The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Hans Jerg Wehrli and Barbara




Husband Hans Jerg Wehrli 1

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Events

• Residence: 1754, Stone Arabia, Albany (Montgomery), New York, (United States).




Wife Barbara

           Born: 
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           Died: 
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Children
1 M Peter Wereley (U.E.L.) 2 3




            AKA: Peter Wardle, Peter Wearly, Pieter Wehrli, Peter <H.> Werley (U.E.L.)
           Born: 1753
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1789
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maria Schmitt (      -      ) 3
           Marr: Abt 1773 - <New York, United States>


2 F Eva Gertraut Wehrli 4

           Born: 15 Mar 1754 - <Stone Arabia>, Albany (Montgomery), New York, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mosis Ward (      -      ) 4


3 F Gertruy Wehrli 5

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Hans Jerg Wehrli

Dutch.

From http://www.edenstree.com/:

In speculative view, the roots of our branch of the Wereley family extend back to the Palatine Migrations from Germany. Some Palatine immigrants came directly from the Palatinate through Rotterdam; others journeyed farther through Holland and England, then on to the Colonies. They moved to avoid heavy taxation and harsh conditions in their homeland, and by 1750, an estimated 70-80,000 Germans had emigrated. Most sought land grants promised by William Penn and entered the Colonies through the port of Philadelphia. However, land grants were limited in number, and soon ran out, causing many immigrants to move on to the upstate NY area for farmland. Others entered through the ports of New England and New Amsterdam, traveling to the upper Hudson River Valley area to work in the Naval Stores Project, producing pitch for the Royal Naval Fleet, but they were less well documented. Only Philadelphia kept good records of immigrants and ships' passenger lists; other ports kept sparse records if any at all. It was not until 1820 that ports were required to keep records, making non-Philadelphia immigration before that time difficult to track. With the coming of the Revolution, many Palatines who fought against the rebels split off and traveled to Canada, principally to Stormont and surrounding counties in then Canada West, now called Ontario, and pledged loyalty to the Crown. This entitled many to UE land patents from the Crown in return for their support. The history of the Palatine migration is well documented, and visiting the links at the left will provide an evening's worth of good reading for the history buffs among us. Our purpose here is not necessarily to study the movements of the people geographically - but to examine their movements genetically.
Several principal male lines of the Wereley family and their probable progenitor are of particular interest: Hans Jerg Wehrli and his wife Barbara are recorded in 1754 in the Albany NY area with new-born daughter Eva Gertraut and son Pieter, born in 1753 according to KRRNY records. Pieter married Maria Schmitt (Smith) about 1773. Their son Peter begat the The Peter (Psalter) Werley line. Son George Werley Sr. sired George G. Werely Jr. b. 1808, and likely Jacob b. 1811 and Martin Wereley, b. 1815, each of whom founded long lines. Pieter and Maria also apparently begat John Wereley, b. 1778, who established the Schoharie line which stayed in the Schoharie region when the others emigrated to Canada. The John "Hansie" Werely, b. Abt. 1800 line through a branch yet to be discovered.. "Hansie" appears to have moved to Canada and wed Barbara Ann Werley - Peter "Psalter" Werley's daughter. The "Hansie" line later merged with the Martin Wereley line with the union of Hansie's son, Harvey and Martin's daughter, Henrietta Wereley. The various spellings are not typo's - the name began as Wehrli but mutated and was listed in official and anecdotal records variously as Werley, Wereley, Werely, Werlee, Werlie, Wearly, Warely, Warly, and on, often within the same family - same generation. To further stir the witch's brew, genealogists over the ages have innocently and understandably homogenized the name into one or two spellings. John (Schoharie) Wereley's will spells the name multiple ways in the same document! His own daughter likewise waffles between spellings.


Research Notes: Wife - Barbara

Source:
http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam00069.html


Research Notes: Child - Peter Wereley (U.E.L.)

Dutch

Probably the same person as Peter Wearly, p.401 of Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District by J.F. Pringle, 1890. If so, he was in the R.R.N.Y. [King's Royal Regiment of New York (Sir John Johnson's corps.)] who settled in the eastern part of Upper Canada, having fought on the side of the Crown.

May not be the same person as Peter Wardle. It is fairly certain that he was the father of Mary Werley/Wardle, wife of Daniel Frederick Papst (Frederick Papst).


Bardolph Lord of Ravenswath




Husband Bardolph Lord of Ravenswath 6

           Born:  - Bretagne [Brittany], (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1100 - Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Eudes Comté de Bretagne (Abt 1008-1079) 7
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

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Children
1 M Acarius Fitz Bardolph of Rafenswad 8

            AKA: Akaris of Ravensworth
           Born:  - Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1161 - Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding, Yorkshire, England
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Bardolph Lord of Ravenswath

From http://cybergata.com/roots/1267.htm :
Background Information. 967
Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath and other manors in Richamondshire, was a great landowner in Yorkshire, who gave a carucate of land and the churches of Patrick Brampton and Ravenswath in pure alms to the Abbey of St. Mary's at York. In his old age, when weary of the world and its trouble, he became a monk and retired to the Abbey, of which he had been a benefactor. He was succeeded by his son and hair, Akaris, or Acarius Fitz Bardolph.

~ Irish Pedigrees: Or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, p. 104
• Background Information. 780
Eschecol, or Ascough, was granted after 1086 by Alan, earl of Richmond, to Bardolf, his brother, father of Akaris, ancestor of the Barons Fitz Hugh of Ravensworth.

~ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States of America, p. 144


Research Notes: Child - Acarius Fitz Bardolph of Rafenswad

From http://cybergata.com/roots/2298.htm :
Akaris, or Acarius Fitz Bardolph, who founded the Abbey of Fors (5 Stephen, A.D. 1140) and granted the original site of Jervaulx to the Suvignian monds at York. He also gave a charter to the Priory of St. Andrews, and lands and tenths in Rafenswad (Ravenswath), to which gifts. --"Hen. fit. Hervei, and Conan d'Ask" were witnesses. [Marrig. Charters, Coll. Top. Et. Genealogy III. 114] He died in 1161 and left two sons, Herveus and Walter.

~ Irish Pedigrees: Or, the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, p. 104


Baron of Kymmer-yn-Edeirnion




Husband Baron of Kymmer-yn-Edeirnion

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Wife

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Children
1 F Mali

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Iorwerth Vychan ap Ieuaf of Llwynon, co. Denbig (      -      )



Research Notes: Husband - Baron of Kymmer-yn-Edeirnion

Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain & Ireland" by John Burke & John Bernard Burke, vol. I (London, 1847), p. 656.


Research Notes: Child - Mali

Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain & Ireland" by John Burke & John Bernard Burke, vol. I (London, 1847), p. 656:
"Mali, widow of David ap Rhys, v. Baron of Kymmer-yn-Edeirnion, co. Merioneth, ancestor of the Hughes's of Gwerclas, Barons of Kymmer-yn-Edeirnion and 3rd dau. of Ievan, living 6 HEN. VI., son of Einion ap Griffith, of Cos-y-Gedol, co. Merioneth (See WYNNE OF PENIARTH.)"



Clodio King of the Salic Franks [Legendary] and Basina de Thuringia




Husband Clodio King of the Salic Franks [Legendary] 9 10 11

            AKA: Clodion King of the Salic Franks, Clodius King of the Salic Franks
           Born: Abt 395 - <Gallia Belgica (France or Belgium)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 447
         Buried: 


         Father: Pharamond King of the Franks [Legendary] (Abt 0369-Abt 0428) 12 13 14
         Mother: Argotta Princess of the Salian Franks (Abt 0376-      ) 15 16


       Marriage: 

Events

• King of Salian Franks: at Dispargum and later Tournai, 426-447.




Wife Basina de Thuringia 17 18

           Born: 398 - Thuringia, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 414 - France
         Buried: 


         Father: Alaric I de Thuringia (      -      ) 19
         Mother: Galla Placidia of Cauca (Abt 0388-0450) 20 21




Children
1 M Merovech King of the Salic Franks [Legendary] 22 23

            AKA: Meerwig, Merovée King of the Salian Franks
           Born: Abt 411 - Gallia Belgica (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 457
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Verica (Abt 0413-      ) 24 25


2 M Sigimerus I d'Auverigne 26

           Born: Abt 414
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Clodio King of the Salic Franks [Legendary]

Legendary. May not have been a real person, and, if a real person, may not have been the father of Merovech.

King of Salic Franks, named after the Franks near the Sale river in Belgium.

From Wikipedia -List of Frankish kings :
Clodio , possible son of Pharamond, King at Dispargum and later Tournai (426 - 447)

From Wikipedia - Clodio :
Chlodio[1] was a king of the Salian Franks from the Merovingian dynasty . He was known as a Long-Haired King and lived at a place on the Thuringian border called Dispargum . From there he invaded the Roman Empire in 428 and settled in Northern Gaul , where already other groups of Salians were settled. Although he was attacked by Romans he was able to maintain his position and 3 years later in 431 he extended his kingdom down south to the Somme River . In 448 , 20 years after his reign began Chlodio was defeated at an unidentified place called Vicus Helena by Flavius Aëtius , the commander of the Roman Army in Gaul.

Like all Merovingian kings Chlodio had long hair as a ritual custom. His successor may have been Merovech , after whom the dynasty was named 'Merovingian'. One legend has it that his father was Pharamond . The sources on Chlodio's history are Gregory of Tours and Sidonius Apollinaris .

Sources
Gregory of Tours , Historiën.
Sidonius Apollinaris , Loeb Classical Edition.


Research Notes: Child - Merovech King of the Salic Franks [Legendary]

Legendary founder of the Merovingian dynasty of the Salian Franks. May not have been a real person, the father of Childeric I.

Defeated Atilla the Hun with the aid of Aetius in 451.

From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :
Merovech , possible son of Chlodio, King at Tournai (447 - 458)


From Wikipedia - Merovech :

Merovech (Latin : Meroveus or Merovius; French : Mérovée) is the legendary founder of the Merovingian dynasty of the Salian Franks , that later became the dominant Frankish tribe. The name is a latinization of a form close to Old High German proper name Marwig, lit. "famed fight"[1] (cf. m "famous" + w "fight").

There is little information about him in the later histories of the Franks. Gregory of Tours only names him once as the father of Childeric I while putting doubt on his descent from Clodio .[2] Many admit today that this formulation finds its explanation in a legend reported by Fredegar.[3] The Chronicle of Fredegar interpolated on this reference by Gregory by adding Merovech was the son of the queen, Clodio's wife; but his father was a sea-god, bistea Neptuni.[4] No other historical evidence exists that Merovech ever lived. Some researchers have noted that Merovech, the Frankish chieftain, may have been the namesake of a certain god or demigod honored by the Franks prior to their conversion to Christianity. It has been suggested Merovech refers to or is reminiscent to the Dutch river Merwede ,[5] nowadays part of the Rhine-Meus-Scheldt delta but historically a main subsidiary of the Rhine, in the neighborhood of which the Salian Franks once dwelled according to Roman historians. Another theory[6] considers this legend to be the creation of a mythological past needed to back up the fast-rising Frankish rule in Western Europe.

According to another legend, Merovech was conceived when Pharamond's wife encountered a Quinotaur , a sea monster which could change shapes while swimming. Though never stated, it is implied that she was impregnated by it. This legend was related by Fredegar in the seventh century, and may have been known earlier. The legend is probably a back-formation or folk etymology used to explain the Salian Franks' origin as a sea coast dwelling people, and based on the name itself. The "Mero-" or "Mer-" element in the name suggests a sea or ocean (see Old English "mere," Latin "mare," or even the Modern English word "mermaid ," etc.). The "Salian" in "Salian Franks " may be a reference to salt , a reminder of their pre-migration home on the shores of the North Sea (alternatively, it may refer to the Isala or IJssel river behind which their homeland, the Salland , may have been located). The legend could also be explained in a much easier way. The sea monster could have been a foreign conqueror, coming from the sea, taking the dead king's(Chlodio or Pharamond ) wife to legitimise his rule.

The first Frankish royal dynasty called themselves Merovingians in his honor.

Merovech may have been the father of Childeric I who may have succeeded him.


Childeric I King of the Salian Franks and Basina Andovera of Thuringia




Husband Childeric I King of the Salian Franks 27 28 29

           Born: Between 436 and 437 - Westphalia, Alemannia (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 26 Nov 482 - Tournai, (Hainaut), Frankish Kingdom (Belgium)
         Buried:  - Tournai, (Hainaut), Frankish Kingdom (Belgium)


         Father: Merovech King of the Salic Franks [Legendary] (Abt 0411-Abt 0457) 22 23
         Mother: Verica (Abt 0413-      ) 24 25


       Marriage: 

Events

• King of the Salian Franks: at Tournai, 458-481.




Wife Basina Andovera of Thuringia 30 31 32

            AKA: Basina of Thuringia, Besina of Thuringia
           Born: Abt 438 - Thuringia, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 480
         Buried: 


         Father: Banin of Thuringia (      -      ) 33
         Mother: Basina of Saxony (      -      ) 34



   Other Spouse: Bisinus King of the Thuringii (Abt 0440-      ) 35 36


Children
1 F Audefleda Meroving Princess of the Franks 37

           Born: Abt 452 - Westphalia, Alemania (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Apr 535 - Ravenna, (Italy)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0454-0526) 38 39
           Marr: 493


2 M Clovis I King of the Franks 40 41 42




            AKA: Chlodovech King of the Franks, Chlodovechus King of the Franks, Clovis I, King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 466 - Gallia Belgica (Belgium)
     Christened: 496 - Cathédrale de Rheims, Rheims, (Marne), France


           Died: 27 Nov 511 - Paris, Île-de-France, Frankish Kingdom (France)


         Buried:  - Basilica of Saint-Denis, Paris, Île-de-France, (France)
         Spouse: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 43 44 45 46
           Marr: 493



Research Notes: Husband - Childeric I King of the Salian Franks

From Wikipedia - Childeric I :

Childeric I (c. 437 - c. 481 ) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis .
He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458 . With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai , on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans , and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans , in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius , who was based in Soissons , he defeated the Visigoths , who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers , together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer , according to Gregory of Tours , to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy .
The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina , whom he married come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai , leaving a son Clovis , afterwards king of the Franks.




Research Notes: Wife - Basina Andovera of Thuringia

First husband was Bisinus, the King of Thuringia.

From Wikipedia - Basina, Queen of Thuringia :

Basina was queen of Thuringia in the middle of the fifth century. She left her husband king Bisinus and went to Roman Gaul . She herself took the initiative to ask for the hand of Childeric I , king of the Franks , and married him. For as she herself said, "I want to have the most powerful man in the world, even if I have to cross the ocean for him". This remark of her may have been related to Childeric's successful invasion of the Roman Empire and his attempt to settle a Frankish kingdom on Roman soil.

Basina's name is probably Low Franconian for 'female boss'. She is the mother of the man who is remembered as the founder of the Frankish realm and modern France. She (not her husband Childeric) named her son Chlodovech, but he is better remembered under his Latinized name Clovis I . The simple fact that Chlodovech's name comes from Basina is remarkable since it was a common practice for the Franks to name a son after a member of the family of the male-line of ancestors.

Through the ages historians have been intrigued by the story of Basina since she obviously acted as a player and not as bystander - which is not uncommon for the women of the Franks, but highly uncommon for the Italians.


Christening Notes: Child - Clovis I King of the Franks

Baptized by Saint Remi, Bishop of Rheims.


Research Notes: Child - Clovis I King of the Franks

United most of the Franks and Roman Gaul, becoming King of all the Franks in 509.

Not to be confused with Clovis of the Riparian Franks Buried in Church of the Apostles Peter and Paul, Paris, France.
--------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Clovis I united all the Frankish petty kingdoms as well as most of Roman Gaul under his rule, conquering the Domain of Soissons of the Roman general Syagrius as well as the Visigothic Kingdom of Toulouse . He took his seat at Paris, which along with Soissons , Reims , Metz , and Orléans became the chief residences. Upon his death, the kingdom was split among his four sons:
Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561
Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561
Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561
Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.
---------

From Wikipedia - Clovis I :

Clovis I (c. 466 - 27 November 511 ) was the first King of the Franks to unite all the Frankish tribes under one ruler. He succeeded his father Childeric I in 481[1] as King of the Salian Franks , one of the Frankish tribes who were then occupying the area west of the lower Rhine , with their centre around Tournai and Cambrai along the modern frontier between France and Belgium , in an area known as Toxandria . Clovis conquered the neighbouring Frankish tribes and established himself as sole king before his death.

He converted to Roman Catholicism , as opposed to the Arianism common among Germanic peoples at the time, at the instigation of his wife, the Burgundian Clotilda , a Catholic. He was baptized in the Cathedral of Rheims , as most future French kings would be. This act was of immense importance in the subsequent history of France and Western Europe in general, for Clovis expanded his dominion over almost all of the old Roman province of Gaul (roughly modern France). He is considered the founder both of France (which his state closely resembled geographically at his death) and the Merovingian dynasty which ruled the Franks for the next two centuries.

In primary sources Clovis' name is spelled in a number of variants: The Frankish form Chlodovech was Latinised as Chlodovechus, from which came the Latin name Ludovicus, which evolved into the French name Louis.

The name features prominently in subsequent history: Three other Merovingian Kings have been called Clovis, while nine Carolingian rulers and thirteen other French kings and one Holy Roman Emperor have been called Louis.

Nearly every European language has developed its own spelling of his name. Louis (French), "Chlodwig" and Ludwig (German), Lodewijk (Dutch), and Lewis (English) are just four of the over 100 possible variations.
Scholars differ about the meaning of his name. Chlodovech is composed out of the Germanic roots Chlod- and -vech, which are usually associated with "glow" and "soldier". His name thus might have meant "illustrious in combat" or "glorious warrior".

In 486, with the help of Ragnachar , Clovis defeated Syagrius , the last Roman official in northern Gaul , who ruled the area around Soissons in present-day Picardie .[2] This victory at Soissons extended Frankish rule to most of the area north of the Loire . After this, Clovis secured an alliance with the Ostrogoths , through the marriage of his sister Audofleda to their king, Theodoric the Great . He followed this victory with another in 491 over a small group of Thuringians east of his territories. Later, with the help of the other Frankish sub-kings, he defeated the Alamanni in the Battle of Tolbiac . He had previously married the Burgundian princess Clotilde (493), and, following his victory at Tolbiac , he converted (traditionally in 496) to her Trinitarian Catholic faith. This was a significant change from the other Germanic kings, like the Visigoths and Vandals , who had embraced the rival Arian beliefs.


Clovis I died in 511 and is interred in Saint Denis Basilica , Paris , whereas his father had been buried with the older Merovingian kings in Tournai. Upon his death his realm was divided among his four sons: Theuderic , Chlodomer , Childebert , and Clotaire . This partitioning created the new political units of the Kingdoms of Rheims , Orléans , Paris and Soissons and inaugurated a period of disunity which was to last, with brief interruptions, until the end (751 ) of his Merovingian dynasty.


Bisinus King of the Thuringii and Basina Andovera of Thuringia




Husband Bisinus King of the Thuringii 35 36

            AKA: Basin, Basinus King of the Thuringii
           Born: Abt 440 - <Thuringia (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died:  - <Thuringia (Germany)>
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Basina Andovera of Thuringia 30 31 32

            AKA: Basina of Thuringia, Besina of Thuringia
           Born: Abt 438 - Thuringia, (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 480
         Buried: 


         Father: Banin of Thuringia (      -      ) 33
         Mother: Basina of Saxony (      -      ) 34



   Other Spouse: Childeric I King of the Salian Franks (Between 0436/0437-0482) 27 28 29


Children
1 M Berthar King of the Thuringians 47

           Born: Abt 470 - Thuringia, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 530
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Bisinus King of the Thuringii

From Wikipedia - Wacho :

Bisinus, Basinus, Besinus, or Bisin (Lombardic : Pisen) was the king of the Thuringii (fl. c. 460 - 506/510).

According to Gregory of Tours , he supplied refuge from Childeric I , the Frankish king who was exiled by his own people. His wife, Basina , left him for Childeric and the two returned to Tournai together, after eight years.
The historical Bisinus bears some resemblance to the Bisinus of Gregory, but the details are different. Bisinus was the leader of a Thuringian confederation on the Rhine and his wife was a Lombard named Menia. He left three sons, Baderic , Herminafred , and Berthachar , who inherited the throne from him. His daughter Radegund married the Lombard king Wacho .


Research Notes: Wife - Basina Andovera of Thuringia

First husband was Bisinus, the King of Thuringia.

From Wikipedia - Basina, Queen of Thuringia :

Basina was queen of Thuringia in the middle of the fifth century. She left her husband king Bisinus and went to Roman Gaul . She herself took the initiative to ask for the hand of Childeric I , king of the Franks , and married him. For as she herself said, "I want to have the most powerful man in the world, even if I have to cross the ocean for him". This remark of her may have been related to Childeric's successful invasion of the Roman Empire and his attempt to settle a Frankish kingdom on Roman soil.

Basina's name is probably Low Franconian for 'female boss'. She is the mother of the man who is remembered as the founder of the Frankish realm and modern France. She (not her husband Childeric) named her son Chlodovech, but he is better remembered under his Latinized name Clovis I . The simple fact that Chlodovech's name comes from Basina is remarkable since it was a common practice for the Franks to name a son after a member of the family of the male-line of ancestors.

Through the ages historians have been intrigued by the story of Basina since she obviously acted as a player and not as bystander - which is not uncommon for the women of the Franks, but highly uncommon for the Italians.


Private and Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

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         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Teucer King of Teucria [Mythological] (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Erichthonius King of Dardania [Mythological] 48 49

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1368 B.C.
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Private



Research Notes: Husband - Dardanus King of Dardania [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Dardanus :

In Greek mythology , Dardanus (Greek : English translation : "burned up", from the verb (dardapto) to wear, to slay, to burn up)[1] was a son of Zeus and Electra , daughter of Atlas , and founder of the city of Dardania on Mount Ida in the Troad .

Dionysius of Halicarnassus (1.61-62) states that Dardanus' original home was in Arcadia where Dardanus and his elder brother Iasus (elsewhere more commonly called Iasion ) reigned as kings following Atlas. Dardanus married Chryse daughter of Pallas by whom he fathered two sons: Idaeus and Dymas . When a great flood occurred, the survivors, who were living on mountains that had now become islands, split into two groups: one group remained and took Deimas as king while the other sailed away, eventually settling in the island of Samothrace . There Iasus (Iasion) was slain by Zeus for lying with Demeter . Dardanus and his people found the land poor and so most of them set sail for Asia.

However another account by Virgil in his Aeneid (3.163f), has Aeneas in a dream learn from his ancestral Penates that "Dardanus and Father Iasius" and the Penates themselves originally came from Hesperia which was afterward renamed as Italy . This tradition holds that Dardanus was a Tyrrhenian prince, and that his mother Electra was married to Corythus, king of Tarquinia (Aeneid 7.195-242; 8. 596 ss. ; 9. 10; Servio, ad Vergilium, Aeneidos, 9.10).
Other accounts make no mention of Arcadia or Hesperia, though they sometimes mention a flood and speak of Dardanus sailing on a hide-raft (as part of the flood story?) from Samothrace to the Troad near Abydos . All accounts agree that Dardanus came to the Troad from Samothrace and was there welcomed by King Teucer and that Dardanus married Batea the daughter of Teucer. (Dionysius mentions that Dardanus' first wife Chryse had died.) Dardanus received land on Mount Ida from his father-in-law. There Dardanus founded the city of Dardania .

Dardanus' children by Batea were Ilus , Erichthonius and Idaea . According to Dionysius of Halicarnassus (1.50.3), Dardanus also had a son named Zacynthus by Bataea and this Zacynthus was the first settler on the island afterwards called Zacynthus . Dionysius also says (1.61.4) that Dardanus's son Idaeus gave his name to the Idaean mountains, that is Mount Ida , where Idaeus built a temple to the Mother of the Gods (that is to Cybele ) and instituted mysteries and ceremonies still observed in Phrygia in Dionysius's time. There are operas on the subject of Dardanus by Jean-Philippe Rameau (1739), Carl Stamitz (1770) and Antonio Sacchini (1784).

One last claim identifies Dardanus with a biblical Darda who is said to be a son of Zerah. The subject is debatable due to Zerah's name being similar to that of Zeus's and his wife, Hera. According to the Old Testament , Zerah was Pharez's twin brother, the former had his whereabouts unknown whereas the former bore Juda, founder of the tribe that bears same name.


Research Notes: Wife - Batea of the Teucri [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Batea (mythology) :

Batea (or Bateia) was a figure in Greek mythology said to be the daughter or (less commonly) the aunt of King Teucer , ruler of a tribe known as the Teucrians (Teucri). The Teucrians inhabited the area of northwest Asia Minor later called the Troad (Troas), and the term is sometimes used as another name for the Trojans . Batea married King Dardanus , son of Zeus and Electra , whom Teucer named as his heir. Batea gave her name to a hill in the Troad, mentioned in the Iliad . By Dardanus, Batea was the mother of Ilus , Erichthonius , Zacynthus , and Idaea . Greek mythology also recounts Arisbe , a daughter of Teucer, as the wife of Dardanus so Arisbe and Batea are usually assumed to be the same person.


Research Notes: Child - Erichthonius King of Dardania [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Erichthonius of Dardania :

The mythical King Erichthonius of Dardania was the son of Dardanus or Darda[citation needed ], King of Dardania , and Batea , (although some legends say his mother was Olizone , descendant of Phineus ).

Fundamentally, all that is known of this Erichthonius comes from Homer , who says (Samuel Butler 's translation of Iliad 20.215-234 ):
"In the beginning Dardanos was the son of Zeus , and founded Dardania , for Ilion was not yet established on the plain for men to dwell in, and her people still abode on the spurs of many-fountained Ida . Dardanos had a son, king Erichthonios, who was wealthiest of all men living; he had three thousand mares that fed by the water-meadows, they and their foals with them. Boreas was enamored of them as they were feeding, and covered them in the semblance of a dark-maned stallion. Twelve filly foals did they conceive and bear him, and these, as they sped over the fertile plain, would go bounding on over the ripe ears of wheat and not break them; or again when they would disport themselves on the broad back of Ocean they could gallop on the crest of a breaker. Erichthonios begat Tros , king of the Trojans,and Tros had three noble sons, Ilos , Assarakos , and Ganymede who was comeliest of mortal men; wherefore the gods carried him off to be Zeus' cupbearer, for his beauty's sake, that he might dwell among the immortals."

John Tzetzes and one of the scholia to Lycophron call his wife Astyoche , daughter of Simoeis . Apollodorus also adds Erichthonius' older brother Ilus , who died young and childless; presumably a doublet of the other Ilus, grandson of Erichthonius, eponym of Troy.

Strabo (13.1.48) records, but discounts, the claim by "some more recent writers" that Teucer came from the deme of Xypeteones in Attica , supposedly called Troes (meaning Trojans) in mythical times. These writers mentioned that Erichthonius appears as founder both in Attica and the Troad, and may be identifying the two.


Clovis II and Bathilde




Husband Clovis II 50

           Born: 634
     Christened: 
           Died: 657
         Buried: 


         Father: Dagobert I King of Austrasia, King of the Franks (Abt 0603-0639) 51 52 53
         Mother: Nanthilde (0610-0642) 54


       Marriage: 



Wife Bathilde 55

           Born: 626
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 680 and 685
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thierry III 56

           Born: 654
     Christened: 
           Died: 691
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Clotilde (0650-0699) 56




Baudouin I Count of Clermont




Husband Baudouin I Count of Clermont 57

           Born: Abt 965 - <Clermont, (Oise), Picardy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Baudouin II Count of Clermont 58

           Born: Abt 990 - <Clermont, (Oise), Picardy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





Baudouin II Count of Clermont




Husband Baudouin II Count of Clermont 58

           Born: Abt 990 - <Clermont, (Oise), Picardy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Baudouin I Count of Clermont (Abt 0965-      ) 57
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Ermengardis de Clermont 59

           Born: Abt 1010 - <Clermont, (Oise), Picardy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Renaud de Clermont (Abt 1000-      ) 60




Sources


1. Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam01091.html.

2. Website - Genealogy, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2591631&id=I530982716 (Rosemary Benson).

3. Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam00069.html.

4. Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam01322.html.

5. Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam01213.html.

6. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1267.htm.

7. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4744.htm.

8. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/2298.htm.

9. Wikipedia.org, Clodio.

10. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873344.

11. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99020 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

12. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99021 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

13. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873345.

14. Wikipedia.org, Pharamond.

15. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875190.

16. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105872 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

17. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140415 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

18. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875434.

19. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140414 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

20. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140409 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

21. Wikipedia.org, Galla Placidia.

22. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99019 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873343.

24. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875433.

25. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317959 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

26. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140482.

27. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99018 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873341.

29. Wikipedia.org, Childeric I.

30. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105692 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

31. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873342.

32. Wikipedia.org, Basina, Queen of Thuringia.

33. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317960 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

34. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319830 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

35. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99024 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

36. Wikipedia.org, Wacho.

37. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105822 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

38. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105823 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

39. Wikipedia.org, Theodoric the Great.

40. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99017 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

41. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873339.

42. Wikipedia.org, Clovis I; List of Frankish kings.

43. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-3 (Clovis I).

44. Wikipedia.org, Clotilde.

45. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105696 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

46. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873340.

47. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316385 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

48. Wikipedia.org, Erichthonius of Dardania.

49. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98996 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

50. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 24A-8.

51. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7.

52. Wikipedia.org, Dagobert I.

53. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873572.

54. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7 (Dagobert I).

55. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-8 (Clovis II).

56. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-9.

57. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f004/f56/a0045689.htm.

58. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019560.htm.

59. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019617.htm.

60. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019616.htm.


Sources


1 Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam01091.html.

2 Website - Genealogy, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2591631&id=I530982716 (Rosemary Benson).

3 Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam00069.html.

4 Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam01322.html.

5 Wereley, Bill, Eden's Tree Genealogy: Home of the Wereley-Savey Family Tree (http://www.edenstree.com/), http://www.edenstree.com/html/fam/fam01213.html.

6 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1267.htm.

7 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4744.htm.

8 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/2298.htm.

9 Wikipedia.org, Clodio.

10 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873344.

11 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99020 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

12 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99021 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

13 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873345.

14 Wikipedia.org, Pharamond.

15 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875190.

16 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105872 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

17 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140415 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

18 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875434.

19 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140414 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

20 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140409 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

21 Wikipedia.org, Galla Placidia.

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99019 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

23 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873343.

24 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875433.

25 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317959 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

26 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140482.

27 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99018 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873341.

29 Wikipedia.org, Childeric I.

30 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105692 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

31 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873342.

32 Wikipedia.org, Basina, Queen of Thuringia.

33 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317960 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

34 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319830 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

35 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99024 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

36 Wikipedia.org, Wacho.

37 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105822 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

38 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105823 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

39 Wikipedia.org, Theodoric the Great.

40 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99017 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

41 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873339.

42 Wikipedia.org, Clovis I; List of Frankish kings.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-3 (Clovis I).

44 Wikipedia.org, Clotilde.

45 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105696 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

46 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873340.

47 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316385 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

48 Wikipedia.org, Erichthonius of Dardania.

49 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98996 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

50 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 24A-8.

51 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7.

52 Wikipedia.org, Dagobert I.

53 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873572.

54 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7 (Dagobert I).

55 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-8 (Clovis II).

56 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-9.

57 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f004/f56/a0045689.htm.

58 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019560.htm.

59 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019617.htm.

60 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f96/a0019616.htm.


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