog (Abt 1121-Abt 1191) 40
         Mother: Angharad verch Owain Gwynedd (      -      ) 39


       Marriage: 



Wife Isota 41

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Gruffydd Maelor II ap Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor I 42

            AKA: Gruffydd ap Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I
           Born: Abt 1198
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Dec 1269
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Emma (      -      ) 41


2 M Maredydd ap Madog of Rhiwabon

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor I Prince of Powys Fadog

Confirm that his father was Gruffudd Maelor I. See History of Wales p. 124, 161

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p. 81

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. II (London, 1882), p. 174

Source at http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400 shows Isota as the mother of Gruffydd Maelor II ap Madoc. It also has Angharad verch Owain Gwynedd as the mother of Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor I.


Research Notes: Child - Gruffydd Maelor II ap Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor I

Confirm that his grandfather was Gruffudd Maelor I. See History of Wales p. 124, 161

Source: A History of Wales by John Davies, London, 2007, p. 81

Source at http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400 lists a daughter Margaret verch Gruffydd, whose mother is Emma.


Research Notes: Child - Maredydd ap Madog of Rhiwabon

Source: The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd by J. Y. W. Lloyd, Vol. II (London, 1882), p. 174


Itta of Landen




Husband

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Itta of Landen 43 44

            AKA: Idoberge of Landen, Itte of Landen
           Born: 591 - Landen, Liège, Austrasia (Belgium)
     Christened: 652
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Pippin I of Landen, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia (0564-Between 0639/0640)


Children

Research Notes: Wife - Itta of Landen

Ancestral Roots, line 190-9 (Duke Ansegisel), states "presumedly dau. of Arnoaldus, Bishop of Metz, son, it is said, of Ansbertus, the Senator (180-6)."



Pippin I of Landen, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia and Itta of Landen




Husband Pippin I of Landen, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia

            AKA: Pepin I of Landen, Mayor of Austrasia, Pepinus de Landis
           Born: 564 - Landen, Liège, Austrasia (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 639 and 640
         Buried: 


         Father: Carolman Major Domus (      -0615)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Itta of Landen 43 44

            AKA: Idoberge of Landen, Itte of Landen
           Born: 591 - Landen, Liège, Austrasia (Belgium)
     Christened: 652
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Saint Begga of Landen 43 45 46

            AKA: Doda of Landen
           Born: Abt 613 - Landen, Liège, Austrasia (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Dec 693 - Andenne, (Namur, Wallonia, Belgium)
         Buried:  - Saint Begga's Collegiate Church, Andenne, (Namur, Wallonia, Belgium)
         Spouse: Ansegisel of Metz, Duke Ansgise (Abt 0602-Between 0648/0669) 47 48 49
           Marr: Bef 639



Death Notes: Husband - Pippin I of Landen, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #91669
(submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer) has d. bet. 639 and 640.


Research Notes: Wife - Itta of Landen

Ancestral Roots, line 190-9 (Duke Ansegisel), states "presumedly dau. of Arnoaldus, Bishop of Metz, son, it is said, of Ansbertus, the Senator (180-6)."


Research Notes: Child - Saint Begga of Landen

From Wikipedia - Begga :

Saint Begga (also Begue) (615 - December 17 , 693 ) was the daughter of Pepin of Landen , mayor of the palace of Austrasia , and his wife Itta . On the death of her husband, she took the veil , founded several churches, and built a convent at Andenne on the Meuse River (Andenne sur Meuse) where she spent the rest of her days as abbess. She was buried in Saint Begga's Collegiate Church in Andenne.

Some hold that the Beguine movement which came to light in the 12th century was actually founded by St. Begga; and the church in the beguinage of Lier, Belgium , has a statue of St. Begga standing above the inscription: St. Begga, our foundress. The Lier beguinage dates from the 13th century. More than likely, however, the Beguines derived their name from that of the priest Lambert le Begue , under whose protection the witness and ministry of the Beguines flourished.

Marriage and issue
She married Ansegisel , son of Arnulf, Bishop of Metz , and had three children:
Pepin of Heristal
Martin of Laon
Clotilda of Heristal , who was married to Theuderic III of the Franks

Veneration
She is commemorated as a saint on her feast days , September 6 and December 17 .


Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Private
         Mother: Private


       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Iulus Ascanius King of Alba Longa [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Ascanius :

In Greek and Roman mythology , Ascanius was the son of Aeneas and Creusa . After the Trojan War , as the city burned, Aeneas escaped to Latium in Italy , taking his father Anchises and his child Ascanius with him, though Creusa died during the escape. Ascanius later fought in the Italian Wars. Virgil 's Aeneid says he had a role in the founding of Rome as the first king of Alba Longa .

According to another legend mentioned by Livy , Ascanius may have been the son of Aeneas and Lavinia and thus born in Latium , not Troy . Thirty years after the founding of Lavinium, Ascanius founded Alba Longa . He had a son or grandson called Aeneas Silvius .

Ascanius was also called Iulus or Julus. The Gens Julia , or the Julians , the clan to which Julius Caesar belonged, claimed to have been descended from Ascanius/Iulus, his father Aeneas, and, ultimately, the goddess Venus , the mother of Aeneas in myth, his father being the mortal Anchises.

The name Iulus was popularised by Virgil in the Aeneid : replacing the Greek name Ascanius with Iulus linked the Julian family of Rome to earlier mythology. The emperor Augustus , who commissioned the work, was a great patron of the arts. As a member of the Julian family, he could claim to have three major Olympian gods in his family tree: (Venus; Jupiter ; and Mars ), so he encouraged his many poets to emphasize his supposed descent from Aeneas.

Ascanius, in the Aeneid, first used the phrase "annue coeptis ," the root phrase of what later became a motto of the United States of America.


Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Silvius (mythology) :

In Roman mythology , Silvius was the son of Aeneas and Lavinia . He succeeded Ascanius as King of Alba Longa . Virgil VI, 763. All the kings of Alba following Silvius bore the name as their cognomen .


From Wikpedia - Brutus of Troy :

"Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil , the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War , and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa , one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father [of Brutus] is Silvius , who is identified as either the second son of Aeneas, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius."

"Geoffrey of Monmouth's account tells much the same story, but in greater detail.[5] In this version, Brutus is explicitly the grandson, rather than son, of Ascanius; his father is Ascanius' son Silvius."


Sources


1. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 1-25, 29A-26.

2. Wikipedia.org, Line 1-25.

3. Wikipedia.org, Aymer of Angoulême.

4. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/802.htm.

5. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 117-26 & 153A-27.

6. Wikipedia.org, Isabella of Angoulême.

7. Wikipedia.org, Hugh X of Lusignan.

8. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 275-27.

9. Wikipedia.org, Henry III of England.

10. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-26, 17-27.

11. Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of Provence.

12. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 111-30, 1-26 (Henry III).

13. Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_England.

14. Wikipedia.org, Hugh IX of Lusignan.

15. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-26.

16. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), ine 275-26 (Hugh IX de Lusignan).

17. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 153-29, 153A-29, 83-28 (John de Warenne).

18. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 83-27.

19. Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872173.

20. Website:, http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm.

21. Cambrian Archæological Association, Archæologia Cambrensis, the Journal of the Cambrian Archæological Association. (Vol. 7, 6th series. London: Chas. J. Clark, 1907.), pp. 8-9.

22. Wikipedia.org, Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford.

23. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-30.

24. http://www.familysearch.org.

25. Wikipedia.org, Hugh XI of Lusignan.

26. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 117-28, 275-28, 135-30 (Yolande de Dreux).

27. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326318249.

28. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326322730.

29. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326318254.

30. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326294550.

31. Wikipedia.org, Welf (father of Judith).

32. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-15.

33. Wikipedia.org, Robert of Hesbaye.

34. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872397.

35. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-14.

36. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872399.

37. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872398.

38. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-15 (Rutpert II).

39. Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6398.

40. Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6396.

41. Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400.

42. Website - Genealogy, Gruffydd Maelor II ap.

43. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-9 (Duke Ansegisel).

44. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91441 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

45. Wikipedia.org, Saint Begga.

46. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91674 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

47. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-9.

48. Wikipedia.org, Ansegisel.

49. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91673 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 1-25, 29A-26.

2 Wikipedia.org, Line 1-25.

3 Wikipedia.org, Aymer of Angoulême.

4 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/802.htm.

5 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 117-26 & 153A-27.

6 Wikipedia.org, Isabella of Angoulême.

7 Wikipedia.org, Hugh X of Lusignan.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 275-27.

9 Wikipedia.org, Henry III of England.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-26, 17-27.

11 Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of Provence.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 111-30, 1-26 (Henry III).

13 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_England.

14 Wikipedia.org, Hugh IX of Lusignan.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-26.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), ine 275-26 (Hugh IX de Lusignan).

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 153-29, 153A-29, 83-28 (John de Warenne).

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 83-27.

19 Website - Genealogy, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872173.

20 Website:, http://www.wrexham.gov.uk/english/heritage/holt_castle.htm.

21 Cambrian Archæological Association, Archæologia Cambrensis, the Journal of the Cambrian Archæological Association. (Vol. 7, 6th series. London: Chas. J. Clark, 1907.), pp. 8-9.

22 Wikipedia.org, Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford.

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 63-30.

24 http://www.familysearch.org.

25 Wikipedia.org, Hugh XI of Lusignan.

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 117-28, 275-28, 135-30 (Yolande de Dreux).

27 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326318249.

28 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326322730.

29 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326318254.

30 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=becker2&id=P326294550.

31 Wikipedia.org, Welf (father of Judith).

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-15.

33 Wikipedia.org, Robert of Hesbaye.

34 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872397.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-14.

36 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872399.

37 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872398.

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-15 (Rutpert II).

39 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6398.

40 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6396.

41 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6400.

42 Website - Genealogy, Gruffydd Maelor II ap.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-9 (Duke Ansegisel).

44 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91441 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

45 Wikipedia.org, Saint Begga.

46 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91674 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

47 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-9.

48 Wikipedia.org, Ansegisel.

49 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91673 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).


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