The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Clodomir IV King of the Franks [Semi-legendary] and Hasilda Princess of the Rugij




Husband Clodomir IV King of the Franks [Semi-legendary] 1 2

           Born: 104 - <Gallia Lugdunensis (France)>, Gaul
     Christened: 
           Died: 166
         Buried: 


         Father: Marcomir IV King of the Franks [Legendary] (Abt 0080-0149) 3 4
         Mother: Athildis [Legendary] (      -      ) 5 6


       Marriage: 



Wife Hasilda Princess of the Rugij 7 8

            AKA: Hafilda Princess of the Rugij
           Born: Abt 119
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Farabert King of the Franks [Semi-legendary] 9 10

           Born: 122 - <Gallia Lugdunensis (France)>, Gaul
     Christened: 
           Died: 186
         Buried: 





Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks and Guntheuc




Husband Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks 11 12 13

            AKA: Chlothar I King of Soissons, King of the Franks, Lothair I King of Soissons
           Born: 497 - Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Nov 561
         Buried:  - Abbey of Saint-Medard, Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France


         Father: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 14 15 16
         Mother: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 17 18 19 20


       Marriage: Abt 524

   Other Spouse: Radegund (      -      )

   Other Spouse: Ingund (Abt 0500-      ) 21 22

   Other Spouse: Arnégonde (Abt 0515-0573) 23 24 25

   Other Spouse: Chunsina (      -      ) 26



Wife Guntheuc

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

   Other Spouse: Chlodomer King of Orléans (Abt 0495-      ) 27 - Bef 523


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks

Succeeded Clovis I in Soissons.
----------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Upon [the death of Clovis I], the kingdom was split among his four sons:

Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561

Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.

Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

-----------

From Wikipedia - Chlothar I :

Chlothar I (or Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 497 - 561 ), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks , was one of the four sons of Clovis . He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département , Picardie , France ).

On the death of his father in 511 , he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons , which he made his capital; the cities of Laon , Noyon , Cambrai , and Maastricht ; and the lower course of the Meuse River . But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer 's children in 524 , and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers . He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534 , obtained Grenoble , Die , and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange , Carpentras , and Gap . In 531 , he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542 , with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain . On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555 , Clotaire annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany , made expeditions into Saxony , and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany , where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin , and died shortly afterwards.

Family
Clotaire's first marriage was to Guntheuc , widow of his own brother Chlodomer, sometime around 524. They had no children.
His second marriage, which occurred around 532 , was to Radegund , daughter of Bertachar , King of Thuringia , whom he and his brother Theuderic defeated. She was later canonized . They had no children.
His third and most successful marriage was to Ingund , by whom he had five sons and two daughters:
Gunthar, predeceased father
Childeric, predeceased father
Charibert , King of Paris
Guntram , King of Burgundy
Sigebert , King of Austrasia
Chlothsind , married Alboin , King of the Lombards

His next marriage was to a sister of Ingund, Aregund , with whom he had a son:
Chilperic , King of Soissons
His last wife was Chunsina (or Chunsine), with whom he had one son:
Chram , who became his father's enemy and predeceased him


Research Notes: Wife - Guntheuc

Source: Wiukipedia - Chlothar I


Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks and Radegund




Husband Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks 11 12 13

            AKA: Chlothar I King of Soissons, King of the Franks, Lothair I King of Soissons
           Born: 497 - Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Nov 561
         Buried:  - Abbey of Saint-Medard, Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France


         Father: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 14 15 16
         Mother: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 17 18 19 20


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Guntheuc (      -      ) - Abt 524

   Other Spouse: Ingund (Abt 0500-      ) 21 22

   Other Spouse: Arnégonde (Abt 0515-0573) 23 24 25

   Other Spouse: Chunsina (      -      ) 26



Wife Radegund

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks

Succeeded Clovis I in Soissons.
----------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Upon [the death of Clovis I], the kingdom was split among his four sons:

Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561

Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.

Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

-----------

From Wikipedia - Chlothar I :

Chlothar I (or Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 497 - 561 ), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks , was one of the four sons of Clovis . He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département , Picardie , France ).

On the death of his father in 511 , he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons , which he made his capital; the cities of Laon , Noyon , Cambrai , and Maastricht ; and the lower course of the Meuse River . But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer 's children in 524 , and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers . He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534 , obtained Grenoble , Die , and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange , Carpentras , and Gap . In 531 , he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542 , with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain . On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555 , Clotaire annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany , made expeditions into Saxony , and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany , where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin , and died shortly afterwards.

Family
Clotaire's first marriage was to Guntheuc , widow of his own brother Chlodomer, sometime around 524. They had no children.
His second marriage, which occurred around 532 , was to Radegund , daughter of Bertachar , King of Thuringia , whom he and his brother Theuderic defeated. She was later canonized . They had no children.
His third and most successful marriage was to Ingund , by whom he had five sons and two daughters:
Gunthar, predeceased father
Childeric, predeceased father
Charibert , King of Paris
Guntram , King of Burgundy
Sigebert , King of Austrasia
Chlothsind , married Alboin , King of the Lombards

His next marriage was to a sister of Ingund, Aregund , with whom he had a son:
Chilperic , King of Soissons
His last wife was Chunsina (or Chunsine), with whom he had one son:
Chram , who became his father's enemy and predeceased him


Research Notes: Wife - Radegund

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar I


Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks and Ingund




Husband Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks 11 12 13

            AKA: Chlothar I King of Soissons, King of the Franks, Lothair I King of Soissons
           Born: 497 - Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Nov 561
         Buried:  - Abbey of Saint-Medard, Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France


         Father: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 14 15 16
         Mother: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 17 18 19 20


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Guntheuc (      -      ) - Abt 524

   Other Spouse: Radegund (      -      )

   Other Spouse: Arnégonde (Abt 0515-0573) 23 24 25

   Other Spouse: Chunsina (      -      ) 26



Wife Ingund 21 22

            AKA: Ingonde, Ingonthe
           Born: Abt 500
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Charibert I King of Paris 28 29

           Born: 520 - Paris, Île-de-France, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 567
         Buried: 



2 M Sigebert I of Austrasia

            AKA: Sigibert I of the Franks King of Austrasia
           Born: 535 - Metz, (Moselle), Austrasia, Frankish Empire (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 575 and 579 - Vitry-en-Artois, (Pas-de-Calais), Austrasia, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Brunhilda of Austrasia (Abt 0543-0613) 30 31 32


3 M Gunthar

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 561
         Buried: 



4 M Childeric

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 561
         Buried: 



5 M Guntram King of Burgundy

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



6 F Chlothsind

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks

Succeeded Clovis I in Soissons.
----------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Upon [the death of Clovis I], the kingdom was split among his four sons:

Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561

Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.

Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

-----------

From Wikipedia - Chlothar I :

Chlothar I (or Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 497 - 561 ), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks , was one of the four sons of Clovis . He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département , Picardie , France ).

On the death of his father in 511 , he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons , which he made his capital; the cities of Laon , Noyon , Cambrai , and Maastricht ; and the lower course of the Meuse River . But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer 's children in 524 , and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers . He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534 , obtained Grenoble , Die , and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange , Carpentras , and Gap . In 531 , he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542 , with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain . On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555 , Clotaire annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany , made expeditions into Saxony , and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany , where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin , and died shortly afterwards.

Family
Clotaire's first marriage was to Guntheuc , widow of his own brother Chlodomer, sometime around 524. They had no children.
His second marriage, which occurred around 532 , was to Radegund , daughter of Bertachar , King of Thuringia , whom he and his brother Theuderic defeated. She was later canonized . They had no children.
His third and most successful marriage was to Ingund , by whom he had five sons and two daughters:
Gunthar, predeceased father
Childeric, predeceased father
Charibert , King of Paris
Guntram , King of Burgundy
Sigebert , King of Austrasia
Chlothsind , married Alboin , King of the Lombards

His next marriage was to a sister of Ingund, Aregund , with whom he had a son:
Chilperic , King of Soissons
His last wife was Chunsina (or Chunsine), with whom he had one son:
Chram , who became his father's enemy and predeceased him


Research Notes: Wife - Ingund

Possibly the sister of Lothair's second wife Arnegunde.


Research Notes: Child - Charibert I King of Paris

Per Wikipedia - Chlothar I - he was King of Paris, succeeding Chlothar I (Clotaire I).


Research Notes: Child - Sigebert I of Austrasia

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #99004 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer) has b. 535 in Metz, d. between 575 & 579 in Metz.

Per Wikipedia - Chlothar I - he was King of Rheims, succeeding Chlothar I (Clotaire I).

Wikipedia - Brunhilda of Austrasia - has differing information:

In 567 , [Brunhilda] was married to king Sigebert I of Austrasia, a grandson of Clovis I who had sent an embassy to Toledo loaded with gifts. She joined him at Metz . Upon her marriage, she abjured Arianism and converted to orthodox Roman Catholicism .[2]
Sigebert's father, Clotaire I , had reunited the four kingdoms of the Franks, but when he died, Sigebert and his three brothers divided them again. According to Gregory of Tours , Sigebert's marriage to a Visigothic princess was a criticism of his brothers' choices in wives. Instead of marrying low-born and promiscuous women, Sigebert contracted a princess of education and morals.

In response to Sigebert's noble marriage, his brother King Chilperic of Soissons sent to Spain for Brunhilda's sister, Galswintha . Gregory of Tours suggests that he proposed because he envied his brother's marriage to Brunhilda.[3] However, Galswintha ordered him to purge his court of prostitutes and mistresses and he soon grew tired of her. He and his favourite mistress, one Fredegund , conspired to murder her within the year. He then married Fredegund.
Brunhilda so detested Fredegund for the death of her sister-and this hatred was so fiercely reciprocated-that the two queens persuaded their husbands to go to war.[4] Sigebert persuaded their other brother, the elder Guntram of Burgundy , to mediate the dispute between the queens. He decided that Galswintha's dower of Bordeaux , Limoges , Cahors , Béarn , and Bigorre should be turned over to Brunhilda in restitution. However, Chilperic did not easily give up the cities and Brunhilda did not forget the murder. Germanus , Bishop of Paris , negotiated a brief peace between them. Between 567 and 570 , Brunhilda bore Sigebert three children: Ingund, Chlodosind, and Childebert .

The peace was then broken by Chilperic, who invaded the Sigebert's dominions. Sigebert defeated Chilperic, who fled to Tournai . The people of Paris hailed Sigebert as a conqueror when he went there with Brunhilda and their children. Germanus wrote to Brunhilda, asking her to persuade her husband to restore the peace and to spare his brother. Chroniclers of Germanus' life say that she ignored this; certainly Sigebert set out to besiege Tournai. Fredegund responded to this threat to her husband by hiring two assassins, who killed Sigebert at Vitry with poisoned daggers (scramasaxi , according to Gregory). Brunhilda was captured and imprisoned at Rouen .


Research Notes: Child - Gunthar

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar I


Research Notes: Child - Childeric

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar I


Research Notes: Child - Guntram King of Burgundy

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar I


Research Notes: Child - Chlothsind

Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar I


Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks and Haldertrude




Husband Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks 33 34 35

            AKA: Chlothar "le Jeune" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Chlothar II "le Grand" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Lothair II King of Neustria, King of the Franks
           Born: 584 - <Neustria>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 629 - Paris, (Île-de-France), Neustria, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria (Abt 0539-0584) 36 37
         Mother: Fredegund (0543-0597) 34 38


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Bertrade (0582-0618) 39

   Other Spouse: Sichilde (      -      )

Events

• King of Neustria: 584-629.

• King of the Franks: 613-629.




Wife Haldertrude 34

           Born: 575
     Christened: 
           Died: 604
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Dagobert I King of Austrasia, King of the Franks 40 41 42

           Born: Abt 603 - <Neustria>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Jan 639
         Buried:  - Saint-Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), Neustria, France
         Spouse: Ragintrudis (      -      )
         Spouse: Nanthilde (0610-0642) 43



Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks

King of Neustria (584-629) and King of all the Franks (613-629)

---------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :
Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

Chlothar II defeated Brunhilda and her grandson, reunifying the kingdom. However, in 623, in order to appease particularistic forces and also to secure the borders, he gave the Austrasians his young son as their own king. His son and successor, Dagobert I , emulated this move by appointing a sub-king for Aquitaine, with a seat at Toulouse , in 629 and Austrasia in 634.


-------
From Wikipedia - Chlothar II :

Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 584 - 629 ), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria , and, from 613 to 629 , King of all the Franks , was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in 584. His mother, Fredegund , was regent until her death in 597 , at which time the thirteen-year old Clotaire began to rule for himself. As king, he continued his mother's feud with Brunhilda , queen of Austrasia , with equal viciousness and bloodshed.

In 599 , he made war with his cousins, Theuderic II of Burgundy and Theudebert II of Austrasia, who defeated him at Dormelles (near Montereau ). At this point, however, the two brothers took up arms against each other. In 605 , he invaded Theuderic's kingdom, but did not subdue it. He remained often at war with Theuderic and the latter died in Metz in late 613 while preparing a campaign against him. At that time, Warnachar , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, and Rado , mayor of the palace of Burgundy, abandoned the cause of Brunhilda and her great-grandson, Sigebert II , and the entire realm was delivered into Clotaire's hands. Brunhilda and Sigebert met Clotaire's army on the Aisne , but the Patrician Aletheus, Duke Rocco, and Duke Sigvald deserted the host and the grand old woman and her king had to flee. They got as far as the Orbe , but Clotaire's minions caught up with them by the lake Neuchâtel . Both of them and Sigebert's younger brother Corbo were executed by Clotaire's orders.
In that year, Clotaire II became the first king of all the Franks since his grandfather Clotaire I died in 561 by ordering the murder of the infant Sigebert II (son of Theuderic), whom the aging Brunhilda had attempted to set on the thrones of Austrasia and Burgundy , causing a rebellion among the nobility. This led to the delivery of Brunhilda into Clotaire's hands, his thirst for vengeance leading to his formidable old aunt enduring the agony of the rack for three whole days, before suffering a horrific death, chained between four horses that were goaded in separate directions, eventually tearing her apart.

In 615 , Clotaire II promulgated the Edict of Paris , a sort of Frankish Magna Carta that reserved many rights to the Frankish nobles while it excluded Jews from all civil employment for the Crown. The ban effectively placed all literacy in the Merovingian monarchy squarely under ecclesiastical control and also greatly pleased the nobles, from whose ranks the bishops were ordinarily exclusively drawn. Clotaire was induced by Warnachar and Rado to make the mayoralty of the palace a lifetime appointment at Bonneuil-sur-Marne , near Paris , in 617 . By these actions, Clotaire lost his own legislative abilities and the great number of laws enacted in his reign are probably the result of the nobles' petitions, which the king had no authority not to heed.
In 623 , he gave the kingdom of Austrasia to his young son Dagobert I . This was a political move as repayment for the support of Bishop Arnulf of Metz and Pepin I , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, the two leading Austrasian nobles, who were effectively granted semi-autonomy.
Clotaire II died in 629 after 45 years on the throne, longer than any other Merovingian dynast. He left the crown greatly reduced in power and prepared the way for the rise of the mayors and the rois fainéants.

Marriage and issue
First wife of Chlothar II was Haldertude (575-604). They had the following son:
Dagobert I
Second wife of Chlothar II was Bertrade.
Third wife of Chlothar II was Sichilde (Brynhilde). They had the following children:
Charibert_II
Oda


Research Notes: Wife - Haldertrude

First wife of Clotaire II. Source: Wikipedia - Chlothar II


Research Notes: Child - Dagobert I King of Austrasia, King of the Franks

King of Austrasia (623-634), King of the Franks (629-634), King of Neustria and Burgundy (629-639)

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873572 :

King of Austrasia 622-628. The greatest of the Merovingian Kings. In 626 Dagobert founded a Benedictine abbey near the tomb of St. Denis. By the 12th century, the abbey had become the richest and most famous in France. Its church was a burial place for many of the French royal house and from the 12th to 15th centuries the oriflamme, the standard of St. Denis, was the banner of the kings of France.

---------

From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Chlothar II defeated Brunhilda and her grandson, reunifying the kingdom. However, in 623, in order to appease particularistic forces and also to secure the borders, he gave the Austrasians his young son as their own king. His son and successor, Dagobert I , emulated this move by appointing a sub-king for Aquitaine, with a seat at Toulouse , in 629 and Austrasia in 634.

Neustria and Burgundy - Dagobert I, 629-639 then Clovis II, 639-658 then Chlothar III, 658-673 then Theuderic III, 673 then Childeric II, 673-675 then Theuderic III, 675-691

Aquitaine - Charibert II, 629-632 then Chilperic, 632 then Dagobert I, 632-639

Austrasia - Dagobert I, 623-634 then Sigebert III, 634-656 then Childebert the Adopted, 656-661 then Chlothar III, 661-662 then Childeric II, 662-675 then Clovis III, 675-676 then Dagobert II, 676-679 then Theuderic III, 679-691

Theuderic III was recognized as king of all the Franks in 679. From then on, the kingdom of the Franks can be treated as a unity again for all but a very brief period of civil war.

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From Wikipedia - Dagobert I :

Dagobert I (c. 603 - 19 January 639 ) was the king of Austrasia (623 -634 ), king of all the Franks (629 -634 ), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629 -639 ). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica .

Rule in Austrasia
Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575-604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613 . In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace , the Vosges , and the Ardennes , but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace ) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate , and the Transjura . Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule
On the death of his father in 629 , Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert , son of Sichilde , claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf , the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632 , Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.
In 631 , Dagobert led three armies against Samo , the rulers of the Slavs , but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg .

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace , Pepin of Landen . In 634 , Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III , on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany ), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica , at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first French king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica , Paris .

Marriage and issue
Dagobert was a serial monogamist.
He married Nanthild and they had the following:
Clovis II , who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.
Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings , either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg .
He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:
Sigebert III
His other wives were:
Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)
Bertechildis (Berthilde)
Gomentrude



Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks and Sichilde




Husband Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks 33 34 35

            AKA: Chlothar "le Jeune" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Chlothar II "le Grand" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Lothair II King of Neustria, King of the Franks
           Born: 584 - <Neustria>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 629 - Paris, (Île-de-France), Neustria, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria (Abt 0539-0584) 36 37
         Mother: Fredegund (0543-0597) 34 38


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Haldertrude (0575-0604) 34

   Other Spouse: Bertrade (0582-0618) 39

Events

• King of Neustria: 584-629.

• King of the Franks: 613-629.




Wife Sichilde

            AKA: Brynhilde
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Charibert II 44

           Born: Abt 608
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Apr 632
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks

King of Neustria (584-629) and King of all the Franks (613-629)

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From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :
Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

Chlothar II defeated Brunhilda and her grandson, reunifying the kingdom. However, in 623, in order to appease particularistic forces and also to secure the borders, he gave the Austrasians his young son as their own king. His son and successor, Dagobert I , emulated this move by appointing a sub-king for Aquitaine, with a seat at Toulouse , in 629 and Austrasia in 634.


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From Wikipedia - Chlothar II :

Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 584 - 629 ), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria , and, from 613 to 629 , King of all the Franks , was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in 584. His mother, Fredegund , was regent until her death in 597 , at which time the thirteen-year old Clotaire began to rule for himself. As king, he continued his mother's feud with Brunhilda , queen of Austrasia , with equal viciousness and bloodshed.

In 599 , he made war with his cousins, Theuderic II of Burgundy and Theudebert II of Austrasia, who defeated him at Dormelles (near Montereau ). At this point, however, the two brothers took up arms against each other. In 605 , he invaded Theuderic's kingdom, but did not subdue it. He remained often at war with Theuderic and the latter died in Metz in late 613 while preparing a campaign against him. At that time, Warnachar , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, and Rado , mayor of the palace of Burgundy, abandoned the cause of Brunhilda and her great-grandson, Sigebert II , and the entire realm was delivered into Clotaire's hands. Brunhilda and Sigebert met Clotaire's army on the Aisne , but the Patrician Aletheus, Duke Rocco, and Duke Sigvald deserted the host and the grand old woman and her king had to flee. They got as far as the Orbe , but Clotaire's minions caught up with them by the lake Neuchâtel . Both of them and Sigebert's younger brother Corbo were executed by Clotaire's orders.
In that year, Clotaire II became the first king of all the Franks since his grandfather Clotaire I died in 561 by ordering the murder of the infant Sigebert II (son of Theuderic), whom the aging Brunhilda had attempted to set on the thrones of Austrasia and Burgundy , causing a rebellion among the nobility. This led to the delivery of Brunhilda into Clotaire's hands, his thirst for vengeance leading to his formidable old aunt enduring the agony of the rack for three whole days, before suffering a horrific death, chained between four horses that were goaded in separate directions, eventually tearing her apart.

In 615 , Clotaire II promulgated the Edict of Paris , a sort of Frankish Magna Carta that reserved many rights to the Frankish nobles while it excluded Jews from all civil employment for the Crown. The ban effectively placed all literacy in the Merovingian monarchy squarely under ecclesiastical control and also greatly pleased the nobles, from whose ranks the bishops were ordinarily exclusively drawn. Clotaire was induced by Warnachar and Rado to make the mayoralty of the palace a lifetime appointment at Bonneuil-sur-Marne , near Paris , in 617 . By these actions, Clotaire lost his own legislative abilities and the great number of laws enacted in his reign are probably the result of the nobles' petitions, which the king had no authority not to heed.
In 623 , he gave the kingdom of Austrasia to his young son Dagobert I . This was a political move as repayment for the support of Bishop Arnulf of Metz and Pepin I , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, the two leading Austrasian nobles, who were effectively granted semi-autonomy.
Clotaire II died in 629 after 45 years on the throne, longer than any other Merovingian dynast. He left the crown greatly reduced in power and prepared the way for the rise of the mayors and the rois fainéants.

Marriage and issue
First wife of Chlothar II was Haldertude (575-604). They had the following son:
Dagobert I
Second wife of Chlothar II was Bertrade.
Third wife of Chlothar II was Sichilde (Brynhilde). They had the following children:
Charibert_II
Oda


Research Notes: Wife - Sichilde

3rd wife of Clotaire II.


Research Notes: Child - Charibert II

From Wikipedia - Charibert II :
Charibert II (c.608 -8 April 632 ), a son of Clotaire II and his second wife Sichilde, was briefly king of Aquitaine from 629 to his death, with his capital at Toulouse .

When his father, Clotaire II , King of the Franks , died in 629, Charibert made a bid for the kingdom of Neustria against his elder half-brother Dagobert I , who had already been king of Austrasia since 623 . In the ensuing negotiations, Charibert, a minor, was represented by his uncle Brodulf , the brother of Queen Sichilde. Dagobert had Brodulf killed and ceded the near-independent realm of Aquitaine to Charibert. This agreement was confirmed in 631 , when Charibert stood godfather to Dagobert's son Sigebert .

Charibert's realm included Toulouse, Cahors , Agen , Perigueux , and Saintes , to which he added his possessions in Gascony . Charibert was married to Gisela, the heiress of Amand of Gascony. His fighting force subdued the resistance of the Basques , until the whole of the Basque Country was under his control.

In 632 , Charibert died at Blaye , Gironde -possibly assassinated on Dagobert's orders-and soon after that Charibert's infant son Chilperic was also killed. Aquitaine passed again to Dagobert. Both Charibert and his son are buried in the early Romanesque Basilica of Saint-Romain at Blaye.



Clovis I King of the Franks and Clotilde Queen of the Franks




Husband Clovis I King of the Franks 14 15 16




            AKA: Chlodovech King of the Franks, Chlodovechus King of the Franks, Clovis I, King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 466 - Gallia Belgica (Belgium)
     Christened: 496 - Cathédrale de Rheims, Rheims, (Marne), France


           Died: 27 Nov 511 - Paris, Île-de-France, Frankish Kingdom (France)


         Buried:  - Basilica of Saint-Denis, Paris, Île-de-France, (France)


         Father: Childeric I King of the Salian Franks (Between 0436/0437-0482) 45 46 47
         Mother: Basina Andovera of Thuringia (Abt 0438-Abt 0480) 48 49 50


       Marriage: 493

Events

• King of the Salian Franks: at Tournai, 481-511.

• Unified: the Kingdom of the Franks, 486.

• King of the Franks: 509-511.




Wife Clotilde Queen of the Franks 17 18 19 20




            AKA: St. Clothilde, Clotild, Clotilda, Saint Clotilde, Evochilde de Cologne
           Born: 475 - Lyons, (Rhône), Burgundy (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 545 - Tours, Touraine (Indre-et-Loire), France
         Buried: 


         Father: Chilperic II King of the Burgundians (Abt 0450-0493) 51 52
         Mother: Caretena (      -0493) 52


Events

• Retired: after the death of Clovis, 511, Abbey of St. Martin at Tours, (Indre-et-Loire), France.


Children
1 M Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia) 53

           Born: Abt 485
     Christened: 
           Died: 534 - <Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)>
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Suavegotha (Abt 0495-      ) 54


2 M Chlodomer King of Orléans 27

            AKA: Clodomer King of Orléans
           Born: Abt 495
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Guntheuc (      -      )
           Marr: Bef 523


3 M Childebert I King of Paris 55

           Born: Abt 496
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Dec 558
         Buried: 



4 M Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks 11 12 13

            AKA: Chlothar I King of Soissons, King of the Franks, Lothair I King of Soissons
           Born: 497 - Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Nov 561
         Buried:  - Abbey of Saint-Medard, Soissons, (Aisne, Picardy), Neustria, France
         Spouse: Guntheuc (      -      )
           Marr: Abt 524
         Spouse: Radegund (      -      )
         Spouse: Ingund (Abt 0500-      ) 21 22
         Spouse: Arnégonde (Abt 0515-0573) 23 24 25
         Spouse: Chunsina (      -      ) 26


5 F Clotilda Princess of the Franks 56 57

            AKA: Chrodechildis, Clotilde of the Franks
           Born: 497 - Reims, (Marne, Champagne), Francia (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 531 - Spain
         Buried:  - Paris, Neustria (Normandy, France)
         Spouse: Amalaric King of the Visigoths (Abt 0502-0531) 58 59
           Marr: 511



Christening Notes: Husband - Clovis I King of the Franks

Baptized by Saint Remi, Bishop of Rheims.


Research Notes: Husband - Clovis I King of the Franks

United most of the Franks and Roman Gaul, becoming King of all the Franks in 509.

Not to be confused with Clovis of the Riparian Franks Buried in Church of the Apostles Peter and Paul, Paris, France.
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From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Clovis I united all the Frankish petty kingdoms as well as most of Roman Gaul under his rule, conquering the Domain of Soissons of the Roman general Syagrius as well as the Visigothic Kingdom of Toulouse . He took his seat at Paris, which along with Soissons , Reims , Metz , and Orléans became the chief residences. Upon his death, the kingdom was split among his four sons:
Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561
Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561
Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561
Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.
---------

From Wikipedia - Clovis I :

Clovis I (c. 466 - 27 November 511 ) was the first King of the Franks to unite all the Frankish tribes under one ruler. He succeeded his father Childeric I in 481[1] as King of the Salian Franks , one of the Frankish tribes who were then occupying the area west of the lower Rhine , with their centre around Tournai and Cambrai along the modern frontier between France and Belgium , in an area known as Toxandria . Clovis conquered the neighbouring Frankish tribes and established himself as sole king before his death.

He converted to Roman Catholicism , as opposed to the Arianism common among Germanic peoples at the time, at the instigation of his wife, the Burgundian Clotilda , a Catholic. He was baptized in the Cathedral of Rheims , as most future French kings would be. This act was of immense importance in the subsequent history of France and Western Europe in general, for Clovis expanded his dominion over almost all of the old Roman province of Gaul (roughly modern France). He is considered the founder both of France (which his state closely resembled geographically at his death) and the Merovingian dynasty which ruled the Franks for the next two centuries.

In primary sources Clovis' name is spelled in a number of variants: The Frankish form Chlodovech was Latinised as Chlodovechus, from which came the Latin name Ludovicus, which evolved into the French name Louis.

The name features prominently in subsequent history: Three other Merovingian Kings have been called Clovis, while nine Carolingian rulers and thirteen other French kings and one Holy Roman Emperor have been called Louis.

Nearly every European language has developed its own spelling of his name. Louis (French), "Chlodwig" and Ludwig (German), Lodewijk (Dutch), and Lewis (English) are just four of the over 100 possible variations.
Scholars differ about the meaning of his name. Chlodovech is composed out of the Germanic roots Chlod- and -vech, which are usually associated with "glow" and "soldier". His name thus might have meant "illustrious in combat" or "glorious warrior".

In 486, with the help of Ragnachar , Clovis defeated Syagrius , the last Roman official in northern Gaul , who ruled the area around Soissons in present-day Picardie .[2] This victory at Soissons extended Frankish rule to most of the area north of the Loire . After this, Clovis secured an alliance with the Ostrogoths , through the marriage of his sister Audofleda to their king, Theodoric the Great . He followed this victory with another in 491 over a small group of Thuringians east of his territories. Later, with the help of the other Frankish sub-kings, he defeated the Alamanni in the Battle of Tolbiac . He had previously married the Burgundian princess Clotilde (493), and, following his victory at Tolbiac , he converted (traditionally in 496) to her Trinitarian Catholic faith. This was a significant change from the other Germanic kings, like the Visigoths and Vandals , who had embraced the rival Arian beliefs.


Clovis I died in 511 and is interred in Saint Denis Basilica , Paris , whereas his father had been buried with the older Merovingian kings in Tournai. Upon his death his realm was divided among his four sons: Theuderic , Chlodomer , Childebert , and Clotaire . This partitioning created the new political units of the Kingdoms of Rheims , Orléans , Paris and Soissons and inaugurated a period of disunity which was to last, with brief interruptions, until the end (751 ) of his Merovingian dynasty.


Research Notes: Wife - Clotilde Queen of the Franks

From Wikipedia - Clotilde :

Saint Clotilde (475 - 545 ), also known as Clotilda or simply Clotild, was the daughter of Chilperic II of Burgundy and Caretena, and wife of the Frankish king Clovis I . Venerated as a saint, she was instrumental to her husbands famous conversion to Catholic Christianity and, in her later years, was known for her almsgiving and penitential works of mercy.

On the death of Gundioc , king of the Burgundians, in 473, his sons Gundobad, Godegesil and Chilperic divided his heritage between them; Chilperic apparently reigning at Lyon, Gundobald at Vienne and Godegesil at Geneva.

According to Gregory of Tours , Chilperic was slain by Gundobad, his wife drowned, and of his two daughters, Chrona took the veil and Clotilde was exiled. This account, however, seems to have been a later invention, since an epitaph discovered at Lyons speaks of a Burgundian queen who died in 506. This was most probably the mother of Clotilde.

In 493 Clotilde married Clovis, King of the Franks , who had just conquered northern Gaul. She was brought up in the Catholic faith and did not rest until her husband had abjured paganism and embraced the Catholic faith in 496 . With him she built at Paris the church of the Holy Apostles, afterwards known as Sainte Geneviève. After the death of Clovis in 511 she retired to the abbey of St Martin at Tours.

In 523 she incited her sons against her cousin Sigismund , the son of Gundobad and provoked the Burgundian war. In the following year she tried in vain to protect the rights of her grandsons, the children of Clodomer , against the claims of her sons Childebert I and Clotaire I , and was equally unsuccessful in her efforts to prevent the civil discords between her children. She died in 544 or 545, and was buried at her husband's side in the church of the Holy Apostles.


Research Notes: Child - Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia)

Merovingian king.

From Wikipedia - Theuderic I :

Theuderic I[1] (c.485 - 533/4) was the Merovingian king of Metz , Rheims , or Austrasia -as it is variously called-from 511 to 533 or 534.

He was the son of Clovis I and one of his earlier wives or concubines. He inherited Metz in 511 at his father's death. In accordance with Salian tradition, the kingdom was divided between Clovis' four surviving sons: Childebert I in Paris , Chlodomer in Orléans , and Clotaire I in Soissons . Early in his reign, he sent his son Theudebert to battle the Scandinavian King Chlochilaich (Hygelac of Beowulf fame) who had invaded his realm. Theudebert defeated and killed Chlochilaich.

Theuderic got involved in the war between the Thuringian King Hermanfrid and Hermanfrid's only living brother: Baderic . In exchange for his help, Theuderic would receive half of the kingdom. Baderic was defeated, but the land promised Theuderic was not given up.

The four sons of Clovis then all fought Sigismund of Burgundy and Godomar , kings of the Burgundians . Godomar fled and Sigismund was taken prisoner by Chlodomer . Theuderic married Sigismund's daughter. Godomar rallied the Burgundian army and won back his kingdom. Chlodomer, aided by Theuderic, defeated Godomar, but died in the fighting at Vézeronce .

Theuderic then, with his brother Clotaire and his son, attacked Thuringia to revenge himself on Hermanfrid. Thuringia was conquered, and Clotaire received Radegund , daughter of King Berthar (Hermanfrid's late brother). After making a treaty with his brother Childebert, Theuderic died in 534. Upon his death the throne of Metz, though seemingly up for grabs, passed unhindered to Theudebert. Theuderic also left a daughter, Theodechild, by his wife Suavegotha, daughter of Sigismund of Burgundy .


Research Notes: Child - Chlodomer King of Orléans

Second of the four sons of Clovis I , King of the Franks

From Wikipedia - Chlodomer :

Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer (born c. 495) was the second of the four sons of Clovis I , King of the Franks . On the death of his father, in 511, he divided the kingdom of the Franks with his three brothers: Theuderic I , Childebert I , and Clotaire I . Although Theuderic, the eldest, had a better claim, Chlodomer divided half of the kingdom with his two other brothers. This was the kingdom of Orléans , taken from the former kingdom of Syagrius . This kingdom included, most notably, the bishoprics of Tours , Poitiers and Orléans . Chlodomer married Guntheuc , with whom he had three sons: Theodebald, Gunthar, and Clodoald .

In 523-24, possibly at the instigation of his mother Clotilde , who was eager to avenge her nephew who had been assassinated by Sigismund of Burgundy , Chlodomer joined with his brothers in an expedition against the Burgundians . After capturing Sigismund, Chlodomer returned to Orléans. However, Sigismund's brother Gondomar returned triumphantly to Burgundy at the head of the troops sent by his ally, the Ostrogothic king Theodoric the Great . There, he massacred the garrison the Franks had left behind.

Although victorious, Chlodomer had Sigismund and his sons Gisald and Gondebaud assassinated on 1 May 524. He then led a second expedition against the Burgundians. He was killed on this expedition, in the spring or summer of the same year, at the Battle of Vézeronce . His three sons were entrusted to his mother until his widow married Clotaire I . Clotaire, however, had Chlodomer's children killed, although Clodoald managed to escape. Better known as Saint Cloud, he later became abbot of Nogent , having given up his hair, the symbol of the Frankish royalty, rather than giving up his life.


Research Notes: Child - Childebert I King of Paris

From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Upon [the death of Clovis I], the kingdom was split among his four sons:
Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561
Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561
Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561
Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.

---------
From Wikipedia - Childebert I :

Childebert I (c.496 - 13 December 558) was the Frankish king of Paris , a Merovingian dynast, one of the four sons of Clovis I who shared the kingdom of the Franks upon their father's death in 511. He was one of the sons of Saint Clotilda , born at Reims .

In the partition of the realm, he received as his share the town of Paris , the country to the north as far as the river Somme , to the west as far as the English Channel , and the Armorican peninsula (modern Brittany ). His brothers ruled in different lands: Theuderic I in Metz , Chlodomer in Orléans , and Clotaire I in Soissons .

In 523, Childebert participated in a war against Godomar of Burgundy . Chlodomer died in the Battle of Vézeronce . In 524, after the murder of Chlodomer's children, Childebert annexed the cities of Chartres and Orléans.

He took part in later various expeditions against the kingdom of Burgundy . He besieged Autun in 532 and, in 534, received as his share of the spoils of that kingdom the towns of Mâcon , Geneva , and Lyon . When Witiges , the king of the Ostrogoths , ceded Provence to the Franks in 535, the possession of Arles and Marseilles was guaranteed to Childebert by his brothers. The annexation of that province was completed, with Clotaire's help, in the winter of 536-537.

In 531, he received pleas from his sister Chrotilda , wife of King Amalaric of the Visigoths . The Arian king of Hispania , Chrotilda claimed, was grossly mistreating her, a Catholic . Childebert went down with an army and defeated the Gothic king. Amalaric retreated to Barcelona, where he was assassinated. Chrotilda died on her return journey to Paris of unknown causes.

Childebert made other expeditions against the Visigoths. In 542, he took possession of Pamplona with the help of his brother Clotaire and besieged Zaragoza , but was forced to retreat. From this expedition he brought back to Paris a precious relic, the tunic of Saint Vincent , in honour of which he built at the gates of Paris the famous monastery of St Vincent, known later as St-Germain-des-Prés .

He died without issue on 13 December 558, and was buried in the abbey he had founded, where his tomb has been discovered.[1] He left no sons, only two daughters, Chrodoberge and Chrodesinde, by his wife Ultragotha. Childebert was an acquisitive monarch. He expanded his domains in more foreign wars than any of his brothers: fighting in Burgundy (more than once), Spain (more than once), Provence, and elsewhere in Gaul. Gregory of Tours , a contemporary, speaking as a Neustrian , puts these words into Childebert's mouth: Velim unquam Arvernam Lemanem quae tantae jocunditatis gratia refulgere dicitur, oculis cernere.[2] Childbert was also one of the more religious of the sons of Clovis, cooperating with his brothers, rescuing his sister, and constructing the famous monastery of Saint Vincent to house his relics.


Research Notes: Child - Clotaire I "le Vieux" King of Soissons and King of the Franks

Succeeded Clovis I in Soissons.
----------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :

Upon [the death of Clovis I], the kingdom was split among his four sons:

Soissons - Chlothar I, 511-561

Paris - Childebert I, 511-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Orléans - Chlodomer, 511-524 then Childebert I, 524-558 then Chlothar I, 558-561

Reims - Theuderic I, 511-534 then Theudebert I, 534-548 then Theudebald, 548-555 then Chlothar I, 555-561.

Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

-----------

From Wikipedia - Chlothar I :

Chlothar I (or Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 497 - 561 ), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks , was one of the four sons of Clovis . He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département , Picardie , France ).

On the death of his father in 511 , he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons , which he made his capital; the cities of Laon , Noyon , Cambrai , and Maastricht ; and the lower course of the Meuse River . But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer 's children in 524 , and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers . He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534 , obtained Grenoble , Die , and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange , Carpentras , and Gap . In 531 , he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542 , with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain . On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555 , Clotaire annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany , made expeditions into Saxony , and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany , where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin , and died shortly afterwards.

Family
Clotaire's first marriage was to Guntheuc , widow of his own brother Chlodomer, sometime around 524. They had no children.
His second marriage, which occurred around 532 , was to Radegund , daughter of Bertachar , King of Thuringia , whom he and his brother Theuderic defeated. She was later canonized . They had no children.
His third and most successful marriage was to Ingund , by whom he had five sons and two daughters:
Gunthar, predeceased father
Childeric, predeceased father
Charibert , King of Paris
Guntram , King of Burgundy
Sigebert , King of Austrasia
Chlothsind , married Alboin , King of the Lombards

His next marriage was to a sister of Ingund, Aregund , with whom he had a son:
Chilperic , King of Soissons
His last wife was Chunsina (or Chunsine), with whom he had one son:
Chram , who became his father's enemy and predeceased him


Research Notes: Child - Clotilda Princess of the Franks

From Wikipedia - Clotilde (died 531) :

Clotilde or Chrodechildis (died 531) was the daughter of King Clovis I of the Franks and Queen Clotilde .

In 511 she was married to the Visigothic King Amalaric . Clotilde was a Catholic , while Amalaric and his fellow-Visigoths were Arians . Clotilde refused to adopt her husband's religious practices and complained to her kin that she was persecuted for her faith.

This led to war in 531 between her brother, King Childebert I , and her husband. Amalaric was defeated and Clotilde returned to Francia with the Frankish army, but died on the journey and was buried at Paris


Thierry III and Clotilde




Husband Thierry III 60

           Born: 654
     Christened: 
           Died: 691
         Buried: 


         Father: Clovis II (0634-0657) 61
         Mother: Bathilde (0626-Between 0680/0685) 62


       Marriage: 



Wife Clotilde 60

           Born: 650
     Christened: 
           Died: 699
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Berthe 63

            AKA: Bertrée
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 720
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Martin of Laon (      -      )




Clovis "the Riparian" Frankish King of Cologne




Husband Clovis "the Riparian" Frankish King of Cologne 64 65

            AKA: of Cologne Clodion
           Born: Bef 420
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Pharamond King of the Franks [Legendary] (Abt 0369-Abt 0428) 66 67 68
         Mother: Argotta Princess of the Salian Franks (Abt 0376-      ) 69 70


       Marriage: 

Events

• Living: 420.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Childebert King of Cologne 71 72 73

            AKA: Childebert I King of Paris, Choldebaud King of Cologne
           Born: Bef 440 - Rheims, (Marne, Champagne-Ardenne), Gaul, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 483 and 488
         Buried: 




Christening Notes: Husband - Clovis "the Riparian" Frankish King of Cologne

Clovis was baptized by Saint Remi, Bishop of Rheims.


Research Notes: Husband - Clovis "the Riparian" Frankish King of Cologne

Kinsman of Clovis I.


Coel King of Britain [Legendary]




Husband Coel King of Britain [Legendary] 74 75 76

            AKA: Coehl Hen King of Britain, Cole King of Britain
           Born: Abt 0072
     Christened: 
           Died: 170
         Buried: 


         Father: Meurig King of Siluria (      -0125) 77 78
         Mother: Julia Victoria verch Prasutagus Princess of Iceni (      -      ) 79 80


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Athildis [Legendary] 5 6

            AKA: Athildis Princess of Siluria
           Born: Abt 0098
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Marcomir IV King of the Franks [Legendary] (Abt 0080-0149) 3 4
           Marr: Abt 103



Research Notes: Husband - Coel King of Britain [Legendary]

Legendary king of Britain.

From Wikipedia - King Cole :

King Cole or Coel is the name of a figure, or multiple figures with similar names, prominent in British literature and legend since the Middle Ages . Early Welsh tradition knew of a Coel Hen (Coel the Old), a leader in Roman or Sub-Roman Britain and the progenitor of several kingly lines in the Hen Ogledd , the Brythonic -speaking part of northern England and southern Scotland . Later medieval legend told of a Coel, apparently derived from Coel Hen, who was the father of Saint Helena and the grandfather of Roman Emperor Constantine the Great . Other similarly-named characters may be confused or conflated with the Welsh Coel. The traditional "King Coel" may be the historical basis for the popular nursery rhyme "Old King Cole ".[1]

Context and evidence
Coel Hen appears in the Harleian genealogies and the later pedigrees known as the Bonedd Gwyr y Gogledd (The Descent of the Men of the North) at the head of several post-Roman royal families of the Hen Ogledd .[2] His line, collectively called the Coeling, included such noted figures as Urien , king of Rheged ; Gwallog , perhaps king of Elmet ; the brothers Gwrgi and Peredur , and Clydno Eiddin , king of Eiddin or Edinburg .[2][3] He was also considered to be the father-in-law of Cunedda , founder of Gwynedd in North Wales, by his daughter Gwawl,[4] while the so-called Arthur stone names him as an ancestor of Artognou , a post-Roman ruler at Tintagel .[5] The genealogies give him the epithet Godebog, meaning "Protector" or "Shelterer".[2] The poem Y Gododdin mentions some enmity between the "Sons of Godebog" and the heroes who fought for the Gododdin at the Battle of Catraeth .[3]


According to Welsh tradition the region of Kyle was named for Coel, and a mound at Coylton in Argyll was regarded as his tomb.[6] Projections back from dated individuals suggest that Coel Hen lived around AD 350 - 420, during the time of the Roman departure from Britain .[3] In his widely-criticized book The Age of Arthur, historian John Morris suggested that Coel may have been the last of the Roman Duces Brittanniarum (Dukes of the Britons) who commanded the Roman army in northern Britain.[7] According to Morris he may have taken over the northern capital at Eburacum (York ) to rule over what had been the northern province of Roman Britain . Upon Coel Hen's death, his lands would have been split between his sons, Garmonion and Cunedda II, and later his grandsons, Dunwal Moelmut, Cunedda III, and Gwrwst Ledlwn, thus creating the many old northern kingdoms of Britain.

Later sources
In his Historia Anglorum, Henry of Huntingdon mentions that a King Coel of Colchester was the father of Saint Helena and therefore the grandfather of Constantine the Great.[8][9] The same claim appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth 's Historia Regum Britanniae , in a passage using some of the same words. However, Henry appears to have written this part of the Historia Anglorum before he knew about Geoffrey's work, leading J. S. P. Tatlock to conclude that Geoffrey borrowed the passage from Henry, rather than the other way around.[10] The source of the claim is unknown, but it may have come from a lost hagiography of Helena.[10]


Geoffrey's largely fictional Historia Regum Britanniae expands upon Henry's brief mention, listing Coel as a King of the Britons following the reign of King Asclepiodotus .[11] He states that, upset with Asclepiodotus's handling of the Diocletianic Persecution , Coel began a rebellion in the duchy of Caercolun (Colchester), of which he was duke. He met Asclepiodotus in battle and killed him, thus taking the kingship of Britain upon himself. Rome , apparently, was pleased that Britain had a new king and sent a senator, Constantius Chlorus , to negotiate with Coel. Afraid of the Romans, Coel met Constantius and agreed to pay tribute and submit to Roman laws as long as he was allowed to retain the kingship. Constantius agreed to these terms but, one month later, Coel died.[11] Constantius married Coel's daughter, Helena, and crowned himself as Coel's successor. Helen later gave birth to a son who became the Emperor, Constantine the Great , giving a British pedigree to the Roman imperial line.[12]


Sources


1. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99033 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

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3. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99034 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

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7. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #111280 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

8. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875435.

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12. Wikipedia.org, Chlothar I; List of Frankish kings.

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17. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-3 (Clovis I).

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23. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-4 (Clotaire I).

24. Wikipedia.org, Aregund.

25. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873001.

26. Wikipedia.org, Chlothar I, Chram.

27. Wikipedia.org, Chlodomer; List of Frankish kings; Clovis I.

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33. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6.

34. Wikipedia.org, Chlothar II.

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36. Wikipedia.org, Chilperic I.

37. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873575.

38. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-5 (Chilpéric I).

39. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6 (Clotaire II).

40. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7.

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43. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7 (Dagobert I).

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47. Wikipedia.org, Childeric I.

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54. Wikipedia.org, Sigismund of Burgundy.

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56. Wikipedia.org, Clotilde (died 531).

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60. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-9.

61. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 24A-8.

62. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-8 (Clovis II).

63. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-10.

64. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-1.

65. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140410.

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38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-5 (Chilpéric I).

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6 (Clotaire II).

40 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7.

41 Wikipedia.org, Dagobert I.

42 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873572.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-7 (Dagobert I).

44 Wikipedia.org, Charibert II, Duke of Aquitaine.

45 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99018 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

46 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873341.

47 Wikipedia.org, Childeric I.

48 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105692 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

49 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873342.

50 Wikipedia.org, Basina, Queen of Thuringia.

51 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #154209 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

52 Wikipedia.org, Chilperic II of Burgundy.

53 Wikipedia.org, Theuderic I; List of Frankish kings.

54 Wikipedia.org, Sigismund of Burgundy.

55 Wikipedia.org, Childebert I; List of Frankish kings.

56 Wikipedia.org, Clotilde (died 531).

57 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #98869 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

58 Wikipedia.org, Amalaric.

59 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316461 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

60 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-9.

61 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 24A-8.

62 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-8 (Clovis II).

63 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-10.

64 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-1.

65 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140410.

66 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99021 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

67 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873345.

68 Wikipedia.org, Pharamond.

69 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875190.

70 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105872 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

71 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-2.

72 Wikipedia.org, Childebert I; Clovis I.

73 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316468 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

74 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873358.

75 http://www.familysearch.org.

76 Wikipedia.org, King Cole.

77 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140398 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

78 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873361.

79 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105899 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

80 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873362.


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