The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Hrimnir "the Giant"




Husband Hrimnir "the Giant" 1

           Born: Abt 664 - <Norway>
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Wife

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Children
1 F Ljod Hrimnirsdatter 1

           Born: Abt 685 - <Norway>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
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         Spouse: Volsung Rersson (Abt 0680-      ) 1
           Marr: Abt 704 - Norway





Nezamysl Duke of Bohemia and Hruba




Husband Nezamysl Duke of Bohemia 1

           Born: Abt 718 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 783
         Buried: 


         Father: Premysl Duke of Bohemia (Abt 0694-0745) 1
         Mother: Libuse Duchess of Bohemia (Abt 0700-      ) 1


       Marriage: 



Wife Hruba 1

           Born: Abt 720 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
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Children
1 M Mnbata Duke of Bohemia 1

           Born: Abt 716 - <Praha, Praha>, Bohemia (Czechoslovakia)
     Christened: 
           Died: 804
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Strezislava (Abt 0711-      ) 1





Hubert Count of Senlis




Husband Hubert Count of Senlis 1 2

            AKA: Hubert Comté de St. Liz
           Born: Abt 880 - <Bretagne, (France)>
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Wife

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Children
1 F Sprote de Bourgogne 1 3 4

            AKA: Esporita de Bourgogne, < > de Sprote de Bourgogne
           Born: Abt 908 - <Normandy, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
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         Spouse: Bernard de Harcourt Lord of Harcourt (Abt 0880-Bef 0960) 1 3 5 6



2 F Sprote de Bretagne à la Danoise 1 4 7

            AKA: Espriotæ de Bretagne, Sprota
           Born: Abt 911 - Bretagne [Brittany], (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 972
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy (Abt 0892-0942) 1 7 8




Research Notes: Child - Sprote de Bourgogne

From http://cybergata.com/roots/423.htm :
~A Genealogical History of the Family of Montgomery, pg. 142, pedigree 113, de Sprote, of the royal family of Burgundy. 1 3 4


Birth Notes: Child - Sprote de Bretagne à la Danoise

May have been born in Bretagne. May have been born abt 911.


Research Notes: Child - Sprote de Bretagne à la Danoise

From http://cybergata.com/roots/423.htm :
~A Genealogical History of the Family of Montgomery, pg. 142, pedigree 113, de Sprote, of the royal family of Burgundy.

---
Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 121E-19 (William I) 1 4 7


Hugh Count of Equisheim




Husband Hugh Count of Equisheim 1

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Wife

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Children
1 F Adela 1 9

            AKA: Alice Countess of Equisheim, Alix
           Born: Abt 929 - <Hainaut, Belgium>
     Christened: 
           Died: 961
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Reginar III Count of Hainaut (0920-0973) 1 10





Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux




Husband Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester 11 12 13

            AKA: Hugh de Meschines 5th Earl of Chester
           Born: 1147 - Kevelioc, Monmouthshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jun 1181 - Leek, Staffordshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulf IV de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester (Abt 1100-1153) 1 14 15
         Mother: Maud FitzRobert of Gloucester (Abt 1120-1190) 1 16 17


       Marriage: 1169

Events

• Vicomte d'Avranches, Normandy:




Wife Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux 11

            AKA: Bertred of Evreux, Bertrade d'Evreux de Montfort
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         Father: Simon III de Montfort Count of Evreux (      -Abt 1181) 18
         Mother: Maud (      -      )




Children
1 M Ranulf de Blondeville 6th Earl of Chester

            AKA: Ranulph de Meschines 4th Earl of Chester and Lincoln
           Born: 1172
     Christened: 
           Died: 26 Oct 1232
         Buried:  - St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England



2 F Mabel of Chester 19

           Born: Abt 1173
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William d'Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel (Bef 1180-1221) 19 20
           Marr: Between 1196 and 1199



3 F Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln 11 21

            AKA: Hawyse of Chester
           Born: 1180
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1241 and 1243
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Robert II de Quincy (      -1257) 22 23



4 F Agnes of Chester, Lady of Chartley 24

            AKA: Alice of Chester
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Nov 1247
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William de Ferrers 4th Earl of Derby (Abt 1162-1247) 1 25
           Marr: 1192 - Cheshire, England




Research Notes: Husband - Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester

From Wikipedia - Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester :

Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester (1147 - 30 June 1181) was the son of Ranulf de Gernon and Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (otherwise known as Robert de Caen , the illegitimate son of Henry I of England , making her Henry's granddaughter).

He is thought by some to have taken his name from Kevelioc in Monmouth as his birthplace, but others think that instead he was born in, and took the name of, the cwmwd of Cyfeiliog (in modern Powys ) in the southern part of the Kingdom of Powys , Wales .

He was underage when his father's death in 1153 made him heir to his family's estates on both sides of the channel. He joined the baronial Revolt of 1173-1174 against King Henry II of England , and was influential in convincing the Bretons to revolt. After being captured and imprisoned after the Battle of Alnwick , he finally got his estates restored in 1177, and served in King Henry's Irish campaigns.

In 1169 he married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux , daughter of Simon III de Montfort . She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:
Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
Maud of Chester (1171-1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby
Hawise of Chester (1180-1242), married Robert II de Quincy
A daughter, name unknown, who was briefly married to Llywelyn Fawr

He also had an illegitimate daughter, Amice of Chester, who married Ralph de Mainwaring.

Hugh of Kevelioc died 30 June 1181 at Leek , Staffordshire , England. 11 12 13


Research Notes: Wife - Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux

Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) 11


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 126-28


Research Notes: Child - Ranulf de Blondeville 6th Earl of Chester

From Wikipedia - Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester :

Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester[1] born 1172 - died 1232, known in some references as the 4th Earl (in the second lineage of the title after the original family line was broken after the 2nd Earl) was one of the "old school" of Anglo-Norman barons whose loyalty to the Angevin dynasty was consistent but contingent on the receipt of lucrative favours. He was described as "almost the last relic of the great feudal aristocracy of the Conquest".[2]

Early life
Ranulf, born in 1172,[1] was the son of Hugh de Kevelioc and Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux . He was said to have been small in physical stature.
He succeeded to the earldom of Chester (like his father before him) as a minor (aged nine) and attained his majority in 1187, which gave him control of his estates in England and Normandy.

[edit ] Early career
In 1189, aged seventeen, he was married to Constance of Brittany , the widow of Henry II 's son Geoffrey, and the mother of Arthur of Brittany , with whom King John contested the succession. Henry did not trust the Countess and wanted her married to a magnate he could trust The marriage gave Ranulf control of the earldom of Richmond and the duchy of Brittany , but was not a success and they separated.
In 1196, King Richard I of England nominated the nine-year-old Arthur as his heir, and summoned him and his mother, Countess Constance, to Normandy. Constance left Nantes and travelled towards Rouen . On the way she was abducted by her estranged husband. Richard, furious, marched to Brittany at the head of an army, intent on rescuing his nephew. Arthur was secretly taken away by his tutor to the French court to be brought up with Louis , son of the French king Philip II .
In 1199, Constance escaped from her husband and their marriage was dissolved on the grounds of desertion.
In 1200 Ranulf cemented his power in Normandy by marrying Clemence of Fougères; she was the daughter of William of Fougères , widow of Alan de Dinant , and sister of Geoffrey of Fougères . He had opposed John's attempted coup of 1193-4, and retained many contacts with partisans of his former stepson Arthur. He spent most of 1199-1204 in France and his continued loyalty was bought by John with further patronage. However the King was suspicious of the Earl, perhaps with some reason. In the winter of 1204-5, Ranulph, suspected of dealings with the rebellious Welsh and of contemplating revolt himself, had extensive estates temporarily confiscated by the king. This episode apparently convinced Ranulph to show loyalty in future. Thereafter he was showered with royal favours. In return he fought John's Welsh wars 1209-12; helped secure the peace with the pope in 1213-14, and was with the king in Poitou in 1214.
Loyal to the king in 1215-16, he was one of the few magnates to witness the Magna Carta of 1215. He played a leading military role in the civil war by virtue of his extensive estates and numerous castles. Ranulf stood with William Marshal and the Earls of Derby and Warwick with the King, whilst the other nobility of the land stood with the enemy or remained aloof from the conflict

Regency
On John's death in 1216, Ranulf's influence increased further. There was an expectation at Gloucester that Ranulf would contend for the regency for the young Henry III . Events moved quickly at Gloucester, where William Marshal and the young king were, in Ranulph's absence. The Marshal was put forward and offered the regency by the nobility and clerics gathered at Gloucester before the arrival of Ranulph. There was concern that Ranulph might object to the decision, but when he arrived (29 October 1216) he stated that he did not want to be regent, so any potential conflict vanished.

Campaign of 1217
Before John's death, rebel barons had offered the throne of England to Louis, the heir to the French throne. Louis had invaded the country during the summer of 1216 and had taken Winchester. De Blondeville put his political weight behind re-issuing the Magna Carta in 1216 and 1217; his military experience was utilised in defeating the rebels at Lincoln in 1217. Ranulph was based in the north midlands and was charged with stopping the northern barons linking up with Louis in the south.
The Earl chose to combine personal concerns with those of the country by attacking Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester 's castle at Mountsorrel in Leicestershire - from which the Earl of Winchester's predecessors had ousted Ranulph's grandfather, Ranulf de Gernon . Louis was persuaded by the Earl of Winchester to send a relief force to the castle. When they arrived, de Blondeville and the Royalist force were gone. In fact they had headed to Lincoln to deal with a French force besieging the castle there.
William Marshal with his main army at Northampton also made for the city, and at Lincoln a battle was fought between the Royalists headed by William Marshal and de Blondeville and the French forces and their allies. The battle went in favour of the Royalists, and they captured forty-six Barons and the Earls of Winchester, Hereford and Lincoln. Following the battle Ranulf was created Earl of Lincoln .

[edit ] Fifth Crusade
In 1218, de Blondeville decided to honour the crusading vow he had made three years previously, and he journeyed eastwards. He met up with the Count of Nevers and the Count of La Marche in Genoa , accompanied by the Earls of Derby, Arundel and Winchester. They then sailed on towards Egypt and the Nile. An icy winter in camp was followed by a burning summer which affected the morale of the crusaders greatly. During September 1219, the Sultan, wary of the conflict outside Damietta , offered the Crusaders a startling bargain - Bethlehem, Nazareth, Jerusalem and central Palastine and Galilee, so long as the Crusaders gave up their war in Egypt. Earl Ranulph was one of many voices in support of taking the offer, and was supported by his English peers. However, Bishop Pelagius , the Patriarch of Jerusalem and the military orders would have none of it. They finally refused the offer and on 5 November they found the walls of Damietta poorly manned, so they attacked and secured the city. When winter came the army was smouldering with discontent. Earl Ranulf left Damietta in September of 1220, with his fellow English earls, leaving behind an indecisive force under the command of Bishop Pelagius and the Military Orders. Upon the crusade's failure he returned to England to find his rival, William Marshal dead and the government in the hands of Hubert de Burgh.

[edit ] Final years
From 1220 to 1224, tensions grew between government officials and old loyalists of King John. This flared into open conflict in the winter of 1223-4 when Ranulf among others briefly tried to resist de Burgh's policy of resumption of sheriffdoms and royal castles. Ranulf built Bolingbroke Castle near Spilsby in Lincolnshire around 1220, later the birthplace of King Henry IV . Ranulf was briefly made castellan of Wallingford Castle . He made an alliance with Llywelyn the Great , whose daughter Elen married Ranulf's nephew and heir, John the Scot , in about 1222.
De Blondeville's final years saw him acting as an elder statesman, witnessing the 1225 re-issue of the Magna Carta, playing a prominent role in the dispute in 1227 over Forest Laws and, as a veteran, leading Henry III's army on the ill-fated Poitou expedition of 1230-1. He came to lead the campaign after the death of William Marshal (the younger). He showed vigour and made a thrust into Anjou, but by the end of June the French had reached the Breton border. Ranulf concluded the campaign with a truce with the King of France for three years, to end in 1234.
Earl Ranulf kept in sight his personal advantage. In 1220 some of his estates avoided carucage ; in 1225 Aid was not levied in Cheshire; and in 1229 he successfully resisted the ecclesiastical tax collector. His only major failure, in old age, was not avoiding the 1232 levy of the fortieth on his lands.

Ranulf's death
Ranulf died on 26 October 1232[1], aged sixty. His viscera were buried at Wallingford Castle, his heart at DieuLacres Abbey (which he had founded), and the remainder of his body at St Werburg's in Chester . His earldom of Lincoln passed to Margaret de Quincy, daughter of his youngest sister Hawise , who had married John de Lacy . His own earldom of Chester went to the son of his sister Maud of Chester , John the Scot .


Research Notes: Child - Mabel of Chester

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 149-27 (William d'Aubigny) 19


Research Notes: Child - Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln

Sister and coheiress of Ranulph de Meschines, fourth Earl of Chester and Lincoln. 11 21


Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester




Husband Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester 11 12 13

            AKA: Hugh de Meschines 5th Earl of Chester
           Born: 1147 - Kevelioc, Monmouthshire, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jun 1181 - Leek, Staffordshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Ranulf IV de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester (Abt 1100-1153) 1 14 15
         Mother: Maud FitzRobert of Gloucester (Abt 1120-1190) 1 16 17


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux (      -      ) 11 - 1169

Events

• Vicomte d'Avranches, Normandy:




Wife

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Children
1 F Amice of Chester 1 11

            AKA: Amicia de Meschines
           Born: Abt 1167
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ralph de Mainwaring (Abt 1155-      ) 1
           Marr: 1179 - Warmingham, Cheshire, England




Research Notes: Husband - Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester

From Wikipedia - Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester :

Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester (1147 - 30 June 1181) was the son of Ranulf de Gernon and Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (otherwise known as Robert de Caen , the illegitimate son of Henry I of England , making her Henry's granddaughter).

He is thought by some to have taken his name from Kevelioc in Monmouth as his birthplace, but others think that instead he was born in, and took the name of, the cwmwd of Cyfeiliog (in modern Powys ) in the southern part of the Kingdom of Powys , Wales .

He was underage when his father's death in 1153 made him heir to his family's estates on both sides of the channel. He joined the baronial Revolt of 1173-1174 against King Henry II of England , and was influential in convincing the Bretons to revolt. After being captured and imprisoned after the Battle of Alnwick , he finally got his estates restored in 1177, and served in King Henry's Irish campaigns.

In 1169 he married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux , daughter of Simon III de Montfort . She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:
Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
Maud of Chester (1171-1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby
Hawise of Chester (1180-1242), married Robert II de Quincy
A daughter, name unknown, who was briefly married to Llywelyn Fawr

He also had an illegitimate daughter, Amice of Chester, who married Ralph de Mainwaring.

Hugh of Kevelioc died 30 June 1181 at Leek , Staffordshire , England. 11 12 13


Research Notes: Child - Amice of Chester

Illegitimate daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, according to Wikipedia. 1 11


Hugh III of Maine




Husband Hugh III of Maine 26

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Children
1 M Herbert I of Maine 26

            AKA: Herbert I "Evigilans Canis" of Maine, Herbert I "Wakedog" of Maine
           Born: 
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           Died: 1036
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Herbert I of Maine

From Wikipedia - Herbert I of Maine :

Herbert I (died 1036), called Wakedog or Evigilans Canis (Eveille-Chien), was the count of Maine from 1015, the son and successor of Hugh III .

Under the last Carolingian and first Capetian kings of France , royal power declined sharply and many royal rights were amassed by the greater and lesser nobility. Herbert of Maine even struck coins with his own monogram. He purchased the loyalty of his vassals by dolling out his land to them and granting them the right to build castles, which proliferated, as at Sablé , Château-du-Loir , Mayenne , Laval , La Ferté Bernard , Saint Calais , Sillé (after 1050), La Suze , Malicorne , La Milesse , Montfort , and Sourches .

From the beginning of his reign, he was constrained to aid his suzerain, Fulk III of Anjou , in a war against Odo II of Blois , both of whom had designs on the Touraine . In 1016, following an attack on the fortress of Montrichard , Odo met the forces of Fulk at the Battle of Pontlevoy on 6 July . Despite Odo's numerical advantage, by the intervention of Herbert, the battle went to Fulk. One of the consequences of the battle was to create a balance of power in the region, which was followed by peace for several years.

By marrying his son to Bertha of Chartres, daughter of Odo II of Blois , Herbert was able to maintain himself independent of his legal suzerain. He also allied with the count of Rennes , who threatened Fulk from the west. He made enemies with the king, Robert II , and even expelled the bishop of Le Mans , Avesgaud of Bellème , from his diocese. Finally, on 7 March 1025 , he was arrested in Saintes by Fulk, who kept him imprisoned for two years until a coalition forced his release. Herbert then did homage to Fulk.

Herbert left four children:
Hugh IV , successor, married Bertha, daughter of Odo of Blois
Biota, married Walter III of the Vexin
Paula, either wife or mother of John de Beaugency , among whose children was Elias to whom Maine eventually passed
Gersenda, married firstly Theobald III of Blois ; divorced in 1048 and married secondly Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan 26


Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France and Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois




Husband Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France 27 28

            AKA: Hugh of Vermandois, Hugues "le Grand" de France, Hugh Magnus, Hugh de Vermandois
           Born: 1057
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Oct 1102 - Tarsus, Cilicia, (Turkey)
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry I of France (1008-1060) 29 30
         Mother: Anne of Kiev (Between 1024/1032-1075) 31 32


       Marriage: Bef 1080



Wife Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois 1 33 34

            AKA: Adele of Vermandois
           Born: Abt 1065 - <Valois, Île-de-France, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Sep 1120 - <Vermandois, (Picardy)>, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Herbert IV Count of Vermandois and Valois (Abt 1032-Abt 1080) 1 35
         Mother: Adela of Valois and Vexin (      -      ) 36 37




Children
1 F Isabel de Vermandois Countess of Leicester 33 38

            AKA: Elizabeth de Vermandois, Isabella de Vermandois, Isabel de Vermandois
           Born: Abt 1081 - <Valois, Île-de-France, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Feb 1131 - England
         Buried:  - Lewes, Sussex, England
         Spouse: Sir Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan (Abt 1049-1118) 1 39 40
           Marr: Between 1096 and 1101
         Spouse: William II de Warenne 2nd Earl of Surrey (Abt 1065-1138) 1 41 42
           Marr: After 1118



2 M Raoul I Count of Vermandois

            AKA: Count Raoul of Vermandois
           Born: 
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           Died: 
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3 M Henry of Chaumont-en-Vexin

           Born: 
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           Died: 1130
         Buried: 



4 M Simon Bishop of Noyon

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5 F Matilde de Vermandois

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6 F Constance de Vermandois

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7 F Agnes de Vermandois

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8 F Beatrix de Vermandois

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9 F Emma de Vermandois

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Death Notes: Husband - Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France

Died on crusade.


Research Notes: Husband - Hugh Magnus of Vermandois and Valois, Duke of France

Duke of France and Burgundy, Marquis of Orleans, Count of Amiens, Chaumont, Paris, Valois, and Vermandois. He was a leader of the First Crusade.

First husband of Adelaide de Vermandois.

From Wikipedia - Hugh of Vermandois :

Hugh of Vermandois (1053 - October 18 , 1101 ), was son to King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev , and the younger brother of King Philip I of France . He was in his own right Count of Vermandois . William of Tyre called him "Hugh Magnus", Hugh the Great, but he was an ineffectual leader and soldier, great only in his boasting. Indeed, Sir Steven Runciman is certain that "Magnus" is a copyist's error, and should be "minus", "the younger" (referring to Hugh as younger brother of the King of France).

In early 1096 Hugh and Philip began discussing the First Crusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris . Although Philip could not participate, as he had been excommunicated , Hugh was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after an eclipse of the moon on February 11 , 1096.

That summer Hugh's army left France for Italy , where they would cross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine Empire , unlike the other Crusader armies who were travelling by land. On the way, many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho joined Hugh's army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians , whose land he had been pillaging. Hugh crossed the Adriatic from Bari in Southern Italy , but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantine port of Dyrrhachium .
Hugh and most of his army was rescued and escorted to Constantinople , where they arrived in November of 1096. Prior to his arrival, Hugh sent an arrogant, insulting letter to Eastern Roman Emperor Alexius I Comnenus , according to the Emperor's biography by his daughter (the Alexiad), demanding that Alexius meet with him:

"Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all, who are under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, and to receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility."

Alexius was already wary of the armies about to arrive, after the unruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in the year. Alexius kept Hugh in custody in a monastery until Hugh swore an oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljuk territory and, in 1098 , captured Antioch , Hugh was sent back to Constantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius was uninterested, however, and Hugh, instead of returning to Antioch to help plan the siege of Jerusalem , went back to France. There he was scorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a Crusader to complete a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicate him. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101 , but was wounded in battle with the Turks in September, and died of his wounds in October in Tarsus .

Family and children
He married Adele of Vermandois, the daughter of Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Valois .They had nine children:
Count Raoul I of Vermandois
Henry, senior of Chaumont-en-Vexin , (d. 1130 ).
Simon, Bishop of Noyon
Elizabeth de Vermandois , married
Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester ;
William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
Matilde de Vermandois, married Raoul I of Beaugency
Constance de Vermandois, married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaucher
Agnes de Vermandois, married Margrave Boniface del Vasto . Mother of Adelaide del Vasto .
Beatrix de Vermandois, married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray
Emma de Vermandois 27 28



Death Notes: Wife - Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois

Possibly d. 1124


Research Notes: Wife - Adelaide de Vermandois Countess of Vermandois and Valois

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

[Adele of Vermandois] was the heiress of the county of Vermandois, and descendant of a junior patrilineal line of descent from Charlemagne . The first Count of Vermandois was Pepin of Vermandois . He was a son of Bernard of Italy , grandson of Pippin of Italy and great-grandson of Charlemagne and Hildegard .

As such, Elizabeth had distinguished ancestry and connections. Her father was a younger brother of Philip I of France and her mother was among the last Carolingians . She was also distantly related to the Kings of England , the Dukes of Normandy , the Counts of Flanders and through her Carolingian ancestors to practically every major nobleman in Western Europe . 1 33 34


Notes: Marriage

After 1067 and before 1080?
FamilySearch has m. abt 1064.


Birth Notes: Child - Isabel de Vermandois Countess of Leicester

FamilySearch has b. abt 1085 in Valois, France


Research Notes: Child - Isabel de Vermandois Countess of Leicester

From: Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Elizabeth de Vermandois, or Elisabeth or Isabel de Vermandois (c. 1081 -13 February 1131 ), is a fascinating figure about whose descendants and ancestry much is known and about whose character and life relatively little is known. She was twice married to influential Anglo-Norman magnates, and had several children (among whose descendants are numbered many kings and some queens of England and Scotland). Her Capetian and Carolingian ancestry was a source of much pride for some of these descendants (who included these arms as quarterings in their coats-of-arms[1] ). However, the lady herself led a somewhat controversial life.

Family
Elizabeth de Vermandois was the third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adele of Vermandois. Her paternal grandparents were Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev . Her maternal grandparents were Herbert IV of Vermandois and Adele of Vexin .
Her mother was the heiress of the county of Vermandois, and descendant of a junior patrilineal line of descent from Charlemagne . The first Count of Vermandois was Pepin of Vermandois . He was a son of Bernard of Italy , grandson of Pippin of Italy and great-grandson of Charlemagne and Hildegard .

As such, Elizabeth had distinguished ancestry and connections. Her father was a younger brother of Philip I of France and her mother was among the last Carolingians . She was also distantly related to the Kings of England , the Dukes of Normandy , the Counts of Flanders and through her Carolingian ancestors to practically every major nobleman in Western Europe .

Countess of Leicester
In 1096, while under age (and probably aged 9 or 11), Elizabeth married Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester . Meulan was over 35 years her senior, which was an unusual age difference even for this time period. He was a nobleman of some significance in France, having inherited lands from his maternal uncle Henry, Count of Meulan, and had fought bravely and with distinction at his first battle, the Battle of Hastings in 1066 then aged only 16. His parents Roger de Beaumont , Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemar and Adeline of Meulan , heiress of Meulan had died long before; Roger had been a kinsman and close associate of William the Conqueror . Meulan had inherited lands in Normandy after his father died circa 1089, and had also been given lands in the Kingdom of England after his participation in the Norman conquest of England . However, at the time of the marriage, he held no earldom in England while his younger brother was already styled Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick .

Planche states that the bride (Elizabeth) agreed willingly to the marriage, although this means little in the context. Despite the immense age difference, this was a good marriage for its times. Meulan was a respected advisor to three reigning monarchs: William II of England ), Robert Curthose of Normandy and Philip I of France .

According to Middle Ages custom, brides were often betrothed young - 8 being the legal age for betrothal and 12 for marriage (for women). The young betrothed wife would often go to her husband's castle to be raised by his parents or other relatives and to learn the customs and ways of her husband's family. The actual wedding would not take place until much later. Some genealogists speculate that the usual age at which a noble bride could expect the marriage to be consummated would be 14. This is consistent with the date of birth of Elizabeth's first child Emma in 1102 when she would be about 15 to 17.

The marriage produced several children, including most notably two sons who were twins (born 1104 ), and thus remarkable in both surviving and both becoming important noblemen. They are better known to historians of this period as the Beaumont twins, or as Waleran de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and his younger twin Robert Bossu (the Humpback) or Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester . (Readers of Ellis Peters' Cadfael historical mystery series will find both twins mentioned frequently).

Another notable child of this marriage was Elisabeth or Isabel de Beaumont, one of the youngest mistresses of Henry I of England and later mother (by her first marriage) of Richard Strongbow .

Some contemporaries were surprised that the aging Count of Meulan (b circa 1049/1050) was able to father so many children, given how busy he was with turmoil in England and Normandy from 1102 to 1110 (or later) and acting as Henry I's unofficial minister. One explanation is offered below; another might simply be an indication of his good health and energy (expended mostly in dashing from one troublespot in Normandy to England back to Normandy).

William II of England died suddenly in a purported hunting accident, and was hastily succeeded not by the expected heir but by the youngest brother Henry . This seizure of the throne led to an abortive invasion by the older brother Duke Robert of Normandy, followed by an uneasy truce between the brothers, followed by trouble in both England and Normandy for some time (stirred up by Duke Robert, and by an exiled nobleman Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury ). Finally, Henry invaded Normandy and in the Battle of Tinchebray (September 28 , 1106 ) destroyed organized opposition to his takeover of Normandy and imprisoned his ineffectual older brother for his lifetime. Meulan and his brother Warwick were apparently supporters of Henry during this entire period, and Meulan was rewarded with the earldom of Leicester in 1103 . By 1107, Meulan was in possession of substantial lands in three domains. In 1111, he was able to revenge himself on the attack on his seat Meulan by Louis VI of France . He avenged himself by harrying Paris .

Countess of Surrey
Elizabeth, Countess of Meulan apparently tired of her aging husband at some point during the marriage. The historian Planche says (1874) that the Countess was seduced by or fell in love with a younger nobleman, William de Warenne (c. 1071 -11 May 1138 ) himself the thwarted suitor of Edith of Scotland , Queen consort of Henry I of England. Warenne, whose mother Gundred has been alleged (in modern times) to be the Conqueror's daughter and stepdaughter by some genealogists, was said to want a royal bride, and Elizabeth fitted his requirements, even though she was also another man's wife.

In 1115, the Countess was apparently carried off or abducted by Warenne, which abduction apparently concealed a long-standing affair. There was some kind of separation or divorce between Meulan and his wife, which however did not permit her to marry her lover. The elderly Count of Meulan died, supposedly of chagrin and mortification in being thus publicly humiliated, in the Abbey of Preaux, Normandy on 5 June 1118 , leaving his properties to his two elder sons whom he had carefully educated.

Elizabeth married, secondly, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey , sometime after the death of her first husband. By him, it is alleged, she already had several children (all born during her marriage to Meulan). She also had at least one daughter born while she was living out of wedlock with Warenne (1115-1118). It is unclear whether this daughter was Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland or Gundrede de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (her half-brothers' first cousin).

The later life of Elizabeth de Vermandois is not known. Her sons by her first marriage appear to have a good relationship with their half-brother William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey although on opposing sides for much of the wars between Stephen and Matilda . Her eldest son Waleran, Count of Meulan was active in supporting the disinherited heir William Clito , son of Robert Curthose until captured by King Henry. He was not released until Clito's death without issue in 1128. Her second son Robert inherited his father's English estates and the earldom of Leicester and married the heiress of the Fitzosbern counts of Breteuil. Her daughter Isabel however became a king's concubine or mistress at a young age; it is unclear whether her mother's own life or her eldest brother's political and personal travails in this period played any part in this decision. Before her mother died, Isabel had become wife of Gilbert de Clare , later (1147) Earl of Pembroke, so had adopted a more conventional life like her mother.

There are no known biographies of Elizabeth de Vermandois, nor any known fictional treatments of her life.

Children and descendants
During her first marriage (1096-1115) to Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (d 5 June 1118), Elizabeth had 3 sons (including twin elder sons) and 6 daughters:
Emma de Beaumont (born 1102 ) whose fate is unknown. She was betrothed as an infant to Aumari, nephew of William, Count of Evreux, but the marriage never took place. She probably died young, or entered a convent.[2]
Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104 ) married and left issue.
Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104 ) married and left issue (his granddaughter Hawisa or Isabella of Gloucester was the unfortunate first wife of King John .
Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106 ) lost his earldom, left issue
Adeline de Beaumont (b ca 1107), married two times:
Hugh IV, 4th Lord of Montfort-sur-Risle to whom she was married firstly by her brother Waleran;
Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
Aubree (or Alberee) de Beaumont (b ca 1109), married by her brother Waleran to Hugh II of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais (possibly son of Hugh I of Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais and his wife Mabille de Montgomerie, 2nd daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury )
Maud de Beaumont (b ca 1111), married by her brother Waleran to William Lovel, or Louvel or Lupel, son of Ascelin Goel, Lord of Ivri.
Isabel de Beaumont (b Aft. 1102), a mistress of King Henry I of England . Married two times:
Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke by whom she was mother of Richard Strongbow , who invaded Ireland 1170 ;
Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland (this marriage is not conclusively proven)
In her second marriage, to William de Warenne, Elizabeth had three sons and two daughters (for a total of fourteen children - nine during her first marriage, and five during her second):
William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Warenne (b. 1119 dspm 1147) whose daughter Isabelle de Warenne, Countess of Surrey married 1stly
William, Count of Boulogne (dsp), yr son of King Stephen, and married 2ndly
Hamelin Plantagenet , an illegitimate half-brother of King Henry II of England by whom she had issue, later earls of Surrey and Warenne.
Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William, whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh;
Ralph de Warenne (dsp)
Gundrada de Warenne , (Gundred) who married first
Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and had issue; second (as his 2nd wife)
William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Warenne and Surrey and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle; and they had issue.

Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon.

The second earl had married Isabella, daughter of Hugh, Count of Vermandois, widow of Robert de Beaumont, earl of Leicester. The arms of Warenne "checky or and azure" were adopted from the Vermandois coat after this marriage.

The original Vermandois arms were "checky or and sable" but there was no black tincture in early medieval heraldry until sable was discovered, being the crushed fur of this animal. A very deep indigo was used instead which faded into blue so the Vermandois arms becams "checky argent and or".
The Vermandois arms were inherited by the earls of Warenne and Surrey, the Newburgh earls of Warwick, the Beauchamp earls of Warwick and Worcester and the Clifford earls of Cumberland. 33 38


Research Notes: Child - Raoul I Count of Vermandois

Source: Hugh of Vermandois


Research Notes: Child - Henry of Chaumont-en-Vexin

Source: Hugh of Vermandois


Research Notes: Child - Simon Bishop of Noyon

Source: Hugh of Vermandois


Research Notes: Child - Matilde de Vermandois

Source: Hugh of Vermandois
Married Raoul I of Beaugency


Research Notes: Child - Constance de Vermandois

Source: Hugh of Vermandois

Married Godefroy de la Ferte-Gaoucher


Research Notes: Child - Agnes de Vermandois

Source: Hugh of Vermandois

Married Margrave Boniface del Vasto. ;Mother of Adelaide del Vasto


Research Notes: Child - Beatrix de Vermandois

Source: Hugh of Vermandois

Married Hugh III of Gournay-en-Bray


Research Notes: Child - Emma de Vermandois

Source: Hugh of Vermandois


Hugo V Count in Nordgau




Husband Hugo V Count in Nordgau 1

           Born: Abt 928 - <Nordgau, (Bavaria), (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 986
         Buried: 


         Father: Eberhard IV Count in Nordgau (Abt 0900-0973) 1
         Mother: Liutgard (Abt 0910-      ) 1 43


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugo VI Count in Nordgau 1

           Born: Abt 960 - <Nordgau, (Bavaria), (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1049
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Heilwig von Dagsburg (Abt 0964-1046) 1
           Marr: Abt 987 - Dabo, Moselle, France





Hugo VI Count in Nordgau and Heilwig von Dagsburg




Husband Hugo VI Count in Nordgau 1

           Born: Abt 960 - <Nordgau, (Bavaria), (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1049
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugo V Count in Nordgau (Abt 0928-Bef 0986) 1
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 987 - Dabo, Moselle, France



Wife Heilwig von Dagsburg 1

           Born: Abt 964 - <Dagsburg (Dabo), (Moselle), Lorraine, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1046
         Buried: 


         Father: Ludwig von Dagsburg (Abt 0940-      ) 1
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Hugo VII Count of Dagsburg 1

           Born: Abt 990 - <Dagsburg (Dabo), (Moselle), Lorraine, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1049
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mechtild (Abt 0994-      ) 1
           Marr: Abt 1017 - Dabo, Moselle, France




Sources


1 http://www.familysearch.org.

2 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f87/a0018747.htm.

3 Wikipedia.org, Lords and Counts of Harcourt.

4 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/423.htm.

5 Wikipedia.org, Bernard the Dane.

6 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/417.htm.

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121E-19.

8 Wikipedia.org, William I, Duke of Normandy.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-19 (Reginar III).

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-19.

11 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

13 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-27, 125-27 (Maud de Caen).

15 Wikipedia.org, Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-27.

17 Wikipedia.org, Maud of Gloucester.

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28 (Hugh of Kevelioc).

19 Wikipedia.org, William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 149-27.

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-29, 54-28 (Robert II de Quincy).

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 54-28.

23 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 102.

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 127-29.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 194-7, 127-29 (Agnes of Chester).

26 Wikipedia.org, Herbert I of Maine.

27 Wikipedia.org, Hugh of Vermandois.

28 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-23, 140-23 (Adelaide de Vermandois).

29 Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France; Elizabeth of Vermandois.

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-22, 101-22.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 241-6.

32 Wikipedia.org, Anne of Kiev.

33 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois.

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 140-23, 50-23.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-22, 140-22.

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 50-22 (Herbert IV).

37 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois; Hugh of Vermandois; Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois.

38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 50-24, 53-24, 83-24, 84-24, 88-25, 89-25, 140-24, 170-23 184-4, 215-24.

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-24 (Isabel de Vermandois).

40 Wikipedia.org, Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.

41 Wikipedia.org, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey.

42 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 413.

43 Wikipedia.org, Wigeric of Lotharingia.


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