The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Ralph Earl of Norfolk




Husband Ralph Earl of Norfolk 1

            AKA: Ralph "the Staller" Earl of Norfolk
           Born: Bef 1011 - Brittany, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: After Feb 1068
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ralph de Gael Seigneur de Gaël et Montfort 1 2

            AKA: Ralph de Guader, Ralph Wader, Radulf Waders
           Born: Bef 1040 - <Gaël, Brittany, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1095
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Emma FitzOsbern (Abt 1059-After 1095) 1
           Marr: 1075 - Exning, Cambridgeshire, England




Birth Notes: Child - Ralph de Gael Seigneur de Gaël et Montfort

May have been born in Hereford, England.


Ralph Count of Ivry




Husband Ralph Count of Ivry 1

           Born: Abt 978 - Ivry, <Normandy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Emma of Ivry 1

           Born: Abt 1008 - Ivry, <Normandy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Osbern (Abt 1000-      ) 1
           Marr: Abt 1029 - France





Ramon Berenguer I Count of Barcelona and Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges




Husband Ramon Berenguer I Count of Barcelona 1 3

            AKA: Ramon Berenguer I "el Viejo" Count of Barcelona, Raymond Berenger I "le Vieux" Count of Barcelona, Raimund I Berenger Count of Barcelona
           Born: 1023 - <Barcelona, Aragon>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 26 May 1076 - Barcelona, Barcelona, Aragón, Spain
         Buried: 


         Father: Raimund Berenger I, Count of Barcelona (1005-1035) 1
         Mother: Sancha Sanchez de Castile (Abt 1006-1026) 1


       Marriage: 1056



Wife Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges 1 4 5

            AKA: Almode de la Marche, Almodis de la Haute Marche, Almodis of La Marche
           Born: Abt 1000 - Toulouse, (Haute-Garonne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Nov 1071
         Buried:  - Cathedral of Barcelona, Spain


         Father: Bernard I Count of La Marche and Péregord (Abt 0970-Abt 1047) 1 6 7
         Mother: Amélie Countess of Aubnay (Abt 0974-Abt 1072) 1 8



   Other Spouse: Hugh V "the Pious" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan (      -1060) 7 9 10 - Abt 1038

   Other Spouse: Pons Count of Toulouse, Albi and Dijon (Between 0990/1020-1060) 11 12 - 1045


Children
1 M Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona 1 13

            AKA: Raimund Berenger II "the Towhead" Count of Barcelona
           Born: 1054 - <Barcelona, Aragon>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Dec 1082
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mathilda of Apulia (Abt 1059-1083) 1
           Marr: 1078



2 M Berenguer Ramon II Count of Barcelona 14

            AKA: Berenger Raymond II "the Fratricide" Count of Barcelona
           Born: 1054 - <Barcelona, Aragon>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 1097
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Ramon Berenguer I Count of Barcelona

From Wikipedia - Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona :


Ramon Berenguer I the Old (née in French : Ramond Berenger LeVieux, in Catalan : el Vell) was Count of Barcelona in 1035-1076. He promulgated the earliest versions of a written code of Catalan law, the Usages of Barcelona .

Born in 1024, he succeeded his father, Berenguer Ramon the Crooked in 1035. It is during his reign that the dominant position of Barcelona among other Catalan counties became evident.

Ramon Berenguer campaigned against the Moors , extending his dominions as far west as Barbastro and imposing heavy tributes (parias ) on other Moorish cities. Historians claim that those tributes helped create the first wave of prosperity in Catalan history. During his reign Catalan maritime power started to be felt in Western Mediterranean. Ramon Berenguer the Old was also the first count of Catalonia to acquire lands (counties of Carcassonne and Razés ) and influence north of the Pyrenees.

Another major achievement of his was beginning of codification of Catalan law in the written Usatges or Usatici of Barcelona which was to become the first full compilation of feudal law in Western Europe. Legal codification was part of the count's efforts to forward and somehow control the process of feudalization which started during the reign of his weak father, Berenger Ramon. Another major contributor was the Church acting through the institution of the Peace and Truce of God . This established a general truce among warring factions and lords in a given region for a given time. The earliest extant date for introducing the Truce of God in Western Europe is 1027 in Catalonia, during the reign of Ramon Berenguer the Old.

Ramon Berenguer I together with his third wife Almodis also founded the Romanesque cathedral of Barcelona, to replace the older basilica presumably destroyed by Almanzor. Their velvet and brass bound wooden coffins are still shown in the Gothic cathedral which replaced Ramon Berenguer's building.

He was succeeded by his twin sons Ramon Berenguer II and Berenguer Ramon II . It has been speculated that the obscure wife of Henry of Burgundy , the grandmother of Alfonso Henriques , first king of Portugal , was his sister.

Ramon Berenguers's marriages and descendants


First wife, Isabel/Elisabeth of Narbonne or of Béziers
Berenguer (died young)
Arnau (died young)
Pere Ramon (1050-1073?), murdered his father's wife, Almodis, and was exiled
Second wife, Blanca (origin unknown)
Third wife, Almodis de La Marche , countess of Limoges
Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona the Fratricide (1053/54-1097)
Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona the Towhead (1053/54-1082)
Inés, married Hugh d'Albo
Sancha, married William Raymond , count of Cerdanya 1 3


Death Notes: Wife - Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges

Murdered


Research Notes: Wife - Almodis de la Marche Countess of Limoges

Second wife of Pons of Toulouse. Third wife of Ramon Berenguer I.

From Wikipedia - Almodis de la Marche :

Almodis de la Marche (990 or c. 1020 - 16 October 1071 ) was the daughter of Bernard I, Count of Marche and wife Amélie. She married Hugh V of Lusignan around 1038 and they had two sons and one daughter:
Hugh VI of Lusignan (c. 1039-1101)
Jordan de Lusignan
Mélisende de Lusignan (b. bef. 1055), married before 1074 to Simon I "l'Archevêque", Vidame de Parthenay

Almodis and Hugh of Lusignan divorced due to consanguinity , and Hugh arranged for her to marry Count Pons of Toulouse in 1040. Together they produced several children, including:
William IV of Toulouse
Raymond IV of Toulouse
Hugh, Abbot of Saint-Gilles
Almodis of Toulouse, married Count Pierre of Melgueil

She was still Pons' wife in April 1053, but shortly thereafter Almodis was abducted by Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona . He kidnapped her from Narbonne with the aid of a fleet sent north by his ally, the Muslim emir of Tortosa . They married immediately (despite the fact both of her previous husbands were still alive) and they appear with their twin sons in a charter the next year. Pope Victor II excommunicated Almodis and Ramon for this illegal marriage until 1056. Together they produced four children:
Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona
Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona
Inés of Barcelona, married Count Guigues I of Albon
Sancha of Barcelona, married Count Guillermo Ramon I of Cerdagne

Almodis maintained contact with her former husbands and many children, and in 1066/1067 she traveled to Toulouse for her daughter's wedding. A few years before, in 1060, Hugh V of Lusignan had revolted against his lord, Duke William VIII of Aquitaine , in support of Almodis' son William IV of Toulouse . Her sons supported one another in military campaigns; Hugh VI of Lusignan , Raymond IV of Toulouse , and Berenguer Ramon all took the Cross.

Her third husband Ramon had a son from a previous marriage, Pedro Ramon, who was his heir. Pedro apparently resented Almodis' influence and was concerned she was trying to replace him with her own two sons. He murdered her in October 1071. Pedro was disinherited and exiled for his crime, and fled the country. When his father died in 1076, Barcelona was split between Berenguer Ramon and Ramon Berenguer, Almodis' sons. The family history of murder did not end with Pedro Ramon, as Berenguer Ramon earned his nickname "The Fratricide " when he killed his own twin brother. 1 4 5


Death Notes: Child - Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona

Murdered by his twin brother, Berenguer Ramon II.


Research Notes: Child - Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona

Twin brother of Berenguer Ramon II, by whom he was murdered.

From Wikipedia - Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona :

Ramon Berenguer II the Towhead or Cap de estopes[1][2] (1053 or 1054 - December 5 , 1082 ) was Count of Barcelona from 1076 until his death. He ruled jointly with his twin brother Berenguer Ramon II .

He succeeded his father Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona to co-rule with his twin brother Berenguer Ramon, in 1075.

The twins failed to agree and divided their possessions between them, against the will of their late father. Ramon Berenguer the Towhead, called so because of the thickness and colour of his hair, was killed while hunting in the woods in 1082. His brother, who went on to become the sole ruler of Catalonia , was credited by popular opinion of having orchestrated this murder. Berenguer Ramon the Fratricide was later succeeded by Ramon Berenguer's son Ramon Berenguer III .

Ramon Berenguers's marriage and child
Mahalta (or Maud) of Apulia , born ca. 1059, died 1111/1112, daughter of Duke Robert Guiscard and of Sikelgaita de Salerno. Following his murder, she remarried to Aimery I of Narbonne , being mother of his son Aimery II
Ramon Berenguer III the Great, count of Barcelona and Provence (before 1082-1131) 1 13


Research Notes: Child - Berenguer Ramon II Count of Barcelona

Twin brother of Ramon Berenguer II, whom he murdered on 5 December 1082.

From Wikipedia - Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona :

Berenguer Ramon II the Fratricide (1050s - 1090s) was Count of Barcelona (1076-1097). He was the son of Ramon Berenguer I , and initially ruled jointly with his twin brother Ramon Berenguer II .

Born in 1053 or 1054 he succeeded his father Ramon Berenguer I the Old to co-rule with his twin brother Ramon Berenguer, in 1075. The twins failed to agree and divided their possessions between them, against the will of their late father. Ramon Berenguer II was killed while hunting in the woods on December 5 , 1082 . Berenguer Ramon II, who became the sole ruler of Catalonia for the next four years, was credited by popular opinion with having orchestrated this murder. This suspicion and other divisions of loyalty led to a civil war. Various parties asserted ways to resolve this 'unjust and iniquitous murder', which led to a moderate compromise in 1086 in which Berenguer Ramon II would rule Catalonia with his brother's four-year-old son (Later to become known as Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona for eleven years until he came of age.[1]

In the 1080s Berenguer Ramon's involvement in the internal strife in the Moorish taifa kingdoms brought him in conflict with El Cid . In the ensuing war the Count of Barcelona was twice taken prisoner.

After his resignation in 1097 his life is more obscure. Still living under the accusations of his brother's assassination, the guilt of which may have been determined by trial by combat , which he lost, he went to Jerusalem , either on pilgrimage , as a penance, or as part of the First Crusade , and perished there between 1097 and 1099. Berenguer Ramon II was succeeded by his nephew Ramon Berenguer III , son of Ramon Berenguer II . 14


Ranulf II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine




Husband Ranulf II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine

            AKA: Rannoux II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine
           Born: Abt 855
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Aug 890
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulf I Duke of Aquitaine (      -0866) 15
         Mother: Bilichilde of Maine (      -      ) 15


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Ebles Mancer Count of Poitou

           Born: 868 - <Poittou, (Vienne), France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 932
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Aremburge (      -      ) 16
           Marr: 892
         Spouse: Emiliane (      -      ) 16
           Marr: 911




Research Notes: Husband - Ranulf II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine

According to Ancestral Roots, Line 144A-17, Ada was not the mother of Ebles Mancer.


Research Notes: Child - Ebles Mancer Count of Poitou

Per Ancestral Roots, line 144A-18, "bastard of Ranulf II by Ermengarde, prob. a concubine"


Ranulf IV de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester and Maud FitzRobert of Gloucester




Husband Ranulf IV de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester 1 17 18

            AKA: Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester, Ranulph de Gernon Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy, Ranulf de Guernan Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches, Ranulph "de Gernon" de Meschines Earl of Chester
           Born: Abt 1100 - Gernon Castle, Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Dec 1153
         Buried:  - St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England


         Father: Ranulf le Meschin 3rd Earl of Chester (Abt 1070-1129) 1 19 20 21 22
         Mother: Lucy of Bolingbroke (Abt 1070-Abt 1136) 1 23 24


       Marriage: Abt 1141



Wife Maud FitzRobert of Gloucester 1 25 26

            AKA: Maud de Caen of Gloucester
           Born: Abt 1120 - Glouchestershire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Jul 1190 - Chester, Cheshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert de Caen 1st Earl of Gloucester (Abt 1090-1147) 1 27 28
         Mother: Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester (1090-1157) 1 29 30




Children
1 M Simon III de Montfort Count of Evreux 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1181
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maud (      -      )



2 F Joanna de Meschines 1

           Born: Abt 1145 - <Chester, Cheshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adam Brus (Abt 1143-1196) 1



3 M Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester 32 33 34

            AKA: Hugh de Meschines 5th Earl of Chester
           Born: 1147 - Kevelioc, Monmouthshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jun 1181 - Leek, Staffordshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux (      -      ) 32
           Marr: 1169




Research Notes: Husband - Ranulf IV de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester

From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester :

Ranulf II, also known as Ranulf le Meschin or Ranulf de Gernon inherited his palatine earldom in 1128 aged 28, upon the death of his father who was descended from the Counts of Bayeux , Calvados Normandy .

2 Chronology of Ranulf's life
2.1 The loss of the Earl's northern lands to King David of Scotland (1136-1139)
2.2 Ranulf takes Lincoln (1140)
2.3 The Battle of Lincoln (2 February 1141)
2.4 The capture of Robert of Gloucester
2.5 The second siege of Lincoln (1144)
2.6 Ranulf defects to the King (1145-1146)
2.7 Agreement between King David and Earl Ranulf
2.8 Ranulf's treaty with Robert Earl of Leicester
3 Monastic foundation
3.1 The death of the Earl (1153)


Early life
Note: He is the 4th Ranulf (ie Ranulf IV) but he is the 2nd Earl of Chester.

Ranulf was born at Gernon castle , Normandy around 1100 to Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester (should be: Ranulf III, 1st Earl of Chester [of the second creation]) and Lucia Taillebois of Mercia , England. His parents were both significant landowners and he had considerable autonomy within the palatine .

[Much more available in Wikipedia]

Monastic foundation
He founded a North Welsh Cistercian Abbey in 1131 which was colonised by monks from the Norman house, the Congregation of Savigny .

[edit ] The death of the Earl (1153)
In 1153 Ranulf survived a failed attempt at murder by poison by one of his arch-enemies, William Peverel the Younger , when he was guest at Peverel's house. William had poisoned the wine that Ranulf and his men had drunk. Three of Ranulf's men died but the Earl recovered, though he suffered agonizingly, as he had drunk less than his men. William was exiled from England after Henry took the crown as he was accused of poisoning Ranulf and his retainers. The Earl died the same year (due to the poisoning?), on the 16 December 1153 . One other notable event of 1153, was that Duke Henry granted Ranulf Staffordshire . After his death, the Earl's son and heir Hugh was allowed to inherit Ranulf's lands as held in 1135, and other honours bestowed upon Ranulf were revoked. 1 17 18


Research Notes: Wife - Maud FitzRobert of Gloucester

From Wikipedia - Maud of Gloucester

Maud of Gloucester, Countess of Chester (died 29 July 1190), also known as Maud FitzRobert, was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, and the daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester , an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England . Her husband was Ranulf de Gernon , 4th Earl of Chester, whom she allegedly poisoned with the assistance of William Peverel of Nottingham .[1]

Family
Lady Maud FitzRobert was born on an unknown date, the daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester . She had seven siblings including William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Roger, Bishop of Worcester . She also had an illegitimate half-brother, Richard, Bishop of Bayeux, whom her father sired by Isabel de Douvres.

Her paternal grandparents were King Henry I of England and his mistress, Sybil Corbet. Her maternal grandparents were Robert FitzHamon , Lord of Gloucester and Glamorgan , and Sybil de Montgomery, daughter of Roger de Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel Talvas of Belleme.


Marriage and children
Sometime before 1141, Lady Maud married Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester. She assumed the title of Countess of Chester upon her marriage. Her husband had considerable autonomy in his palatine earldom.

Shortly after their marriage, in January 1141, Maud was besieged at Lincoln Castle by the forces of King Stephen of England . A relief army, loyal to Empress Matilda and led by her father, defeated the King in the fierce fighting which followed, which became known as the First Battle of Lincoln . In return for his help in repelling the King's troops, Maud's father compelled Ranulf to swear fealty to his half-sister Matilda. Ranulf was seized by King Stephen at court in Northampton on 29 August 1146. Stephen later granted him the castle and city of Lincoln sometime after 1151.[2]

Together Ranulf and Maud had three children:
Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147- 30 June 1181), married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, by whom he had five children, including Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester , Maud of Chester , and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Lincoln .
Richard of Chester (died 1170/1175), buried in Coventry .
Beatrice of Chester, married Raoul de Malpas
Ranulf had an illegitimate son, Robert FitzCount (died before 1166), by an unknown mistress. His date of birth was not recorded. Robert married as her second husband, Agnes FitzNeel.

On 16 December 1153, Maud allegedly poisoned her husband with the assistance of William Peverel of Nottingham. In 1172, she founded Repton Priory in Derbyshire .[3]

The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property Wadinton de feodo comitis Cestrie, held by Maud, Countess of Chester.[2]

Maud died on 29 July 1190. The Annals of Tewkesbury records the death in 1190 of Maud, Countess of Chester.[2] 1 25 26


Research Notes: Child - Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester

From Wikipedia - Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester :

Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester (1147 - 30 June 1181) was the son of Ranulf de Gernon and Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (otherwise known as Robert de Caen , the illegitimate son of Henry I of England , making her Henry's granddaughter).

He is thought by some to have taken his name from Kevelioc in Monmouth as his birthplace, but others think that instead he was born in, and took the name of, the cwmwd of Cyfeiliog (in modern Powys ) in the southern part of the Kingdom of Powys , Wales .

He was underage when his father's death in 1153 made him heir to his family's estates on both sides of the channel. He joined the baronial Revolt of 1173-1174 against King Henry II of England , and was influential in convincing the Bretons to revolt. After being captured and imprisoned after the Battle of Alnwick , he finally got his estates restored in 1177, and served in King Henry's Irish campaigns.

In 1169 he married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux , daughter of Simon III de Montfort . She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:
Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
Maud of Chester (1171-1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby
Hawise of Chester (1180-1242), married Robert II de Quincy
A daughter, name unknown, who was briefly married to Llywelyn Fawr

He also had an illegitimate daughter, Amice of Chester, who married Ralph de Mainwaring.

Hugh of Kevelioc died 30 June 1181 at Leek , Staffordshire , England. 32 33 34



Ranulph II Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy and Maud d'Avranches




Husband Ranulph II Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy 1 35 36

            AKA: Ranulf de Briquessart, Ranulf de Gernon Viscomte de Bessin, Ranulf de Meschines Vicomte de Bayeux
           Born: Abt 1048 - <Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: After Apr 1089
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulph I Vicomte of the Bessin (Abt 1017-      ) 1 37
         Mother: Alice of Normandy (Abt 1021-      ) 1 38


       Marriage: Abt 1069 - Avranches, (Manche), Normandy, France

Events

• Adult: by 1066.

• Living: 1089.




Wife Maud d'Avranches 1 22 39

            AKA: Margaret d'Avranches, Maud de Abrincis
           Born: Abt 1054 - <Avranches, (Manche), Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard le Goz Viscomte d'Avranches (Abt 1020-After 1084) 39 40 41
         Mother: Emma de Conteville (Abt 1043-      ) 42 43




Children
1 M Ranulf le Meschin 3rd Earl of Chester 1 19 20 21 22

            AKA: Ranulph III le Meschin de Briquessart 3rd Earl of Chester, Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester, Ranulf de Meschines Lord of Cumberland, Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy
           Born: Abt 1070 - <Briquessart, Livry, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Jan 1129 - Chester, Cheshire, England
         Buried:  - St Werburgh, Chester, Cheshire, England
         Spouse: Lucy of Bolingbroke (Abt 1070-Abt 1136) 1 23 24
           Marr: Abt 1098



2 M William le Meschin Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire 1 44 45

            AKA: William de Meschines
           Born: Abt 1100 - <Gernon Castle, Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Cecily de Rumilly (Abt 1100-      ) 1 46




Research Notes: Husband - Ranulph II Vicomte of Bayeux in Normandy

Adult by 1066

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-25
--------
From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Briquessart :

Ranulf de Briquessart[1] or Ranulf the Viscount (died c. 1089 or soon after) was an 11th century Norman magnate and viscount . Ranulf's family were connected to the House of Normandy by marriage, and, besides Odo , bishop of Bayeux , was the most powerful magnate in the Bessin region.[2] He married Margaret, daughter of Richard Goz, viscount of the Avranchin , whose son and successor Hugh d'Avranches became Earl of Chester in England c. 1070.[3]

Ranulf is probably the "Ranulf the viscount" who witnessed a charter of William , Duke of Normandy , at Caen on 17 June 1066.[4] Ranulf helped preside over a judgement in the curia of King William (as duke) in 1076 in which a disputed mill was awarded to the Abbey of Mont St. Michael .[5] On 14 July 1080 he witnessed a charter to the Abbey of Lessay (in the diocese of Coutances ), another in the same year addressed to Remigius de Fécamp bishop of Lincoln in favour of the Abbey of Préaux .[6] and one more in the same period, 1079 x 1082, to the Abbey of St Stephen of Caen .[7] His name is attached to a memorandum in 1085, and on 24 April 1089 he witnessed a confirmation of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy and Count of Maine to St Mary of Bayeaux, where he appears below his son in the witness list.[8]

He probably died sometime after this. His son Ranulf le Meschin became ruler of Cumberland and later Earl of Chester.[9] The Durham Liber Vitae , c. 1098 x 1120, shows that his eldest son was one Richard, who died in youth, and that he had another son named William.[10] He also had a daughter called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).[9] 1 35 36


Research Notes: Wife - Maud d'Avranches

Sister of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-25 (Ranulph II) 1 22 39


Death Notes: Child - Ranulf le Meschin 3rd Earl of Chester

Death date may be 27 Jan 1128/29.


Research Notes: Child - Ranulf le Meschin 3rd Earl of Chester

From thepeerage.com:
Ranulph le Meschin, 1st Earl of Chester gained the title of Vicomte de Bayeux [Normandy].3 He was also known as Ranulph de Briquessart.3 He succeeded to the title of Vicomte d'Avranches [Normandy] on 25 November 1120.3 He was created 1st Earl of Chester [England] in 1121.3 He was Commander of the Royal forces in Normandy in 1124.


-----

From Wikipedia - Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester :

Ranulf le Meschin, Ranulf de Briquessart or Ranulf I [Ranulph, Ralph] (died 1129) was a late 11th- and early 12th-century Norman magnate based in northern and central England. Originating in Bessin in Normandy, Ranulf made his career in England thanks to his kinship with Hugh d'Avranches , the earl of Chester, the patronage of kings William II Rufus and Henry I Beauclerc , and his marriage to Lucy , heiress of the Bolingbroke-Spalding estates in Lincolnshire.

Ranulf fought in Normandy on behalf of Henry I, and served the English king as a kind of semi-independent governor in the far north-west, Cumberland and Westmorland , before attaining the palatine county of Chester on the Anglo-Welsh marches in 1120. He held this position for the remainder of his life, and passed the title on to his son.

Family and origins
Ranulf was the son of Ranulf de Briquessart , viscount of the Bessin, and likely for this reason the former Ranulf was styled le Meschin, "the younger".[2] His mother was Matilda, daughter of Richard, viscount of the Avranchin . We know from an entry in the Durham Liber Vitae , c. 1098 x 1120, that he had an older brother named Richard (who died in youth), and a younger brother named William.[3] He had a sister called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).[2]

Ranulf's earliest appearance in extant historical records was 24 April 1089 , the date of a charter of Robert Curthose , Duke of Normandy , to Bayeux Cathedral .[2] Ranulf, as "Ranulf son of Ranulf the viscount", was one of the charter's witnesses.[2] He appeared again in the sources, c. 1093/4, as a witness to the foundation charter of Chester Abbey , granted by his uncle Hugh d'Avranches , palantine count ("earl") of Chester.[2] Between 1098 and 1101, probably in 1098, Ranulf became a major English landowner in his own right when he became the third husband of Lucy , heiress of the honour of Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire.[4] This acquisition also brought him the lordship of Appleby in Cumberland , previously held by Lucy's second husband Ivo Taillebois .[2]

Lord of Cumberland and Westmorland

A charter issued in 1124 by David I , King of the Scots , to Robert I de Brus granting the latter the lordship of Annandale recorded that Ranulf was remembered as holding lordship of Carlisle and Cumberland, holding with the same semi-regal rights by which Robert was to hold Annandale .[2] A source from 1212 attests that the jurors of Cumberland remembered Ranulf as quondam dominus Cumberland ("sometime Lord of Cumberland").[5] Ranulf possessed the power and in some respects the dignity of a semi-independent earl in the region, though he lacked the formal status of being called such. A contemporary illustration of this authority is one charter in the records of Wetheral Priory , which recorded Ranulf addressing his own sheriff, "Richer" (probably Richard de Boivill).[6]

Ivo Taillebois, when he married Ranulf's future wife Lucy, had acquired her Lincolnshire lands; sometime after 1086 he acquired authority in Westmorland and Kendal . Adjacent lands in Lancashire and Westmorland, previously controlled by Earl Tostig Godwinson , were probably carved up in the 1080s by the king, between Roger the Poitevin and Ivo, a territorial division at least partially responsible for the later boundaries between the two counties.[7] Norman lordship in the heartland of Cumberland dates to around 1092, the year King William Rufus seized the region from its previous ruler, Dolfin.[8] There is inconclusive evidence that this happened around the same time as William II's expedition to Carlisle, and that settlers from Ivo's Lincolnshire lands came into Cumberland as a result.[9]

When Ranulf acquired Ivo's authority, or an extended version of it, is not clear. Between 1094 and 1098 Lucy was married to Roger fitz Gerold de Roumare, so it is possible that this marriage was the king's way of transferring authority in the region to Roger fitz Gerold.[10] The "traditional view", and that held by the historian William Kapelle , was that Ranulf's authority in the region did not come about until 1106 or after, as a reward for Ranulf's participation in the Battle of Tinchebrai .[11] Another historian, Richard Sharpe , has recently attacked this view and argued that it probably came in or soon after 1098. Sharpe believed that Lucy was the main mechanism by which this authority changed hands here, and pointed out that Ranulf had been married to Lucy years before Tinchebrai, and that, moreover, Ranulf can be found months before Tinchebrai taking evidence from county jurors at York (which may have been responsible for parts of this partially-shired region at this point).[12]

Firm dates for Ranulf's authority in the region do however come only from 1106 and after, well into the reign of Henry I .[2] It was in 1106 that Ranulf founded a Benedictine monastic house at Wetheral , Wetheral Priory.[2] The record of the jurors of Cumberland dating to 1212 claimed that Ranulf created two baronies in the region, Burgh-by-Sands for Robert de Trevers, Ranulf's brother-in-law, and Liddel for Turgis Brandos.[13] He appears to have attempted to give Gilsland to his brother William, though its lord, "Gille", held out; later the lordship of Allerdale (also called Egremont or Copeland ) was given to William.[14] Kirklinton may have been given to Richard de Boivill, Ranulf's sheriff.[2]

Earl of Chester

Marriage to the a great heiress came only with royal patronage, which in turn came only through having royal respect and trust. Ranulf was however not recorded often at the court of Henry I, and did not form part of the king's closest group of administrative advisers.[15] He was however one of the king's military companions, and served under Henry as an officer of the royal household when the latter was on campaign; Ranulf was in fact one of his three commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai, where he led the vanguard of Henry's army, and was often in Normandy when the king's interests were threatened there.[16] He is found serving as a royal justice in both 1106 and 1116. Later in his career, 1123-4, he commanded the king's garrison at Évreux during the war with William Clito , and in March 1124 he assisted in the capture of Waleran, Count of Meulan .[2]

The death of Richard , count-palatine of Chester in the White Ship Disaster of 1120 near Barfleur , paved the way for Ranulf's elevation to comital rank.[2] Merely four days before the disaster, Ranulf and his cousin Richard had witnessed a charter together at Cerisy .[2] Henry recognized Ranulf as Richard's successor to the county of Chester.[2] Ranulf's accession may have involved him giving up many of his other lands, including much of his wife's Lincolnshire lands and his land in Cumbria, though direct evidence for this beyond convenient timing is lacking.[17] Richard Sharpe suggested that Ranulf may have had to sell much land in order to pay the king for the palatine-county of Chester, though it could not have covered the whole fee, as Ranulf's son Ranulf de Gernon , when he succeeded his father to Chester in 1129, owed the king £1000 "from his father's debt for the land of Earl Hugh".[18]

Ranulf died in January 1129, and was buried in Chester Abbey.[2] He was survived by his wife and countess, Lucy, and succeeded by his son Ranulf de Gernon.[2] A daughter, Alicia, married Richard de Clare , a lord in the Anglo-Welsh marches.[2] 1 19 20 21 22


Research Notes: Child - William le Meschin Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 132B-26 1 44 45


Ranulph the Rich




Husband Ranulph the Rich

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Simon de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton 47 48

            AKA: Simon de St. Liz, Simon de Senliz Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1110
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maud of Huntingdon (Abt 1074-1131) 49 50 51
           Marr: Abt 1090




Research Notes: Husband - Ranulph the Rich

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-26 (Maud of Huntingdon)


Research Notes: Child - Simon de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton

Crusader, son of Ranulph the Rich, a Norman.

From Wikipedia - Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton :

Simon I of St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton and 1st Earl of Huntingdon[1] (died 1109) was a Norman nobleman.

He built Northampton Castle and the town walls[2]. He also built one of the three remaining Round churches in England , the The Holy Sepulchre , Sheep Street, Northampton ).

Family
He married Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon . Simon de Senlis, 4th Earl of Northampton was their son. A daughter, Maud de St. Liz, married Robert Fitz Richard . Waltheof of Melrose was also a son. 47 48


Raoul Count of Guînes




Husband Raoul Count of Guînes 52

           Born: Abt 978 - Guînes, (Pas-de-Calais), Flanders (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 1036
         Buried: 


         Father: Adolfus Count of Guînes (Abt 0937-0996) 53
         Mother: Maud de Bologne (Abt 0944-      ) 54


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Manasses Count of Guînes 55 56

           Born: Abt 1012 - Guînes, (Pas-de-Calais), Flanders (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Manasses Count of Guînes

55 56


Raoul I Viscount de Thouars




Husband Raoul I Viscount de Thouars

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Auliarde de Thouars

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hugh IV "Brunus" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan (      -Between 1025/1032)




Research Notes: Husband - Raoul I Viscount de Thouars

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan)


Research Notes: Child - Auliarde de Thouars

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan)


Ratherius King of the Franks




Husband Ratherius King of the Franks 57

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 0090
         Buried: 


         Father: Antenor IV King of the Franks (      -0069) 58
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Richimir I King of the Franks 59

           Born: 0070
     Christened: 
           Died: 114
         Buried: 




Sources


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3 Wikipedia.org, Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

5 Wikipedia.org, Almodis de la Marche.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 185A-4, 275-21 (Hugh V de Lusignan).

7 Wikipedia.org, County of La Marche.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-4 (Bernard I).

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10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-21.

11 Wikipedia.org, Pons, Count of Toulouse.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 185A-5 (Almode), 185-2 (Emma of Mortain).

13 Wikipedia.org, Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona.

14 Wikipedia.org, Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-16.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-18 (Ebles Mancer).

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-27, 125-27 (Maud de Caen).

18 Wikipedia.org, Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-26, 132D-26.

20 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), pp. 86-87.

21 Wikipedia.org, Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester.

22 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-26 (Ranulph III).

24 Wikipedia.org, Lucy of Bolingbroke.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-27.

26 Wikipedia.org, Maud of Gloucester.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-26, 124-26.

28 Wikipedia.org, Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 124-26 (Robert de Caen), 63-26 (Hawise de Beaumont).

30 Wikipedia.org, Mabel FitzHamon of Gloucester.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28 (Hugh of Kevelioc).

32 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

34 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132B-25.

36 Wikipedia.org, Ranulf de Briquessart.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.).

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), line 132A-24.

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132B-25 (Ranulph II).

40 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com (Emma de Contville).

41 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872564.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lline 132A-25 (Ranulph II).

43 Wikipedia.org.

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132B-26.

45 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Mortimer.

46 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132B-26 (William le Meschin).

47 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-26 (Maud of Huntingdon).

48 Wikipedia.org, Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton.

49 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-26.

50 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 413.

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