The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Hezikiah Frederick and Susannah




Husband Hezikiah Frederick 1

           Born: Abt 1805 - Georgia, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1875 - Boone, Arkansas, United States
         Buried: 


         Father: John Frederick (Abt 1785-      ) 2
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 1830 - Tennessee, United States



Wife Susannah 3

           Born: Abt 1813 - <Tennessee>, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1870 - <Boone, Arkansas>, United States
         Buried: 


Children
1 M John Frederick 4

           Born: Apr 1835 - Marion, Tennessee, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1901 - Harrison, Boone, Arkansas, United States
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Eliza Jane (1840-After 1901) 5
           Marr: Abt 1855 - Missouri, United States





Ezekial Aaron Eyestone and Susannah




Husband Ezekial Aaron Eyestone

           Born: 27 Apr 1817 - Sycamore, (Wyandot), Ohio, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Sep 1870
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Susannah

           Born: Abt 1819
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Oct 1908
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Harmon Alexander Eyestone 6 7

           Born: 28 Feb 1855 - Tiffin, Seneca, Ohio, United States
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Nov 1927 - Gresham, York, Nebraska
         Buried:  - Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Gresham, York, Nebraska, United States
         Spouse: Amanda Melvina Lucas (1858-1929) 6 8
           Marr: McLean, McLean, Illinois, United States




Research Notes: Husband - Ezekial Aaron Eyestone

Source: Geddes family tree on RootsWeb WorldConnect Project.


Research Notes: Wife - Susannah

Source: Geddes family tree on RootsWeb WorldConnect Project.


Research Notes: Child - Harmon Alexander Eyestone

6 7



Svend I "Forked Beard" King of Denmark, Norway and England and Swietoslava




Husband Svend I "Forked Beard" King of Denmark, Norway and England 6

            AKA: Sveyn "Forkbeard"
           Born: Abt 960 - Denmark
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Feb 1014 - Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, England
         Buried:  - Hellig Trefoldigheds Kirke, Roskilde, Roskilde, Denmark


         Father: Harald "the Blue Tooth" Gormsson King of Denmark (Abt 0910-0987) 6 9
         Mother: Gyrid Olafsdottir (Abt 0930-      ) 6 9


       Marriage: 998



Wife Swietoslava 6

            AKA: Sygryda
           Born: Abt 970 - <Poznan, Poznan>, Poland
     Christened: 
           Died: After 2 Feb 1014
         Buried: 


         Father: Mieszko Prince of Poland (Abt 0922-0992) 6
         Mother: Dbubravka Princess of Bohemia (Abt 0931-0977) 6




Children
1 F Estrid Svensdatter Princess of Denmark 6

            AKA: Margrete Svensdatter
           Born: Abt 997 - Denmark
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried:  - Cathedral, Roskilde, Roskilde, Denmark
         Spouse: Ulf Thorgilsson (Abt 0993-1027) 6




Research Notes: Husband - Svend I "Forked Beard" King of Denmark, Norway and England

From Wikipedia - "Sveyn Forkbeard . Born about 960. Usually given as the son of Harald and Gyrid, though it is said in some of the older sagas that he was an illegitimate son." 6


Swen I King of Denmark




Husband Swen I King of Denmark

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Astrid of Denmark

            AKA: Margaret of Denmark
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Richard II Duke of Normandy (Abt 0985-1027) 6 10 11 12
           Marr: 1017




Research Notes: Husband - Swen I King of Denmark

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 121E-21 (Richard II)


Research Notes: Child - Astrid of Denmark

Second wife of Richard II "the Good."

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 121E-21 (Richard II)


Thierry I of Lorraine, Count of Flanders and Sybil of Anjou




Husband Thierry I of Lorraine, Count of Flanders 13 14

            AKA: Dietrich I of Lorraine, Count of Alsace, Thierry of Alsace, Thierry Count of Flanders
           Born: Abt 1099
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Jan 1168
         Buried: 


         Father: Thierry II Duke of Lorraine (      -1115) 15 16
         Mother: Gertrude of Flanders (Abt 1070-1117) 17


       Marriage: 1131

Events

• Count of Flanders: 1128-1168.




Wife Sybil of Anjou 18 19

            AKA: Sibylla of Anjou
           Born: Abt 1112 - <Anjou, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1165
         Buried: 


         Father: Fulk V "the Young" Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem (1092-1144) 20 21 22
         Mother: Erembourg Countess of Maine (      -1126) 23 24




Children
1 M Matthew of Alsace, Count of Boulogne 25

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Marie of Blois, Countess of Boulogne (1136-1182) 26



2 F Margarite of Lorraine 27

           Born: Between 1140 and 1145
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Dec 1195
         Buried: 



3 F Margaret I of Flanders 28

            AKA: Margaret I of Alsace
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Nov 1194
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Baldwin V of Hainaut (1150-1195) 29
           Marr: 1169




Research Notes: Husband - Thierry I of Lorraine, Count of Flanders

Youngest son of Thierry II, Duke of Lorraine.

From Wikipedia - Thierry, Count of Flanders :

Thierry of Alsace (Dietrich) (c. 1099 - January 17 , 1168 ), in Flanders known as Diederik van den Elzas, was count of Flanders from 1128 to 1168. He was the youngest son of Duke Thierry II of Lorraine and Gertrude of Flanders (daughter of Robert I of Flanders ). With a record of four campaigns in the Levant and Africa (including participation in the Second Crusade , the failed 1157-1158 siege of the Syrian city Shaizar , and the 1164 invasion of Egypt ), he had a rare and distinguished record of commitment to crusading.

Life
After the murder of his cousin Charles the Good in 1127, Thierry claimed the county of Flanders as grandson of Robert I, but William Clito became count instead with the support of King Louis VI of France . William's politics and attitude towards the autonomy of Flanders made him unpopular, and by the end of the year Bruges , Ghent , Lille , and Saint-Omer recognized Thierry as a rival count. Thierry's supporters came from the Imperial faction of Flanders, and upon his arrival he engaged in battle against William.

Louis VI had Raymond of Martigné , the Archbishop of Reims , excommunicate him, and Louis himself then besieged Lille, but was forced to retire when Henry I of England , William's uncle, transferred his support to Thierry. However, Thierry was defeated at Tielt and Oostkamp and fled to Brugge. He was forced to flee Brugge as well, and went to Aalst , where he was soon under siege from William, Godfrey I of Leuven , and Louis VI. The city was about to be captured when William was found dead on July 27 , 1128 , leaving Thierry as the only claimant to the county.

Thierry set up his government in Ghent and was recognized by all the Flemish cities as well as King Henry, who had his Flemish lords in England swear fealty to him. Thierry himself swore homage to Louis VI after 1132, in order to gain the French king's support against Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut , who had advanced his own claim on Flanders.

In 1132 his wife, Suanhilde, died, leaving only a daughter. In 1139 then went on pilgrimage to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem , and married Sibylla of Anjou , daughter of King Fulk of Jerusalem and widow of William Clito; a very prestigious marriage.

This was the first of Thierry's four pilgrimages to the Holy Land . While there he also led a victorious expedition against Caesarea Phillippi , and fought alongside his father-in-law in an invasion of Gilead . He soon returned to Flanders to put down a revolt in the Duchy of Lower Lotharingia , ruled at the time by Godfrey III of Leuven .

Thierry went on crusade a second time in 1147 during the Second Crusade . He led the crossing of the Maeander River in Anatolia and fought at the Battla of Attalya in 1148, and after arriving in the crusader Kingdom he participated in the Council of Acre , where the ill-fated decision to attack Damascus was made.

He participated in the Siege of Damascus , led by his wife's half-brother Baldwin III of Jerusalem , and with the support of Baldwin, Louis VII of France , and Conrad III of Germany , he lay claim to Damascus; the native crusader barons preferred one of their own nobles, Guy Brisebarre, lord of Beirut , but in any case the siege was a failure and all parties returned home.

During his absence, Baldwin IV of Hainaut invaded Flanders and pillaged Artois ; Sibylla reacted strongly and had Hainaut pillaged in response. The Archbishop of Reims intervened and a treaty was signed. When Thierry returned in 1150, he took vengeance on Baldwin IV at Bouchain , with the aid of Henry I, Count of Namur and Henry II of Leez , Bishop of Ličge . In the subsequent peace negotiations, Thierry gave his daughter Marguerite in marriage to Baldwin IV's son, the future Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut .

In 1156 Thierry had his eldest son married to Elizabeth of Vermandois , daughter and heiress of Raoul I of Vermandois . In 1156 he returned to the Holy Land, this time with his wife accompanying him. He participated in Baldwin III's siege of Shaizar , but the fortress remained in Muslim hands when a dispute arose between Thierry and Raynald of Chatillon over who would possess it should it be captured. He returned to Flanders 1159 without Sibylla, who remained behind to become a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany . Their son Philip had ruled the county in their absence, and he remained co-count after Thierry's return.

In 1164 Thierry returned once more to the Holy Land. He accompanied King Amalric I , another half-brother of Sibylla, to Antioch and Tripoli . He returned home in 1166, and adopted a date palm as his seal, with a crown of laurels on the reverse.

He died on February 4, 1168, and was buried in the Abbey of Watten , between Saint-Omer and Gravelines . His rule had been moderate and peaceful; the highly developed administration of the county in later centuries first began during these years. There had also been great economic and agricultural development, and new commercial enterprises were established; Flanders' greatest territorial expansion occurred under Thierry.

Family
His first wife, Suanhilde, died in 1132, leaving only one daughter:
Laurette of Flanders , who married four times: Iwain, Count of Aalst ; Henry II, Duke of Limburg ; Raoul I of Vermandois , Count of Vermandois ; Henry IV of Luxembourg . Laurette finally retired to a nunnery, where she died in 1170.
Thierry secondly married Sibylla of Anjou , daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine , and widow of William Clito . Their children were:
Philip of Flanders (died 1191)
Matthew of Alsace (died 1173), married Countess Marie of Boulogne
Margaret I of Flanders (died 1194), married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
Gertrude of Flanders (died 1186), married Humbert III of Savoy
Matilda of Flanders, abbess of Fontevrault
Peter of Flanders (died 1176), Bishop of Cambrai 13 14


Research Notes: Wife - Sybil of Anjou

Second wife of Thierry I of Lorraine (also known as Dietrich I, Count of Alsace).

From Wikipedia - Sibylla of Anjou :

Sibylla of Anjou (c. 1112-1165) was a daughter of Fulk V of Anjou and Ermengarde of Maine , and wife of William Clito and Thierry, Count of Flanders .

In 1123 Sibylla married William Clito, son of the Norman Robert Curthose and future Count of Flanders . Sibylla brought the County of Maine to this marriage, which was annulled in 1124 on grounds of consanguinity . The annulment was made by Pope Honorius II upon request from Henry I of England , William's uncle; Fulk opposed it and did not consent until Honorius excommunicated him and placed an interdict over Anjou . Sibylla then accompanied her widower father to the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem , where he married Melisende , the heiress of the kingdom, and became king himself in 1131. In 1139 she married Thierry, Count of Flanders , who had arrived on his first pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

She returned to Flanders with her new husband, and during his absence on the Second Crusade the pregnant Sibylla acted as regent of the county. Baldwin IV, Count of Hainaut took the opportunity to attack Flanders, but Sibylla led a counter-attack and pillaged Hainaut . In response Baldwin ravaged Artois . The archbishop of Reims intervened and a truce was signed, but Thierry took vengeance on Baldwin when he returned in 1149.

In 1157 she travelled with Thierry on his third pilgrimage, but after arriving in Jerusalem she separated from her husband and refused to return home with him. She became a nun at the convent of St. Lazarus in Bethany , where her step-aunt, Ioveta of Bethany , was abbess. Ioveta and Sibylla supported Queen Melisende and held some influence over the church, and supported the election of Amalric of Nesle as Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem over a number of other candidates. Sibylla died in Bethany in 1165.

With Thierry she had six children:
Philip , Count of Flanders
Matthew , Count of Boulogne , married Marie of Boulogne
Margaret , Countess of Flanders and Hainaut, married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut
Gertrude
Matilda
Peter 18 19


Research Notes: Child - Margaret I of Flanders

From Wikipedia - Margaret I, Countess of Flanders :

Margaret I of Alsace (died 15 November 1194 ) was countess of Flanders from 1191 to her death.

History
She was the daughter of Thierry, Count of Flanders and Sibylla of Anjou , and the heiress of her childless brother, Philip of Flanders .

Family
In 1169 she married Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut , who became her co-ruler. They had the following issue:
Isabelle of Hainaut (Valenciennes , April 1170 - 15 March 1190 , Paris ), married king Philip II of France
Baldwin VI of Hainaut (1171-1205), also count of Flanders and Latin Emperor
Yolanda of Flanders (1175-1219), married Peter of Courtenay , Latin Emperor
Philip I, Marquis of Namur (1175-1212)
Henry of Flanders (1176-1216), Latin Emperor
Sybille (1179 - 9 January 1217 ), married c. 1197 Guichard IV, Sire de Beaujeu (d. 1216). They had a daughter, Agnes of Beaujeu .
Eustace of Hainault (d. 1219), regent of the Kingdom of Thessalonica
Godfrey of Hainault 28


Taksóny Prince of Hungary




Husband Taksóny Prince of Hungary 30

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 972
         Buried: 


         Father: Zoltán Prince in Hungary (      -0947) 31
         Mother: < > (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Mihaly Duke betw. Morava and Esztergom (Hron) 32

            AKA: Michael Duke betw. Morava and Esztergom (Hron)
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 976 and 978
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelajda of Poland (      -After 0997)



2 M Géza Grand Prince of Hungary

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Mihaly Duke betw. Morava and Esztergom (Hron)

First husband of Adelajda of Poland. 32


Research Notes: Child - Géza Grand Prince of Hungary

Second husband of Adelajda of Poland. (Brother of her first husband, Mihaly.)


Chief Tarhe and Ronyouquaines La Durante




Husband Chief Tarhe 6 33 34




           Born: 1742 - [near Detroit], (Michigan), (United States)
     Christened: 


           Died: 28 Aug 1816 - Cranetown near Upper Sandusky, (Wyandot), Ohio, United States


         Buried: Nov 1816 - (Wyandot), Ohio, United States
       Marriage: 



Wife Ronyouquaines La Durante 6

           Born: Between 1715 and 1738
     Christened: 
           Died: 1803
         Buried: 


         Father: Chevalier Durante (Between 1673/1712-Between 1715/1793) 6
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Myeerah 6

           Born: Abt 1757 - Solomontown, Northwest Territory, <(Ohio)>, (United States)
     Christened: 
           Died: Feb 1816 - Zanesville, Muskingum, Ohio, United States
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isaac Zane (1753-1816) 6 35 36 37
           Marr: 1776 - Wheeling, Ohio, (West) Virginia, (United States)




Research Notes: Husband - Chief Tarhe

From http://www.wyandot.org/sachem.htm :

TARHE GRAND SACHEM
C.A. Buser

When dealing with a history largely oral there comes the moment when one must choose between fancy and probability. In the case of Tarhe, if one is to accept the eye-witness accounts of his contemporaries as truth, there is little need for fiction.

During the period 1789-1818 many famous Indians lived in the Old Northwest Territory. Such men as Tecumseh, Little Turtle, Captain Pipe, Black Hoof, Buckongehelas, Walk-in-the-Water and Round Head helped to shape the history of the region. But none was more distinguished than Tarhe, Grand Sachem of the Wyandot Nation.

There are literally dozens of names for the tribe known generally as Wyandot (its very tribal identity is debated by student osf Indian history); and the great chief himself is variously referred to as Tarhee, Tarkee, Takee, the Crane or - by the French - as Le Grue, Le Chef Grue, or Monsieur Grue.

Further complicating an already invfolved story, a well known and no doubt well-meaning novelist contributed his own romanticized version of tribal history and his version became widely accepted. Zane Grey, in his book Betty Zane, told of a young boy who was captured and raised by Indians and subsequently married the chief's daughter. Much of the story was true.
The boy Mr. Grey wrote about was Isaac Zane, a member of the famous Zane family of Wheeling that helped lay out the National road and for whom Zanesville, Ohio is named. Since Zane Grey himself was related to that family, it all bore the stamp of truth.

Later generations of Wyandots came to accept the story in its entirety. After all, everyone would love to have an Indian Princess as an ancestor, and who could ask for a better princess than Myeerah, daughter of the famous Tarhe, Grand Sachem of the Wyandots?

Grey wrote that Tarhe was born in the beautiful Muskoka Lake region of Ontario, married a beautiful French captive, fathered a beautiful daughter and named her Myeerah, the name carried by his own mother and grand-mother.

Actually Tarhe was born very near Detroit, the son of a woman of the Porcupine Clan. The name Myeerah, belonged to one of the Turtle clans. His grandmother may have been named Myeerah. It is certain that his mother was not. (It does appear to be true that the young girl, Myeerah, was beautiful)

Tarhe's own name is intriguing. The English meaning is unknown. The name is not believed to be a clan property name and it apparently died with the man. It may have been given to him because of some particular deed or attribute of the man or boy. Old-time Wyandots said the name meant "at him" or "at the tree", or was perhaps the personification of "the tree". Tarhe's great height lends credence tot the latter theory.; He was six feet four inches tall in an era when few men reached six feet.

The name is now pronounce Tar-hee, but the earlier writers indicated that the accent was on the second syllable. (Pronounced more correctly, Tar-Hay)

Little is known of Tarhe's early years. It is thought he served in all of his nation's battles, possibly even the Braddock fight. (He would then have been no more thatn thirteen or fourteen years of age.) Some references are made to his going on war parties against the Cherokees as a young man. The first explicit mention of Tarhe as a warrior is in the account of Dunmore's war. Tarhe was conspicuous at the Battle of Point Pleasant where he served under the Wyandot Chief, Chiyawee, and under the great Shawnee Chief, Cornstalk.

The Shawnee, Puckenskinwa, father of Tecumseh, was killed at this battle on the Kanwha. Forty years later Tarhe was in the immediate vicinity during the Battle of the thames wehre Tecumseh himself was killed. The careers of Tarhe and Tecumseh ran somewhat parallel but there was often serious disagreement between the two men.

The Wyandots were prominent in the defeat of Braddock in 1755. A Huron/Wendat from Lorette, near Quebec, commanded all of the Indians in the battle. Although there was French support, not enough has been made of the fact that it was in truth an Indian victory.

If a youthful Tarhe actually did fight against Braddock it makes for additional conjecture. In that same battle the contingent of Ottawa warriors was led by Chief Pontiac. Since Tarhe supproted Pontiac at Detroit eight years later it would be interesting to know if the older man noticed the young Wyandot at that early date.

Ponticac depended heavily on the Wyandots in 1763. The chieftain whom Parkman refers to as "Takee" was almost certainly Tarhe. Another Wyandots, Teata, went along (with some reluctance), but his group of Wyandots never exhibited the enthusiasm of Tarhe's followers.
The victories at the Battle of Bloody Bridge, at Fort Sandusky, at Presque Isle and elsewhere could hardly have been won without the Wyandots' contribution. Parkman was surely correct when he sttaed that the Wyandots were the premier warriors of the Midwest.

By 1763, when barely twenty years of age, Tarhe was regarded as a leading warrior, but he may not have become even a minor chief at that point.

The war chief carried the title of Ron-Tun-Dee, or Warpole. There is no record of Tarhe's ever having become Ron-Tun-Dee. Although regarded as a very brave man, Tarhe was not considered a truly great warrior by his own tribe. The Wyandots loved and respected him but they believed Round Head, Zhaus-Sho-Toh, Khun, Slitlog and others to be superior warriors. In a nation of warriors excellence was commonplace.

The Sachem was the titular head of the Wyandot nation and held the title of Sastaretsi. There was no royal family as such, among the Wyandots, but since the title of Sastaretsi was in actual practice often inherited, there developed something of a hereditary line of chiefs. If Sastaretsi died without a suitable heir, the tribal council selected a successor.

Such an occasion arose in 1788 when Too-Dah-Reh-Zhooh died. he was better known by his many other names, such as Half-King, Pomoacan, Dunquad, Daunghuat and Petawontakas. (Care should be taken to avoid confusion with the Oneida Half-King and thee Seneca Half-King and with another Wyandot of lesser stature named Dunquad who was chief some years later.)

Tarhe was chosen to be the successor of Too-Doh-Reh-Zhooh. There is no record of any other member of the Porcupine Clan having become Sastaretsi up until that time. Sachems had always come from the Deer, Bear and Turtle clans. But Tarhe, a Porcupine, because of his unique abilities was selected by general concensus to guide the Wyandots in those desperate days. Although he assumed the duties and powers of Sachem it is not believed that Tarhe ever assumed the title Sastaretsi.

He had already gained the respect of the various tribes and of the French, British and Americans long before this time. In 1786 Tarhe and his son-in-law, Isaac Zane, were listed among the witnesses to a United States Treaty signing with the Shawnee. Both before and after this time, Wyandots were often invited to sit in on negotiations between the Government and various tribes.

Isaac Zane had come a long way since his capture at the age of nine. The tribe treated him vdery well and Tarhe took him into his own household to live. When he reached manhood, Isaac married Myeerah, Tarhe's only daughter.

Isaac visited his Zane relatives many times. However he always returned to the Wyandots. Isaac acted as interpreter on many important occasions. He served under Anthony Wayne for a time and, upon his return, was welcomed into the Wyandot lodges where he was respected for having done his duty as he saw it.

A bit of mystery surrounds Tarhe's first wife, the mother of Myeerah. It is generally believed that she was French of the Durante family. Some say she was captured as a child, raised by the Wyandots and subsequently married to Tarhe. One stgory claims that she was recognized by her blood father while at Detroit and that Tahre took her away from the area and never permitted he to bo back, fearing that he would lose her. This would appear to be romantic fiction. She may very well have been French and a Durante, but almost certainly she was not a captive. The Wyandots were on excellent terms with the French during those years and such a seizure would surely have been unthinkable.

Whatever the truth of the matter, Myeerah's mother is rarely, if ever, mentioned again in writing. She may have died at an early age, or Tarhe may have been divorced from her. He married at least once more, and that marriage too d in mystery. He probably married Sally Sharpe. They had one son who was severely disabled and died at the age of twenty-five.
Sally Sharpe subsequently married another Wyandot, Between-the-Logs. She moved west with the tribe in 1843 and at some point married a man named Frost. She is most generally referred to as Sally Frost. She was said to have been captured at Greenbriar, Virginia in 1782, at the age of one or two. Another version says that Sally Frost was actually Caty Sage, who was captured in Elk Creek Valley, Viriginia and died in Kansas at the age of sixty-six after having been married three times, etc. Caty's brother is said to have visited her in Kansas in 1848, but she reportedly refused to return to Virginia with him. She said to him, "Though you may think my lot has been a hard one- and certainly it has- I have no reason to complain. I have always been treated tenderly in the way I have been raised." It was generally considered that the Wyandots treated prisoners more kindly thatn did other tribes.)

Another story of an Indian captive that concerns Tarhe tells something of his personal character.

Peggy Fleming, a white girl, was brought as a captive to Upper Sandusky, a Wyandot town, by a small group of Cherokees in 1789. The party camped about one-quarter mile from Tarhe's village. Word soon spread that there was a white captive nearby.

A white man named Whitaker who had himself been captured and raised by the Wyandots went to visit Peggy. Whitaker had by this time achieved a position of influence in the tribe. He had frequently gone on trading missions to Pittsburgh where he had often stayed at a tavern owned by Peggy's father. Whitaker recognized the girl immediately and she begged him to help her escape.

He returned to Upper Sandusky and told Tarhe the prisoneer was his sister. Tarhe believed Whitaker and went to the Cherokee camp asking for Peggy's release. The Cherokees refused. Tarhe then offered to purchase the girl and again they refused his request. he was determined to secure her release and returned to the Wyandot town, telling Whitaiker to raise a fair sum of money or a quantity of silver brooches. Early the next morning Tarhe and eight or ten other warriors returned to the Cherokee camp and found them asleep. Peggy was naked and painted black, an indication that she was to be killed. Tarhe cut her bonds, secured her clothing and then awakened the Cherokees. He told them Peggy was now his prisoner and tossed the money and brooches at their feet. The Wyandots took Peggy to Upper Sandusky and delivered her to Whitaker. After a few days she was escorted back to Pittsburgh. Wheterh Tarhe ever learned Peggy was not related to Whitaker is not know.

Among the close friends of Tarhe was the greaqt Mingo chief, Logan. They lived near each other for a time and the Mingo felt very close to the Wyandot nation. It is believed the Wyandots buried this famous chief when he died.

Tarhe lived at various locations in Ohio including present day Lancaster, Columbus, Solomonstown, Zanesfield, Upper Sandusky and Cranetown (named for him).

Tarhe helped negotiate many treaties during the time he was Grand Sachem. Throught this time he attempted to hold his tribe together, to serve the other tribes in the area and to relinquish each parcel of land only after the pressures had become unbearable.

He fought against Clark, Boupuet, Marmar, St. Clair and Wayne. Although Tarhe was eventually defeated, both his enemies and his friends knew he was dedicated first and last to the welfare of his people.

It is believed the last battle Tarhe fought in personally was in 1794 at Fallen Timbers. That action was a brief but devastating one for the allied tribes. The only tribe to fight with distinction that day was the Wyandots. They were pinned down near the river and lost heavily. The Wyandot chiefs were decimated. Of the thirteen chiefs who entered the battle, only Tarhe survived and he was severely wounded in the right elbow.

Most Indians realized their cause was lost after Fallen Timbers. The British had failed to supprot tem and the tribes could assemble no force capable of opposing Wyane. When he summoned the tribes to Greenville, almost all of the Indian leaders in the Midwest responded. A notable exception was Tecumseh.

In July 1795, nearly a year after Fallen Timbers, a great assemblage of Indians met with Wayne at Greenville, Ohio. The acknowledged leader of the Indians was Tarhe, and a principal interpreter was Isaac Zane.
During the lengthy negotiations Tarhe made several speeches. The following example of his eloquence gives some measure of his intellect:

"Elder brother! Now listen to us. The great Spirit above has appointed this day for us to meet together. I shall now deliver my sentiments to you, the fifteen fires. I view you, lying in a gore of blood. It is me, an Indian who caused it. Our tomahawk yet remains in your head- the English gave it to me to place there.

"Elder brother! I now take the tomahawk out of your head; but with so much care you shall not feel pain or injury. I will now tear a big tree up by the roots and throw the hatchet into the cavity which they occupy; where the waters will wash it away to where it can never be found. Now, I have buried the hatchet, and I expect that none of my color will ever again find it out. I now tell you that none in particular can justly claim this ground- it belongs in common to all. No earthly being has an exclusive right to it." (Spoken on a blue belt.)

"Brothers, the fifteen fires, listen! You now see that we have buried the hatchet. We still see blood around, and in order to clear away all grief, we now wipe away the blood from around you, which together with the dirt that comes away from it, we bury with the hatchet in the hole we have made for them, and replace the great tree, as it stood before, so that neither our children, nor our children's children can ever again discover it." (Spoken on a blue string attached and both delivered.)

"Brothers, listen! I now wipe your body clean from all blood with this white, soft linen (a white wampum) and I do it with as much tenderness as I am capable of. You have appointed this house for the chiefs of the different tribes to sit in with you, and none but good words ought to be spoken in it. I have swept it clean- nothing impure remains in it.

"Brothers, listen! We are both placed on this ground. I now wipe the tears from your eyes and open your ears. I see your throat is so stopped that you are nearly suffocated- I now open your throat and make it quite clean, that whatever the Great Spirit may think proper for you to swallow may go down without any obstruction. I see also that your heart is not in its true situation- I now place it in its proper position, that anything you may hear from us, your brothers, may descend directly to it, and what you shall say may come with truth and ease from it.

"Brother! I clear away the hovering clouds that we may enjoy a clear, bright day; and easily see the sun which the Great Spirit has bestowed on us, to rise and set continually." (A white string.)

"Brother! Listen to us Indians, who now speak to you. The bones which lie scattered of your ancient warriors who fell in defense of the present cause, we gather all together, and bury them now, and place this white board over the, that they may never again be seen by our posterity." (A white belt and string.)

"Brother warrior! Listen to us. The great chiefs are about to speak to you. Your chiefs and warriors present, listen also.

"Brother! We speak not from our lips, but from our hearts, when we are resolved upon good works. I always told you that I never intended to deceive you, when we entered upon this business. It was never the intention of us Indians to do so. I speak from my heart what I now say to you. The Great Spirit is now viewing us, and did he discover any baseness or treachery, it would excite his just anger against us.

"Brother! Listen to me. We are all of one mind, who are here assembled. This is a business not to be trifled with- it is a matter of the utmost concern to us. We happily so far agree in handling our ancestors' records, who always worked for peace.

"Brother! You have proposed to us to build our good work on the treaty of Muskingum. That treaty I have always considered as formed upon the fairest principles. You took pity on us Indians- you did not do as our fathers, the British, agreed you should. You might by that agreement, have taken all our lands; but you pitied us, and let us hold part. I always looked upon that treaty to be binding upon the United States and us Indians.
"Brother! Listen to us Indians- I told you just now that we were upon business of the greatest moment. I now conclude the great work we have been employed in, and with this, I cover the whole earth, that it may appear white, and shine all over the world. I hope the Great Spirit will have pity on us, and make this work lasting." (Four large mixed belts presented.)

"Brother! I am going to relate to you the treaty made at Muskingum in a few words. I have not forgotten that treaty; neither have you. At that time we settled a peace between the Delawares, Six Nations, Ottawas, Chippeways, Potawattamies, and us Wyandots. It is very true there were not so many different nations then assembled as are now present. We now establish a general, permanent, and lasting peace, forever.

"Brother! We are all sensible that when you struck the boundary, at that time, it ran from Tuscarawas to a little way below Loramie, where the fort stood, which was destroyed in 1752. I understand the line has since been moved a little toward us. Be strong, brothers, and fulfill your engagements.
"Brothers, listen! I have told you that I speak from my heart- you see the speeches I have delivered. Peruse them and see whether or not I have spoken with sincerity. This is all your brothers of the different nations present have this day to say to you."

Chief Tarhe died in November 1816, at Cranetown near Upper Sandusky Ohio. The funeral for this 76 year old man was the largest ever known for an Indian Chief. Among the Indians coming from great distances was Red Jacket, the noted leader and orator from Buffalo New York. The mourners were without paint or decorations of any kind and their countenance showed the deepest sorrow. 6 33 34


Birth Notes: Child - Myeerah

Per FamilySearch.org, birthplace may have been Zanesville, Ohio.


Tassilo I Duke of Bavaria




Husband Tassilo I Duke of Bavaria 38 39

           Born: Abt 560
     Christened: 
           Died: 610
         Buried: 


         Father: Sinduald Prince of Heruli (      -0565) 40
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Acceded: as Duke of Bavaria, 592.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Theodo IV Duke of Bavaria 41 42

            AKA: Grimaldo I Duke of Bavaria, Theodo I Duke of Bavaria
           Born:  - <Bavaria, (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 680
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Fara of Bavaria (Abt 0600-0641) 43 44




Research Notes: Husband - Tassilo I Duke of Bavaria

This may not have been the father of Theodo IV, Duke of Bavaria.

From Wikipedia - Tassilo I of Bavaria :

Tassilo I (or Tassilon) (560 - 610 ) was King of Bavaria from 591 to his death. According to Paul the Deacon , he was appointed as Bavarian rex by Childebert II , Frankish king of Austrasia , according to Paul the Deacon in 591, ending the war with the Franks. The war began during the reign of Tassilo's predecessor, Garibald I , when Garibald concluded a marriage alliance with the Langobards . We do not know whether Garibald died or was deposed. Nor do we know Tassilo's exact relationship to Garibald, though we can assume Tassilo was a close relation if not his son. The fact that Childebert named Tassilo king shows frankish control over the Bavarian state.

Paul the Deacon also tells us that Tassilo soon moved into the lands of the Slavs (probably the recently conquered eastern Tyrol and Carinthia ), and returned victorious with much plunder. This victory proved to be short-lived as Paul tells us of 2000 Bavarians, who were slain to a man in 595 when invading the lands of the Slavs to help the Kakan (chief of the Avars ).

Tassilo died in 610 and was succeeded by his son Garibald II . 38 39


Research Notes: Child - Theodo IV Duke of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Theodo of Bavaria :

"His father was Theodo IV, Duke of Bavaria and his mother was probably Fara of Bavaria (b: 600), daughter of Chrodaold of the Lombards (575 - 624) and (her mother) Daughter of Gisulf (b: 577).
" 41 42


Tassilo II of Bavaria




Husband Tassilo II of Bavaria 42 45

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 719
         Buried: 


         Father: Theodo V Duke of Bavaria (Abt 0625-0716) 42 46
         Mother: Folchaide of Salzeburg (      -      ) 42


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Imma (      -Abt 0750)



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Tassilo II of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Tassilo II of Bavaria :

Tassilo II (d.c.719 ) was the son, probably third, of Theodo and Folchaid. Sometime before 715 , Theodo divided his duchy and associated with its rule the eldest two of his four sons. The eldest, Theodbert , was co-ruling as early as 702 and the second, Theobald , from 711 . On Theodo's death (probably in 716 ), the division took full effect. It is not known if the was territorial (as with the Merovingians ) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua ). If the former, it seems to have followed the fourfold ecclesiastic division into diocese which Theodo had effected. If that is the case, it is most probably that Tassilo ruled the diocese of Passau with his capital there.
War broke out between the brothers soon after their father's death, but little in the way of details is known. About Tassilo's time as duke, next to nothing is known. His existence is confirmed in the "Codex of Salzburg" (Salzburger Verbrüderungsbuch) where he is listed as unmarried, though some surmise that a certain Waldrada, mentioned as a wife of Theobald , was in fact Tassilo's. On the other hand, he is attributed as the husband of Imma (d.c.750 ), by which he had Grimoald and Swanachild . Through Swanachild, Tassilo would be the father-in-law of Charles Martel . Because Swanachild is with certainty the niece of duke Odilo , one would be forced to assume that Odilo was brother or brother-in-law to Tassilo. Tassilo was dead by 719 , as were all his brothers save Grimoald . 42 45


Teucer King of Teucria [Mythological]




Husband Teucer King of Teucria [Mythological] 47

            AKA: Teucrus King of Teucria
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Private (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Private




Research Notes: Husband - Teucer King of Teucria [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - King Teucer :

In Greek mythology , King Teucer (also Teucrus) was said to have been the son of the river Scamander and of the nymph Idaea . Before the arrival of Dardanus , the land that would come to be called Dardania (and later still the Troad ) was known as Teucria and the inhabitants as Teucrians, after Teucer. Batea , King Teucer's daughter, was given in marriage to Dardanus, and after Teucer's death the land came to be known as Dardania. Yet in later times, the people of Troy often referred to themselves as "Teucrians". 47


Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Batea (mythology) :

Batea (or Bateia) was a figure in Greek mythology said to be the daughter or (less commonly) the aunt of King Teucer , ruler of a tribe known as the Teucrians (Teucri). The Teucrians inhabited the area of northwest Asia Minor later called the Troad (Troas), and the term is sometimes used as another name for the Trojans . Batea married King Dardanus , son of Zeus and Electra , whom Teucer named as his heir. Batea gave her name to a hill in the Troad, mentioned in the Iliad . By Dardanus, Batea was the mother of Ilus , Erichthonius , Zacynthus , and Idaea . Greek mythology also recounts Arisbe , a daughter of Teucer, as the wife of Dardanus so Arisbe and Batea are usually assumed to be the same person. 48 49


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1 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #15 Pin #915926.

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3 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #15 Pin #915927.

4 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #15 Pin #915924.

5 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #15 Pin #915925.

6 http://www.familysearch.org.

7 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, Geddes family tree on RootsWeb WorldConnect Project.

8 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, Geddes family tree on RootsWeb WorldConnect Project.
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9 Wikipedia.org, Harald I of Denmark.

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132A-22 (Judith of Brittany).

11 Wikipedia.org, Richard II, Duke of Normandy.

12 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 164-25, 165-25, 129-25 (Sybil of Anjou).

14 Wikipedia.org, Thierry, Count of Flanders.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 164-24 (Gertrude of Flanders).

16 Wikipedia.org, Theodoric II, Duke of Lorraine.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 164-24.

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 129-25, 165-25 (Thierry of Lorraine).

19 Wikipedia.org, Sibylla of Anjou.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-24.

21 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871915.

22 Wikipedia.org, Fulk of Jerusalem.

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 129-24 (Fulk V).

24 Wikipedia.org, Ermengarde of Maine.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 165-26, 169-26 (Mary of Blois), 155-26 (Henry I).

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-26.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 164-26.

28 Wikipedia.org, Margaret I, Countess of Flanders.

29 Wikipedia.org, Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut.

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-3.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-2.

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-4.

33 Website:, http://ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/ohiopix/Image.cfm?ID=528.

34 Website:, http://www.wyandot.org/sachem.htm.

35 Website:, http://www.wyandot.org/emigrant.htm.

36 Website:, The Emigrant Tribes: Wyandot, Delaware & Shawnee, A Chronology by Larry Hancks.

37 Cartmell, T. K, Shenandoah Valley Pioneers and Their Descendants: A History of Frederick County, Virgina From its Formation in 1738 to 1908 (Winchester, Va.: Eddy Press Corporation, 1909), pp. 436-437.

38 Wikipedia.org, Tassilo I of Bavaria.

39 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105711.

40 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105710.

41 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99001 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

42 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria.

43 Wikipedia.org, Theodo of Bavaria; Agilofings.

44 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #308135 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

45 Wikipedia.org, Tassilo II of Bavaria.

46 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98935 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

47 Wikipedia.org, King Teucer.

48 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140031 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

49 Wikipedia.org, Batea (mythology).


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