The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy and Luitgarde of Vermandois




Husband William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy 1 2 3

            AKA: Guillaume I "Longue Épée" Duke of Normandy, William I "Longsword"
           Born: Abt 892 - <Rouen, (Seine-Maritime), Normandy, Neustria, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Dec 942 - Normandy, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Hrólf "Ganger" Rognvaldsson Princeps Nortmannorum (Between 0846/0870-Abt 0929) 1 4 5 6 7
         Mother: Poppa de Bayeux (Abt 0872-      ) 1 8 9


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Sprote de Bretagne à la Danoise (Abt 0911-Abt 0972) 1 2 10

Events

• Succeeded: to County of Normandy, Abt 927.

• Bretons rebelled: Abt 930.




Wife Luitgarde of Vermandois

           Born: Abt 920
     Christened: 
           Died: After 978
         Buried: 


         Father: Herbert II Count of Vermandois, Soissons and Troyes (Between 0880/0890-0943) 11 12 13 14
         Mother: Liegarde of France (Abt 0886-After 0931) 1 15




Children

Birth Notes: Husband - William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy

May have been born in Bayeux or Rouen.

From http://cybergata.com/roots/443.htm :
Web Reference: Guilliaume "Longue Épée" by Stewat Baldwin. 174
William's place of birth was probably not on the European mainland, but possibly in Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia, or one of the islands held by Vikings.


Death Notes: Husband - William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy

Killed in treacherous ambush by servants of Theobald of Blois and Arnulf of Flanders


Research Notes: Husband - William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy

When the Bretons rebelled about 930, he subdued them, taking Brittany, the Channel Islands, the Contentin, and the Averanchin.

From Wikipedia - William I, Duke of Normandy :

William I Longsword (French : Guillaume Longue-Épée, Latin : Willermus Longa Spata, Scandinavian : Vilhjálmr Langaspjót; 893 - 17 December 942) was the second Duke of Normandy from his father's death until his own assassination. The title dux (duke) was not in use at the time and has been applied to early Norman rulers retroactively; William actually used the title comes (count).

Little is known about his early years. He was born in Bayeux or Rouen to Rollo and his wife Poppa. All that is known of Poppa is that she was a Christian, and the daughter to Berengar of Rennes , the previous lord of Brittania Nova , which eventually became western Normandy. According to the William's planctus , he was baptised a Christian.

William succeeded Rollo sometime around 927. It appears that he faced a rebellion early in his reign, from Normans who felt he had become too Gallicised . Subsequent years are obscure. In 939 William became involved in a war with Arnulf I of Flanders , which soon became intertwined with the other conflicts troubling the reign of Louis IV . He was killed by followers of Arnulf while at a meeting to settle their conflict. His son Richard the Fearless , child of his first wife, Sprota, succeeded him. William also left a widow, Liègard (Liutgard), who died in 985. 1 2 3


Research Notes: Wife - Luitgarde of Vermandois

Second wife of William I "Longsword"

Source: Wikipedia - Herbert II, Count of Vermandois


Talaus King of Argos [Mythological] and Lysimache [Mythological]




Husband Talaus King of Argos [Mythological] 16

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Bias of Argos [Mythological] (      -      ) 17
         Mother: Pero [Mythological] (      -      ) 18


       Marriage: 



Wife Lysimache [Mythological] 19

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Abas [Mythological] (      -      ) 19
         Mother: Cyrene [Mythological] (      -      ) 19




Children
1 M Adrastus King of Argos [Mythological] 20

            AKA: Adrestus King of Argos
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Talaus King of Argos [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Talaus

In Greek mythology , Talaus (Ancient Greek : was the king of Argos and one of the Argonauts . He was the son of Bias and Pero . His wife was Lysimache , daughter of Abas. He was the father of Adrastus , Astynome, Eriphyle , Mecisteus , Mythidice, and Pronax .[1] 16


Research Notes: Wife - Lysimache [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Lysimache :

Lysimache, daughter of Abas and Cyrene . She married king Talaus of Argos and bore him these children: Adrastus , Parthenopaeus , Mecisteus , Hippomedon , Pronax , Aristomachus , and Eriphyle .[1] 19


Research Notes: Child - Adrastus King of Argos [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Adrastus :

Adrastus (Greek : Adrastos) or Adrestus (Ionic Greek : Adr), traditionally translated as "nonparticipant" or "uncooperative",[1] was a legendary king of Argos during the war of the Seven Against Thebes .

Mythological tradition
He was a son of Talaus and Lysimache .[2] Pausanias calls his mother Lysianassa ,[3] and Hyginus calls her Eurynome .[4][5] He was one of the three kings at Argos , along with Iphis and Amphiaraus , who was married to Adrastus's sister Eriphyle . He was married to either Amphithea , daughter of Pronax , or to Demonassa . His daughters Argea and Deipyle married Polynices and Tydeus , respectively. His other children include Aegiale , Aegialeus , and Cyanippus.

During a feud between the most powerful houses in Argos , Talaus was slain by Amphiaraus , and Adrastus being expelled from his dominions fled to Polybus, then king of Sicyon . When Polybus died with-out heirs, Adrastus succeeded him on the throne of Sicyon, and during his reign he is said to have instituted the Nemean Games .[6][7][8][3]

According to "Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece" by Edward E. Barthell, he states that Adrastus is the son of Talaus and Lysimache (daughter of Abas). He married Amphitheia, daughter of his brother Pronax, and became the father of a son, Aegialeus, and four daughters: Aegialeia, who became the wife of Diomedes (son of Tydeus); Argeia, who became the wife of Polyneices (son of Oedipus); Deipyle, who became the wife of Tydeus (son of Oeneus); and Eurydice, who became the wife of the Trojan king, Ilus (son of Tros).[9]

Seven against Thebes
Afterwards, however, Adrastus became reconciled to Amphiaraus , gave him his sister Eriphyle in marriage, and returned to his kingdom of Argos upon the swift immortal horse Arion , a gift of Heracles . During the time he reigned there it hap-pened that Tydeus of Calydon and Polynices of Thebes , both fugitives from their native countries, met at Argos near the palace of Adrastus, and came to words and from words to blows.[10] On hearing the noise, Adrastus hastened to them and separated the combatants, in whom he immediately recognised the two men that had been promised to him by an oracle as the future husbands of two of his daughters; for one bore on his shield the figure of a boar, and the other that of a lion, and the oracle was that one of his daughters was to marry a boar and the other a lion. Adras-tus therefore gave his daughter Deipyle to Tydeus, and Argeia to Polynices, and at the same time promised to lead each of these princes back to his own country. Adrastus now prepared for war against Thebes, although Amphiaraus foretold that all who should engage in it should perish, with the exception of Adrastus.[11][12]


Thus arose the celebrated war of the Seven against Thebes , in which Adrastus was joined by six other heroes, Polynices , Tydeus , Amphiaraus , Capaneus , Hippomedon , and Parthenopaeus . Instead of Tydeus and Polynices other legends mention Eteoclos and Mecisteus . This war ended as unfortunately as Amphiaraus had predicted, and Adrastus alone was saved by the swiftness of his horse Arion.[13][14][15]


After the battle, Creon , king of Thebes, ordered that none of the fallen enemies were to be given funeral rites. Against his order, Antigone buried Polynices and was put to death, but Adrastus escaped to Athens to petition Theseus , the city's king, to attack Thebes and force the return of the bodies of the remaining five. Theseus initially refused but was convinced by his mother, Aethra , who had been beseeched by the mothers of the fallen, to put the matter to a vote of the citizens. The Athenians marched on Thebes and conquered the city but inflicted no additional damage, taking only what they came for, the five bodies. They were laid upon a funeral pyre and Adrastus eulogized each.[16][17]


Second war against Thebes
Ten years after this Adrastus persuaded the seven sons of the heroes who had fallen in the war against Thebes to make a new attack upon that city, and Amphiaraus now declared that the gods approved of the undertaking, and promised success.[18][19] This war is celebrated in ancient story as the War of the Epigoni . Thebes was taken and razed to the ground, after the greater part of its inhabitants had left the city on the advice of Tiresias .[20][21][22] The only Argive hero that fell in this war was Aegialeus , the son of Adras-tus. After having built a temple of Nemesis in the neighborhood of Thebes, he set out on his return home. But weighed down by old age and grief at the death of his son he died at Megara and was buried there.[23] After his death he was worshipped in several parts of Greece, as at Megara,[24] at Sicyon where his memory was celebrated in tragic cho-ruses,[8] and in Attica .[25]


The legends about Adrastus and the two wars against Thebes have furnished ample materials for the epic as well as tragic poets of Greece,[26] and some works of art relating to the stories about Adrastus are mentioned in Pausanias.[27]


From Adrastus the female patronymic "Adrastine" was formed.[28] 20


William d'Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel of Chester




Husband William d'Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel 21 22

            AKA: William d' Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel
           Born: Bef 1180
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Feb 1221 - [near Rome], (Italy)
         Buried:  - Wymondham Abbey, Wymondham, Norfolk, England


         Father: William d'Aubigny 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex (      -1193) 23 24
         Mother: Maud de St. Hilary (1132-1193) 1 25 26


       Marriage: Between 1196 and 1199



Wife Mabel of Chester 22

           Born: Abt 1173
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147-1181) 13 27 28
         Mother: Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux (      -      ) 27




Children
1 F Nichole d' Aubigny 29

            AKA: Nichole d'Aubigny
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Roger de Somery of Dudley, Warwickshire (      -1273) 30



2 F Isabel d'Aubigny

            AKA: Isabel d' Aubigny
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John FitzAlan Lord of Clun and Oswestry, Salop (1200-1240) 31 32




Death Notes: Husband - William d'Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel

Other sources have d. March 1220/1221


Research Notes: Husband - William d'Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel

Crusader, named in the Magna Charta, 1215

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-27

From Wikipedia - William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel :

William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (before 1180 - 1 February 1221) was a son of William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel and Matilda St Hilary .

Lineage
His paternal grandparents were William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel and Adeliza of Leuven . His maternal grandparents were James de St. Hilaire and his wife Aveline.

A royal favourite
William was a favourite of King John . He witnessed King John's concession of the kingdom to the Pope on 15 May 1213. On 14 June 1216 he joined Prince Louis (later Louis VIII of France ) after King John abandoned Winchester . He returned to the allegiance of the King Henry III after the Royalist victory at Lincoln , on 14 July 1217.

Death returning from the Fifth Crusade
He joined in the Fifth Crusade (1217-1221), in 1218. He died on his journey home, in Caneill, Italy, near Rome , on 1 February 1221. News of his death reached England on 30 March 1221. He was brought home and buried at Wymondham Abbey .
His title was held by his son William , until he died, childless, in 1224, when it was passed to William's youngest son Hugh .

Marriage and Issue
After 1196 and before 1200 William married Mabel of Chester (born c. 1173), daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux. They were the parents of seven children.
Maud d'Aubigny
Cicely d'Aubigny
Colette d'Aubigny
William d'Aubigny, 4th Earl of Arundel (d. 1224); buried Wymondham Abbey
Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel (d. 7 May 1243); buried Wymondham Abbey
Isabel d'Aubigny ; married John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry , by whom she had issue.
Nicole d'Aubigny; married Roger De Somery

Sources
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 16C-26, 126-29, 149-27.
Remfry, P.M., Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649 (ISBN 1-899376-28-3 )
G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 237. 21 22


Research Notes: Wife - Mabel of Chester

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-27 (William d'Aubigny) 22


Research Notes: Child - Nichole d' Aubigny

First wife of Roger de Somery

Source also: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) 29


Research Notes: Child - Isabel d'Aubigny

Isabel d'Aubigny

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-28


Adam de Aldithley of Stanlegh and Mabella?




Husband Adam de Aldithley of Stanlegh 33

            AKA: Adam de Audley
           Born: Abt 1125 - Leek, Staffordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1200 - Staffordshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Lydulph de Aldithley (Bef 1040-After 1130)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Deputy of Bertram de Verdun: as Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, 1168-1183.

• Sheriff: of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, 1184-1185.

• Deputy of Bertram de Verdun: as Sheriff of Cheshire, 1186.

• Manor of Stanleigh: in Staffordshire granted by Bertram de Verdun, 1190.

• Exchanged Manor of Stanleigh: and half of Manor of Balterley with cousin William, Abt 1192.




Wife Mabella?

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M William de Stanleigh Lord of Thalk 34

            AKA: William Audley, William [I] de Stanley, William de Stonelegh Lord of Thalk
           Born: Abt 1170 - Staffordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1236 - <Staffordshire>, England
         Buried: 



2 M Adam Audley 35

            AKA: Adam de Aldithley, Adam Stanleigh
           Born: Abt 1171
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 M Thomas Stanleigh

           Born: Abt 1172
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



4 M Richard Stanleigh

           Born: Abt 1173
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



5 M Lucase Audley

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



6 M Henry Audley

            AKA: Henry de Aldithley
           Born: Abt 1197
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Nov 1246
         Buried: 



7 F Isabel Audley

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Birth Notes: Husband - Adam de Aldithley of Stanlegh

Source:
The House of Stanley from the 12th Century
by Peter Stanley at
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ourpage/history.htm :
"In fact, however, Lydulph (or Liulf), styled 'de Aldithley', was born circa 1115 - some years after the Conquest. His younger brother Adam was born circa 1125. The Manor of Aldithley (Audley) is not situated in Normandy, but is near Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire (as are the Manors of Balterley and Talk on the Hill). These three Manors did not come into the possession of the Audleys until early in the 12th century when they were held by socage, i.e. military service, from the De Verdun family. There is no evidence to support the story that these Manors were acquired through marriage to Saxon heiresses, and the Manor of Stanleigh did not come into the possession of the Audleys until late in the 12th century when it was the gift of their Overlord, Bertram de Verdun, before he left England for the Crusades in 1190."

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 gives b. abt 1125, d. abt 1200


Death Notes: Husband - Adam de Aldithley of Stanlegh

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 gives d. abt 1200.


Research Notes: Husband - Adam de Aldithley of Stanlegh

From http://cybergata.com/roots/8089.htm :

~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Stanley), Vol. XIIA, p. 246, Adam de Stanley, of Stanley, in Leek Staffordshire, which he held from Liulf de Audley, and was living during the reign of Stephen.

Background Information.
The Stanleys who succeeded to Hooton are known to be a younger branch of the houseof Audley, descended from Adam de Stanlegh, brother of Lydulph (or Lyulph) de Audley, who assumed the local name of a township in Staffordshire, afterwards granted to his son William.
~Ormerod's History of Cheshire, Vol. II, pg. 411 713

~Cokayne's Complete Peerage says it is possible, but that there is no evidence to support any blood relationship between the the Audley or Stanley families. Most likely the Stanleys were tenants of the Audleys.
~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Stanley), Vol. XIIA, pp. 244-245 141

---
Excerpted from The House of Stanley from the 12th Century
by Peter Stanley at
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ourpage/history.htm :

"Adam de Aldithley played a prominent part in the retinue of Bertram de Verdun and acted as his Deputy when Bertram was Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire from 1168 to 1183. He succeeded Bertram as Sheriff of these two counties in 1184 and 1185, and acted as his Deputy in Cheshire in 1186. In 1190 Bertram de Verdun accompanied King Richard I to the Crusades in the Holy Land. Before leaving England, he granted to Adam de Aldithley the additional Manor of Stanleigh in Staffordshire, as a mark of his special favour. Bertram did not return to England, dying in Juppa in 1192. He was succeeded to his estates in England by his son, Nicholas de Verdun. Some time later, Adam de Aldithley took the opportunity to rearrange his estates by exchanging his new Manor of Stanleigh, and half of the Manor of Balterley, with his cousin William, the son of his uncle, Adam (later styled 'de Stanleigh') for William's Manor of Talk on the Hill (which adjoined Aldithley). His cousin, William, being possessed of the Manor of Stanleigh then adopted the surname of 'de Stanleigh', being the first member of the family appearing in records using a surname when he witnessed a Charter in 1203, and again in 1217 and 1223 as 'William de Stanle'. Thus William was the first Ancestor of the Stanley family.

"The Manor of Stanleigh (Stanley) is situated about five miles from Leek in Staffordshire. At the time of the Great Survey in 1086, it was part of the larger Manor of Endor (which later became part of the De Verdun estates). It did not come into the possession of the De Aldithley family until late in the 12th century, when it was gift to Adam de Aldithley from his Overlord, Bertram de Verdun before the latter left with Richard 1 for the Crusades in 1190.

"Both Aldithley and Stanleigh were Saxon place names - the former meaning a meadow belonging to And (a Saxon female name), and the latter meaning a meadow or clearing which was craggy or stony. Because of this, Sir Anthony Wagner, Garter King of Arms, suggested in his book English Ancestry, that the Audleys and Stanleys were probably of Saxon stock. Mr L. G. Pine, former editor of Burke's Peerage, held a similar view. Surnames, however, first appeared in Europe in the 11th century and were not introduced into England until the arrival of the Normans. They were still rare at the time of the Conquest and only the more important barons possessed them at the time of the Great Survey in 1086. These surnames were generally derived from their estates in Normandy. It was not until the 12th century that the minor barons and knights adopted surnames and it is therefore unlikely that the early Aldithleys or Stanleys possessed a surname during their actual lifetime. These were probably added later by their descendants as a means of identification of an ancestor."

Adam de Aldithley was probably given the name Adam Stanleigh posthumously after his son William acquired the Manor of Stanley.

-----

Excerpted from The House of Stanley from the 12th Century
by Peter Stanley at
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ourpage/history.htm :
Debunks this story:
"Two of Adam de Aldithley's grandsons were said to have married Saxon heiresses. His elder son, Lydulph, had a son, Adam, to whom a Saxon thane gave his only daughter and heir, Mabella, in marriage, and it was thus that he acquired in his wife's right, the Manors of Stanleigh and Balterley in Staffordshire.... Later, Adam, the son of Lydulph, exchanged his Manor of Stanleigh and half the Manor of Balterley, with his cousin, William (the son of his uncle, Adam), for the Manor of Talk on the Hill. William, then being possessed of the Manor of Stanleigh, adopted the surname 'de Stanleigh', and became the ancestor of the Stanleys, while his cousin, Adam de Aldithley, was the ancestor of the Audleys of Heleigh in Staffordshire.

"In fact, however, Lydulph (or Liulf), styled 'de Aldithley', was born circa 1115 - some years after the Conquest. His younger brother Adam was born circa 1125. The Manor of Aldithley (Audley) is not situated in Normandy, but is near Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire (as are the Manors of Balterley and Talk on the Hill). These three Manors did not come into the possession of the Audleys until early in the 12th century when they were held by socage, i.e. military service, from the De Verdun family. There is no evidence to support the story that these Manors were acquired through marriage to Saxon heiresses, and the Manor of Stanleigh did not come into the possession of the Audleys until late in the 12th century when it was the gift of their Overlord, Bertram de Verdun, before he left England for the Crusades in 1190." 33


Birth Notes: Child - William de Stanleigh Lord of Thalk

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 gives b. abt 1170, d. abt 1236, as does stanleyroots.co.uk. Another source has b. 1166.
May have been born in Hooton, Cheshire, England or in Staffordshire, England


Death Notes: Child - William de Stanleigh Lord of Thalk

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 gives d. abt 1236.


Research Notes: Child - William de Stanleigh Lord of Thalk

www.familysearch.org (AFN: 8XKQ-61)


Excerpted from The House of Stanley from the 12th Century
by Peter Stanley at
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ourpage/history.htm :

"In 1190 Bertram de Verdun accompanied King Richard I to the Crusades in the Holy Land. Before leaving England, he granted to Adam de Aldithley the additional Manor of Stanleigh in Staffordshire, as a mark of his special favour. Bertram did not return to England, dying in Juppa in 1192. He was succeeded to his estates in England by his son, Nicholas de Verdun. Some time later, Adam de Aldithley took the opportunity to rearrange his estates by exchanging his new Manor of Stanleigh, and half of the Manor of Balterley, with his cousin William, the son of his uncle, Adam (later styled 'de Stanleigh') for William's Manor of Talk [Thalk] on the Hill (which adjoined Aldithley). His cousin, William, being possessed of the Manor of Stanleigh then adopted the surname of 'de Stanleigh', being the first member of the family appearing in records using a surname when he witnessed a Charter in 1203, and again in 1217 and 1223 as 'William de Stanle'. Thus William was the first Ancestor of the Stanley family.

"In 1230, William de Stanleigh, together with his Kinsman, Henry de Aldithley (the son of Adam de Aldithley), accompanied their Overlord, Nicholas de Verdun when he attended Henry III in his invasion of Brittany. Thereafter, many of William's descendants distinguished themselves as soldiers, playing a prominent part in the various French, Irish and Scottish Wars."

"Both Aldithley and Stanleigh were Saxon place names - the former meaning a meadow belonging to And (a Saxon female name), and the latter meaning a meadow or clearing which was craggy or stony. Because of this, Sir Anthony Wagner, Garter King of Arms, suggested in his book English Ancestry, that the Audleys and Stanleys were probably of Saxon stock. Mr L. G. Pine, former editor of Burke's Peerage, held a similar view. Surnames, however, first appeared in Europe in the 11th century and were not introduced into England until the arrival of the Normans. They were still rare at the time of the Conquest and only the more important barons possessed them at the time of the Great Survey in 1086. These surnames were generally derived from their estates in Normandy. It was not until the 12th century that the minor barons and knights adopted surnames and it is therefore unlikely that the early Aldithleys or Stanleys possessed a surname during their actual lifetime. These were probably added later by their descendants as a means of identification of an ancestor...

"The Manor of Stanleigh (Stanley) is situated about five miles from Leek in Staffordshire. At the time of the Great Survey in 1086, it was part of the larger Manor of Endor (which later became part of the De Verdun estates). It did not come into the possession of the De Aldithley family until late in the 12th century, when it was gift to Adam de Aldithley from his Overlord, Bertram de Verdun before the latter left with Richard 1 for the Crusades in 1190. ... 34


Research Notes: Child - Thomas Stanleigh

Source: Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919


Research Notes: Child - Richard Stanleigh

Source: Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919


Research Notes: Child - Lucase Audley

Source: Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919


Birth Notes: Child - Henry Audley

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 has b. abt 1197


Death Notes: Child - Henry Audley

Glenda Turcks http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 has d. 19 Nov 1246


Private




Husband Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Private
         Mother: Gwendolen Queen of the Britons [Legendary] (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Private

Ruled for 20 years. Contemporary of Saul in Judea, Eurysthenes in Sparta.

From Wikipedia - Mempricius :

Mempricius (Welsh : Membyr) was a legendary king of the Britons , as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth . He was the son of King Maddan and brother of Malin.

Upon his father's death, war broke out between Mempricius and his brother, Malin, over who would dominate Britain . Mempricius called a conference with his brother and other delegates to end the war between the two brothers. Once there, Mempricius killed Malin and took the throne of the Britons for himself.

He ruled as a tyrant for twenty years, killing most of the distinguished men on the island. More so, he defeated and killed all other claimants to the throne. He abandoned his wife and his son, Ebraucus , to live a life of sodomy . While on a hunting expedition, he was separated from his companions and attacked by a pack of wolves. He died and was succeeded by his son Ebraucus.

According to Geoffrey, he reigned at the same period as Saul in Judea and Eurysthenes in Sparta . 38 39


Olaf of Dublin and Maelcorcre




Husband Olaf of Dublin

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1034
         Buried: 


         Father: Sihtric of the Silken Beard King of Dublin (      -1042)
         Mother: Slani (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife Maelcorcre

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Dunlang King of Leinster (      -1014)
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Ragnaillt 40 41

            AKA: Raignillt of Dublin
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Cynan ap Iago Prince of North Wales (      -1060) 42 43 44




Research Notes: Husband - Olaf of Dublin

Source: AAncestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 239-3, "prob. the Olaf slain by the 'Saxons' while en route to Rome on a pilgrimage 1034"


Research Notes: Wife - Maelcorcre

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 239-3 (Olaf)


Research Notes: Child - Ragnaillt

Source:Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 239-4 40 41


Magnus Duke of Saxony and Sophia




Husband Magnus Duke of Saxony 45

           Born: Bef 1045
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Aug 1106
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Between 1070 and 1071



Wife Sophia 46

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Jun 1095
         Buried: 


         Father: Béla I King of Hungary (      -Abt 1063) 47
         Mother: Rixa of Poland (      -      ) 48




Children
1 F Wulfhilda of Saxony 49

           Born: Abt 1075
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Dec 1126
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Henry I Duke of Bavaria (1074-1126) 50
           Marr: Between 1095 and 1100




Research Notes: Husband - Magnus Duke of Saxony

Second husband of Sophia 45


Malcolm Earl of Angus




Husband Malcolm Earl of Angus

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: by 1242
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Maud

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Gilbert d' Umfreville (      -      ) 51





Malcolm I of Scotland




Husband Malcolm I of Scotland 1 52 53

            AKA: Mael-Coluim King of Scots, Malcolm I King of Scots, Máel Coluim mac Domnaill
           Born: Abt 897 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 954 - <Fetteresso or Dunnottar>, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
         Buried:  - Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland


         Father: Donald II of Scotland (Abt 0862-0900) 1 54 55
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Crowned: King of Scots, 943.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Cinaed King of Scots 1 56 57

            AKA: Kenneth II King of Scots, Cináed mac Maíl Coluim King of Alba
           Born: Abt 932 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 995 - <Fettercairn, (Aberdeenshire), Scotland>
         Buried:  - Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland



2 M Dub of Scotland 58

            AKA: Duff of Scotland, Dub mac Maíl Coluim King of Alba
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 967
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Malcolm I of Scotland

Killed by the men of Moray


Research Notes: Husband - Malcolm I of Scotland

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-16

From Wikipedia - Malcolm I of Scotland:
Máel Coluim mac Domnaill (Modern Gaelic : Maol Chaluim mac Dhòmhnaill),[1] anglicised as Malcolm I, and nicknamed An Bodhbhdercc, "the Dangerous Red"[2] (before 900 - 954) was king of Scots , becoming king when his cousin Constantine II (Causantín mac Áeda) abdicated to become a monk. He was the son of Donald II (Domnall mac Causantín).

In 945 Edmund the Elder , King of England, having expelled Olaf Sihtricsson (Amlaíb Cuaran) from Northumbria , devastated Cumbria and blinded two sons of Domnall III (Domnall mac Eógain), king of Strathclyde . It is said that he then "let" or "commended" Strathclyde to Malcolm in return for an alliance.[3] What is to be understood by "let" or "commended" is unclear, but it may well mean that Malcolm had been the overlord of Strathclyde and that Edmund recognised this while taking lands in southern Cumbria for himself.[4]

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba says that Malcolm took an army into Moray "and slew Cellach". Cellach is not named in the surviving genealogies of the rulers of Moray , and his identity is unknown.[5]

Malcolm appears to have kept his agreement with the late English king, which may have been renewed with the new king, Edmund having been murdered in 946 and succeeded by his brother Edred . Eric Bloodaxe took York in 948, before being driven out by Edred, and when Olaf Sihtricsson again took York in 949-950, Malcolm raided Northumbria as far south as the Tees taking "a multitude of people and many herds of cattle" according to the Chronicle.[6] The Annals of Ulster for 952 report a battle between "the men of Alba and the Britons [of Strathclyde] and the English" against the foreigners, i.e. the Northmen or the Norse-Gaels . This battle is not reported by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and it is unclear whether it should be related to the expulsion of Olaf Sihtricsson from York or the return of Eric Bloodaxe.[7]

The Annals of Ulster report that Malcolm was killed in 954. Other sources place this most probably in the Mearns , either at Fetteresso following the Chronicle, or at Dunnottar following the Prophecy of Berchán . He was buried on Iona .[8] Malcolm's sons Dub and Kenneth were later kings. 1 52 53


Birth Notes: Child - Cinaed King of Scots

Born before 954.


Death Notes: Child - Cinaed King of Scots

Killed by his own men.


Research Notes: Child - Cinaed King of Scots

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-17

From Wikipedia - Kenneth II of Scotland :
Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, (Modern Gaelic : Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim)[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2] (before 954-995) was King of Scotland (Alba ). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose , John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn , through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar , Mormaer of Angus , in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12] 1 56 57


Research Notes: Child - Dub of Scotland

From Wikipedia - Dub of Scotland :
Dub mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic : Dubh mac Mhaoil Chaluim),[1] sometimes anglicised as Duff,[2] called Dén, "the Vehement"[3] and Niger, "the Black"[4] (died 967) was king of Alba . He was son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill) and succeeded to the throne when Indulf (Ildulb mac Causantín) was killed in 962.
While later chroniclers such as John of Fordun supplied a great deal of information on Dub's life and reign, including tales of witchcraft and treason, almost all of this is rejected by modern historians. There are very few sources for the reign of Dub, of which the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba and a single entry in the Annals of Ulster are the closest to contemporary.
The Chronicle records that during Dub's reign bishop Fothach, most likely bishop of St Andrews or of Dunkeld , died. The remaining report is of a battle between Dub and Cuilén , son of king Ildulb. Dub won the battle, fought "upon the ridge of Crup", in which Duchad, abbot of Dunkeld, sometimes supposed to be an ancestor of Crínán of Dunkeld , and Dubdon , the mormaer of Atholl , died.
The various accounts differ on what happened afterwards. The Chronicle claims that Dub was driven out of the kingdom. The Latin material interpolated in Andrew of Wyntoun 's Orygynale Cronykl states that he was murdered at Forres , and links this to an eclipse of the sun which can be dated to 20 July 966. The Annals of Ulster report only: "Dub mac Maíl Coluim, king of Alba, was killed by the Scots themselves"; the usual way of reporting a death in internal strife, and place the death in 967. It has been suggested that Sueno's Stone , near Forres, may be a monument to Dub, erected by his brother Kenneth II (Cináed mac Maíl Coluim). It is presumed that Dub was killed or driven out by Cuilén, who became king after Dub's death, or by his supporters.
Dub left at least one son, Kenneth III (Cináed mac Dub). Although his descendants did not compete successfully for the kingship of Alba after Cináed was killed in 1005, they did hold the mormaerdom of Fife . The MacDuib (or MacDuff) held the mormaerdom, and later earldom, until 1371. 58


Malcolm II King of Scots




Husband Malcolm II King of Scots 1 59 60

            AKA: Mael-Coluim King of Scots, Máel Coluim mac Cináeda King of Scots, Malcolm MacKenneth King of Scots, Melkolf MacKenneth King of Scotland
           Born: Abt 970 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Nov 1034 - Glamis, Forfarshire, Scotland
         Buried:  - Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland


         Father: Cinaed King of Scots (Abt 0932-0995) 1 56 57
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Crowned: King of Scots, 25 Mar 1005.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Donada

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 F Anleta "Thora Donada" MacKenneth 1

           Born: Abt 968 - <Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sigurd II "Digri" Hlodversson (Abt 0960-1014) 1
           Marr: Abt 988 - Scotland



3 F Bethóc 1 61 62

            AKA: Beatrix Princess of Scotland, Bethóc ingen Maíl Coluim meic Cináeda
           Born: Abt 984 - <Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Crinan "the Thane" Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Governor of  Scots Islands (Abt 0978-1045) 1 63 64
           Marr: Abt 1000




Death Notes: Husband - Malcolm II King of Scots

Murdered


Research Notes: Husband - Malcolm II King of Scots

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-18. "Fought a battle in 1008 at Carham with Uchtred (d. 1016), son of Waltheof, Earl of the Northumbrians, and overcame the Danes, 1017; published a code of laws; was murdered, 25 Nov. 1034."

From Wikipedia - Malcolm II of Scotland :
Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Modern Gaelic : Maol Chaluim mac Choinnich),[1] known in modern anglicized regnal lists as Malcolm II (died 25 November 1034 ),[2] was King of the Scots from 1005 until his death.[3] He was a son of Kenneth II (Cináed mac Maíl Coluim); the Prophecy of Berchán says that his mother was a woman of Leinster and refers to him as Máel Coluim Forranach, "the destroyer".[4]

To the Irish annals which recorded his death, Malcolm was ard rí Alban, High King of Scotland. In the same way that Brian Bóruma , High King of Ireland , was not the only king in Ireland , Malcolm was one of several kings within the geographical boundaries of modern Scotland : his fellow kings included the king of Strathclyde , who ruled much of the south-west, various Norse-Gael kings of the western coasts and the Hebrides and, nearest and most dangerous rivals, the Kings or Mormaers of Moray . To the south, in the kingdom of England , the Earls of Bernicia and Northumbria , whose predecessors as kings of Northumbria had once ruled most of southern Scotland, still controlled large parts of the south-east.

Malcolm died in 1034, Marianus Scotus giving the date as 25 November 1034 . The king lists say that he died at Glamis , variously describing him as a "most glorious" or "most victorious" king. The Annals of Tigernach report that "Máel Coluim mac Cináeda, king of Scotland, the honour of all the west of Europe, died." The Prophecy of Berchán, perhaps the inspiration for John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun 's accounts where Malcolm is killed fighting bandits, says that he died by violence, fighting "the parricides", suggested to be the sons of Máel Brigte of Moray.[28]

Perhaps the most notable feature of Malcolm's death is the account of Marianus, matched by the silence of the Irish annals, which tells us that Duncan I became king and ruled for five years and nine months. Given that his death in 1040 is described as being "at an immature age" in the Annals of Tigernach, he must have been a young man in 1034. The absence of any opposition suggests that Malcolm had dealt thoroughly with any likely opposition in his own lifetime.[29]

On the question of Malcolm's putative pilgrimage, pilgrimages to Rome, or other long-distance journeys, were far from unusual. Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Canute and Macbeth have already been mentioned. Rognvald Kali Kolsson is known to have gone crusading in the Mediterranean in the 12th century. Nearer in time, Domnall mac Eógain of Strathclyde died on pilgrimage to Rome in 975 as did Máel Ruanaid uá Máele Doraid, King of the Cenél Conaill , in 1025.

Not a great deal is known of Malcolm's activities beyond the wars and killings. The Book of Deer records that Malcolm "gave a king's dues in Biffie and in Pett Meic-Gobraig, and two davochs" to the monastery of Old Deer .[30] He was also probably not the founder of the Bishopric of Mortlach-Aberdeen. John of Fordun has a peculiar tale to tell, related to the supposed "Laws of Malcom MacKenneth", saying that Malcolm gave away all of Scotland, except for the Moot Hill at Scone , which is unlikely to have the least basis in fact. 1 59 60


Research Notes: Child - Donada

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-18 (Mael-Coluim)


Research Notes: Child - Anleta "Thora Donada" MacKenneth

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-18 (Mael-Coluim) 1


Research Notes: Child - Bethóc

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-19

From Wikipedia - Bethóc :
Bethóc ingen Maíl Coluim meic Cináeda was the eldest daughter of King Máel Coluim mac Cináeda , King of Scots , who had no known sons.

The strongest hereditary claim of succession to the Scottish throne therefore passed through Bethóc. Approximately 1000, Princess Bethóc married Crínán , Abbot of Dunkeld. The first son of this marriage was Donnchad I , who ascended to the throne of Scotland in 1034. Early writers have asserted that Máel Coluim also designated Donnchad as his successor under the rules of tanistry because there were other possible claimants to the throne.

It is possible that Bethóc had previously been married to Jarl Sigurd the Stout of Orkney , and to Findláech , the Mormaer of Moireabh . 1 61 62


Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org.

2 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121E-19.

3 Wikipedia.org, William I, Duke of Normandy.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121E-18, 144A-19 (William I of Poitou).

5 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f00/a0020075.htm.

6 Wikipedia.org, Rollo.

7 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/445.htm.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121E-18 (Ganger Rolf).

9 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/465.htm.

10 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/423.htm.

11 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-18.

12 Wikipedia.org, Herbert II, Count of Vermandois.

13 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

14 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871672.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 48-19, 50-18 (Herbert II).

16 Wikipedia.org, Talaus.

17 Wikipedia.org, Bias (mythology).

18 Wikipedia.org, Pero.

19 Wikipedia.org, Lysimache.

20 Wikipedia.org, Adrastus.

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-27.

22 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel.

23 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (his son).

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26.

25 Wikipedia.org, John FitzGeoffrey; Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford.

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-26 (William d'Aubigny).

27 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 126-30, 249-30.

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 249-30 (Nichole d'Aubigny).

31 Wikipedia.org, John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry.

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-28 (Isabel d'Aubigny).

33 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/8089.htm.

34 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/815.htm.

35 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=nanatea&id=I33919 (Glenda Turcks).

36 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105910 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

37 Wikipedia.org, Maddan; List of legendary kings of Britain.

38 Wikipedia.org, Mempricius: List of legendary kings of Britain.

39 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105911 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

40 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 239-4.

41 Website - Genealogy, http://www.gencircles.com/users/kristinhopper/4/pedigree/6392.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 239-4 (Ragnaillt).

43 Davies, John, A History of Wales. (Rev. ed. New York: Penguin Group, 2007.), p. 80.

44 Wikipedia.org, Cynan ab Iago.

45 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243A-23, 166-24 (Henry I).

46 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-7. 166-24 (Henry I).

47 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-6, 166-24 (Henry I).

48 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-6 (Béla I).

49 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 248-8, 166-24 (Henry I).

50 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 166-24.

51 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 224-30 (Elizabeth Comyn).

52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-16.

53 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_I_of_Scotland.

54 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-15.

55 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_II_of_Scotland.

56 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-17.

57 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_of_Scotland.

58 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dub_of_Scotland.

59 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-18.

60 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_II_of_Scotland.

61 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-19, 172-19.

62 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethoc.

63 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-19.

64 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%ADn%C3%A1n_of_Dunkeld.


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