The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Henry III Count of Bar and Eleanor of England




Husband Henry III Count of Bar

           Born: 1259 - Naples, Italy
     Christened: 
           Died: Sep 1302
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 20 Sep 1283 - Bristol, England



Wife Eleanor of England

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet
           Born: 18 Jun 1269
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Aug 1298
         Buried:  - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England


         Father: King Edward I of England (1239-1307) 1 2
         Mother: Eleanor of Castile, Countess of Ponthieu (1241-1290) 3 4




Children
1 M Edward I of Bar, Comte de Bar

           Born: 1284
     Christened: 
           Died: 1336
         Buried: 



2 F Eleanor

           Born: 1285
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Llywelyn ap Owain ap Maredudd (      -1309)



3 F Jeanne

           Born: 1295
     Christened: 
           Died: 1361
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Henry III Count of Bar

From Wikipedia - Henry III, Count of Bar :

Henry III of Bar (Henri III de Bar, 1259 -Naples , September 1302 ) was Count of Bar from 1291 to 1302. He was son of Thibault II of Bar and Jeanne de Toucy.

Life
His introduction to military life came as he was made a knight in a conflict between his father and the Bishop of Metz . He then served Ferry III of Lorraine . He was preparing to go on crusade when his father died.
In 1284 Jeanne de Navarre , countess of Champagne, had married the future Philip IV of France , making the county of Bar adjacent to the French royal domain. Henry's reaction was a marriage to Eleanor , daughter of Edward I of England . When war broke out in short order between France and England, Henry was drawn in. The fighting ceased after the 1301 Treaty of Bruges . Under its terms, Henry gave up some fortresses and paid homage to Philip for part of his lands, then called the Barrois mouvant . He also undertook to fight in Cyprus against the Muslim forces.
Henry therefore made his way to the Kingdom of Naples . In assisting Charles II of Naples against the invading forces of Frederick I of Sicily , he was wounded in fighting, and died soon afterwards.

Family
He married at Bristol on 20 September 1283 Eleanor of England (1269-1298) , daughter of Edward I of England , and Eleanor of Castile . Their children were :
Edward I of Bar (1284-1336), comte de Bar
Eleanor (b. 1285), who married Llewelyn ap Owain
Jeanne (1295-1361), who married John de Warenne, 8th Earl of Surrey . The marriage was annulled 1315. Jeanne became regent of Bar from 1354.

Source
Georges Poull (1994), La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor of England

From Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1269-1298) :

Eleanor of England (18 June 1269 - 29 August 1298 ), was the eldest surviving daughter of Edward I of England and his first wife, Eleanor of Castile .
For a long period she was betrothed to King Alphonso III of Aragon (d. 18 June 1291 ). However, Alphonso's death occurred before the marriage could take place.
Eleanor subsequently married the French nobleman, Henry III, Count of Bar in 1293, as a means of allying Bar and England against the Kings of France. Eleanor and Henry had three surviving children:
Edward I of Bar (1284-1336), comte de Bar
Eleanor (b. 1285), who married Llewelyn ap Owain
Jeanne (1295-1361), who married John de Warenne, 8th Earl of Surrey . The marriage was annulled 1315. Jeanne became regent of Bar from 1354
Eleanor pre-deceased her husband and was buried 12 October 1298 in Westminster Abbey .


Research Notes: Child - Edward I of Bar, Comte de Bar

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1269-1298)


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1269-1298)


Research Notes: Child - Jeanne

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1269-1298)


William Marshal Earl of Pembroke and Eleanor




Husband William Marshal Earl of Pembroke

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Apr 1231
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 23 Apr 1224



Wife Eleanor

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet, Elinor Plantagenet
           Born: 1215
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Apr 1275
         Buried: 


         Father: King John "Lackland" of England (1167-1216) 5 6
         Mother: Isabella of Angoulême (Abt 1186-1246)



   Other Spouse: Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester (Abt 1208-1265) - 7 Jan 1238 or 1239


Children

Research Notes: Husband - William Marshal Earl of Pembroke

d.s.p.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30 (Eleanor)


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30

Source also: Wikipedia - John of England


Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester and Eleanor




Husband Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester

            AKA: Simon III de Montfort Earl of Leicester
           Born: Abt 1208 - Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Aug 1265 - Evesham, Worcestershire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Simon IV de Montfort l'Aumary (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 7 Jan 1238 or 1239



Wife Eleanor

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet, Elinor Plantagenet
           Born: 1215
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Apr 1275
         Buried: 


         Father: King John "Lackland" of England (1167-1216) 5 6
         Mother: Isabella of Angoulême (Abt 1186-1246)



   Other Spouse: William Marshal Earl of Pembroke (      -1231) - 23 Apr 1224


Children
1 F Elinor de Montfort

            AKA: Eleanor de Montfort
           Born: Abt 1252
     Christened: 
           Died: 1282
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Llywelyn II Prince of North Wales (Abt 1252-1282)
           Marr: 13 Oct 1278 - Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England




Research Notes: Husband - Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester

Second husband of Eleanor.

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia, 1912.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30 (Eleanor)


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 260-30

Source also: Wikipedia - John of England


Research Notes: Child - Elinor de Montfort

Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia, 1912.

Source: Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire, and its Borders, Vol. XIII, Issued by the Powys-Land Club for the Use of Its Members, London, 1880, p. 122 has "Eleanor, dau. to Simon Mountford, Earl of Leicester."

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 260-31, has "b. abt. Michaelmas 1252, d. 1282; m. 13 Oct. 1278, Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, son of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, d. 1 Mar. 1244, the son of LLYWELYN AP IORWERTH (176B-27), by Senena, perh. of Man."


King Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine




Husband King Louis VII of France

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 1137



Wife Eleanor of Aquitaine

           Born: Abt 1124
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 Mar 1204 - Fontevrault, (Fontevraud-l'Abbaye), (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France
         Buried:  - Fontévrault Abbey, (Fontevraud-l'Abbaye), (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France

   Other Spouse: Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England (1132-1189) - 18 May 1152 - Bordeaux, (Gironde), Aquitaine, France


Children

Research Notes: Husband - King Louis VII of France

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008.


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor of Aquitaine

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 110-26


Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine




Husband Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England

            AKA: King Henry II of England
           Born: 5 Mar 1132 - Le Mans, (Sarthe), Maine, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Jul 1189
         Buried:  - Fontévrault Abbey, (Fontevraud-l'Abbaye), (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France


         Father: Geoffrey V Plantagenet Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy (1113-1151) 7 8 9
         Mother: Empress Matilda Countess of Anjou (Abt 1102-1167) 10 11


       Marriage: 18 May 1152 - Bordeaux, (Gironde), Aquitaine, France

   Other Spouse: Ida de Tosny (      -      ) 12 13



Wife Eleanor of Aquitaine

           Born: Abt 1124
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 Mar 1204 - Fontevrault, (Fontevraud-l'Abbaye), (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France
         Buried:  - Fontévrault Abbey, (Fontevraud-l'Abbaye), (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France

   Other Spouse: King Louis VII of France (      -      ) - 1137


Children
1 F Eleanor of England 14 15

            AKA: Leonora of England and Aquitaine
           Born: 13 Oct 1162 - Domfront, Normandy
     Christened: 
           Died: 31 Oct 1214
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alfonso VIII "the Noble" King of Castile (1155-1214) 16 17
           Marr: Sep 1180



2 M King John "Lackland" of England 5 6




            AKA: John King of England, John "Lackland" King of England
           Born: 24 Dec 1167 - Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Oct 1216 - Newark Castle, Lincolnshire, England
         Buried:  - Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England
         Spouse: Isabella of Angoulême (Abt 1186-1246)
           Marr: 10 May 1200
         Spouse: Clemence (      -      )




Research Notes: Husband - Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 1-24


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor of Aquitaine

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 110-26


Birth Notes: Child - Eleanor of England

Ancestral Roots has b. 1162 and b. 1161


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor of England

From Wikipedia - Eleanor of England (1162-1214) :

Eleanor of England (known in Castilian as Leonora; 13 October 1162 - 31 October 1214) was Queen of Castile and Toledo as wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile .

She was born in the castle at Domfront , Normandy , and was baptised by Henry of Marcy . She was the sixth child and second daughter of King Henry II of England and his wife Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine . Her godfather was the chronicler Robert of Torigny , who had a special interest in her and recorded her life as best he could. She received her first name as a namesake of her mother, whose name "Eleanor" (or Alienor) had previously been unrecorded though may have been related to the Greek Helen or the Italian Elena . Another view holds that in the Occitan language , Eleanor simply meant "the other Aenor," since Eleanor of Aquitaine was named for her mother, called Aenor .

Eleanor was a younger maternal half-sister of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France . She was a younger sister of William IX, Count of Poitiers , Henry the Young King , Matilda, Duchess of Saxony , Richard I of England and Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany . She was also an older sister of Joan of Sicily and John of England .

When she was eighteen years old, in September 1180, she was married to Alfonso VIII . The marriage was arranged to secure the Pyrennean border, with Gascony offered as her dowry.

Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughters, her namesake Eleanor best inherited her mother's political influence. She was almost as powerful as her husband, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berenguela to the king of Leon in the interest of peace.

When Alfonso died, his queen was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their daughter Berenguela instead performed these honors. Leonora then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Las Huelgas abbey in Burgos.

Children
Berenguela, Queen of Castile (August 1180 - 8 November 1246 ), married King Alfonso IX of Leon
Sancho of Castile (born & died 1181)
Sancha of Castile (1182 - 3 February 1184 )
Henry of Castile (born & died 1184)
Urraca of Castile (1186-1220), married King Alfonso II of Portugal
Blanca of Castile (4 March 1188 - 26 November 1252 ), married King Louis VIII of France
Fernando of Castile (29 September 1189 - 1211)
Mafalda of Castile (1191-1204)
Constance of Castile (1195-1198)
Constanza, nun at Las Huelgas (1201-1243)
Eleanor of Castile , married King James I of Aragon
Henry I, King of Castile (14 April 1204 - 1217) 14 15


Research Notes: Child - King John "Lackland" of England

From Wikipedia - John of England :

John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216 [1]) reigned as King of England from 6 April 1199 , until his death. He succeeded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I (known in later times as "Richard the Lionheart"). John acquired the nicknames of "Lackland" (French : Sans Terre) for his lack of an inheritance as the youngest son and for his loss of territory to France , and of "Soft-sword" for his alleged military ineptitude.[2] He was a Plantagenet or Angevin king.

Apart from entering popular legend as the enemy of the fictional Robin Hood , he is also known for acquiescing to the nobility and signing Magna Carta , a document that limited his power and that is popularly regarded as an early first step in the evolution of modern democracy .

Born at Beaumont Palace , Oxford , John was the fifth son and last of eight children born to Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine . He was almost certainly born in 1166 instead of 1167, as is sometimes claimed.[3]
He was a younger maternal half-brother of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France , his mother's children by her first marriage to Louis VII of France , which was later annulled. He was a younger brother of William, Count of Poitiers ; Henry the Young King ; Matilda, Duchess of Saxony ; Richard I of England ; Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany ; Leonora, Queen of Castile ; and Joan, Queen of Sicily


Early life
While John was his father's favourite son, as the youngest he could expect no inheritance . His family life was tumultuous, as his older brothers all became involved in repeated rebellions against Henry . Eleanor was imprisoned by Henry in 1173, when John was a small boy.

As a child, John was betrothed to Alys (pronounced 'Alice'), daughter and heiress of Humbert III of Savoy . It was hoped that by this marriage the Angevin dynasty would extend its influence beyond the Alps , because John was promised the inheritance of Savoy , the Piemonte , Maurienne , and the other possessions of Count Humbert. King Henry promised his young son castles in Normandy which had been previously promised to his brother Geoffrey, which was for some time a bone of contention between King Henry and his son Geoffrey. Alys made the trip over the Alps and joined Henry's court, but she died before being married.

Gerald of Wales relates that King Henry had a curious painting in a chamber of Winchester Castle , depicting an eagle being attacked by three of its chicks, while a fourth chick crouched, waiting for its chance to strike. When asked the meaning of this picture, King Henry said:

The four young ones of the eagle are my four sons, who will not cease persecuting me even unto death. And the youngest, whom I now embrace with such tender affection, will someday afflict me more grievously and perilously than all the others.

Before his accession, John had already acquired a reputation for treachery, having conspired sometimes with and sometimes against his elder brothers, Henry, Richard and Geoffrey. In 1184, John and Richard both claimed that they were the rightful heir to Aquitaine, one of many unfriendly encounters between the two. In 1185, John became the ruler of Ireland , whose people grew to despise him, causing John to leave after only eight months...

Death

Retreating from the French invasion, John took a safe route around the marshy area of the Wash to avoid the rebel held area of East Anglia . His slow baggage train (including the Crown Jewels ), however, took a direct route across it and was lost to the unexpected incoming tide. This dealt John a terrible blow, which affected his health and state of mind. Succumbing to dysentery and moving from place to place, he stayed one night at Sleaford Castle before dying on 18 October (or possibly 19 October ) 1216 , at Newark Castle (then in Lincolnshire , now on Nottinghamshire 's border with that county). Numerous, possibly fictitious, accounts circulated soon after his death that he had been killed by poisoned ale, poisoned plums or a "surfeit of peaches".

He was buried in Worcester Cathedral in the city of Worcester .
His nine-year-old son succeeded him and became King Henry III of England (1216-72), and although Louis continued to claim the English throne, the barons switched their allegiance to the new king, forcing Louis to give up his claim and sign the Treaty of Lambeth in 1217.

Legacy

King John's reign has been traditionally characterised as one of the most disastrous in English history: it began with defeats-he lost Normandy to Philip Augustus of France in his first five years on the throne-and ended with England torn by civil war and himself on the verge of being forced out of power. In 1213, he made England a papal fief to resolve a conflict with the Roman Catholic Church , and his rebellious barons forced him to sign Magna Carta in 1215, the act for which he is best remembered...


Marriage and issue
In 1189, John was married to Isabel of Gloucester , daughter and heiress of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (she is given several alternative names by history, including Avisa, Hawise, Joan, and Eleanor). They had no children, and John had their marriage annulled on the grounds of consanguinity , some time before or shortly after his accession to the throne, which took place on 6 April 1199 , and she was never acknowledged as queen. (She then married Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex as her second husband and Hubert de Burgh as her third).
John remarried, on 24 August 1200 , Isabella of Angoulême , who was twenty years his junior. She was the daughter of Aymer Taillefer , Count of Angouleme. John had kidnapped her from her fiancé, Hugh X of Lusignan .
Isabella bore five children:
Henry III (1207-1272), King of England.
Richard (1209-1272), 1st Earl of Cornwall.
Joan (1210-1238), Queen Consort of Alexander II of Scotland .
Isabella (1214-1241), Consort of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor .
Eleanor (1215-1275), who married William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke , and later married Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester .

John is given a great taste for lechery by the chroniclers of his age, and even allowing some embellishment, he did have many illegitimate children. Matthew Paris accuses him of being envious of many of his barons and kinsfolk, and seducing their more attractive daughters and sisters. Roger of Wendover describes an incident that occurred when John became enamoured of Margaret, the wife of Eustace de Vesci and an illegitimate daughter of King William I of Scotland . Eustace substituted a prostitute in her place when the king came to Margaret's bed in the dark of night; the next morning, when John boasted to Vesci of how good his wife was in bed, Vesci confessed and fled.
John had the following illegitimate children:
Joan, Lady of Wales , the wife of Prince Llywelyn Fawr of Wales , (by a woman named Clemence)
Richard Fitz Roy , (by his cousin, Adela, daughter of his uncle Hamelin de Warenne )
Oliver FitzRoy, (by a mistress named Hawise) who accompanied the papal legate Pelayo to Damietta in 1218, and never returned.
By an unknown mistress (or mistresses) John fathered:
Geoffrey FitzRoy, who went on expedition to Poitou in 1205 and died there.
John FitzRoy, a clerk in 1201.
Henry FitzRoy, who died in 1245.
Osbert Gifford, who was given lands in Oxfordshire, Norfolk, Suffolk , and Sussex , and is last seen alive in 1216.
Eudes FitzRoy, who accompanied his half-brother Richard on Crusade and died in the Holy Land in 1241.
Bartholomew FitzRoy, a member of the order of Friars Preachers .
Maud FitzRoy, Abbess of Barking , who died in 1252.
Isabel FitzRoy, wife of Richard Fitz Ives .
Philip FitzRoy, found living in 1263.
(The surname of FitzRoy is Norman-French for son of the king.) 5 6





John de Beaumont Earl of Buchan, 2nd Lord Beaumont and Eleanor of Lancaster




Husband John de Beaumont Earl of Buchan, 2nd Lord Beaumont 18 19

           Born: 1318
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Apr 1342
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry Beaumont 4th Earl of Buchan (Abt 1288-1340)
         Mother: Alice Comyn (1289-1349) 20


       Marriage: 6 Nov 1330 20



Wife Eleanor of Lancaster 21 22

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet
           Born: Abt 1318 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jan 1372 - Arundel Castle, West Sussex, England
         Buried:  - Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England


         Father: Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester (Abt 1281-1345) 23 24
         Mother: Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester (1282-Bef 1322) 25 26 27



   Other Spouse: Sir Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan 10th Earl of Arundel and Warenne (Abt 1313-1376) 28 29 30 - 5 Feb 1345 - Ditton Church, Stokes Poges, Buckinghamshire, England


Children
1 M Henry Beaumont 3rd Lord Beaumont

           Born: 1340
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 F Matilda Beaumont

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Jul 1467
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - John de Beaumont Earl of Buchan, 2nd Lord Beaumont

First husband of Eleanor of Lancaster.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 17-30 (Eleanor of Lancaster). Has d. bet 24 Feb 1342 and 25 May 1342.

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster has d. in a tournament on 14 Apr 1342. 18 19


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor of Lancaster

Second wife of Richard (FitzAlan) d'Arundel.

From Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster :

Eleanor of Lancaster (sometimes called Eleanor Plantagenet 1) (about 1315 - 11 January 1372 ) was born as the fifth daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancaster (c. 1281-1345) and his wife Maud Chaworth (1282-1322).


First marriage and offspring
Sometime between September 1 and November 6 , 1330 , she married John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont , son of Henry Beaumont, 4th Earl of Buchan (c. 1288 - 1340) and his wife Alice Comyn (c. 1291-1349). They had two children:
Henry Beaumont, 3rd Lord Beaumont , born 1340
Matilda Beaumont (died July 1467), married Hugh de Courtenay
Eleanor was a lady-in-waiting to Queen Philippa , and was in service to her in Ghent when her son Henry was born. John de Beaumont died in a tournament on 14 April 1342 .

Second marriage
On 5 February 1344 at Ditton Church , Stoke Poges , Buckinghamshire , she married Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel (9th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots), 4th Earl of Surrey, known by the soubriquet of "Copped Hat", Justiciar of North Wales, Governor of Carnarvon Castle, Admiral of the West.2

His previous marriage, to Isabel le Despenser , had taken place when they were children. It was annulled by Papal mandate as she, since her father's attainder and execution, had ceased to be of any importance to him. Pope Clement VI obligingly annulled the marriage, bastardized the issue, and provided a dispensation for his second marriage to the woman with whom he had been living in adultery (the dispensation, dated 4 March 1344 /1345 , was required because his first and second wives were first cousins).
The children of Eleanor's second marriage were:
Richard (1346-1397), who succeeded as Earl of Arundel
John Fitzalan (bef 1349-1379)
Thomas Arundel , Archbishop of York (c. 1345-February 19 , 1413 )
Joan Fitzalan (bef. 1351-April 17 , 1419 ), married Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford
Alice Fitzalan (1352 -March 17 , 1416 ), married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (Thomas Holand)

Eleanor died at Arundel and was buried at Lewes Priory in Lewes , Sussex , England. Her husband was buried beside her; in his will Richard requests to be buried "near to the tomb of Eleanor de Lancaster, my wife; and I desire that my tomb be no higher than hers, that no men at arms, horses, hearse, or other pomp, be used at my funeral, but only five torches...as was about the corpse of my wife, be allowed."

Sources
Fowler, Kenneth. The King's Lieutenant, 1969
Nicolas, Nicholas Harris. Testamenta Vetusta, 1826.
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 17-30, 21-30, 28-33, 97-33, 114-31

Notes
1The surname "Plantagenet" has been retrospectively applied to the descendants of Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou and Empress Matilda without historical justification: it is simply a convenient, if deceptive, method of referring to people who had, in fact, no surname. The first descendant of Geoffrey to use the surname was Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (father of both Edward IV of England and Richard III of England ) who apparently assumed it about 1448.
2also called Richard de Arundel. 21 22


Research Notes: Child - Henry Beaumont 3rd Lord Beaumont

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster


Research Notes: Child - Matilda Beaumont

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster


Sir Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan 10th Earl of Arundel and Warenne and Eleanor of Lancaster




Husband Sir Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan 10th Earl of Arundel and Warenne 28 29 30

            AKA: Richard of Arundel, Sir Richard de Arundel, Richard FitzAlan d'Arundel 9th Ear;l of Arundel
           Born: Abt 1313
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Jan 1376 - Arundel, West Sussex, England
         Buried:  - Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England


         Father: Sir Edmund FitzAlan 9th Earl of Arundel (1285-1326) 31 32
         Mother: Alice de Warenne (      -Bef 1338) 33


       Marriage: 5 Feb 1345 - Ditton Church, Stokes Poges, Buckinghamshire, England

   Other Spouse: Isabel le Despenser (1312-1356) 34 35 - 9 Feb 1321

Events

• Earl of Arundel: 1331.

• Lord of Bromfield (Wrexham) and Yale: 30 Jun 1347.

• Inherited: castles of Caerleon (Holt) and Dinas Bran, 30 Jun 1347.

• Did homage: to Edward III, 24 Oct 1353.




Wife Eleanor of Lancaster 21 22

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet
           Born: Abt 1318 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jan 1372 - Arundel Castle, West Sussex, England
         Buried:  - Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England


         Father: Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester (Abt 1281-1345) 23 24
         Mother: Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester (1282-Bef 1322) 25 26 27



   Other Spouse: John de Beaumont Earl of Buchan, 2nd Lord Beaumont (1318-1342) 18 19 - 6 Nov 1330 20


Children
1 M Sir Richard FitzAlan 11th Earl of Arundel & 10th Earl of Surrey 36 37 38 39




           Born: 1346 - <Arundel, West Sussex>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Sep 1397 - Cheapside, London, England


         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Arundel (Abt 1350-1385) 38 40 41
           Marr: Abt 28 Sep 1359
         Spouse: Philippa (      -      )



2 M John FitzAlan 1st Baron Arundel and Lord Maltravers 42 43

            AKA: Sir John d'Arundel 1st Lord Arundel
           Born: Abt 1348 - Etchingham, Sussex, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Dec 1379
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eleanor Maltravers (1345-1405) 42 44
           Marr: 17 Feb 1358



3 F Joan FitzAlan 45

           Born: Abt 1348
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Apr 1419
         Buried:  - Walden Abbey, Essex, England
         Spouse: Humphrey de Bohun 7th Earl of Hereford, Earl of Essex & Northampton (1342-1373) 46 47



4 M Thomas Arundel Archbishop of York 21

           Born: Abt 1350
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Feb 1413
         Buried: 



5 F Alice FitzAlan 21

           Born: 1350
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Mar 1416
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Thomas Holland 2nd Earl of Kent (      -      )




Research Notes: Husband - Sir Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan 10th Earl of Arundel and Warenne

When John II de Warenne died without legal issue on 29 June 1347, Richard FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel, was the next heir in blood through his mother, Alice de Warenne, John's sister.
-----
From Wikipedia - Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel :

Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel (c. 1307 - January 24, 1376) was an English nobleman and military leader.

Fitzalan was the eldest son of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, and Alice Warenne. His maternal grandparents were William de Warenne, 8th Earl of Surrey and Joan de Vere. William was the only son of John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey.

His birthdate is uncertain, but could not have been before 1307. Around 1321, FitzAlan's father allied with King Edward II's (also an ancestor) favorites, the Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester (also an ancestor) and his namesake son, and Richard was married to Isabel le Despenser, daughter of Hugh the Younger. Fortune turned against the Despenser party, and in 1326, FitzAlan's father was executed, and he did not succeed to his father's estates or titles.

However, political conditions had changed by 1330, and over the next few years Richard was gradually able to reacquire the Earldom of Arundel as well as the great estates his father had held in Sussex and in the Welsh Marches. Beyond this, in 1334 he was made justice of North Wales (later his term in this office was made for life), sheriff for life of Caernarvonshire, and governor of Caernarfon Castle.

His daughter Joan was the mother of Mary de Bohun who would marry King of England Henry IV. 28 29 30


Research Notes: Wife - Eleanor of Lancaster

Second wife of Richard (FitzAlan) d'Arundel.

From Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster :

Eleanor of Lancaster (sometimes called Eleanor Plantagenet 1) (about 1315 - 11 January 1372 ) was born as the fifth daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancaster (c. 1281-1345) and his wife Maud Chaworth (1282-1322).


First marriage and offspring
Sometime between September 1 and November 6 , 1330 , she married John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont , son of Henry Beaumont, 4th Earl of Buchan (c. 1288 - 1340) and his wife Alice Comyn (c. 1291-1349). They had two children:
Henry Beaumont, 3rd Lord Beaumont , born 1340
Matilda Beaumont (died July 1467), married Hugh de Courtenay
Eleanor was a lady-in-waiting to Queen Philippa , and was in service to her in Ghent when her son Henry was born. John de Beaumont died in a tournament on 14 April 1342 .

Second marriage
On 5 February 1344 at Ditton Church , Stoke Poges , Buckinghamshire , she married Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel (9th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots), 4th Earl of Surrey, known by the soubriquet of "Copped Hat", Justiciar of North Wales, Governor of Carnarvon Castle, Admiral of the West.2

His previous marriage, to Isabel le Despenser , had taken place when they were children. It was annulled by Papal mandate as she, since her father's attainder and execution, had ceased to be of any importance to him. Pope Clement VI obligingly annulled the marriage, bastardized the issue, and provided a dispensation for his second marriage to the woman with whom he had been living in adultery (the dispensation, dated 4 March 1344 /1345 , was required because his first and second wives were first cousins).
The children of Eleanor's second marriage were:
Richard (1346-1397), who succeeded as Earl of Arundel
John Fitzalan (bef 1349-1379)
Thomas Arundel , Archbishop of York (c. 1345-February 19 , 1413 )
Joan Fitzalan (bef. 1351-April 17 , 1419 ), married Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford
Alice Fitzalan (1352 -March 17 , 1416 ), married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (Thomas Holand)

Eleanor died at Arundel and was buried at Lewes Priory in Lewes , Sussex , England. Her husband was buried beside her; in his will Richard requests to be buried "near to the tomb of Eleanor de Lancaster, my wife; and I desire that my tomb be no higher than hers, that no men at arms, horses, hearse, or other pomp, be used at my funeral, but only five torches...as was about the corpse of my wife, be allowed."

Sources
Fowler, Kenneth. The King's Lieutenant, 1969
Nicolas, Nicholas Harris. Testamenta Vetusta, 1826.
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 17-30, 21-30, 28-33, 97-33, 114-31

Notes
1The surname "Plantagenet" has been retrospectively applied to the descendants of Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou and Empress Matilda without historical justification: it is simply a convenient, if deceptive, method of referring to people who had, in fact, no surname. The first descendant of Geoffrey to use the surname was Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (father of both Edward IV of England and Richard III of England ) who apparently assumed it about 1448.
2also called Richard de Arundel. 21 22


Notes: Marriage

Wikipedia


Death Notes: Child - Sir Richard FitzAlan 11th Earl of Arundel & 10th Earl of Surrey

Condemned and beheaded on Tower Hill by Richard II


Research Notes: Child - Sir Richard FitzAlan 11th Earl of Arundel & 10th Earl of Surrey

From Wikipedia - 11th Earl of Arundel and 10th Earl of Surrey.

"In 1377 he was Admiral of the West and South, and in 1386 Admiral of all England. In this capacity he defeated a combined Franco-Spanish-Flemish fleet off of Margate in 1387. The following year he was one of the Lords Appellant to Richard II. In 1397 he was arrested for his opposition to Richard II, and then attainted and beheaded 21 September 1397."
-----------
From Wikipedia - Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel :

Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and 10th Earl of Surrey (1346 - September 21, 1397, beheaded) was an English nobleman and military commander.

He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster.

In 1377 he was Admiral of the West and South, and in 1386 Admiral of all England. In this capacity he defeated a combined Franco-Spanish-Flemish fleet off of Margate in 1387. The following year he was one of the Lords Appellant to Richard II. In 1397 he was arrested for his opposition to Richard II, and then attainted and beheaded.

Arundel married twice. His first wife was Elizabeth de Bohun, daughter of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. They married around September 28, 1359 and had four children.

***********
From Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry, p. 50:

"III LADY ELIZABETH DE BOHUN, who married Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, who was beheaded on Tower Hill, September, 1397. Elizabeth died during her husband's life-time, prior to 15 Richard II., for in that year the Earl of Arundel paid a fine to the king for marrying (the second time) without a license. [Dugdale]. His second wife survived him.

"His will is as follows:
'I, Richard, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, March 4, 1392, 16 Richard II. in my Castle of Philipp. My body to be buried in the Priory of Lewis, in a place behind the high altar, which I have shewn to my beloved in God Danz John Chierlien, Prior, and frere Thomas Asshebourne, my confessor. In case my dear wife E., on whom God have mercy, be not there interred by me, I charge my executors that they cause my said wife to be conveyed from her present tomb to the said place with the same form as the body of my most honored lord and father was buried. If I die in England I desire to have my corpse privately conveyed to the said Priory, and I forbid armed men, or to her pomp, attendant at my burial.

.... My manors of Angermeryn, Wepham, Warnecamp, Soucstoke, Tothungton, Upinerdon, and Pyperyng...
'My most dear [second] wife Philippa... My sons [in law] the Earl Marshall, Lord Charlton, and William Beauchamp... My son Richard a standing bed called Clove also a bed of silk, embroidered with the arms of Arundel and Warren quarterly... to my dear son Thomas, from the day of my death C L annually in aid of his maintenance, also the Manors of Begenever, Sullynton, and Schapewyk... My dear daughter Charlton; to my daughter Elizabeth a nounce with lions and crowns which was give me by my dear son her husband.' [Testamenta Vetusta, p. 129.]

"The Earl of Arundel had issue by his first wife Elizabeth:
1. Richard, d. S. P.
2. Thomas, who died S. P. and whose title passed to his kinsman, but whose lands descended to his sisters.
3. Alice married John de Charlton prior 1392; died before 1415, S. P.
4. Alianora, who had Royal License 28 Oct. 1371, to marry Robert de Ufford, son of William Earl of Suffolk. [Notes from the Patent Rolls Inq. etc.]; but is said in 'Williamson's Evidences' to have died unmarried, p. 30.] [Hist. Cheshire, Ormerod, p. 38.]
5. Elizabeth, of whom hereafter.
6. Joane, married before 1392, William Beauchamp of Abergavenny. She died 14 Nov. 1435.
7. Margaret, married Sir Rowland Lenthall." 36 37 38 39


Research Notes: Child - John FitzAlan 1st Baron Arundel and Lord Maltravers

1st Lord Arundel, Marshal of England, Lord Mautravers 42 43


Research Notes: Child - Joan FitzAlan

From Wikipedia - Joan Fitzalan :

Lady Joan Fitzalan, Countess of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton (1347/1348- 7 April 1419), was the wife of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford , 6th Earl of Essex, and 2nd Earl of Northampton. Joan was the mother of Mary de Bohun , the first wife of Henry of Bolingbroke who later reigned as King Henry IV of England , and Eleanor de Bohun , Duchess of Gloucester. She was the maternal grandmother of King Henry V of England .

Family
Lady Joan was born in about 1347 or 1348 at Arundel Castle , Sussex , one of seven children, and the eldest daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster .[1] Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne . Her maternal grandparents were Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth .

List of siblings
Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel (1346- 21 September 1397 Tower Hill, Cheapside, London), married firstly Elizabeth de Bohun , sister of Humphrey de Bohun, by whom he had seven children, and secondly Philippa Mortimer. He was beheaded on charges of high treason against King Richard II of England .
John Fitzalan 1st baron of Arundel, 1st Baron Maltravers (1351-16 December 1379), married Eleanor Maltravers, by whom he had issue. He drowned in the Irish Sea, having been shipwrecked after defeating the French off the Cornish coast.
Alice Fitzalan (1350- 17 March 1416), married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent , by whom she had issue.
Thomas Arundel Archbishop of Canterbury (1352- 19 February 1414)
Mary Fitzalan (died 29 August 1396), married John Le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere, by whom she had issue, including Ankaret Le Strange who married Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot. These were the parents of John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury
Eleanor Fitzalan (1356- before 1366)
J
oan had a half-brother from her father's first marriage to Isabel le Despenser :
Edmund of Arundel (1327- after 1377), he was bastardised by his parents annulment. He married Sybil Montagu, by whom he had two daughters.

Joan had two uterine half-siblings from her mother's first marriage to John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont (died 14 April 1342):
Henry de Beaumont, 3rd Lord Beaumont (4 April 1340- 17 June 1369), married as her first husband Margaret de Vere (died 15 June 1398), by whom he had issue.
Matilda de Beaumont (died July 1367), married Hugh de Courtney.

Marriage and children
Sometime after 9 September 1359, Joan married Humphrey de Bohun , one of the most powerful noblemen in the kingdom. His titles included 7th Earl of Hereford, 6th Earl of Essex, 2nd Earl of Northampton, and he was the hereditary Constable of England. He was the son of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere . The marriage produced two daughters, whom upon the death of their father, divided his vast estates between them:
Eleanor de Bohun (c.1360- 3 October 1399), co-heiress of her father. In 1376 she married Thomas of Woodstock , 1st Duke of Gloucester, the youngest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault . The marriage produced five children, including Anne of Gloucester . Eleanor died as a nun at Barking Abbey.
Mary de Bohun (1369- 4 June 1394), co-heiress of her father. On 27 July 1380 she married Henry of Bolingbroke, who would later be crowned King Henry IV. She died before he ascended the throne. The marriage produced six chidren including King Henry V of England .

Execution of John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter
In 1397, Joan's brother Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and a Lord Appellant was executed on Tower Hill for his opposition to King Richard II of England . The king's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter , Earl of Huntingdon accompanied him to the scaffold, as one of King Richard's representatives. Less than three years later in 1400, when Holland joined a conspiracy to murder the new king Henry IV, and was captured near Joan's principal residence Pleshy Castle in Essex , he was turned over to her for punishment. Described as having possessed a "stern character",[2] she showed him no mercy, and swiftly gave orders for his execution by decapitation , after summoning the children of her dead brother to witness the deed. Following the beheading, which was performed without benefit of a trial, she ordered that Holland's severed head be raised on the end of a pike, which was placed upon the battlements of Pleshy Castle.
Death
Lady Joan Fitzalan died on 7 April 1419 and was buried in Walden Abbey with her husband who had died in 1373. 45


Private and Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Private
         Mother: Private


       Marriage: 



Wife Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children


Elesa




Husband Elesa 50 51

           Born: Abt 447
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Esla [Legendary] (Abt 0421-      ) 51 52
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Cerdic King of the West Saxons [Semi-legendary] 53 54




           Born: Abt 473
     Christened: 
           Died: 534
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Elesa

From Wikipedia - Esla (Anglo-Saxon king) :


Esla appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as the son of Gewis and a descendant of Woden . He is also described as the father of Elesa , the father of Cerdic of Wessex who invaded Britain and founded the kingdom of Wessex 50 51


Research Notes: Child - Cerdic King of the West Saxons [Semi-legendary]

King of the West Saxons 519-534.

From Ancestral Roots, Line 1-1 :
"CERDIC... was a Saxon earldorman who founded a settlement on the coast of Hampshire, England, in 495, assumed the title of King of the West Saxons in 519, and became the ancestor of the English royal line."

From Wikipedia - Cerdic of Wessex :

Cerdic of Wessex (d. 534 ) was the King of Wessex (519 -534 ) and is regarded as the ancestor of all subsequent Kings of Wessex (See House of Wessex family tree ).

Official life and career

According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , Cerdic landed in Hampshire in 495 with his son Cynric in three keels (ships). He is said to have fought a British king named Natanleod at Netley Marsh in Hampshire and killed him in 508, and to have fought at Charford (Cerdic's Ford) in 519, after which he became first king of Wessex . The conquest of the Isle of Wight is also mentioned among his campaigns, and it was later given to his kinsmen, Stuf and Wihtgar (who had supposedly arrived with the West Saxons in 514). Cerdic is said to have died in 534 and was succeeded by his son Cynric .
The early history of Wessex in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is clearly muddled. David Dumville has suggested that Cerdic's true regnal dates are 538 -554 . Some scholars suggest that Cerdic was the Saxon leader defeated by the British at the battle of Mount Badon , which was probably fought sometime between 490 and 518 . This cannot be the case if Dumville is correct, and others assign this battle to Ælle or another Saxon leader.

It should also be noted that while Cerdic's area of operation was, according to the Chronicle, in the area north of Southampton, there is also stronger archaeological evidence of early Anglo-Saxon activity in the area around Dorchester-on-Thames . This is the later location of the first West Saxon bishopric, in the first half of the seventh century, so it appears likely that the origins of the kingdom of Wessex are more complex than the version provided by the surviving traditions.[1]

Some scholars have gone so far as to suggest that Cerdic is purely a legendary figure, and had no actual existence, but this is a minority view. However, the earliest source for Cerdic, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, was put together in the late ninth century; though it probably does record the extant tradition of the founding of Wessex, the intervening four hundred years mean that the account cannot be assumed to be accurate.[2][3]

Cerdic is allegedly an ancestor to Egbert of Wessex , and therefore would be an ancestor of not only the modern British monarchy under Elizabeth II , allowing The British Royal Family to trace its roots back over 1500 years, but virtually every royal lineage in Europe.

Origins

Curiously, the name Cerdic is thought to be British - a form of the name Ceretic (in Latin Caratacus) - rather than Germanic in origin. One explanation for this is the possibility that Cerdic's mother was British and that he was given a name used by his mother's people; if so, this would provide evidence for a degree of mixing, both cultural and biological, between the invaders and the native British.

J.N.L. Myres noted that when Cerdic and Cynric first appear in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 495 they are described as ealdormen , which at that point in time was fairly junior rank. Myres remarks that "It is thus odd to find it used here to describe the leaders of what purports to be an independent band of invaders, who origins and authority are not otherwise specified. It looks very much as if a hint is being conveyed that Cerdic and his people owed their standing to having been already concerned with administrative affairs under Roman authority on this part of the Saxon Shore." Furthermore, it is not until 519 that Cerdic and Cynric are recorded as "beginning to reign", suggesting that they ceased being dependent vassals or ealdormen and became independent Kings in their own right.

Summing up, Myres believed that It is thus possible ... to think of Cerdic as the head of a partly British noble family with extensive territorial interests at the western end of the "Litus Saxonicum. As such he may well have been entrusted in the last days of Roman, or sub-Roman authority with its defence. He would then be what in later Anglo-Saxon terminology could be described as an ealdorman. ... If such a dominant native family as that of Cerdic had already developed blood-relationships with existing Saxon and Jutish settlers at this end of the Saxon Shore, it could very well be tempted, once effective Roman authority had faded, to go further. It might have taken matters into its own hands and after eliminating any surviving pockets of resistance by competing British chieftains, such as the mysterious Natanleod of annal 508 , it could 'begin to reign' without recognizing in future any superior authority."

Some would disagree with Myres, as Cerdic is reported to have landed in Hampshire. Some also would say that the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle proves that Cerdic was indeed a Saxon, however it does not prove that he had no Celtic blood. Some scholars believe that it is likely that his mother was a British Celt who left for the Continent or perhaps was a Continental Celt. Geoffrey Ashe postulates he may be a son of Riothamus . 53 54


Fernando III of Castile King of Castile and Leon and Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen




Husband Fernando III of Castile King of Castile and Leon 55

            AKA: Saint Ferdinand, San Fernando, Fernando III "el Santo" of Castile
           Born: 5 Aug 1199 - Monastery of Valparaíso (Peleas de Arriba, Zamora), (Spain)
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 May 1252 - Seville, Spain
         Buried: 


         Father: Alfonso IX King of Léon (1171-1230) 56 57 58
         Mother: Berengaria of Castile (1180-1246) 57 59 60


       Marriage: Nov 1219 - Royal Monastery of San Zoilo, Carrión de los Condes (Palencia), Spain

   Other Spouse: Jeanne de Dammartin (Abt 1220-1279) 61 62 - Oct 1237 - Burgos, Castile, Spain

Events

• King of Castile: 1217-1252.

• King of Galicia and Léon: 1230-1252.

• Count of Aumale: 1239-1252.




Wife Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen 63

            AKA: Beatriz de Suabia, Elizabeth of Hohenstaufen
           Born: 1203
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Nov 1235 - Toro, Spain
         Buried: 


         Father: Philip II of Swabia, King of Germany (1177-1208) 64 65
         Mother: Irene Angelina (1181-1208) 66


Events

• Queen of Castile: 1219-1235.

• Queen of Léon: 1230-1235.


Children
1 M Alfonso X "El Sabio" King of Galicia, Castile and León 67

            AKA: Alfonso X of Castile King of Galicia, Castile and León
           Born: 23 Nov 1221 - Toledo, Castile, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Apr 1284 - Seville, Spain
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mayor Guillén de Guzmán (      -      ) 68
         Spouse: Yolanda of Aragon (1236-1301) 69
           Marr: 26 Dec 1246 - Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain




Research Notes: Husband - Fernando III of Castile King of Castile and Leon

From Wikipedia - Ferdinand III of Castile :

Saint Ferdinand III (August 5 , 1199 - May 30 , 1252 ), was the King of Castile from 1217 and King of Galicia and Leon from 1230. Through his second marriage he was also Count of Aumale . He finished the work done by his maternal grandfather Alfonso VIII and consolidated the Reconquista . In 1231, he permanently united Castile and Galicia -León. He was canonized in 1671 and, in Spanish , he is Fernando el Santo or San Fernando.


St Ferdinand was the son of Alfonso IX of León and Berenguela of Castile . He was born at the monastery of Valparaíso (Peleas de Arriba , Zamora ) in 1198 or 1199. His parents' marriage was annulled by order of Pope Innocent III in 1204, due to consanguinity. Berenguela took their children, including Ferdinand, to the court of her father. In 1217, her younger brother Henry I died and she succeeded him to the Castilian throne, but she immediately surrendered it to her son Ferdinand, for whom she initially acted as regent. When Alfonso died in 1230, Ferdinand also inherited León, though he had to fight for it with Alfonso's designated heirs, Sancha and Dulce, the daughters of his first wife. He thus became the first sovereign of both kingdoms following the death of Alfonso VII in 1157.

Early in his reign, Ferdinand had to deal with a rebellion of the House of Lara . He also established a permanent border with the Kingdom of Aragon by the Treaty of Almizra (1244).

St Ferdinand spent much of his reign fighting the Moors . Through diplomacy and war, exploiting the internal dissensions in the Moorish kingdoms, he triumphed in expanding Castilian power over southern Iberian Peninsula . He captured the towns of Úbeda in 1233, Córdoba in 1236, Jaén in 1246, and Seville in 1248, and occupied Murcia in 1243, thereby reconquering all Andalusia save Granada , whose king nevertheless did homage to Ferdinand. Ferdinand divided the conquered territories between the Knights , the Church, and the nobility, whom he endowed with great latifundias . When he took Córdoba, he ordered the Liber Iudiciorum to be adopted and observed by its citizens, and caused it to be rendered, albeit inaccurately, into Castilian .


The capture of Córdoba was the result of an uneven and uncoordinated process whereby parts (the Ajarquía) of the city first fell to the independent almogavars of the Sierra Morena to the north, which Ferdinand had not at the time subjugated.[1] Only in 1236 did Ferdinand arrive with a royal army to take Medina, the religious and administrative centre of the city.[1] Ferdinand set up a council of partidores to divide the conquests and between 1237 and 1244 a great deal of land was parcelled out to private individuals and members of the royal family as well as the Church.[2] On 10 March 1241 , Ferdinand established seven outposts to define the boundary of the province of Córdoba.

On the domestic front, he strengthened the University of Salamanca and founded the current Cathedral of Burgos . He was a patron of the newest movement in the Church: that of the friars . Whereas the Benedictines and then the Cistercians and Cluniacs had taken a major part in the Reconquista up til then, Ferdinand founded Dominican , Franciscan , Trinitarian , and Mercedarian houses in Andalusia, thus determining the religious future of that region. Ferdinand has also been credited with sustaining the convivencia in Andalusia.[3]

The Primera Crónica General de España asserts that, on his death bed, Ferdinand commended his son "you are rich in lands and in many good vassals - more so than any other king in Christendom," probably in recognition of his expansive conquests.[4] He was buried within the Cathedral of Seville by his son Alfonso X . His tomb is inscribed with four languages: Arabic, Hebrew, Latin, and an early incarnation of Castilian.[5] St Ferdinand was canonized by Pope Clement X in 1671. Several places named San Fernando were founded across the Spanish Empire .

The symbol of his power as a king was his sword Lobera .

Marriages and family

In 1219, Ferdinand married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen (1203-1235), daughter of the German king Philip of Swabia and Irene Angelina . Elisabeth was called Beatriz in Spain. Their children were:
Alfonso X , his successor
Fadrique
Ferdinand (1225-1243/1248)
Eleanor (born 1227), died young
Berenguela (1228-1288/89), a nun at Las Huelgas
Henry
Philip (1231-1274). He was promised to the Church, but was so taken by the beauty of Princess Kristina of Norway , daughter of Haakon IV of Norway , who had been intended as a bride for one of his brothers, that he abandoned his holy vows and married her. She died in 1262, childless.
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo and Seville (1233-1261)
Juan Manuel , Lord of Villena
Maria, died an infant in November 1235

After he was widowed, he married Jeanne of Dammartin , Countess of Ponthieu , before August 1237. They had four sons and one daughter:
Ferdinand (1239-1260), Count of Aumale
Eleanor (c.1241-1290), married Edward I of England
Louis (1243-1269)
Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo
John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba 55


Research Notes: Wife - Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen

First wife of Ferdinand III.

From Wikipedia - Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen :

Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen (called Beatriz de Suabia in Spanish) (1203 - 5 November 1235[1] in Toro, Spain ), Queen of Castile 1219-1235, Queen of Leon 1230-1235. She was the fourth daughter of Philip , Duke of Swabia and King of Germany, and Irene Angelina , daughter of Emperor Isaac II Angelos of the Byzantine Empire .

After the death of her father Philip, she became the ward of her cousin, Frederick, King of Sicily (later Emperor Frederick II); he later married her to Ferdinand III , King of Castile and Leon (called the Saint). The marriage was celebrated at the end of November of 1219 or 1220 in the Royal Monastery of San Zoilo in Carrión de los Condes (Palencia). In Castile, she was known as Beatriz.

Children of Elisabeth and Ferdinand
Alfonso X (called the Wise)
Fadrique of Castile
Fernando, died without issue.
Enrique
Felipe. Married Princess Kristina of Norway .
Enrique "the Senator", Lord of Ecija.
Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo from 1251-1261.
Manuel
Leonor, died in infancy.
Berenguela, nun in Las Huelgas, died in 1279.
Lucas de Tuy affirms that there was another daughter:
Maria, died in infancy.

Elisabeth was buried in the Royal Monastery of Huelgas de Burgos, next to King Enrique I . Her son Alfonso transferred her body to Seville, where that of her husband rested. 63


Research Notes: Child - Alfonso X "El Sabio" King of Galicia, Castile and León

From Wikipedia - Alfonso X of Castile :

Alfonso X (Toledo, Spain , November 23, 1221 - April 4, 1284 in Seville, Spain ) was a Castilian monarch who ruled as the King of Castile , León and Galicia from 1252 until his death. He also was elected King of the Germans (formally King of the Romans ) in 1257, though the Papacy prevented his confirmation.

He established Castilian as a language of higher learning, founded universities such as the University of Toledo ) and earned his nicknames (Spanish : 'el Sabio', Galician : 'O Sabio') ("the Wise" or "the Learned") and (Spanish : 'el Astrólogo', Galician : 'O Astrólogo') ("the Astronomer") through his own prolific writings, including Galician-Portuguese poetry .

Life

Alfonso was the eldest son of Ferdinand III of Castile and Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen , through whom he was a cousin of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor , to whom Alfonso is often compared. His maternal grandparents were Philip of Swabia and Irene Angelina .

Ruler
As a ruler, Alfonso showed legislative capacity, and a wish to provide the kingdoms expanded under his father with a code of laws and a consistent judicial system. The Fuero Real was undoubtedly his work. He began medieval Europe's most comprehensive code of law, the Siete Partidas , which, however, thwarted by the nobility of Castile, was only promulgated by his great-grandson. Because of this, and because the Partidas remain fundamental law in the American Southwest, he is one of the 23 lawmakers depicted in the House of Representatives chamber of the United States Capitol .

Alfonso "turned to the vernacular for the kind of intellectual commitments that formerly were inconceivable outside Latin ."[2] He was the first king who initiated the use of the Castilian language extensively, although his father, Fernando III, had begun to use it for some documents, instead of Latin, as the language used in courts, churches, and in books and official documents.

Throughout his reign, Alfonso contended with the nobles, particularly the families of Nuño González de Lara , Diego López de Haro and Esteban Fernández de Castro, all of whom were formidable soldiers and instrumental in maintaining Castile's military strength in frontier territories. According to some scholars, Alfonso lacked the singleness of purpose required by a ruler who would devote himself to organization, and also the combination of firmness with temper needed for dealing with his nobles.[3] Others have argued that his efforts were too singularly focused on the diplomatic and financial arrangements surrounding his bid for Holy Roman Emperor .

Alfonso's descent from the Hohenstaufen through his mother, a daughter of the emperor Philip of Swabia, gave him a claim to represent the Swabian line. Alfonso's election by the prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire in 1257 misled him into wild schemes that involved excessive expense but never took effect. To obtain money, he debased the coinage and then endeavoured to prevent a rise in prices by an arbitrary tariff . The little trade of his dominions was ruined, and the burghers and peasants were deeply offended. His nobles, whom he tried to cow by sporadic acts of violence, rebelled against him.

Music
Alfonso X commissioned or co-authored numerous works of music during his reign. These works included Cantigas d'escarnio e maldicer and the vast compilation Cantigas de Santa Maria ("Songs to the Virgin Mary"), which was written in Galician-Portuguese and figures among the most important of his works. The Cantigas form one of the largest collections of vernacular monophonic songs to survive from the Middle Ages . They consist of 420 poems with musical notation. The poems are for the most part on miracles attributed to the Virgin Mary . One of the miracles Alfonso relates is his own healing in Puerto de Santa María .

Lineage
Alfonso's eldest son, Ferdinand de la Cerda, Infante of Castile , died in 1275 when Morocco and Granada invaded Castile, leaving two infant sons. Alfonso's second son, Sancho , claimed to be the new heir, in preference to the children of Ferdinand de la Cerda, basing his claim on an old Castilian custom, that of proximity of blood and agnatic seniority . Alfonso preferred to leave the throne to his grandsons, but Sancho had the support of the nobility. A bitter civil war broke out resulting in Alfonso's being forced in 1282 to accept Sancho as his heir instead of his young grandsons. Son and nobles alike supported the Moors when he tried to unite the nation in a crusade; and when he allied himself with Abu Yusuf Yakub , the ruling Marinid Sultan of Morocco , they denounced him as an enemy of the faith. A reaction in his favor was beginning in his later days, but he died defeated and deserted at Seville , leaving a will, by which he endeavored to exclude Sancho, and a heritage of civil war.

Family
In 1246, Alfonso X married Violante of Aragon , the daughter of King James I of Aragon and Yolande of Hungary in 1249, although betrothed already in 1246. Because of her young age (Violante was only 10 years old at the time of the marriage), she produced no children for several years and it was feared that she was barren. Alfonso almost had their marriage annulled, but they went on to have ten children:
Fernando, died in infancy, and buried in Las Huelgas in Burgos .
Berengaria of Castile (1253 - after 1284). She was betrothed to Louis, the son and heir of King Louis IX of France , but her fiance died prematurely in 1260. She entered the convent in Las Huelgas, where she was living in 1284.
Beatriz of Castile (1254-1280). She married William VII, Marquess of Montferrat .
Ferdinand de la Cerda, Infante of Castile (October 23, 1255 - July 25, 1275). He married Blanche, the daughter of King Louis IX of France, by whom he had two children. Because he predeceased his father, his younger brother Sancho inherited the throne.
Leonor of Castile (1257-1275)
Urraca of Castile (1256-?). She married Pedro Nunez de Guzman y Manzanedo .
Sancho IV of Castile (May 13, 1258 - 1295)
Constanza of Castile (1258 - August 22, 1280), a nun at Las Huelgas.
Pedro of Castile (June 1260 - October 10, 1283)
Juan of Castile, Lord of Valencia (March or April, 1262 - June 25, 1319).
Isabella, died young.
Violante of Castile (1265-1296). She married Diego Lopez de Haro
Jaime of Castile (August 1266 - August 9, 1284)

Alfonso X also had several illegitimate children. His illegitimate daughter, Beatriz de Castilla , married King Afonso III of Portugal . An illegitimate son, Martin, was Abbot of Valladolid. 67


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