The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona and Mathilda of Apulia




Husband Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona 1 2

            AKA: Raimund Berenger II "the Towhead" Count of Barcelona
           Born: 1054 - <Barcelona, Aragon>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Dec 1082
         Buried: 


         Father: Ramon Berenguer I Count of Barcelona (1023-1076) 1 3
         Mother: Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges (Abt 1000-1071) 1 4 5


       Marriage: 1078



Wife Mathilda of Apulia 1

            AKA: Maud of Apulia, Mathilda d'Apulia
           Born: Abt 1059 - <Apulia, Calabria>, Italy
     Christened: 
           Died: 1083
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert I "Guiscard" de Hauteville (      -1101) 1
         Mother: Sigelgaita Princess of Salerno (      -      ) 1




Children
1 M Raymond III Berenger Count of Barcelona 1

            AKA: Ramon Berenguer III, Raimund III Berenger Marquis of Barcelona
           Born: 11 Nov 1080 or 1082 - <Barcelona, Aragon>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Jun 1131
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dulce Aldonza Milhaud (Abt 1095-1190) 1 6




Death Notes: Husband - Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona

Murdered by his twin brother, Berenguer Ramon II.


Research Notes: Husband - Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona

Twin brother of Berenguer Ramon II, by whom he was murdered.

From Wikipedia - Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona :

Ramon Berenguer II the Towhead or Cap de estopes[1][2] (1053 or 1054 - December 5 , 1082 ) was Count of Barcelona from 1076 until his death. He ruled jointly with his twin brother Berenguer Ramon II .

He succeeded his father Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona to co-rule with his twin brother Berenguer Ramon, in 1075.

The twins failed to agree and divided their possessions between them, against the will of their late father. Ramon Berenguer the Towhead, called so because of the thickness and colour of his hair, was killed while hunting in the woods in 1082. His brother, who went on to become the sole ruler of Catalonia , was credited by popular opinion of having orchestrated this murder. Berenguer Ramon the Fratricide was later succeeded by Ramon Berenguer's son Ramon Berenguer III .

Ramon Berenguers's marriage and child
Mahalta (or Maud) of Apulia , born ca. 1059, died 1111/1112, daughter of Duke Robert Guiscard and of Sikelgaita de Salerno. Following his murder, she remarried to Aimery I of Narbonne , being mother of his son Aimery II
Ramon Berenguer III the Great, count of Barcelona and Provence (before 1082-1131) 1 2


Régnier V Count of Hainaut and Mathilde of Verdun




Husband Régnier V Count of Hainaut 7

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1039
         Buried: 


         Father: Régnier IV Count of Hainaut (Abt 0950-1013) 8
         Mother: Hedwig of France (Abt 0969-After 1013) 9


       Marriage: Abt 1015

Events

• Count of Hainaut: 1013.




Wife Mathilde of Verdun 10

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1039
         Buried: 


         Father: Herman von Enham Count in Eifelgau, Count in Westphalia (      -1029) 10
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Beatrix of Hainaut 11

           Born: Abt 998 - <Hainaut, Belgium>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ebles I Count of Rheims & Roucy, Archbishop of Rheims (Abt 0980-1033) 12 13
         Spouse: Manasses Calva Asina de Rameru (Abt 1010-1057) 1





Roger I de Vignory and Mathilde




Husband Roger I de Vignory 14

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1059
         Buried: 


         Father: Guy I de Vignory (      -Abt 1040) 15
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Alice de Bar-sur-Aube (      -      ) 16



Wife Mathilde 16

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Guy II "le Rouge" de Vignory 17

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hildegarde de Bar-sur-Aube (      -      ) 18




Research Notes: Husband - Roger I de Vignory

Third husband of Alice de Bar-sur-Aube 14


Research Notes: Wife - Mathilde

First wife of Roger I de Vignory. 16


William d'Alençon and Matilda de Condé




Husband William d'Alençon

            AKA: William d'Alençon
           Born: Abt 950 - Alençon, (Orne), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1048 - Domfront, (Orne), Normandy, France
         Buried:  - Notre-Dame-sur-l'Eau, Domfront, (Orne), France


         Father: Yves au Front Cruel d'Alençon (Abt 0922-0997) 19
         Mother: Godehilde du Maine (Abt 0930-      ) 20


       Marriage: Abt 9 Sep 974 - Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne, France



Wife Matilda de Condé 21

           Born: Abt 950 - Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1033
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Warin de Mortaigne 22

           Born: Abt 975 - Mortagne-au-Perche, (Orne), Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1026
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Melisende de Châteaudun (Abt 0990-      ) 23
           Marr: Abt 999 - Mortagne, Orne, France





Hugh de Gournay and Matilda




Husband Hugh de Gournay 1

           Born: Abt 1205 - Norfolk, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Matilda 1

           Born: Abt 1209 - Norfolk, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Julian de Gournay 1

           Born: 1231 - <Mapledurham>, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1295 - Mapledurham, Oxfordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William Bardolf (Abt 1231-1289) 1





Robert I "the Good" Count of Artois and Matilda of Brabant




Husband Robert I "the Good" Count of Artois 24

           Born: 1216
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Feb 1250
         Buried: 


         Father: Louis VIII King of France (1187-1226) 25 26
         Mother: Blanche of Castile (1188-1252) 27 28


       Marriage: 14 Jun 1237



Wife Matilda of Brabant 29 30

           Born: 1224
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Sep 1288
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry II Duke of Brabant (1207-1248) 31
         Mother: Marie of Hohenstaufen (1201-1235) 32 33




Children
1 F Blanche of Artois 34

            AKA: Blanche de Navarre
           Born: Between 1245 and 1250
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 May 1302 - Paris, (Île-de-France), France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Henry III Count of Champagne and Brie, King of Navarre (      -1274) 35
           Marr: 1259
         Spouse: Edmund "Crouchback" 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester (1245-1296) 36
           Marr: 29 Oct 1276 - Paris, (Île-de-France), France



2 M Robert II of Artois, Count of Artois

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Robert I "the Good" Count of Artois

First husband of Matilda of Brabant.

Wikipedia (Robert I of Artois):

Robert I "the Good" (1216 - February 8 , 1250 ) was Count of Artois . He was the third (and second surviving) son of King Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile .
On June 14 , 1237 , Robert married Matilda of Brabant, daughter of Henry II, Duke of Brabant , and they had two children:
Blanche of Artois (1248 -1302 )
Robert II of Artois (1250 -1302), Count of Artois
He was killed in Egypt during the Seventh Crusade of his brother Louis IX of France , while leading a reckless attack on Al Mansurah . He and the Templars accompanying the expedition charged into the town and became trapped in the narrow streets. According to Jean de Joinville , he defended himself for some time in a house there, but was at last overpowered and killed. 24



Birth Notes: Wife - Matilda of Brabant

Wikipedia (Marie of Hohenstaufen) has b. 1224. Ancestral Roots has b. 1196.


Research Notes: Wife - Matilda of Brabant

Wikipedia (Henry II, Duke of Brabant) 29 30


Research Notes: Child - Blanche of Artois

Widow of Henry I of Navarre. Second wife of Henry III. Second wife of Edmund "Crouchback."

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 45-30

Wikipedia 34


William de Stanleigh "The Elder", Lord of Stanley, Storeton & Hooton and Matilda




Husband William de Stanleigh "The Elder", Lord of Stanley, Storeton & Hooton 37 38 39 40 41




            AKA: Sir William [VI] De Stanley Knt. of Hooton, Cheshire, William [VI] de Stanley (II), William de Stanley Forester of Wirral Forest, William de Stanley
           Born: Abt 1337 - Wirral Forest, Cheshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1398
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Stanleigh Lord of Stanleigh and Storeton (1311-1360) 42 43 44
         Mother: Cecily Congleton (Abt 1315-Bef 1353)


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Margery de Hooton (1342-Abt 1430) 41 45 46 47 - 1376 - Lathom, Ormskirk, Lancashire, England

   Other Spouse: Agnes Beckington (      -      ) 48

Events

• Charter: Grant by William Wilbraham of Thyngwall for lands, etc., 1337, Cheshire, England.

• Charter: Powers of attorney from the same to John Dogynton to deliver seisin to the same., 1338.

• Granted manor of Stanley: from his father, 1362.




Wife Matilda

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Birth Notes: Husband - William de Stanleigh "The Elder", Lord of Stanley, Storeton & Hooton

Various sources have differing birth, marriage & death dates.
- Birth dates: abt 1328, 1337, abt 1355, abt 1348, abt 1360, abt 1368, abt 1370, abt 1375
- Marriage: 1386, abt 1379
- Death: 1428, bef 1428, 2 Feb 1427 or 1428

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 has b. abt 1345.

http://stanleyroots.co.uk has b. 1337, d.1398


Death Notes: Husband - William de Stanleigh "The Elder", Lord of Stanley, Storeton & Hooton

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 has d. 2 Feb 1427 or 1428.

http://stanleyroots.co.uk has b. 1337, d.1398


Research Notes: Husband - William de Stanleigh "The Elder", Lord of Stanley, Storeton & Hooton

Note: The present researcher has been unable as yet to find an authoritative source that would definitively answer questions about William de Stanleigh's wives, children, birth/death dates, parentage of Jonet Stanley, etc. The reader is advised not to rely on this site as its sole source.

For example, Website http://cybergata.com/roots/8444.htm has Margery de Hooton (Margaret de Houghton) married to Sir William de Stanley (1368-1428). In my opinion, that William is her son, and Margery de Hooton was married to an elder William de Stanley (c. 1337-1398). kjf 27 Jun 2013.

That same source (http://cybergata.com/roots/484.htm) does, however, contain the following useful information:
~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, (Stanley), 247. calls him Forester of Wirral Forest, which he successfully claimed in 1361/2. In 1355 he was accused of participating in an attack on the Abbey of Burton-upon-Trent.

----------
Son and heir, lord of Stanley, Storeton, and of Hooton in right of his wife.

Sources that list his children usually include these but not Jonet (Sioned) Stanley:
- Sir William b. 1405 (or abt 1386?)
- Agnes b. 1388
- Edmund b. 1390
- John b. 1392
Possibly also Ellen

http://stanleyroots.co.uk/thenorthwest.htm "The Stanleys of Storeton in Chester":

William de Stanleigh 'The Elder' (1337-1398) probably built Storeton Hall near Bebington (still standing, SJ3084) as his main residence, around 1360, after the death of his father.

In 1376 William de Stanleigh complained to King Edward III about the deforestation of the Wirral, which was blamed on the Black Prince (the late son of the king). The king agreed that William (as hereditary forester) should continue to receive the profits from the forest, and in 1397 he was granted 20 marks a year by the crown in compensation (Patent Rolls). He seems to have been on military service in Ireland shortly before his death (Patent Rolls). When William 'the Elder' died in 1398, it seems his second wife and widow Matilda was not maintained by her step-son Sir William de Stanley, so in 1400 Henry IV granted Matilda "who has come to such poverty that she cannot keep her estate" 2d a day for life.

------------

From The Baronetage of England, vol. 2, p. 206 :
"William, his son, lord of Stanley, &c. living 26 Edw. III, married Alicia, daughter of Hugh Massey, de Timperly, sister to Sir Hamond Massey, Knt. and had issue by her William de Stanley, lord of Stanley, &c. living 10 Rich. II. Henry, Matildes, and John. Which last William, the son and heir, married Margaret, daughter and sole heir of William de Hooton, lord of Hooton, in Wirehall in Cheshire, where that family have since continued to this day."

-------

From The History of the House of Stanley from the Conquest to the Death of the Right Honourable Edward, Late Earl of Derby, in 1776, pp. 14-15 :
"Sir William, the elder brother of John, by Mary Massey, was the eighth heir of this house, and succeeded his father Sir William in honour and estate. The tenth of Richard II, he married Margery the only daughter of William de Hooton, of Hooton, in the hundred of Wirral, and county of Chester; and by her had issue a son, named William, who is styled Lord of Stanley, Stourton, and Hooton, and grand ranger in chief of Wirral, in the county of Chester." 37 38 39 40 41



Matilda of Scotland




Husband

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Matilda of Scotland

            AKA: Edith of Scotland, Maud of Scotland
           Born: 1079 - Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 May 1118 - Westminster Palace, London, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots (Abt 1031-1093) 49 50
         Mother: Saint Margaret of Scotland (1045-1093) 51 52



   Other Spouse: Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England (Between 1068/1069-1135) 53 54 - 11 Nov 1100 - Westminster Abbey, London, Midlesex, England


Children

Birth Notes: Wife - Matilda of Scotland

Place name may be Dermfermline.


Research Notes: Wife - Matilda of Scotland

Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 1-22

From Wikipedia - Matilda of Scotland :

Matilda of Scotland[1] (born Edith; c. 1080 - 1 May 1118) was the first wife and queen consort of Henry I .

Matilda was born around 1080 in Dunfermline , the daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret . She was christened Edith, and Robert Curthose stood as godfather at her christening - the English queen Matilda of Flanders was also present at the font and may have been her godmother.
When she was about six years old, Matilda (or Edith as she was then probably still called) and her sister Mary were sent to Romsey , where their aunt Cristina was abbess. During her stay at Romsey and Wilton , The Scottish princess was much sought-after as a bride; she turned down proposals from both William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey , and Alan Rufus , Lord of Richmond. Hermann of Tournai even claims that William II Rufus considered marrying her. She was out of the monastery by 1093, when Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, wrote to the Bishop of Salisbury ordering that the daughter of the king of Scotland be returned to the monastery that she had left.

After the death of William II Rufus in August 1100, his brother Henry quickly seized the royal treasury and the royal crown. His next task was to marry, and Henry's choice fell on Matilda. Because Matilda had spent most of her life in a nunnery, there was some controversy over whether or not she had been veiled as a nun and would thus be ineligible for marriage. Henry sought permission for the marriage from Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury , who returned to England in September 1100 after a long exile. Professing himself unwilling to decide so weighty a matter on his own, Anselm called a council of bishops in order to determine the legality of the proposed marriage. Matilda testified to the archbishop and the assembled bishops of the realm that she had never taken holy vows. She insisted that her parents had sent her and her sister to England for educational purposes, and that her aunt Cristina had veiled her only to protect her "from the lust of the Normans ." Matilda claimed she had pulled the veil off and stamped on it, and her aunt beat and scolded her most horribly for this. The council concluded that Matilda had never been a nun, nor had her parents intended that she become one, and gave their permission for the marriage.
Matilda and Henry seem to have known one another for some time before their marriage - William of Malmesbury states that Henry had "long been attached" to her, and Orderic Vitalis says that Henry had "long adored" Edith's character. Through her mother she was descended from Edmund Ironside and thus Alfred the Great and the old line of the kings of Wessex; this was very important as Henry wanted to help make himself more popular with the English people and Matilda represented the old English dynasty. In their children the Norman and Anglo-Saxon dynasties would be united. Another benefit of the marriage was that England and Scotland became politically closer; three of her brothers served as kings of Scotland and were unusually friendly to England during this period.

After Matilda and Henry were married on 11 November 1100 at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury , she was crowned as "Matilda", a fashionable Norman name. She gave birth to a daughter, Matilda, in February 1102, and a son, William, in November 1103. As queen, she maintained her court primarily at Westminster , but accompanied her husband in his travels all across England, and, circa 1106-1107, probably visited Normandy with him. She also served in a vice-regal capacity when Henry was away from court. Her court was filled with musicians and poets; she commissioned a monk, probably Thurgot , to write a biography of her mother, Saint Margaret . She was an active queen, and like her mother was renowned for her devotion to religion and the poor. William of Malmesbury describes her as attending church barefoot at Lent , and washing the feet and kissing the hands of the sick. She also administered extensive dower properties and was known as a patron of the arts, especially music.

After Matilda died on 1 May 1118 at Westminster Palace , she was buried at Westminster Abbey . The death of her only son and Henry's failure to produce a legitimate son from his second marriage led to the succession crisis of The Anarchy .


Geoffrey V Plantagenet Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Empress Matilda Countess of Anjou




Husband Geoffrey V Plantagenet Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy 55 56 57

            AKA: Geoffrey V Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Geoffrey 'the Fair' Plantagenet Count of Anjou
           Born: 24 Aug 1113 - Anjou, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Sep 1151
         Buried:  - Le Mans, (Sarthe), Maine, (France)


         Father: Fulk V "the Young" Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem (1092-1144) 58 59 60
         Mother: Erembourg Countess of Maine (      -1126) 61 62


       Marriage: 22 May 1128 - Le Mans, (Sarthe), Maine, (France)

   Other Spouse: < > (      -      )

Events

• Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine: 1129-1151.

• Duke of Normandy: 1144-1151.




Wife Empress Matilda Countess of Anjou 63 64

            AKA: Mathilda of England, Empress Maud Countess of Anjou, Maude of England
           Born: Abt 7 Feb 1102
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Sep 1167
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England (Between 1068/1069-1135) 53 54
         Mother: Matilda of Scotland (1079-1118)



   Other Spouse: Henry V Holy Roman Emperor (1086-1125) - 7 Jan 1114 - Worms, (Rhine-Palatinate, Germany)


Children
1 M Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England

            AKA: King Henry II of England
           Born: 5 Mar 1132 - Le Mans, (Sarthe), Maine, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Jul 1189
         Buried:  - Fontévrault Abbey, (Fontevraud-l'Abbaye), (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France
         Spouse: Eleanor of Aquitaine (Abt 1124-1204)
           Marr: 18 May 1152 - Bordeaux, (Gironde), Aquitaine, France
         Spouse: Ida de Tosny (      -      ) 65 66




Research Notes: Husband - Geoffrey V Plantagenet Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy

Second husband of Matilda.

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871913 :
'The Fair' Count of Anjou (1129-1151); founder of the Plantagenet dynasty. Geoffey's nickname derived from his physical appearance - he was said to be tall, handsome, graceful and strong. He was also known as Geoffrey Plantagenet, appearantly from the sprig of broom (genet) he wore in his hat. In 1127, aged 14, he was married to Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England and the widow of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. They disliked each other, but maintained an uneasy political alliance and produces three sons, Henry (the future Henry II of England), Geoffrey and William. An illegitimate son, Hamelin became the Duke of Salisbury. Geoffrey spent much of his youth imposing order on his unruly vassals, including his own brother Helias II, Count of Maine, who rebelled against him in 1131; Geoffrey captured Helias and held him prisoner in Tours, Helias died soon after his release from a disease contracted in prison. In 1135 Henry I of England died, and Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois (RIN # 1643) seized the English throne, together with Normandy, traditionally coveted by the counts of Anjou. Geoffrey laid claim to the duchy in his wife's right. Between 1135-1138 Geoffrey launched four expeditions into Normandy, none of which achieved great success. The expedition in 1137 was striken by dysentery, and forced to return swiftly to Anjou. In 1139 Matilda invaded England, seeking to press her claim to the English throne, and Geoffrey remained in Anjou to continue the war against Normandy. The Morman barons opposed Geoffrey, not through loyalty to Stephen, who had only visited Normandy once, but out of hatred of their traditional enemy, Anjou. However, Norman morale was weakened when Matilda captured Stephen at Lincoln in 1141, and many castles surrendered to Geoffrey, leaving him in control of most of the lands between Bayeux and the Seine. In 1142 he took the Avranchin and Mortain, and in 1143 moved east of the Seine, overunning the Cotentin. He was invested as Duke of Normandy in 144 after the fall of Rouen, and Arques, the last castle opposing him, capitulated in 1145, leaving him unchallenged master of Normandy. After the conquest of Normandy, Geoffrey joined Louis VII of France in the abortive Second Crusade (1147-9), returning in 1149. In 1150 he ceded Normandy to his son Henry, who also inhereted the family claim to the English throne. Geoffrey died in 1151, and was buried in Le Mans Cathedral; founder of a great dynasty of kings through his son, Henry II of England. For more on the Second Crusade, see RIN # 1618.
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 38-63,80,102,140,154

----

From Wikipedia - Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou :

Geoffrey (24 August 1113 - 7 September 1151), called the Handsome (French : le Bel) and Plantagenet, was the Count of Anjou , Touraine , and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda , daughter and heiress of Henry I of England , Geoffrey had a son, Henry Curtmantle , who succeeded to the English throne and founded the Plantagenet dynasty to which Geoffrey gave his nickname.

Biography
Geoffrey was the elder son of Fulk V of Anjou and Eremburga of La Flèche , heiress of Elias I of Maine . Geoffrey received his nickname for the yellow sprig of broom blossom (genêt is the French name for the genista, or broom shrub) he wore in his hat as a badge. King Henry I of England, having heard good reports on Geoffrey's talents and prowess, sent his royal legates to Anjou to negotiate a marriage between Geoffrey and his own daughter, Matilda. Consent was obtained from both parties, and on 10 June 1128 the fifteen-year-old Geoffrey was knighted in Rouen by King Henry in preparation for the wedding. Interestingly, there was no opposition to the marriage from the Church, despite the fact that Geoffrey's sister was the widow of Matilda's brother (only son of King Henry) which fact had been used to annul the marriage of another of Geoffrey's sisters to the Norman pretender William Clito .

On 17 June 1128 Geoffrey married Empress Matilda, the daughter and heiress of King Henry I of England by his first wife Edith of Scotland , and widow of Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor . The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

The year after the marriage Geoffrey's father left for Jerusalem (where he was to become king ), leaving Geoffrey behind as count of Anjou. John of Marmoutier describes Geoffrey as handsome, red-headed, jovial, and a great warrior; however, Ralph of Diceto alleges that his charm concealed his cold and selfish character.

When King Henry I died in 1135, Matilda at once entered Normandy to claim her inheritance. The border districts submitted to her, but England chose her cousin Stephen of Blois for its king, and Normandy soon followed suit. The following year, Geoffrey gave Ambrieres, Gorron, and Chatilon-sur-Colmont to Juhel de Mayenne, on condition that he help obtain the inheritance of Geoffrey's wife. In 1139 Matilda landed in England with 140 knights, where she was besieged at Arundel Castle by King Stephen. In the "Anarchy" which ensued, Stephen was captured at Lincoln in February, 1141, and imprisoned at Bristol. A legatine council of the English church held at Winchester in April 1141 declared Stephen deposed and proclaimed Matilda "Lady of the English". Stephen was subsequently released from prison and had himself recrowned on the anniversary of his first coronation.

During 1142 and 1143, Geoffrey secured all of Normandy west and south of the Seine, and, on 14 January 1144, he crossed the Seine and entered Rouen. He assumed the title of Duke of Normandy in the summer of 1144. In 1144, he founded an Augustine priory at Chateau-l'Ermitage in Anjou. Geoffrey held the duchy until 1149, when he and Matilda conjointly ceded it to their son, Henry, which cession was formally ratified by King Louis VII of France the following year.

Geoffrey also put down three baronial rebellions in Anjou, in 1129, 1135, and 1145-1151. He was often at odds with his younger brother, Elias , whom he had imprisoned until 1151. The threat of rebellion slowed his progress in Normandy, and is one reason he could not intervene in England. In 1153, the Treaty of Westminster allowed Stephen should remain King of England for life and that Henry, the son of Geoffrey and Matilda should succeed him.

Geoffrey died suddenly on September 7, 1151. According to John of Marmoutier, Geoffrey was returning from a royal council when he was stricken with fever. He arrived at Château-du-Loir , collapsed on a couch, made bequests of gifts and charities, and died. He was buried at St. Julien's Cathedral in Le Mans France. Geoffrey and Matilda's children were:
Henry II of England (1133-1189)
Geoffrey, Count of Nantes (1 June 1134 Rouen - 26 July 1158 Nantes ) died unmarried and was buried in Nantes
William X, Count of Poitou (1136-1164) died unmarried

Geoffrey also had illegitimate children by an unknown mistress (or mistresses): Hamelin ; Emme, who married Dafydd Ab Owain Gwynedd , Prince of North Wales ; and Mary, who became a nun and Abbess of Shaftesbury and who may be the poetess Marie de France . Adelaide of Angers is sometimes sourced as being the mother of Hamelin.

The first reference to Norman heraldry was in 1128, when Henry I of England knighted his son-in-law Geoffrey and granted him a badge of gold lions (or leopards ) on a blue background. (A gold lion may already have been Henry's own badge.) Henry II used two gold lions and two lions on a red background are still part of the arms of Normandy. Henry's son, Richard I , added a third lion to distinguish the arms of England. 55 56 57


Birth Notes: Wife - Empress Matilda Countess of Anjou

Ancestral Roots Line 1-23 has b. abt. 1102-1104; Line 118-25 has b. 1104.
Some other source has b. Feb 1101


Research Notes: Wife - Empress Matilda Countess of Anjou

From Wikipedia - Empress Matilda :

Empress Matilda, also known as Matilda of England or Maude (c. 7 February 1102 - 10 September 1167) was the daughter and heir of King Henry I of England . Matilda and her younger brother, William Adelin , were the only legitimate children of King Henry. Her brother died young in the White ship disaster , leaving Matilda as the last heir from the paternal line of her grandfather William the Conqueror .

As a child, Matilda was betrothed and later married to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor . From her marriage to Henry, she acquired the title Empress. The couple had no known children. When widowed, she was married to the much younger Geoffrey of Anjou , by whom she became the mother of three sons, the eldest of whom became King Henry II of England .

Matilda was the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England . However the length of her effective rule was quite brief - a few months in 1141 - and she was never crowned and failed to consolidate her rule (legally and politically). Because of this she is normally excluded from lists of English monarchs, and her rival (and cousin) Stephen of Blois is routinely listed as monarch for the period 1135-1154. Their warring rivalry for the throne led to years of unrest and civil war in England that have been called The Anarchy . She did secure her inheritance of the Duchy of Normandy - through the military feats of her husband Geoffrey - and she campaigned unstintingly for her oldest son's inheritance, living to see him ascend the throne in 1154.

(In Latin texts Matilda was sometimes called Maude . This is a modernised spelling of the Norman-French form of her name, Mahaut.)

Early life
Matilda was the firstborn of two children to Henry I of England and his wife Matilda of Scotland (also known as Edith). Her maternal grandparents were Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland . Margaret was daughter of Edward the Exile and granddaughter of Edmund II of England . (Most historians believe Matilda was born at Winchester , but one, John Fletcher (1990), argues for the possibility of the royal palace at Sutton Courtenay in Oxfordshire .)

First marriage: Holy Roman Empress
When she was seven years old, Matilda was betrothed to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor ; at nine, she was sent to the Holy Roman Empire (Germany) to begin training for the life of Empress consort . The royal couple were married at Worms on January 7, 1114, and Matilda accompanied her husband on tours to Rome and Tuscany . After time, the young wife of the Emperor acted as regent , mainly in Italy, in his absence[1]. Emperor Henry died in 1125. The imperial couple had no surviving offspring, but Herman of Tournai states that Matilda bore a son who lived only a short while.

Despite being popularly known by the title "Empress " from her first marriage, Matilda's right to the title was dubious. She was never crowned Holy Roman Empress by a legitimate Pope - which ceremony was normally required to achieve the title; indeed, in later years she encouraged chroniclers to believe she had been crowned by the Pope. Contemporary, she was called German Queen by her husband's bishops, while her formal title was recorded as "Queen of the Romans". Still, "Empress" was arguably an appropriate courtesy title for the wife of an Emperor who had been crowned by the Pope.

In 1120 her brother William Adelin was drowned in the disastrous wreck of the White Ship , which left Matilda as the only legitimate child of her father King Henry . Like Matilda, her cousin Stephen of Blois was a grandchild of William (the Conqueror) of Normandy ; but her paternal line made her senior in right of succession to his maternal line.

Second marriage: Countess of Anjou
Matilda returned to England a young widow, age 23, and dowager "Empress" - a status of considerable pride to her. There Henry named her his heir to both the English throne and his Duchy of Normandy . Henry saw to it that the Anglo-Norman barons (including Stephen of Blois ) were sworn (several times) to accept Matilda as ruler if Henry died without a male heir.

Henry then arranged a second marriage for Matilda; as he aimed to achieve peace between the fractious barons of Normandy and Anjou. On 17 June 1128, Matilda, aged 26, was married to Geoffrey of Anjou , aged 15, who also was Count of Maine and heir apparent to (his father) the Count of Anjou - which title he soon acquired, and by which Matilda became Countess of Anjou. It was a title she rarely used. Geoffrey called himself "Plantagenet " from the broom flower (planta genista) he adopted as his personal emblem. So Plantagenet became the dynastic name of that powerful line of English kings who descended from Matilda and Geoffrey.

Matilda's marriage with Geoffrey was troubled; there were frequent long separations, but they had three sons and she survived him. The eldest son, Henry , was born on 5 March 1133. In 1134, she nearly died in childbirth, following the birth of her second son, Geoffrey, Count of Nantes . A third son, William X, Count of Poitou , was born in 1136.

When her father died in Normandy, on 1 December 1135, Matilda was with her husband, in Anjou ; and, crucially, too far away from events rapidly unfolding in England and Normandy. Stephen of Blois rushed to England upon learning of Henry's death; in London he moved quickly to grasp the crown of England from its appointed heir.

But Matilda was game to contest Stephen in both realms; she and her husband Geoffrey entered Normandy and began military campaigns to claim her inheritance. Progress was uneven at first, but she persevered; even so, it was not until 1139 that Matilda felt secure enough in Normandy to turn her attentions to invading England and fighting Stephen directly.
In Normandy, Geoffrey secured all fiefdoms west and south of the Seine by 1143; in January 1144, he crossed the Seine and took Rouen without resistance. He assumed the title Duke of Normandy , and Matilda became Duchess of Normandy. Geoffrey and Matilda held the duchy conjointly until 1149, then ceded it to their son, Henry, which event was soon ratified by King Louis VII of France .

Struggle for throne of England
On the death of her father, Henry I, in 1135, Matilda expected to succeed to the throne of England , but her cousin, Stephen of Blois , a nephew of Henry I, usurped the throne with the support of most of the barons, breaking the oath he had previously made to defend her rights. The civil war which followed was bitter and prolonged, with neither side gaining the ascendancy for long, but it was not until 1139 that Matilda could command the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm. Stephen's wife, the Countess of Boulogne who was also named Matilda , was the Empress's maternal cousin. During the war, Matilda's most loyal and capable supporter was her illegitimate half-brother, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester .

Matilda's greatest triumph came in April 1141, when her forces defeated and captured King Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln . He was made a prisoner and effectively deposed.

Her advantage lasted only a few months. When she marched on London , the city was ready to welcome her and support her coronation . She used the title of Lady of the English and planned to assume the title of queen upon coronation (the custom which was followed by her grandsons, Richard and John ).[2] However, she refused the citizens' request to have their taxes halved and, because of her own arrogance [2], she found the gates of London shut and the civil war reignited on 24 June 1141. By November, Stephen was free, having been exchanged for the captured Robert of Gloucester, and a year later, the tables were turned when Matilda was besieged at Oxford but escaped to Wallingford , supposedly by fleeing across the snow-covered land in a white cape. In 1141 she had escaped Devizes in a similarly clever manner, by disguising herself as a corpse and being carried out for burial. In 1148, Matilda and Henry returned to Normandy , following the death of Robert of Gloucester, and the reconquest of that county by her husband. Upon their arrival, Geoffrey turned Normandy over to his son, and retired to his own county of Anjou .

Later life
Matilda's first son, Henry , was showing signs of becoming a successful leader. Although the civil war had been decided in Stephen's favour, his reign was troubled. In 1153, the death of his son Eustace, combined with the arrival of a military expedition led by Henry, led him to acknowledge the latter as his heir by the Treaty of Wallingford .

Matilda retired to Rouen in Normandy during her last years, where she maintained her own court and presided over the government of the duchy in the absence of Henry. She intervened in the quarrels between her eldest son Henry and her second son Geoffrey, but peace between the brothers was brief. Geoffrey rebelled against Henry twice before his sudden death in 1158. Relations between Henry and his youngest brother, William X, Count of Poitou , were more cordial, and William was given vast estates in England. Archbishop Thomas Becket refused to allow William to marry the Countess of Surrey and the young man fled to Matilda's court at Rouen. William, who was his mother's favourite child, died there in January 1164, reportedly of disappointment and sorrow. She attempted to mediate in the quarrel between her son Henry and Becket, but was unsuccessful.

Although she gave up hope of being crowned in 1141, her name always preceded that of her son Henry, even after he became king. Matilda died at Notre Dame du Pré near Rouen and was buried in the Abbey church of Bec-Hellouin, Normandy. Her body was transferred to the Rouen Cathedral in 1847; her epitaph reads: "Great by Birth, Greater by Marriage, Greatest in her Offspring: Here lies Matilda, the daughter, wife, and mother of Henry." 63 64


Notes: Marriage

Marriage date may have been 3 April 1127 (Ancestral Roots Line 1-23). Line 118-25 (Geoffrey V) has m. 22 May 1127.


Research Notes: Child - Henry II "Curtmantel" King of England

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 1-24


Stephen of Blois, King of England and Matilda of Boulogne




Husband Stephen of Blois, King of England 67 68

            AKA: Stephen of England
           Born: Abt 1096 - Blois, (Loire-et-Cher), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Oct 1154 - Dover Priory, Dover, Kent, England
         Buried:  - Faversham Abbey, Kent, England


         Father: Stephen of Blois, Count of Blois (Abt 1045-1102) 69 70
         Mother: Adela of Normandy (Between 1062/1067-Abt 1137) 71 72


       Marriage: Abt 1119

Events

• Count of Mortain: 1115-1154.

• King of England: 1135-1154.




Wife Matilda of Boulogne 73 74

            AKA: Matilda I of Boulogne, Maud of Boulogne
           Born: Abt 1105 - Boulogne-sur-Mer [Boulogne], (Pas-de-Calais, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 3 Jul 1151 - Hedingham Castle, Essex, England
         Buried:  - Faversham Abbey, Kent, England


         Father: Eustace III Count of Boulogne and Lens (      -After 1125) 75 76
         Mother: Mary of Scotland (      -1118) 77




Children
1 F Marie of Blois, Countess of Boulogne 78

            AKA: Mary of Blois
           Born: 1136
     Christened: 
           Died: 1182
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Matthew of Alsace, Count of Boulogne (      -      ) 79




Research Notes: Husband - Stephen of Blois, King of England

From Wikipedia - Stephen of England :

Stephen often known as Stephen of Blois (c. 1096 - 25 October 1154) was a grandson of William the Conqueror . He was the last Norman King of England , from 1135 to his death, and also the Count of Boulogne jure uxoris . His reign was marked by civil war with his rival the Empress Matilda and general chaos, known as The Anarchy . He was succeeded by Matilda's son, Henry II , the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet kings.

Early life
Stephen was born at Blois in France, son of Stephen , Count of Blois , and Adela of England, (daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders ). One of ten children, his surviving brothers were Count Theobald II of Champagne , Henry of Blois , Bishop of Winchester , and William of Sully . He also had four sisters, including Eléonore of Blois .

Stephen was sent to be raised at the English court of his uncle, King Henry I , in 1106. He became Count of Mortain in about 1115, and married Matilda , daughter of the Count of Boulogne , in about 1125, who became Countess of Boulogne. Their marriage was a happy one and his wife was an important supporter during the struggle for the English crown. Stephen became joint ruler of Boulogne in 1128.

Reign

King of England
There were several principal contenders for the succession to Henry I . The least popular was the Empress Matilda , Henry I's only legitimate surviving child, not simply because she was a woman, but because her husband Geoffrey, Count of Anjou was an enemy of the Normans . The other contenders were Robert, Earl of Gloucester , illegitimate son of Henry I, Stephen, and Stephen's older brother, Theobald, Count of Blois . However, Theobald did not want the kingdom, at least not enough to fight for it.[1] Before his death in 1135, Henry I named his daughter Matilda his heir and made the barons of England swear allegiance to her. Stephen was the first baron to do so. However, upon King Henry's death, Stephen claimed the throne, saying Henry had changed his mind on his deathbed and named Stephen as his heir. Once crowned, Stephen gained the support of the majority of the barons as well as Pope Innocent II and the first few years of his reign were peaceful, notwithstanding insurgences by the Welsh, King David I of Scotland , and Baldwin de Redvers.

The Anarchy: War with Matilda
By 1139, Stephen had lost much support and the country sank into a civil war , commonly called The Anarchy . Stephen faced the forces of Empress Matilda at several locations including the Battle of Beverston Castle and the Battle of Lincoln . Bad omens haunted him before the Battle of Lincoln where Stephen faced Matilda's illegitimate brother Robert and Ranulph, Earl of Chester . According to chroniclers, Stephen fought bravely but was captured by a knight named William de Cahaignes (a relative of Ranulph, ancestor of the Keynes family ). Stephen was defeated and brought before his cousin Matilda. He was imprisoned at Bristol .

Stephen's wife rallied support amongst the people from London and the barons. Matilda was, in turn, forced out of London. With the capture of her most able lieutenant, her half-brother the Earl of Gloucester, she was obliged to trade Stephen for him, and Stephen was restored to the throne in November the same year.

In December 1142, the Empress was besieged at Oxford , but managed to escape, dressed in white, across the snow to Wallingford Castle , held by her supporter Brien FitzCount .

In 1147, Empress Matilda's teenage son, the future King Henry II of England , decided to assist in the war effort by raising a small army of mercenaries and invading England. Rumours of this army's size terrified Stephen's retainers, although in truth the force was very small. Having been defeated twice in battle, and with no money to pay his mercenaries, young Henry appealed to his uncle Robert for aid but was turned away. Desperately, and in secret, the boy asked Stephen for help. According to the Gesta Stephani , "On receiving the message, the king...hearkened to the young man..." and bestowed upon him money and other support.

Reconciliation and death
Stephen maintained his precarious hold on the throne for the remainder of his lifetime. However, after a military standoff at Wallingford with Henry, and following the death of his son and heir, Eustace , in 1153, he was persuaded to reach a compromise with Matilda (known as the Treaty of Wallingford or Winchester), whereby Stephen's son William of Blois would be passed over for the English throne, and instead Matilda's son Henry would succeed Stephen.

Stephen died in Dover , at Dover Priory , and was buried in Faversham Abbey , which he had founded with Countess Matilda in 1148.

Besides Eustace, Stephen and Queen Matilda had two other sons, Baldwin (d. before 1135), and William of Blois (Count of Mortain and Boulogne, and Earl of Surrey or Warenne). They also had two daughters, Matilda and Marie of Boulogne . In addition to these children, Stephen fathered at least three illegitimate children , one of whom, Gervase, became Abbot of Westminster .

English royal descendants
Philippa of Hainault , the wife of Edward III , was a descendant of Stephen, and he was thus ancestor of all subsequent kings of England.[3] 67 68


Death Notes: Wife - Matilda of Boulogne

Wikipedia has d. 3 May 1152.


Research Notes: Wife - Matilda of Boulogne

From Wikipedia - Matilda of Boulogne :

Matilda I or Maud (1105? - 3 May, 1152), was suo jure Countess of Boulogne . She was also wife of King Stephen of England and Queen of England .

History
She was born in Boulogne , France , the daughter of Eustace III, Count of Boulogne and his wife Mary of Scotland, daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland . Matilda was first cousin of her husband's rival, Empress Matilda . Through her maternal grandmother, Matilda was descended from the pre-Conquest English kings.

In 1125, Matilda married Stephen of Blois , Count of Mortain, who possessed a large honour in England. When Matilda's father abdicated and retired to a monastery the same year, this was joined with Boulogne and the similarly large English honour Matilda inherited. On Eustace III's death, Matilda and her husband became joint rulers of Boulogne. Two children, a son and a daughter, were born to the Countess and Count of Boulogne during the reign of King Henry I , who had granted Stephen and Matilda a residence in London. [1] The son was named Baldwin, after Matilda's uncle, King Baldwin I of Jerusalem . [2] The daughter was named Matilda. Baldwin died in early childhood and the young Matilda is thought to have died during childhood too, although some scholars state that she lived long enough to be espoused to the count of Milan. [3]

On the death of Henry I of England in 1135, Stephen rushed to England, taking advantage of Boulogne's control of the closest seaports, and was crowned king, beating his rival, the Empress Matilda . Matilda was heavily pregnant at that time and crossed the Channel after gaving birth to a son, Eustace , who would one day succeed her as Count of Boulogne. Matilda was crowned queen at Easter - March 22, 1136. [4]

In the civil war that followed, known as the Anarchy , Matilda proved to be her husband's strongest supporter. After he was captured at the Battle of Lincoln she rallied the king's partisans, and raised an army with the help of William of Ypres . Empress Matilda was besieging Stephen's brother Henry of Blois , but she, in turn, besieged the Empress, driving her away and capturing the Empress's brother, Robert of Gloucester .

Around 1125, her father died and she succeeded as Countess of Boulogne. She ruled this area jointly with her husband until 1150, when she reigned alone until 1151, when the County was given to her eldest son Eustace, then her surviving son William inherited it, and then her daughter Marie.

Matilda died of a fever at Hedingham Castle , Essex , England and is buried at Faversham Abbey , which was founded by her and her husband. [5]

Issue
Stephen and Matilda had three sons:
Eustace IV, Count of Boulogne
Baldwin of Boulogne (d. before 1135)
William of Blois , Count of Mortain and Boulogne and Earl of Surrey
They also had two daughters:
Matilda of Boulogne
Marie of Boulogne 73 74


Research Notes: Child - Marie of Blois, Countess of Boulogne

Countess of Boulogne in her own right. 78


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63 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-23, 118-25 (Geoffrey V).

64 Wikipedia.org, Empress Matilda.

65 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 69-28 (Maud Marshal).

66 Wikipedia.org, Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk.

67 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-25, 165-26 (Matthew of Alsace), 158-24 (Matilda of Boulogne).

68 Wikipedia.org, Stephen of England.

69 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-24 (Adela of Normandy).

70 Wikipedia.org, Stephen II, Count of Blois.

71 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-24.

72 Wikipedia.org, Adela of Normandy.

73 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 158-24, 165-26 (Matthew of Alsace).

74 Wikipedia.org, Matilda of Boulogne.

75 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 158-23.

76 Wikipedia.org, Eustace III, Count of Boulogne.

77 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 158-23 (Eustace III).

78 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-26.

79 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 165-26, 169-26 (Mary of Blois), 155-26 (Henry I).


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