The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Reginar II Count of Hainaut and < >




Husband Reginar II Count of Hainaut 1

            AKA: Rainer II Count of Hainaut
           Born: Abt 890 - <Lorraine, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 932
         Buried: 


         Father: Reginar I "Longneck" Duke of Lorraine (Abt 0850-Bef 0916) 2 3 4
         Mother: Alberade (      -0916) 5


       Marriage: 



Wife < > 6

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Reginar III Count of Hainaut 7 8

            AKA: Rainier III Count of Hainault
           Born: 920 - <Hainaut, Belgium>
     Christened: 
           Died: 973
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adela (Abt 0929-0961) 8 9



Research Notes: Husband - Reginar II Count of Hainaut

From Ancestral Roots, Line 240-18, p. 217, "From these two brothers [Reginar II and Giselbert] are descended the later kings of England, Scotland, France, Spain, Portugal, many of the German emperors, the Dukes of Brabant, Burgundy, Warwick, Northumberland, and Lorraine, the Earls of Chester, Clare, and Pembroke, the Counts of Roucy, Vermandois, Barcelona, Provence, Nevers, Poitou, Burgundy, and Savoy, and the families of Cantelou, Courtenay, Zouche, and many others."


Research Notes: Wife - < >

Possibly a daughter of Count Boso.


Norman Darcy of Cawkwell, Lincolnshire and < >




Husband Norman Darcy of Cawkwell, Lincolnshire 8

           Born: Abt 1062 - <Lincolnshire, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1115 - Stalingborough, Lincolnshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Norman Darcy of Lincolnshire (Abt 1031-      ) 8
         Mother: < > (Abt 1035-      ) 8


       Marriage: Abt 1090 - <Nocton>, Lincolnshire, England



Wife < > 8

           Born: Abt 1063 - <Stalingborough, Lincolnshire, England>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Robert Darcy of Nocton, Lincolnshire 8

           Born: Abt 1091
     Christened: 
           Died: 1163 - Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: < > (Abt 1093-      ) 8
           Marr: Abt 1117 - <Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England>




Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots and < > [Daughter of Siward, Danish Earl of Northumbria]




Husband Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots 10

            AKA: Donnchad mac Crínáin
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Aug 1040 - [near Elgin]
         Buried: 


         Father: Crinan "the Thane" Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Governor of  Scots Islands (Abt 0978-1045) 8 11 12
         Mother: Bethóc (Abt 0984-      ) 8 13 14


       Marriage: 

Events

• Crowned: King of Scots, 1034.




Wife < > [Daughter of Siward, Danish Earl of Northumbria] 15

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Siward Danish Earl of Northumbria (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots 16 17




            AKA: Malcolm III King of Scotland, Malcolm III "Canmore" King of Scots, Máel Coluim mac Donnchada
           Born: Abt 1031
     Christened: 


           Died: 13 Nov 1093 - Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ingibiorg (      -      ) 18
           Marr: 1059
         Spouse: Saint Margaret of Scotland (1045-1093) 19 20
           Marr: 1068 or 1069 - Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland



Death Notes: Husband - Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots

Murdered by Macbeth near Elgin, 14 Aug. 1040.


Research Notes: Husband - Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots

Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-20.
"He besieged Durham, 1035. '1034. Duncan, the son of Crinan, abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethoc, daughter of Malcolm, the son of Kenneth, reigned six years.' This source believes the unbroken succession of the kings of the Scots from Fergus to Malcolm II is "soundly and convincingly authenticated."


Death Notes: Child - Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots

Slain while besieging Alnwick Castle.


Research Notes: Child - Malcolm III Canmore King of Scots

From Wikipedia - Malcolm III of Scotland :

Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (Modern Gaelic : Maol Chaluim mac Dhonnchaidh),[1] called in most Anglicised regnal lists Malcolm III, and in later centuries nicknamed Canmore, "Big Head"[2][3] or Long-neck [4] (died 13 November 1093), was King of Scots . It has also been argued recently that the real "Malcolm Canmore" was this Malcolm's great-grandson Malcolm IV , who is given this name in the contemporary notice of his death.[5] He was the eldest son of King Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin). Malcolm's long reign, lasting 35 years, preceded the beginning of the Scoto-Norman age.

Malcolm's Kingdom did not extend over the full territory of modern Scotland : the north and west of Scotland remained in Scandinavian , Norse-Gael and Gaelic control, and the areas under the control of the Kings of Scots would not advance much beyond the limits set by Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) until the 12th century. Malcolm III fought a succession of wars against the Kingdom of England , which may have had as their goal the conquest of the English earldom of Northumbria . However, these wars did not result in any significant advances southwards. Malcolm's main achievement is to have continued a line which would rule Scotland for many years,[6] although his role as "founder of a dynasty" has more to do with the propaganda of his youngest son David, and his descendants, than with any historical reality.[7]

Malcolm's second wife, Saint Margaret of Scotland , was later beatified and is Scotland's only royal saint. However, Malcolm himself gained no reputation for piety. With the notable exception of Dunfermline Abbey he is not definitely associated with major religious establishments or ecclesiastical reforms.

Background
Malcolm's father Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin) became king in late 1034, on the death of Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda), Duncan's maternal grandfather. According to John of Fordun , whose account is the original source of part at least of William Shakespeare 's Macbeth , Malcolm's mother was a niece of Siward, Earl of Northumbria ,[8][9] but an earlier king-list gives her the Gaelic name Suthen.[10]

Duncan's reign was not successful and he was killed by Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findlaích) on 15 August 1040. Although Shakespeare's Macbeth presents Malcolm as a grown man and his father as an old one, it appears that Duncan was still young in 1040,[11] and Malcolm and his brother Donalbane (Domnall Bán) were children.[12] Malcolm's family did attempt to overthrow Macbeth in 1045, but Malcolm's grandfather Crínán of Dunkeld was killed in the attempt.[13]

Soon after the death of Duncan his two young sons were sent away for greater safety - exactly where is the subject of debate. According to one version, Malcolm (then aged about 9) was sent to England, and his younger brother Donalbane was sent to the Isles.[14][15] Based on Fordun's account, it was assumed that Malcolm passed most of Macbeth's seventeen year reign in the Kingdom of England at the court of Edward the Confessor .[16][17]
According to an alternative version, Malcolm's mother took both sons into exile at the court of Thorfinn Sigurdsson , Earl of Orkney , an enemy of Macbeth's family, and perhaps Duncan's kinsman by marriage.[18]

An English invasion in 1054, with Earl Siward in command, had as its goal the installation of Máel Coluim , "son of the King of the Cumbrians (i.e. of Strathclyde )". This Máel Coluim, perhaps a son of Owen the Bald , disappears from history after this brief mention. He has been confused with King Malcolm III.[19][20] In 1057 various chroniclers report the death of Macbeth at Malcolm's hand, on 15 August 1057 at Lumphanan in Aberdeenshire .[21][22] Macbeth was succeeded by his stepson Lulach , who was crowned at Scone , probably on 8 September 1057. Lulach was killed by Malcolm, "by treachery",[23] near Huntly on 23 April 1058. After this, Malcolm became king, perhaps being inaugurated on 25 April 1058, although only John of Fordun reports this.[24]

Malcolm and Ingibiorg

If Orderic Vitalis is to be relied upon, one of Malcolm's earliest actions as King may have been to travel south to the court of Edward the Confessor in 1059 to arrange a marriage with Edward's kinswoman Margaret , who had arrived in England two years before from Hungary .[25] If he did visit the English court, he was the first reigning King of Scots to do so in more than eighty years. If a marriage agreement was made in 1059, however, it was not kept, and this may explain the Scots invasion of Northumbria in 1061 when Lindisfarne was plundered.[26] Equally, Malcolm's raids in Northumbria may have been related to the disputed "Kingdom of the Cumbrians", reestablished by Earl Siward in 1054, which was under Malcolm's control by 1070.[27]

The Orkneyinga saga reports that Malcolm married the widow of Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Ingibiorg , a daughter of Finn Arnesson .[28] Although Ingibiorg is generally assumed to have died shortly before 1070, it is possible that she died much earlier, around 1058.[29] The Orkneyinga Saga records that Malcolm and Ingibiorg had a son, Duncan II (Donnchad mac Maíl Coluim), who was later king.[4] Some Medieval commentators, following William of Malmesbury , claimed that Duncan was illegitimate, but this claim is propaganda reflecting the need of Malcolm's descendants by Margaret to undermine the claims of Duncan's descendants, the Meic Uilleim .[30] Malcolm's son Domnall, whose death is reported in 1085, is not mentioned by the author of the Orkneyinga Saga. He is assumed to have been born to Ingibiorg.[31]

Malcolm's marriage to Ingibiorg secured him peace in the north and west. The Heimskringla tells that her father Finn had been an adviser to Harald Hardraade and, after falling out with Harald, was then made an Earl by Sweyn Estridsson , King of Denmark , which may have been another recommendation for the match.[32] Malcolm enjoyed a peaceful relationship with the Earldom of Orkney , ruled jointly by his stepsons, Paul and Erlend Thorfinnsson . The Orkneyinga Saga reports strife with Norway but this is probably misplaced as it associates this with Magnus Barefoot , who became king of Norway only in 1093, the year of Malcolm's death.[33]

Malcolm and Margaret

Although he had given sanctuary to Tostig Godwinson when the Northumbrians drove him out, Malcolm was not directly involved in the ill-fated invasion of England by Harald Hardraade and Tostig in 1066, which ended in defeat and death at the battle of Stamford Bridge .[34] In 1068, he granted asylum to a group of English exiles fleeing from William of Normandy , among them Agatha , widow of Edward the Confessor's nephew Edward the Exile , and her children: Edgar Ætheling and his sisters Margaret and Cristina . They were accompanied by Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria . The exiles were disappointed, however, if they had expected immediate assistance from the Scots.[35]

In 1069 the exiles returned to England, to join a spreading revolt in the north. Even though Gospatric and Siward's son Waltheof submitted by the end of the year, the arrival of a Danish army under Sweyn Estridsson seemed to ensure that William's position remained weak. Malcolm decided on war, and took his army south into Cumbria and across the Pennines , wasting Teesdale and Cleveland then marching north, loaded with loot, to Wearmouth . There Malcolm met Edgar and his family, who were invited to return with him, but did not. As Sweyn had by now been bought off with a large Danegeld , Malcolm took his army home. In reprisal, William sent Gospatric to raid Scotland through Cumbria. In return, the Scots fleet raided the Northumbrian coast where Gospatric's possessions were concentrated.[36] Late in the year, perhaps shipwrecked on their way to a European exile, Edgar and his family again arrived in Scotland, this time to remain. By the end of 1070, Malcolm had married Edgar's sister Margaret, the future Saint Margaret of Scotland .[37]

The naming of their children represented a break with the traditional Scots Regal names such as Malcolm, Cináed and Áed. The point of naming Margaret's sons, Edward after her father Edward the Exile , Edmund for her grandfather Edmund Ironside , Ethelred for her great-grandfather Ethelred the Unready and Edgar for her great-great-grandfather Edgar was unlikely to be missed in England, where William of Normandy's grasp on power was far from secure.[38] Whether the adoption of the classical Alexander for the future Alexander I of Scotland (either for Pope Alexander II or for Alexander the Great ) and the biblical David for the future David I of Scotland represented a recognition that William of Normandy would not be easily removed, or was due to the repetition of Anglo-Saxon Royal name-another Edmund had preceded Edgar-is not known.[39] Margaret also gave Malcolm two daughters, Edith , who married Henry I of England , and Mary, who married Eustace III of Boulogne .

In 1072, with the Harrying of the North completed and his position again secure, William of Normandy came north with an army and a fleet. Malcolm met William at Abernethy and, in the words of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle "became his man" and handed over his eldest son Duncan as a hostage and arranged peace between William and Edgar.[40] Accepting the overlordship of the king of the English was no novelty, previous kings had done so without result. The same was true of Malcolm; his agreement with the English king was followed by further raids into Northumbria, which led to further trouble in the earldom and the killing of Bishop William Walcher at Gateshead . In 1080, William sent his son Robert Curthose north with an army while his brother Odo punished the Northumbrians. Malcolm again made peace, and this time kept it for over a decade.[41]

Malcolm faced little recorded internal opposition, with the exception of Lulach's son Máel Snechtai . In an unusual entry, for the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle contains little on Scotland, it says that in 1078:
" Malcholom [Máel Coluim] seized the mother of Mælslæhtan [Máel Snechtai] ... and all his treasures, and his cattle; and he himself escaped with difficulty.[42] " Whatever provoked this strife, Máel Snechtai survived until 1085.[43]

Malcolm and William Rufus

When William Rufus became king of England after his father's death, Malcolm did not intervene in the rebellions by supporters of Robert Curthose which followed. In 1091, however, William Rufus confiscated Edgar Ætheling's lands in England, and Edgar fled north to Scotland. In May, Malcolm marched south, not to raid and take slaves and plunder, but to besiege Newcastle , built by Robert Curthose in 1080. This appears to have been an attempt to advance the frontier south from the River Tweed to the River Tees . The threat was enough to bring the English king back from Normandy , where he had been fighting Robert Curthose. In September, learning of William Rufus's approaching army, Malcolm withdrew north and the English followed. Unlike in 1072, Malcolm was prepared to fight, but a peace was arranged by Edgar Ætheling and Robert Curthose whereby Malcolm again acknowledged the overlordship of the English king.[44]

In 1092, the peace began to break down. Based on the idea that the Scots controlled much of modern Cumbria , it had been supposed that William Rufus's new castle at Carlisle and his settlement of English peasants in the surrounds was the cause. However, it is unlikely that Malcolm did control Cumbria, and the dispute instead concerned the estates granted to Malcolm by William Rufus's father in 1072 for his maintenance when visiting England. Malcolm sent messengers to discuss the question and William Rufus agreed to a meeting. Malcolm travelled south to Gloucester , stopping at Wilton Abbey to visit his daughter Edith and sister-in-law Cristina. Malcolm arrived there on 24 August 1093 to find that William Rufus refused to negotiate, insisting that the dispute be judged by the English barons. This Malcolm refused to accept, and returned immediately to Scotland.[45]


It does not appear that William Rufus intended to provoke a war,[46] but, as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports, war came:
" For this reason therefore they parted with great dissatisfaction, and the King Malcolm returned to Scotland. And soon after he came home, he gathered his army, and came harrowing into England with more hostility than behoved him ... " Malcolm was accompanied by Edward, his eldest son by Margaret and probable heir-designate (or tánaiste), and by Edgar.[47] Even by the standards of the time, the ravaging of Northumbria by the Scots was seen as harsh.[48]

Death
While marching north again, Malcolm was ambushed by Robert de Mowbray , Earl of Northumbria, whose lands he had devastated, near Alnwick on 13 November 1093. There he was killed by Arkil Morel, steward of Bamburgh Castle . The conflict became known as the Battle of Alnwick .[49] Edward was mortally wounded in the same fight. Margaret, it is said, died soon after receiving the news of their deaths from Edgar.[50] The Annals of Ulster say:

" Mael Coluim son of Donnchad, over-king of Scotland, and Edward his son, were killed by the French i.e. in Inber Alda in England. His queen, Margaret, moreover, died of sorrow for him within nine days.[51] " Malcolm's body was taken to Tynemouth Priory for burial, where it remains to this day. A body of a local farmer was sent north for burial in Dunfermline Abbey in the reign of his son Alexander or perhaps on Iona .[52]

On 19 June 1250, following the canonisation of Malcolm's wife Margaret by Pope Innocent IV , Margaret's remains were disinterred and placed in a reliquary. Tradition has it that as the reliquary was carried to the high altar of Dunfermline Abbey , past Malcolm's grave, it became too heavy to move. As a result, Malcolm's remains were also disinterred, and buried next to Margaret beside the altar.[53]

Issue
Malcolm and Ingebjorg had a son:
Duncan II of Scotland , suceeded his father as King of Scotland

Malcolm and Margaret had eight children, six sons and two daughters:
Edward, killed 1093.
Edmund of Scotland
Ethelred , abbot of Dunkeld
King Edgar of Scotland
King Alexander I of Scotland
King David I of Scotland
Edith of Scotland , also called Matilda, married King Henry I of England
Mary of Scotland , married Eustace III of Boulogne




Alexander Darcy of Little Malden, Essex and < > of Little Malden, Essex




Husband Alexander Darcy of Little Malden, Essex 8

           Born: Abt 1242
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Michael Darcy of Little Malden, Essex (Abt 1218-      ) 8
         Mother: < > (Abt 1220-      ) 8


       Marriage: Abt 1265



Wife < > of Little Malden, Essex 8

           Born: Abt 1244
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Norman Darcy of Little Malden, Essex 8

           Born: Abt 1266
     Christened: 
           Died: 1296 - Manor Great Yeldham, Halstead, Essex, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: < > D'Amory of Little Malden, Essex (Abt 1270-      ) 8
           Marr: Abt 1274




Godefried Duke of Alemania and < > [Daughter of Theodo V]




Husband Godefried Duke of Alemania 21 22 23

            AKA: Godefroy Duke of Allemania, Godofroy (Godofreid) of Allemania, Gotefrid Duke of Alamannia, Gotfrid Duke of Alemannia, Gottfried Duke of Allemania
           Born: Abt 659
     Christened: 
           Died: 709
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 

Events

• Became: Duke of Alemania, 687.




Wife < > [Daughter of Theodo V] 24 25

            AKA: Daughter of Theudon II - Duke of Bavaria
           Born: Abt 660 - <Bavaria, (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Theodo V Duke of Bavaria (Abt 0625-0716) 24 26
         Mother: Regintrude of Austrasia (      -      ) 24 27




Children
1 M Houching Count in Alemania 28 29

            AKA: Houchi, Hug Count in Allemania, Huocin, Nebi Huoching (Theobold) - Duke of Allemania, Theobold Duke of Allemani
           Born: Abt 675 - <Alemannia (Germany)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 727
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Godefried Duke of Alemania

From Ancestral Roots, line 182-1, "GODEFRIED, Duke of Alemania (or, of the Alamans) 687-709, d. 709."

From Wikipedia - Theodo of Bavaria :

[Theodo of Bavaria] married Regintrude of Austrasia , daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude . They had the following:
Daughter of Theodo , married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia

From Wikipedia - Gotfrid :

Gotfrid, Gotefrid, or Gottfried (Latin : Gotfridus or Cotefredus; died 709) was the Duke of Alemannia in the late seventh century and until his death. He was of the house of the Agilolfing , which was the dominant ruling family in Bavaria .

In a document dated to the year 700 in Cannstatt , Gotfrid at the request of a priest named Magulfus donated the castle of Biberburg to the monastery of Saint Gall .

Gotfrid fought a war over his de facto independence with the mayor of the palace Pepin of Heristal . The war was unfinished when Gotfrid died in 709. His sons, Lantfrid and Theudebald , had the support of Pepin and succeeded him.

Gotfrid married a daughter of Theodo of Bavaria and his third son, Odilo , later ruled in Bavaria. From his son Huoching (Huocin, Houchi, or Hug) came the later stock of the Ahalolfings . His daughter Regarde married Hildeprand of Spoleto , and he left a youngest son named Liutfrid.



Research Notes: Wife - < > [Daughter of Theodo V]

From Wikipedia - Theodo of Bavaria :

Marriage and issue
He married Regintrude of Austrasia , daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude . They had the following:
Daughter of Theodo , married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia
He also married Folchiade of Salzeburg . They had the following:
Theodbert
Grimoald
Theobald


Richard I Duke of Normandy and < > [Mistress(es) of Richard I]




Husband Richard I Duke of Normandy 8 30 31 32 33

            AKA: Richard I "Sans Peur" de Normandie Princeps Nortmannorum, Richard I "Sans Peur" Duke of Normandy, Richard I "the Fearless" Duke of Normandy
           Born: 28 Aug 933 - <Fécamp>, Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Nov 996 - Fécamp, (Seine-Maritime), Normandy, France
         Buried:  - Fécamp, (Seine-Maritime), Normandy, France


         Father: William I "Longsword" Duke of Normandy (Abt 0892-0942) 8 34 35
         Mother: Sprote de Bretagne à la Danoise (Abt 0911-Abt 0972) 8 34 36


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Gunnora de Crepon (Abt 0936-Abt 1031) 37 38 39 40

   Other Spouse: Emma of Paris (      -Abt 0968) - 960

Events

• Named: his father's heir, 29 May 942.




Wife < > [Mistress(es) of Richard I] 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F <Papia>

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Richard FitzGilbert Seigneur of Hugleville & Auffay (Abt 1005-      ) 8 30


2 M Guillaume d'Eu 41

            AKA: Guillaume d' Eu
           Born: Abt 978 - Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1057 - Normandy, France
         Buried:  - Notre-Dame et Saint-Laurent (Collegiate Church), Eu, (Seine-Maritime), Normandy, France
         Spouse: Lesceline de Harcourt (      -1057) 42


3 M Geoffrey Count of Eu & Count of Brionne 8 43 44

            AKA: Geoffroy Comte d'Eu et Brionne, Godfrey Count of Eu and Brionne
           Born: Abt 953 - <Brionne, (Eure)>, Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1015
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Haloise de Guînes (Abt 0942-      ) 45



Birth Notes: Husband - Richard I Duke of Normandy

Ancestral Roots has b. abt 933 in Fecamp, France.


Research Notes: Husband - Richard I Duke of Normandy

From http://cybergata.com/roots/441.htm :
Background Information. 220
Richard Fitz Gilbert, styled from his possession "de Bienfaite," "de Clare" and "de Tonbride," was son of Gilbert, comté de Brionne in Normandy, which Gilbert was son and heir of Godfrey, comté de Brionne, illegitimate son of Richard, Duc de Normandie.

~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Clare), Vol. III, p. 242
• Background Information. 732
When Richard's father, William Longsword, was assassinated in 942, his Uncle, Bernard the Dane, brought Richard from Bayeyx, age ten years at the time, so that he might be solemnly invested with ducal sword and mantle and to receive homage of the Normans. He received the acknowledgement the Norman chiefs. King Louis captured and imprisoned the young Richard under the pretense of providing Richard with an education at Motleon. Richard, with the help of Osmon the Dane who had accompanied Richard to the king's court, was able to escape and return to Normandy. Louis, with the aid of Hugh the Great, attacked the Normans. The Kings of Denmark came to the assistance of the Normans and Louis was defeated.

Richard married Esmé, daughter of Hugh the Great, who died young and childless. Richard married his mistress, Gunnora, who was said to be the sister of Herfaste, a Dane of noble birth. According to Guillaume de Jumièges, Richard had three sons. One was Richard, the second Duke of Normandy, Robert, who became the Archbishop of Rouen, and Mauger or Maugis, who married in 1012 Germaine, the daughter and heiress of Count Bouchard, and because of this marriage, he became Earl of Corbeil. Richard's daughter, Emma, was twice crowned Queen of England having first married King Ethelred in 1002, and then King Canute. She and Ethelred were the parents of Edward "the Confessor. By her other husband, she mothered King Hardicanute. Richard also was known to have at least three illegitimate children

~The Peshale Family, 870-1913, pg. 30-41, Much of this may be more myth than truth!
• Web Reference: Richard I of Nomandy by Steward Baldwin, whose information is based on hard evidence.

~Weis' Ancestral Roots . . ., 1:18, 118:23. 119::24, 119A:22, 121E:20 - son of William I "Longsword" and Sporta, m. 1st to Emma, daughter of Hugh Capet, m. 2nd to Gunnora to make his children with her legitimate, 177:3, 184:1, 214:22m 235:19, 250:20

---
From Wikipedia - Richard I, Duke of Normandy :

Richard I of Normandy (born 28 August 933 , in Fécamp Normandy , France died November 20 , 996 , in Fécamp) was the Duke of Normandy from 942 to 996; he is considered the first to actually have held that title. He was called Richard the Fearless (French, Sans Peur).

Birth
He was born to William I of Normandy , ruler of Normandy, and his wife, Sprota . He was still a boy when his father died in 942. His mother was a Breton concubine captured in war and bound to William by a Danish marriage. After William died, Sprota became the wife of Esperleng, a wealthy miller; Rodulf of Ivry was their son and Richard's half-brother.

Life
Richard was still a boy when his father died, and so he was powerless to stop Louis IV of France when he seized Normandy. Louis kept him in confinement in his youth at Lâon, but he escaped with the assistance of Osmond de Centville , Bernard de Senlis (who had been a companion of Rollo of Normandy ), Ivo de Bellèsme , and Bernard the Dane (ancestor of families of Harcourt and Beaumont ). In 968, Richard agreed to "commend" himself to Hugh, Count of Paris. He then allied himself with the Norman and Viking leaders, drove Louis out of Rouen, and took back Normandy by 947. He later quarrelled with Ethelred II of England regarding Viking invasions of England because Normandy had been buying up much of the stolen booty.

Richard was bilingual, having been well educated at Bayeux. He was more partial to his Danish subjects than to the French. During his reign, Normandy became completely Gallicized and Christianized. He introduced the feudal system and Normandy became one of the most thoroughly feudalized states on the continent. He carried out a major reorganization of the Norman military system, based on heavy cavalry. He also became guardian of the young Hugh, Count of Paris, on the elder Hugh's death in 956.

Marriages
He married 1st (960) Emma (not to be confused with Emma of France ), daughter of Hugh "The Great" of France , and Hedwiga de Sachsen . They were betrothed when both were very young. She died 19 Mar 968, with no issue.
According to Robert of Torigni , not long after Emma's death, Duke Richard went out hunting and stopped at the house of a local forester. He became enamoured of the forester's wife, Seinfreda, but she being a virtuous woman, suggested he court her unmarried sister, Gunnor , instead. Gunnor became his mistress, and her family rose to prominence. Her brother, Herefast de Crepon , may have been involved in a controversial heresy trial. Gunnor was, like Richard, of Norse descent, being a Dane by blood. Richard finally married her to legitimize their children:
Richard II "the Good", Duke of Normandy (966)
Robert , Archbishop of Rouen , Count of Evreux , died 1037.
Geoffrey, Count of Eu, b. abt 962 died abt 1015. (Parentage [mother] not certain)
Mauger, Earl of Corbeil , died after 1033; his alleged grandson (or perhaps great-grandson) was Robert Fitzhamon , an important Anglo-Norman baron.
Robert Danus, died between 985 and 989
Emma of Normandy (c.985-1052) wife of two kings of England.
Maud of Normandy, wife of Odo II of Blois , Count of Blois, Champagne and Chartres
Hawise of Normandy (b. ca. 978), d. 21 February 1034 . m. Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany
Beatrice of Normandy , Abbess of Montvilliers d.1034 m. Ebles of Turenne (d.1030 (divorced)
Papia m. Gilbert de St Valery.
Fressenda (ca. 995-ca. 1057), m. Tancred of Hauteville .
Muriella m. Tancred of Hauteville .

Mistresses
Richard was known to have had several other mistresses and produced children with many of them. Known children are:
Geoffrey, Count of Brionne , (b. ca. 970)
William, Count of Eu (ca. 972 -26 January 1057/58) m. Leseline de Turqueville (d. 26 January 1057/58).

Death
He died in Fecamp , France on November 20 , 996 of natural causes.


Research Notes: Child - <Papia>

Illegitimate daughter of Richard I, d. 996, Duke of Normandy.


Research Notes: Child - Guillaume d'Eu

From http://cybergata.com/roots/1991.htm :
~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, Vol. III, 1890, (EU) pg. 290, says that this William is one of the illegitimate sons of Richard I of Normandy.


Research Notes: Child - Geoffrey Count of Eu & Count of Brionne

Illegitimate son of Duke Richard I of Normandy by an unnamed concubine.

Possibly the father of Giselbert "Crispin."


Étienne de Vaux 1st Sire de Joinville, Count of Joigny and < >




Husband Étienne de Vaux 1st Sire de Joinville, Count of Joigny 46

            AKA: Stephen de Vaux 1st Sire de Joinville, Count of Joigny
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Bef 1027



Wife < >

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Engelbert de Brienne (      -      ) 47
         Mother: Adelaide Countess of Joigny (      -      ) 47




Children
1 M Geoffroi de Joinville Seigneur de Joinville 48

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1080
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Blanche of Reynel (      -      ) 49




Henry of Burgundy and < > [Not Sibylle of Barcelona]




Husband Henry of Burgundy 8 50 51

            AKA: Henri Comte de Bourgogne
           Born: Abt 1035 - <Bourgogne, (Champagne), (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1071
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert "the Old" Duke of Burgundy (Abt 1011-1076) 52 53
         Mother: Hélie (1016-1055) 54


       Marriage: 

Events

• "Le damoiseau de Bourgogne":




Wife < > [Not Sibylle of Barcelona]

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugh I Duke of Burgundy

           Born: 1057
     Christened: 
           Died: 1093
         Buried: 



2 M Eudes I Duke of Burgundy 55 56

            AKA: Eudes I "the Red" of Burgundy, Eudes I Borel of Burgundy
           Born: Abt 1058 - <Bourgogne, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Mar 1103 - Cilicia, Armenia (Turkey)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sibylle of Burgundy-Ivrea (      -After 1103) 57
           Marr: 1080
         Spouse: Mathilda of Burgundy (Abt 1062-1093) 58
           Marr: France


3 M Robert Bishop of Langres

           Born: 1059
     Christened: 
           Died: 1111
         Buried: 



4 F Beatrice of Burgundy 59

           Born: Abt 1063
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1110
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Guy III de Vignory Seigneur de Vignory (      -1125/1126) 60
           Marr: After 1082


5 M Reginald Abbot of St. Pierre

           Born: 1065
     Christened: 
           Died: 1092
         Buried: 



6 M Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal 8 61 62




            AKA: Henri of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henrique of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henry I de Bourgogne, Henry I Count of Portugal
           Born: 1069 - <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Nov 1112
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theresa of Leon and Castile (Abt 1070-1130) 8
           Marr: 1093


7 F Helie

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Henry of Burgundy

Ancestral Roots has d. 27 Jan. 1066/7 and d. 27 Jan.1066/1074. Wikipedia has d. abt. 1071.


Research Notes: Husband - Henry of Burgundy

His wife was NOT named Sibylle of Barcelona, daughter of Berenger Ramon I, according to Wikipedia.

From Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy :

Henry of Burgundy (1035 - c. 1071 ) was the son and heir of Robert I , duke of Burgundy . He died shortly before his father and failed to succeed in Burgundy. The name of his wife is unknown (that it was Sibil has been discredited) as is her origin, although a connection to the Counts of Barcelona has been hypothesized. Their children were:
Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy (1057-1093)
Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy (1058-1103)
Robert, bishop of Langres (1059-1111)
Helie, a nun (b. 1061)
Beatrice (b. 1063), married Guy I, count of Vignory
Reginald, abbot of St Pierre (1065-1092)
Henry, Count of Portugal (1066-1112), who became a vassal of León and ruler of the county of Portugal in 1093; his son would be Afonso Henriques , first king of Portugal


Research Notes: Child - Hugh I Duke of Burgundy

Source: Wikipedia (Henry of Burgundy)


Research Notes: Child - Eudes I Duke of Burgundy

From Wikipedia - Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy :

Eudes I, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058-23 March 1103 ) was Duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Eudes was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I . He became the duke following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Eudes married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy .

They had:
Florine of Burgundy 1083-1097
Helie of Burgundy 1080-1141 wife of Bertrand of Toulouse and William III of Ponthieu
Hugh II of Burgundy
Henry d.1131

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness, Eadmer , biographer of Anselm of Canterbury . While Saint Anselm was progressing through Eudes's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately allowed the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.

He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101 .


Research Notes: Child - Robert Bishop of Langres

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy


Research Notes: Child - Reginald Abbot of St. Pierre

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy


Research Notes: Child - Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal

From Wikipedia - Henry, Count of Portugal :

Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal (1066 -1112 ) was Count of Portugal from 1093 to his death. He was the son of Henry of Burgundy , heir of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy , and brother of Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy and Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . His name is Henri in modern French , Henricus in Latin , Enrique in modern Spanish and Henrique in modern Portuguese . He was a distant cousin of Raymond of Burgundy and Pope Callistus II .
As a younger son, Henry had little chances of acquiring fortune and titles by inheritance, thus he joined the Reconquista against the Moors in the Iberian Peninsula . He helped king Alfonso VI of Castile and León conquer modern Galicia and the north of Portugal and in reward he married Alfonso's daughter Theresa, Countess of Portugal in 1093 , receiving the County of Portugal , then a fiefdom of the Kingdom of León , as a dowry .

From Teresa, Henry had three sons and three daughters. The only son to survive childhood was Afonso Henriques , who became the second Count of Portugal in 1112. However, the young man Afonso was energetic and expanded his dominions at the expense of Muslims . In 1139 , he declared himself King of Portugal after reneging the subjugation to León, in open confrontation with his mother. Two daughters also survived childhood, Urraca and Sancha. Urraca Henriques married a Bermudo Peres de Trava, Count of Trastamara. Sancha Henriques married a nobleman, Sancho Nunes de Celanova.


Research Notes: Child - Helie

A nun.

Source: Wikipedia - Henry of Burgundy


Maurilion Gallo of Troyes and < > [Princess of the Thuringians]




Husband Maurilion Gallo of Troyes 63

           Born: Abt 520 - Tricassium (Troyes), (Aube, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife < > [Princess of the Thuringians] 64

           Born: Abt 520
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Berthar King of the Thuringians (Abt 0470-Abt 0530) 65
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Palatina of Troyes 66 67

           Born: Abt 547 - Tricassium (Troyes), (Aube, France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Saint Gondulphus of Maastricht, Bishop of Tongres (0524-0607) 66 68 69




Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy and < > [Daughter of Duke Bernard]




Husband Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy 70 71

           Born: Apr 773
     Christened: 12 Apr 781 - Rome, (Italy)
           Died: 8 Jul 810 - Milan, Italy
         Buried: 


         Father: Charlemagne King of France, Emperor of Rom (0747-0814) 72 73 74 75
         Mother: Hildegard of Vinzgouw (Abt 0758-0783) 17 76 77 78


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Bertha (      -      ) - Bef 800

Events

• Baptized: by Pope Adrian I, 12 Apr 781, Rome, (Italy).

• King of Italy: 781-810.

• Consecrated: King of Lombardy, 15 Apr 781.




Wife < > [Daughter of Duke Bernard] 79

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Duke Bernard (      -      ) 79
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Bernard King of Italy 80 81

           Born: 797 - Vermand, Picardy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Apr 818 - Milan, Italy
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Cunigunde (      -Abt 0835) 82



Christening Notes: Husband - Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy

Baptized at Rome, 12 Apr. 781, by Pope Adrian I


Research Notes: Husband - Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-14

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) has b. Apr 777.

Wikipedia has b. April 773.

From Wikipedia - Pepin of Italy :

Pepin (April 773 - 8 July 810 ) was the son of Charlemagne and king of Italy (781 -810) under the authority of his father.

Pepin was the third son of Charlemagne , and the second with his wife Hildegard . He was born Carloman, but when his brother Pepin the Hunchback betrayed their father, the royal name Pepin passed to him. He was made king of Italy after his father's conquest of the Lombards , in 781, and crowned by Pope Hadrian I with the Iron Crown of Lombardy .

He was active as ruler of Italy and worked to expand the Frankish empire. In 791 , he marched a Lombard army into the Drava valley and ravaged Pannonia , while his father marched along the Danube into Avar territory. Charlemagne left the campaigning to deal with a Saxon revolt in 792 . Pepin and Duke Eric of Friuli continued, however, to assault the Avars' ring-shaped strongholds. The great Ring of the Avars, their capital fortress, was taken twice. The booty was sent to Charlemagne in Aachen and redistributed to all his followers and even to foreign rulers, including King Offa of Mercia .

His activities included a long, but unsuccessful siege of Venice in 810. The siege lasted six months and Pepin's army was ravaged by the diseases of the local swamps and was forced to withdraw. A few months later Pepin died.
He married Bertha, daughter of William of Gellone , count of Toulouse , and had five daughters with her (Adelaide , married Lambert I of Nantes ; Atala; Gundrada; Bertha; and Tetrada), all of whom but the eldest were born between 800 and Pepin's death and died before their grandfather's death in 814 . Pepin also had an illegitimate son Bernard . Pepin was expected to inherit a third of his father's empire, but he predeceased him. The Italian crown passed on to his son Bernard, but the empire went to Pepin's younger brother Louis the Pious .


Research Notes: Child - Bernard King of Italy

Natural son of Pepin, probably by a daughter of Duke Bernard.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-15

Also Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

From Wikipedia - Bernard of Italy :

Bernard (b. 797 , Vermandois , Normandy ; d. 17 April 818 , Milan , Lombardy ) was the King of Italy from 810 to 818. He plotted against his uncle, Emperor Louis the Pious , when the latter's Ordinatio Imperii made Bernard a vassal of his cousin Lothair . When his plot was discovered, Louis had him blinded, a procedure which killed him.

Life
Bernard was the illegitimate son of King Pepin of Italy , the second legitimate son of the Emperor Charlemagne . In 810, Pepin died from an illness contracted at a siege of Venice; although Bernard was illegitimate, Charlemagne allowed him to inherit Italy. Bernard married Cunigunda of Laon in 813. They had one son, Pepin, Count of Vermandois .
Prior to 817, Bernard was a trusted agent of his grandfather, and of his uncle. His rights in Italy were respected, and he was used as an intermediary to manage events in his sphere of influence - for example, when in 815 Louis the Pious received reports that some Roman nobles had conspired to murder Pope Leo III, and that he had responded by butchering the ringleaders, Bernard was sent to investigate the matter.
A change came in 817, when Louis the Pious drew up an Ordinatio Imperii, detailing the future of the Frankish Empire. Under this, the bulk of the Frankish territory went to Louis' eldest son, Lothair; Bernard received no further territory, and although his Kingship of Italy was confirmed, he would be a vassal of Lothair. This was, it was later alleged, the work of the Empress, Ermengarde , who wished Bernard to be displaced in favour of her own sons. Resenting Louis' actions, Bernard began plotting with a group of magnates: Eggideo, Reginhard, and Reginhar, the last being the grandson of a Thuringian rebel against Charlemagne, Hardrad. Anshelm, Bishop of Milan and Theodulf, Bishop of Orléans , were also accused of being involved: there is no evidence either to support or contradict this in the case of Theodulf, whilst the case for Anshelm is murkier.[1][2]
Bernard's main complaint was the notion of his being a vassal of Lothair. In practical terms, his actual position had not been altered at all by the terms of the decree, and he could safely have continued to rule under such a system. Nonetheless, "partly true" reports came to Louis the Pious that his nephew was planning to set up an 'unlawful' - i.e. independent - regime in Italy.[3]
Louis the Pious reacted swiftly to the plot, marching south to Chalon. Bernard and his associates were taken by surprise; Bernard travelled to Chalon in an attempt to negotiate terms, but he and the ringleaders were forced to surrender to him. Louis had them taken to Aix-la-Chapelle, where they were tried and condemned to death. Louis 'mercifully' commuted their sentences to blinding, which would neutralise Bernard as a threat without actually killing him; however, the process of blinding (carried out by means of pressing a red-hot stiletto to the eyeballs) proved so traumatic that Bernard died in agony two days after the procedure was carried out. At the same time, Louis also had his half-brothers Drogo, Hugh and Theoderic tonsured and confined to monasteries, to prevent other Carolingian off-shoots challenging the main line. He also treated those guilty or suspected of conspiring with Bernard treated harshly: Theodulf of Orleans was gaoled, and died soon afterwards; the lay conspirators were blinded, the clerics deposed and imprisoned; all lost lands and honours. [4][5][6]

Legacy
His Kingdom of Italy was reabsorbed into the Frankish empire, and soon after bestowed upon Louis' eldest son Lothair. In 822, Louis made a display of public penance at Attigny , where he confessed before all the court to having sinfully slain his nephew; he also welcomed his half-brothers back into his favour. These actions possibly stemmed from guilt over his part in Bernard's death. It has been argued by some historians that his behaviour left him open to clerical domination, and reduced his prestige and respect amongst the Frankish nobility.[7] Others, however, point out that Bernard's plot had been a serious threat to the stability of the kingdom, and the reaction no less a threat; Louis' display of penance, then, "was a well-judged gesture to restore harmony and re-establish his authority."[8]

References
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ Riche, Pierre, The Carolingians, p. 148
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ Riche, Pierre, The Carolingians, p. 148
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The New Cambridge History, 700-900
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
^ McKitterick, Rosamond, The New Cambridge History, 700-900

Sources
McKitterick, Rosamond, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
Riche, Pierre, The Carolingians
McKitterick, Rosamond, The New Cambridge History, 700-900


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2. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-17, 240-17, 140-17.

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6. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-18 (Reginar II).

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71. Wikipedia.org, Pepin of Italy.

72. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 50-13, 140-13, 190-13.

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81. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-15.

82. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-15 (Bernard).


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