The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Robert de Quincy Lord of Buckley and of Fawside and Orabilis of Leuchars




Husband Robert de Quincy Lord of Buckley and of Fawside 1 2

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1197
         Buried: 


         Father: Saer I de Quincy Lord of Daventry (      -      ) 2 3
         Mother: Maud de St. Liz (      -1140) 2 4 5


       Marriage: Bef 1170

Events

• Justiciar of Scotland:

• Crusader:




Wife Orabilis of Leuchars 1 2

            AKA: Orabel of Leuchars
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Ness Fitz William Lord of Leuchars (      -      ) 1
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Saher IV de Quincy 1st Earl of Winchester 1 2

            AKA: Seer de Quincy, Saher de Quincey Earl of Winchester, Saher de Quincey Earl of Winchester, Saer de Quincy 1st Earl of Winchester
           Born: 1155
     Christened: 
           Died: 3 Nov 1219 - Palestine
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Margaret de Beaumont (Abt 1156-Abt 1235) 6 7 8
           Marr: Bef 1173 - England




Research Notes: Husband - Robert de Quincy Lord of Buckley and of Fawside

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester :

Family
The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest , and took their name from Cuinchy in the Arrondissement of Béthune ; the personal name "Saer" was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.

The first recorded Saer de Quincy (known to historians as "Saer I") was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Matilda of St Liz , stepdaughter of King David I of Scotland . This marriage produced two sons, Saer II and Robert de Quincy . It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saer de Quincy who eventually became Earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert Fitz Richard , Matilda was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saer's close ally, Robert Fitzwalter.

Robert de Quincy seems to have inherited no English lands from his father, and pursued a knightly career in Scotland, where he is recorded from around 1160 as a close companion of his cousin, King William the Lion . By 1170 he had married Orabilis , heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars and, through her, he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife , Strathearn and Lothian . 1 2


Research Notes: Wife - Orabilis of Leuchars

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester:

By 1170 he had married Orabilis , heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars and, through her, he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife , Strathearn and Lothian .

Saer de Quincy, the son of Robert de Quincy and Orabilis of Leuchars, was raised largely in Scotland. His absence from English records for the first decades of his life has led some modern historians and genealogists to confuse him with his uncle, Saer II, who took part in the rebellion of Henry the Young King in 1173, when the future Earl of Winchester can have been no more than a toddler. Saer II's line ended without direct heirs, and his nephew and namesake would eventually inherit his estate, uniting his primary Scottish holdings with the family's Northamptonshire patrimony, and possibly some lands in France.

By his wife Margaret de Beaumont, Saer de Quincy had three sons and three daughters:
Lorette who married Sir William de Valognes
Arabella who married Sir Richard Harcourt
Robert (d. 1217). Some sources say he married Hawise, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester . However, it is more likely Hawise married Saer's brother Robert II;
Roger , who succeeded his father as earl of Winchester (though he did not take formal possession of the earldom until after his mother's death);
Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen , daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great ;
Hawise, who married Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford . 1 2


Research Notes: Child - Saher IV de Quincy 1st Earl of Winchester

From Wikipedia - Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester

Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester (1155 - 1219 -11-03 ) was one of the leaders of the baronial rebellion against King John of England , and a major figure in both Scotland and England in the decades around the turn of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Saer de Quincy's immediate background was in the Scottish kingdom: his father was a knight in the service of king William the Lion , and his mother was the heiress of the lordship of Leuchars in Fife (see below ). His rise to prominence in England came through his marriage to Margaret, the younger sister of Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester : but it is probably no coincidence that her other brother was the de Quincys' powerful Fife neighbour, Roger de Beaumont , Bishop of St Andrews . In 1204, Earl Robert died, leaving Margaret as co-heiress of the vast earldom along with her elder sister. The estate was split in half, and after the final division was ratified in 1207, de Quincy was made Earl of Winchester .

Following his marriage, de Quincy became a prominent military and diplomatic figure in England. There is no evidence of any close alliance with King John , however, and his rise to importance was probably due to his newly-acquired magnate status and the family connections that underpinned it.

Family
The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest , and took their name from Cuinchy in the Arrondissement of Béthune ; the personal name "Saer" was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.

The first recorded Saer de Quincy (known to historians as "Saer I") was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Matilda of St Liz , stepdaughter of King David I of Scotland . This marriage produced two sons, Saer II and Robert de Quincy . It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saer de Quincy who eventually became Earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert Fitz Richard , Matilda was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saer's close ally, Robert Fitzwalter.

Robert de Quincy seems to have inherited no English lands from his father, and pursued a knightly career in Scotland, where he is recorded from around 1160 as a close companion of his cousin, King William the Lion . By 1170 he had married Orabilis , heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars and, through her, he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife , Strathearn and Lothian .

Saer de Quincy, the son of Robert de Quincy and Orabilis of Leuchars, was raised largely in Scotland. His absence from English records for the first decades of his life has led some modern historians and genealogists to confuse him with his uncle, Saer II, who took part in the rebellion of Henry the Young King in 1173, when the future Earl of Winchester can have been no more than a toddler. Saer II's line ended without direct heirs, and his nephew and namesake would eventually inherit his estate, uniting his primary Scottish holdings with the family's Northamptonshire patrimony, and possibly some lands in France.

By his wife Margaret de Beaumont, Saer de Quincy had three sons and three daughters:

Lorette who married Sir William de Valognes
Arabella who married Sir Richard Harcourt
Robert (d. 1217). Some sources say he married Hawise, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, earl of Chester . However, it is more likely Hawise married Saer's brother Robert II;
Roger , who succeeded his father as earl of Winchester (though he did not take formal possession of the earldom until after his mother's death);
Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen , daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great ;
Hawise, who married Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford .
His arms were: Or, a fess gules, in chief a label of seven points azure. 1 2


Ordgar Ealdorman of Devon




Husband Ordgar Ealdorman of Devon 7 9

           Born: Abt 922 - <Devonshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Ælfthryth 7 9

            AKA: Elfrida, Elfthryth, Ethelfleda
           Born: 945 - <Devonshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1000 - Wherwell, Hampshire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Edgar "the Peaceful" King of England (0944-0975) 7 10
           Marr: 965




Death Notes: Child - Ælfthryth

A nun at Wherwell when she died.


Research Notes: Child - Ælfthryth

2nd wife of Edgard "the Peaceful." 7 9


Hugh de Lusignan and Orengarde




Husband Hugh de Lusignan 11

           Born: Abt 1141
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 11 Mar 1169
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh VIII "le Vieux" de Lusignan (Abt 1141-Abt 1173) 12 13
         Mother: Bourgogne de Rancon (      -After 1169)


       Marriage: 

Events

• Co-Seigneur de Lusignan: 1164-1169.




Wife Orengarde

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Hugh IX "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of La Marche 14 15

            AKA: Hugh IV de Lusignan Count of La Marche, Hugues IX de Lusignan
           Born: 1163 or 1168
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Nov 1219 - Damietta, Egypt
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Agatha de Preuilly (      -Bef 1194) 16
         Spouse: Mahaut de Angoulême (      -After 1233)
           Marr: After 1194




Research Notes: Wife - Orengarde

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-25 (Hugh de Lusignan)


Death Notes: Child - Hugh IX "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of La Marche

Died on Fifth Crusade


Research Notes: Child - Hugh IX "le Brun" de Lusignan Count of La Marche

Seigneur de Lusignan 1172, Seigneur de Couhe et de Chateau-Larcher 1190/1200 and Count of la Marche by marriage 1203. On Crusades from 1190. Died on Fifth crusade.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 275-26

From Wikipedia - Hugh IX of Lusignan :

Hugh IX the Brown of Lusignan or Hugh IV of La Marche or Hugues IX & IV le Brun de Lusignan[1] (1163 or 1168 - 5 November 1219 ) was the grandson of Hugh VIII . His father, Hugues de Lusignan, b. c. 1141 , Co-Seigneur de Lusignan in 1164 , married Orengarde N before 1162 or about 1167 and died in 1169 leaving a six or one-year-old son. Hugh IX became Seigneur de Lusignan in 1172 , Seigneur de Couhe et de Chateau-Larcher 1190 /1200 , and Count of La Marche by marriage in 1203 and died on the Fifth Crusade at Damietta on 5 November 1219 .

Hugh IX is mentioned under the pseudonym Maracdes ("Emerald") in two poems by the troubadour Gaucelm Faidit , according to the Occitan razós to these poems.

Marriage and issue
His first wife was Agathe de Preuilly, daughter of Peter (Pierre) II de Preuilly and Aenor de Mauleon. Their marriage was annulled in 1189 . According to the below reference, Agathe was the mother of:
Hugues X de Lusignan
His second wife, married c. 1189, was Mahaut or Mathilde Taillifer (Mahaut or Mathilde d'Angoulême) (1181 - 1233 ), daughter of Wulgrin or Vulgrin III Taillifer, Count of Angouleme and Count of La Marche (brother of Aymer/Adhemar Taillifer). According to this reference's chronology[2], Mahaut or Mathilde (which seems more likely since she was the actual Countess of La Marche and so was Hugh X) was the mother of:
Hugues X de Lusignan
Agathe d'Angoulême-Lusignan, married c. 1220 Geoffroi V Seigneur de Pons 14 15


Osbern




Husband Osbern 7

           Born: Abt 1000 - Normandy, France
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Wife

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Children


Robert Fossard and Osceria




Husband Robert Fossard 7

           Born: Abt 1068 - Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1135
         Buried: 


         Father: Nigel Fossard (Abt 1040-      ) 7
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Osceria 7

           Born: Abt 1078 - <Yorkshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Emma Fossard 7

           Born: Abt 1112 - <Hutton-Mulgrave>, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Bertram de Bulmer (Abt 1100-1166) 7 17





Oslac Royal Cup Bearer




Husband Oslac Royal Cup Bearer 18

            AKA: Osric Royal Cup Bearer
           Born: Abt 779 - England
     Christened: 
           Died:  - England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Osburga 19 20 21

            AKA: Osburh
           Born: Abt 805 - Hampshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: After 876 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Æthelwulf King of Wessex and King of Kent (Between 0795/0800-0858) 22 23
           Marr: Bef 844




Research Notes: Child - Osburga

19 20 21


Wacho King of the Lombards and Ostrogotha




Husband Wacho King of the Lombards 24

            AKA: Waccho King of the Lombards, Waldchis King of the Lombards
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 539
         Buried: 


         Father: Unichus (      -      ) 25
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Radigunde (      -      )

Events

• King of the Lombards: Abt 510-539.




Wife Ostrogotha

            AKA: Austrigusa
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Waldrada of Lombardy 26

           Born:  - <Lombardy (Italy)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theudebald King of Austrasia (Abt 0535-0555) 27 28
         Spouse: Garibald I Duke of Bavaria (Abt 0540-Abt 0591) 29 30
           Marr: 556



2 F Wisigarda

            AKA: Wisigard
           Born:  - <Lombardy (Italy)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theudebert I King of Austrasia (Abt 0500-0548) 31 32




Research Notes: Husband - Wacho King of the Lombards

From Wikipedia - Wacho :

Wacho or Waccho was king of the Lombards before they entered Italy from an unknown date (perhaps circa 510 ) until his death in 539 . His father was Unichus. Wacho usurped the throne by assassinating (or having assassinated) his uncle, King Tato (again, probably around 510). Tato's son Ildichis fought with him and fled to the Gepids where he died.[1] Wacho had good relations with the Franks .

Wacho married three times. First, Radigunde, daughter of Bisinus , King of the Thuringi. Second, Austrigusa a Gepid possibly named after her maternal descent from Ostrogothic rulers, she was the mother of two daughters, Wisigarda married Theudebert I of Austrasia and Waldrada married firstly, Theudebald of Austrasia and secondly, Garibald I of Bavaria. Thirdly he married Silinga, a Heruli-mother of Waltari. 24


Research Notes: Wife - Ostrogotha

Source: Wikipedia - Wacho


Research Notes: Child - Waldrada of Lombardy

From Wikipedia - Waldrada :

Waldrada, widow (firstly) of Theudebald , King of Austrasia (ruled 548-555), repudiated wife (secondly) of Chlothar I , King of the Franks (ruled c.558-561), was the daughter of Wacho , King of the Lombards (ruled c.510-539) and his second wife Ostrogotha, a Gepid . The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda …secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho and his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald ".[1] The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum".[2] Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald".[3] Gregory of Tours names Vuldetrada as the wife of King Theodebald.[4] Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus".[5] According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria",[6] which does not imply that King Clotaire married Waldrada. 26


Research Notes: Child - Wisigarda

Source: Wikipedia - Wacho and Theudebald


Sigismund of Burgundy and Ostrogotha




Husband Sigismund of Burgundy 33




           Born: 
     Christened: 


           Died: 524
         Buried: 


         Father: Gundobad King of Burgundy (      -0516) 34
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 494 or 496



Wife Ostrogotha 35 36

            AKA: Arevagni Princess of the Ostrogoths
           Born: Abt 475
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0454-0526) 36 37
         Mother: < > of Moesia [Concubine of Theodoric] (      -      ) 36




         Father: Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0454-0526) 36 37
         Mother: Audefleda Meroving Princess of the Franks (Abt 0452-0535) 38




Children
1 F Suavegotha 39

           Born: Abt 495
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia) (Abt 0485-0534) 40



2 M Sigeric

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 522
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Sigismund of Burgundy

From Wikipedia - Sigismund of Burgundy :

Sigismund (died 524 ) was king of the Burgundians from 516 to his death. He was the son of king Gundobad , whom he succeeded in 516. Sigismund and his brother Godomar were defeated in battle by Clovis ' sons and Godomar fled. Sigismund was taken by Chlodomer , King of Orleans , where he was kept as a prisoner. Godomar then rallied the Burgundian army and won back his kingdom. Meanwhile, Chlodomer ordered the death of Sigismund and marched with his brother Theuderic I , King of Metz, on Burgundy in 524.

Sigismund was a student of bishop Saint Avitus of Vienne , the Catholic bishop of Vienne who converted Sigismund from the Arian faith of his Burgundian forebears. Sigismund was inspired to found a monastery dedicated to Saint Maurice at Agaune in Valais in 515 . The following year he became king of the Burgundians.

[The 6th century saw] significant events for Sigismund. His son opposed him in 517 , and insulted his new wife and Sigismund had him strangled. Then, overcome with remorse, Sigismund retreated to the monastery that he had founded.

In 523 , he led the Burgundians against the invading Franks of Childebert I , Clotaire I and Theodebert I . Though he put on a monk's habit and hid in a cell near his abbey, he was captured by Clotaire, taken to Orléans and put to death. Afterwards, he was honoured by the Burgundians as a martyr . His bones were recovered from the well at Columelle where his body had been thrown, and a shrine developed near Agaune. Eventually Sigismund was canonized .

Correspondence has survived between Avitus, who was a poet and one of the last masters of the classical arts, and Sigismund.
In the 14th century , Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor , transferred Sigismund's relics to Prague , hence he has become a patron saint of the Czech Republic .

Family and Issue
He married Ostrogotha, the illegitimate daughter of Theodoric the Great and a concubine in 494 as a part of Theodoric's negotiation for an alliance with Sigimund and the Burgundians. Both had the following issue:
Sigeric (? - 522, murdered by his own father)
Suavegotha (495 - ?) She was married to Theuderic I , son of Clovis I . 33


Birth Notes: Wife - Ostrogotha

Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodoric_the_great


Research Notes: Wife - Ostrogotha

From Wikipedia - Theodoric the Great :

Theodoric was married once.

He had a concubine in Moesia , name unknown, and had two daughters:
Theodegotha (ca. 473 - ?). In 494, she was married to Alaric II as a part of her father's alliance with the Visigoths.
Ostrogotha or Arevagni (ca. 475 - ?). In 494 or 496, she was married to the king Sigismund of Burgundy as a part of her father's alliance with the Burgundians.

Married to Audofleda in 493 and had one daughter:
Amalasuntha , Queen of the Goths. She was married to Eutharic and had two children: Athalaric and Matasuentha (the latter being married to Witiges first, then, after Witiges' death, married to Germanus Justinus , neither had children). Any hope for a reconciliation between the Goths and the Romans in the person of a Gotho-Roman Emperor from this family lineage was shattered. 35 36


Death Notes: Child - Sigeric

Murdered by his father, Sigismund of Burgundy


Research Notes: Child - Sigeric

Source: Wikipedia - Sigismund of Burgundy


Osulf of Flemingby




Husband Osulf of Flemingby 41

           Born: 
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Wife

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Children
1 M Robert de Harington 42

           Born:  - <Harington, Cumberland>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Christiana (      -      ) 42




Research Notes: Husband - Osulf of Flemingby

From http://cybergata.com/roots/4232.htm :
Osulf of Flemingby of Cumberland made a grant of land to the Priory of Carlisle "eighty years after Magnus Barelegs perished in Ireland." [Grimble, pg. 19]. He flourished during the time of Richard I (1189-1199]. His name was taken from a Northumbrian king who had been murdered 400 years ealier.
~Medieval Ancestors . . ., pgs. 131

According to Carl Boyer in his book, Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell, the pedigree that begins with Osulf of Flemingby to Sir Robert de Harington is taken from Ian Grimble's The Harington Family. Grimble says the Plea Roll of 1277 contains a pedigree of Sir Robert's descent from Osulf which confirmed the evidence of the Register at St. Bee's [Dungdale's Monasticon]. This evidence was part of a suit against the Abbot of Holm Culton concerning Sir Robert's claim to the manor of Flemingby, but Robert had to vacant all but 380 acres of the manor.
~Medieval Ancestors . . ., pgs. 131-132 41


Research Notes: Child - Robert de Harington

From http://cybergata.com/roots/4231.htm :
Robert de Harington in Cumberland was called Robertus de Hafrinctuna in a grant to the Priory of St. Bee of a church and two hides of land. His wife, Christiana was mentioned as his advisor in the grant.
~Medieval Ancestors . . ., pgs. 131


According to Carl Boyer in his book, Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell, the pedigree that begins with Osulf of Flemingby to Sir Robert de Harington is taken from Ian Grimble's The Harington Family. Grimble says the Plea Roll of 1277 contains a pedigree of Sir Robert's descent from Osulf which confirmed the evidence of the Register at St. Bee's [Dungdale's Monasticon]. This evidence was part of a suit against the Abbot of Holm Culton concerning Sir Robert's claim to the manor of Flemingby, but Robert had to vacant all but 380 acres of the manor.
~Medieval Ancestors . . ., pgs. 131-132 42


Osulf I of Bamburgh




Husband Osulf I of Bamburgh 43

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 963
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
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           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Waltheof of Bamburgh 7 44

            AKA: Walroef, Waltheof I of Bamburgh
           Born: Abt 960
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Osulf I of Bamburgh

From Wikipedia - Osulf I of Bamburgh :

Osulf (fl. 946-54) was high-reeve of Bamburgh and ruler of Northumbria . Sometimes called "earl", he is more surely the first recorded high-reeve of Bamburgh and the man who, after assisting in the death of its last independent ruler Erik Bloodaxe , administered the York-based Kingdom of Northumbria when it was taken over by the Wessex-based King Eadred of England in 954.

Origins
He appears at least 5 times in witness lists for charters, some of which may be genuine, in the years 946, 949, and 950. In 946 and 949 he witnessed charters as "high reeve" [1] In 949 he witnessed an Evesham grant as well as a grant by King Eadred to Canterbury Cathedral as dux.[2] And in 950 an Osulf Bebbanburg is alleged to have witnessed as Eorl.[3]

Osulf is the first man specifically designated "high-reeve" of Bamburgh. High-reeve is Old English heah-gerefa, which Alfred Smyth thought was influenced by the Scottish word mormaer, which possibly has the same meaning ("High Steward").[4] Judging by the North People's Law, a high-reeve was not the same as an ealdorman (dux), having only half an ealdorman's wergild .[5]
Osulf's origins are unclear. Many historians assume him to have been the son of Ealdred or a relative of Ealdred and his father Eadulf , English rulers of the York-based Northumbrian kingdom.[6] Richard Fletcher and David Rollason thought he might be the Osulf Dux who had witnessed charters further south in the 930s, which if true would extend Osulf's floruit back to 934.[


Erik Bloodaxe and domination of all Northumbria

Though Eadulf and Ealdred appear to have ruled Northumbria, in the years running up to 954 the kingdom was controlled by the Scandinavians Amlaíb Cuarán and Eric Bloodaxe .[8] According to Roger of Wendover 's Flores historiarum (early 13th century), Osulf was responsible for a conspiracy with a certain Maccus that led to the betrayal and death of Eric Bloodaxe , King of Northumbria, "in a certain lonely place called Stainmore ".[9]

Following this, Osulf is said to have taken control of all Northumbria.[10] Although this part of the Flores historiarum was compiled centuries later and contains some obvious anachronisms, Roger of Wendover appears to have used certain earlier sources, no longer extant, which would add credibility to the story.[11] The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names King Eadred as the new ruler of Northumbria following the expulsion of Erik:
Her Norðhymbre fordrifon Yric, 7 Eadred feng to Norðhymbra rice
In this year the Northumbrians drove out Eric and Eadred succeeded to the kingdom".[12]

This is why Richard Fletcher thinks Osulf was working at Eadred's instigation, and that a grateful Eadred promoted Osulf ruler of the entire Northumbrian sub-kingdom.[13] However he got there, it was with Eadred's consent and overlordship, at least according to our sources. De primo Saxonum adventu summarises his status as follows:

Primus comitum post Eiricum, quem ultimum regem habuerunt Northymbrenses, Osulf provincias omnes Northanhymbrorum sub Edrido rege procuravit.

First of the earls after Erik, the last king whom the Northumbrians had, Osulf administered under King Eadred all the provinces of the Northumbrians.[14]

Similar sentiments were expressed in the related Historia Regum : "Here the kings of Northumbrians came to an end and henceforth the provinces was administered by earls".[15] Eadred's takeover and Osulf's rule thus represent the beginning of permanent West Saxon control of the North. Historian Alex Woolf argued that this take-over was a personal union of crowns rather like that between Scotland and England in 1603 .[16]

[edit ] Death and legacy

Little is else is known about Osulf's period in power. The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba says that in the time of Ildulb mac Causantín (954-62), Edinburgh was abandoned to the Scots, though nothing is said about the involvement of Northumbrians or Osulf.[17]

The date of Osulf's death is not known. He was probably dead before 963, as that is the date Oslac appears for the first time as ealdorman in York.[18] It is unclear whether Oslac was related to Osulf.[19] According to the De primo Saxonum adventu, Northumbria was divided into two parts after Osulf's death.[20] Osulf had at least one son, Waltheof , who ruled Bamburgh from 975.[21] 43


Research Notes: Child - Waltheof of Bamburgh

From Wikipedia - Waltheof of Bamburgh :

Waltheof was high-reeve or ealdorman of Bamburgh (fl. 994). He was the son of Osulf I . His name is Scandinavian and implies that he had Viking ancestors. It remained in his family when Earl Siward married his great-granddaughter and named his son Waltheof. This son of Siward became Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria . Nothing is known about Waltheof's period in office. 7 44


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-27 (Margaret de Beaumont).

2 Wikipedia.org, Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-27, 130-27 (Maud de St. Liz).

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-27, 53-27 (Margaret de Beaumont).

5 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 120.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-27.

7 http://www.familysearch.org.

8 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford; Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-17 (Edgar).

10 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-17.

11 Wikipedia.org, Hugh IX of Lusignan; Hugh VIII de Lusignan.

12 Wikipedia.org, Hugh VIII of Lusignan; County of La Marche.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-24.

14 Wikipedia.org, Hugh IX of Lusignan.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 275-26.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), ine 275-26 (Hugh IX de Lusignan).

17 Wikipedia.org, Bulmer (family).

18 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872466.

19 Wikipedia.org, Alfred the Great.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-13 (Aethelwulf).

21 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871983.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-13.

23 Wikipedia.org, Æthelwulf of Wessex.

24 Wikipedia.org, Wacho; Theudebald.

25 Wikipedia.org, Wacho.

26 Wikipedia.org, Waldrada; Theudebald.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Compact Disc #94 Pin #105702.

28 Wikipedia.org, Theudebald.

29 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105706.

30 Wikipedia.org, Garibald I of Bavaria.

31 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105699.

32 Wikipedia.org, Theudebert I.

33 Wikipedia.org, Sigismund of Burgundy; Gundobad.

34 Wikipedia.org, Gundobad; Gondioc.

35 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316459 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

36 Wikipedia.org, Theodoric the Great.

37 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105823 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

38 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105822 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

39 Wikipedia.org, Sigismund of Burgundy.

40 Wikipedia.org, Theuderic I; List of Frankish kings.

41 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4232.htm.

42 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/4231.htm.

43 Wikipedia.org, Osulf I of Bamburgh.

44 Wikipedia.org, Waltheof of Bamburgh.


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