The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Count Gainfroi and Theidlindis




Husband Count Gainfroi 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Mainier Count of Sens, Duke of Austrasia (      -0800)
         Mother: < > (      -      ) 1


       Marriage: 



Wife Theidlindis 2

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Aubri II Count of Blois (      -      ) 3
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Giselbert Count in the Maasgau 4

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Count Gainfroi

fl. 795 1


Research Notes: Child - Giselbert Count in the Maasgau

Probably married a sister of Echard, Count of Hesbaye. 4


Theodosius of Cauca and Galla Juntina Valentina of Rome




Husband Theodosius of Cauca 5

           Born: 346 - Cauca, (Spain)
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Galla Juntina Valentina of Rome 6

           Born: 395
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Valentinia I Western Emperor of Rome (0321-0375) 7
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Galla Placidia of Cauca 8 9




           Born: Abt 388
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Nov 450


         Buried:  - Ravenna, (Italy)
         Spouse: Alaric I de Thuringia (      -      ) 10




Research Notes: Child - Galla Placidia of Cauca

From Wikipedia - Galla Placidia :

Aelia Galla Placidia (c. 388 - November 27 , 450 ) was the daughter of Roman Emperor Theodosius I and his second wife Galla , who herself was daughter of the Emperor Valentinian I , Galla Placidia was half sister of emperors Honorius and Arcadius .

She had spent much time in the household of Stilicho the Vandal and his wife Serena . Stilicho was effectively the military steward of the West, and according to himself also of the East. He was executed by Honorius, however, in 408 causing most of the non-Italians in Roman service to go over to Visigoth chieftain Alaric I - who promptly invaded Italy.
In either 409 or 410, during Alaric 's siege of Rome , Galla became the captive of the Visigoths, who kept her with them as they sacked Rome (for three days beginning August 24 , 410 ), then wandered through Italy where Alaric died in the same year, and later Gaul .

She married Athaulf , brother-in-law of Alaric, and king of the Visigoths after Alaric's death, at Narbo in January 414 , although the historian Jordanes states that they married earlier, in 411 at Forum Livii (Forlì ). Jordanes's date may actually be when she and the Gothic king first became more than captor and captive. She had a son, Theodosius, by the Visigothic king, but he died in infancy and was buried in Barcelona . Years later the corpse was exhumed and reburied in the imperial mausoleum in Saint Peter's Basilica , Rome. Athaulf was mortally wounded by a servant of a Gothic chieftain he had slain, and before dying in the late summer of 415 , instructed his brother to return Galla to the Romans. It was the Gothic King Wallia who traded her to the Romans in return for a treaty and supplies early in 416 .

Her brother Honorius forced her into marriage to the Roman Constantius in January of 417 . They had a son who became Valentinian III , and a rather more strong-willed daughter, Justa Grata Honoria . Constantius became emperor in 421 , but died shortly afterwards. Galla herself, the former Augusta, was however forced from the Western empire. Whatever the politics or motivations, the public issue was increasingly scandalous public sexual caresses from her own brother Honorius. She left with her young children to find refuge at Constantinople . After Honorius died in 423 , and after the suppression of Joannes despite his ally Aëtius ' attempt to raise troops to his aid, her son Valentinian was elevated as Emperor in Rome in 425 .

At first she attempted to rule in her son's name, but as the generals loyal to her one by one either died or defected to Aëtius, imperial policy came to rest in his hands by the time he was made patrician. Placidia apparently was the one who made peace with Aetius - he later was pivotal to the defense of the Western Empire against Attila the Hun - who was diverted from his focus on Constantinople towards Italy as his target due to a foolish letter from Placidia's own daughter, Justa Grata Honoria , in spring 450 , asking him to rescue her from an unwanted marriage to a senator that the Imperial family, including Placidia, was trying to force on her. Placidia's last notable public act was to convince her son Valentinian III to exile rather than kill Honoria for this. She died shortly afterwards at Rome in November 450, and did not live to see Attila ravage Italy in 451 -453 in a much more brutal campaign than the Goths had waged, using Justa's letter as their sole "legitimate" excuse.

Throughout her life Galla remained a devout Catholic , and in her later years endowed or enriched several churches in Ravenna . Her Mausoleum in Ravenna was one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites inscribed in 1996 . 8 9



Garcia VII of Navarre and Marguerite de l'Aigle




Husband Garcia VII of Navarre 11 12

            AKA: García VI "el Restaurador," Garcia VI "the Restorer" of Navarre, García Ramírez of Navarre
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Nov 1150 - Lorca
         Buried:  - Santa María la Real, Pamplona
       Marriage: After 1130

Events

• Lord of Monzón and Logroño:

• King of Navarre: 1134-1150.




Wife Marguerite de l'Aigle 13 14

            AKA: Margaret de l'Aigle
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 May 1141
         Buried: 


         Father: Gilbert de l'Aigle, Seigneur de l'Aigle in Normandy (      -      ) 13 14
         Mother: Juliana of Mortagne and Perche (      -      ) 15




Children
1 F Blanca Garcés of Navarre 16 17

            AKA: Blanca of Navarre, Blanche of Navarre, Sancha of Navarre
           Born: After 1133
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Aug 1156
         Buried:  - Monastery of Santa Maria la Real of Najera
         Spouse: Sancho III of Castile (1134-1158) 18 19
           Marr: 30 Jan 1151 - Catahorra, Logroño




Research Notes: Husband - Garcia VII of Navarre

From Wikipedia - García Ramírez of Navarre :

García Ramírez, sometimes García IV,V, VI or VII (died 21 November 1150 , Lorca ), called the Restorer (Spanish : el Restaurador), was Lord of Monzón and Logroño , and, from 1134, King of Navarre . He "restored" the independence of the Navarrese crown after 58 years of union with the Kingdom of Aragon .

Early years
García was born in the early twelfth century, the grandson of Rodrigo Díaz, better known as El Cid . His father was Ramiro Sánchez of Monzón , a son of Sancho Garcés , illegitimate son of García Sánchez III of Navarre and half-brother of Sancho IV . His mother was the Cid's daughter Cristina.

Rise to power
When Aragon, which had from 1076 been united to Navarre, lost its warrior king Alfonso the Battler and fell into a succession crisis in 1134, García managed to wrest Navarre from his Aragonese cousins. He was elected in Pamplona by the bishops and nobles of the realm against the will of Alfonso. That Alfonso, in drawing up a will, had ignored his distant relation (of an illegitimate line), is not unsurprising given the circumstances. Alfonso had nearer male kin in the form of his brother Ramiro . Besides that, since Alfonso seems to have disregarded Ramiro as well, the choice of an illegitimate descendant of Sancho the Great would undoubtedly have aroused the opposition of the Papacy to the succession.[1]


Ramiro did succeed Alfonso in Aragon, because the nobles refused to enact the late king's unusual will. His accession did raise protest from Rome and was not uncontested within Aragon, much less in Navarre, where García was the chosen candidate once the testament of Alfonso was laid aside. Rome does not seem to have opposed him, but neither does he seem to have had much support within Aragon, while Ramiro strongly objected to his election in Navarre. In light of this, the Bishop of Pamplona granted García his church's treasure to fund his government against Ramiro's pretensions.[2] Among Garcías other early supporters were Lop Ennechones, Martinus de Leit, and Count Latro, who carried out negotiations on the king's behalf with Ramiro.[3] Eventually, however, the two monarchs reached a mutual accord - the Pact of Vadoluongo - of "adoption" in January 1135: García was deemed the "son" and Ramiro the "father" in an attempt to maintain both the independence of each kingdom and the de facto supremacy of the Aragonese one.

In May 1135, García declared himself a vassal of Alfonso VII . This simultaneously put him under the protection and lordship of Castile and bought recognition of his royal status from Alfonso, who was a claimant to the Battler's succession.[4] García's submission to Castile has been seen as an act of protection for Navarre which had the consequence of putting her in an offensive alliance against Aragon, which thus forced Ramiro to marry, to forge an alliance with Raymond Berengar IV of Barcelona and to produce an heir, now that García, his adoptive son, was out of the question.[5] On the other hand, García may have been responding to Ramiro's marriage, which proved beyond a doubt that the king of Aragon was seeking another heir than his distant relative and adopted son.[6]


Before September 1135, Alfonso VII granted García Zaragoza as a fief.[7] Recently conquered from Aragon, this outpost of Castilian authority in the east was clearly beyond the military capacity of Alfonso to control and provided further reasons for recognition of García in Navarre in return for not only his homage, but his holding Zaragoza on behalf of Castile. In 1136, Alfons was forced to do homage for Zaragoza to Ramiro and to recognise him as King of Zaragoza. In 1137, Zaragoza was surrendered to Raymond Berengar, though Alfonso retained suzerainty over it. By then, García's reign in Zaragoza had closed.

García's heirs
Sometime after 1130, but before his succession, García married Marguerite de l'Aigle . She was to bear him a son and successor, Sancho VI , as well as two daughters who each married kings: the elder, Blanca , born after 1133, married Sancho III of Castile , while the younger, Margaret , named after her mother, married William I of Sicily . García's relationship with his first queen was, however, shaky. She took on many lovers and showed favouritism to her French relatives. She bore a second son named Rodrigo , whom her husband refused to recognise as his own.[8] On 24 June 1144 , in León , García married Urraca , called "La Asturiana" (the Asturian), illegitimate daughter of Alfonso VII by Guntroda Pérez , to strengthen his relationship with his overlord.

In 1136, García was obliged to surrender Rioja to Castile but, in 1137, he allied with Alfonso I of Portugal and confronted Alfonso VII. They confirmed a peace between 1139 and 1140. He was thereafter an ally of Castile in the Reconquista and was instrumental in the conquest of Almería in 1147. In 1146, he occupied Tauste , which belonged to Aragon, and Alfonso VII intervened to mediate a peace between the two kingdoms.

By his marriage to Urraca, García had also become a brother-in-law of Raymond Berengar IV, with whom he confirmed a peace treaty in 1149. The count was promised to García's daughter Blanca while already engaged to Petronilla of Aragon , but García died before the marriage could be carried out.

García died on 21 November 1150 in Lorca , near Estella , and was buried in the cathedral of Santa María la Real in Pamplona. He was succeeded by his eldest son. He left one daughter by Urraca: Sancha, who married Gaston V of Béarn . He left a widow in the person of his third wife, Ganfreda López.

García left, as the primary monument of his reign, the monastery of Santa María de la Oliva in Carcastillo . It is a fine example of Romanesque architecture . 11 12


Research Notes: Wife - Marguerite de l'Aigle

From Wikipedia - Marguerite de l'Aigle :

Marguerite de l'Aigle (d.1144) was a daughter of Gilbert de l'Aigle, Seigneur de l'Aigle and his wife Juliana du Perche . She was Queen consort of Navarre , by her marriage to García Ramírez of Navarre .

Family
Marguerite's paternal grandparents were Richer de l'Aigle, Seigneur de l'Aigle and his wife, Judith d'Avranches. Her maternal grandparents were Geoffrey II du Perche, Count of Perche and Mortagne, and his wife, Beatrix de Montdidier.
Marguerite had three siblings. These were two sisters, Lucy and Emmeline; and her brother was Richard II de L'Aigle, successor to their father, as Baron de l'Aigle.
Marguerite was a descendent of Hedwig of France , daughter of Hugh Capet . Marguerite was also a distant cousin of Felica of Roucy , second queen of Sancho Ramírez , King of Aragon .[1]

Queen of Navarre
Marguerite married in 1130 to García Ramírez of Navarre , shortly before his accession to the throne of Navarre .[2]
Marguerite was to bear García Ramírez a son and heir, Sancho VI , as well as two daughters who each married kings: the elder, Blanca , born after 1133, married Sancho III of Castile , while the younger, Margaret , named after her mother, married William I of Sicily . García's relationship with Marguerite was, however, unstable. She took many lovers and showed favouritism to her French relatives. She bore a second son named Rodrigo , whom her husband refused to recognise as his own. He was never acknowledged as a son by the Navarrese king, even after Marguerite's death, and he was widely considered a bastard, though his sister, Margaret did not treat him as such. He certainly never behaved as anything other than the son of a king.[3]
Marguerite died disgraced in 1144. Her husband later remarried, to Urraca, illegitimate daughter of Alfonso VII of Castile . [4] 13 14


Garibald I Duke of Bavaria and Waldrada of Lombardy




Husband Garibald I Duke of Bavaria 20 21

            AKA: Garivald I of Bavaria
           Born: Abt 540
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 591
         Buried: 


         Father: Fara Prince of Heruli (      -0535) 22
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 556



Wife Waldrada of Lombardy 23

           Born:  - <Lombardy (Italy)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Wacho King of the Lombards (      -0539) 24
         Mother: Ostrogotha (      -      )



   Other Spouse: Theudebald King of Austrasia (Abt 0535-0555) 25 26


Children
1 F Theudelinde of Bavaria, Queen of the Lombards 27 28




            AKA: Theodelinda
           Born: 546 - Metz, (Moselle), Austrasia, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 625
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Agilulf King of the Lombards (Abt 0547-0616) 29 30
           Marr: 591




Research Notes: Husband - Garibald I Duke of Bavaria

From Wikipedia - Garibald I of Bavaria :

Garibald I (also Garivald) (b. 540 ) was Duke of Bavaria from 555 until 591 . He stands at the head of the Bavarian Dynasty .

After the death of the Merovingian king Theudebald , Theudebald's successor Clotaire I married his widow Waldrada (531 - 572 ), daughter of the Lombard king Wacho . Clotaire's bishops objected, so he gave Waldrada to Garibald to marry in 556 . Not only did this grant Garibald prestige, but it created lasting political ties between the Bavarii and the Lombards of Pannonia and Bohemia . This would have consequences after the Lombards moved into Italy in 568 .

Some time before 585 , the Merovigian court attempted to bind Garibald more closely to their interests by arranging a marriage between Garibald's daughter Theodelinda and king Childebert II . At the same time the Merovigians were attempting to normalise relations with Authari , the Lombard king, by arranging a marriage between Childebert's sister and Authari. Both these proposals fell through. The offended Authari was engaged to Theodelinda in 588 . Fearing an anti-Frankish axis, the Franks sent an army into Bavaria. Garibald's children Gundoald and Theodelinda fled to Italy. Authari married Theodelinda in May 589 and named his brother-in-law, Gundoald, Duke of Asti . In 590 , the Franks invaded Lombardy with help from Byzantium , but were defeated.

In 591, Childebert normalised relations with the Lombards and Bavarii. Authari died in 590 and the Lombard dukes asked Theodelinda to marry again. She chose Agilulf as her husband and he was accepted as the next king. They then negotiated a peace with Childebert which lasted for decades. Peace with Bavaria was restored when Childebert named Tassilo rex (king) according to Paulus Diaconus . It is unknown whether Garibald was deposed or died. Nor is it clear what Tassilo's relationship to Garibald was; though if not his son, he was certainly a close relation. 20 21


Research Notes: Wife - Waldrada of Lombardy

From Wikipedia - Waldrada :

Waldrada, widow (firstly) of Theudebald , King of Austrasia (ruled 548-555), repudiated wife (secondly) of Chlothar I , King of the Franks (ruled c.558-561), was the daughter of Wacho , King of the Lombards (ruled c.510-539) and his second wife Ostrogotha, a Gepid . The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda …secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho and his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald ".[1] The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum".[2] Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald".[3] Gregory of Tours names Vuldetrada as the wife of King Theodebald.[4] Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus".[5] According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria",[6] which does not imply that King Clotaire married Waldrada. 23


Research Notes: Child - Theudelinde of Bavaria, Queen of the Lombards

From Wikipedia - Theodelinda :

Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards , (c. 570 - 628 ) was the daughter of duke Garibald I of Bavaria .

She was married first in 588 to Authari , king of the Lombards, son of king Cleph . Authari died in 590 . Theodelinda was allowed to pick Agilulf as her next husband and Authari's successor in 591 . She thereafter exerted much influence in restoring Nicene Christianity (the mainstream, in 1054 split by the East-West Schism in Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy ) to a position of primacy in Italy against its rival, Arian Christianity .

After the conversion of Authari to the Catholic faith, she started building churches in Lombardy and Tuscany , among them the cathedral of Monza and the first Baptistery of Florence. They were all dedicated to Saint John the Baptist .

The famous treasure of Monza contains the Iron Crown of Lombardy and the theca persica, enclosing a text from the Gospel of John , sent by Pope Gregory I (590-604) to her for her son Adaloald . Another of the gifts of this pope to the Lombard queen was a cruciform encolpion (reliquary) containing a portion of the True Cross . 27 28


Garnier de Troyes, Viscount of Sens




Husband Garnier de Troyes, Viscount of Sens 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Teutberg 32

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 960
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Charles Constantine Count of Vienne (Abt 0901-Abt 0962) 33





Gautier de Moëlan




Husband Gautier de Moëlan 34

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1080
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thibaud Seigneur de Dampierre 35

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1107
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isabel de Montlhéry Viscomtessa de Troyes (      -      ) 36





Skjöldr King of Denmark [Legendary] and Gefion




Husband Skjöldr King of Denmark [Legendary] 37 38

            AKA: Skioldus, Skjold King of the Danes
           Born: Abt 237 - <Hleithra, Denmark>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Odin [Mythological] (Abt 0215-      ) 39 40
         Mother: Freya [Mythological] (Abt 0219-      ) 41 42


       Marriage: 



Wife Gefion 43

           Born:  - <Hleithra, Denmark>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Fridleif Skjoldsson 44

           Born: Abt 259 - <Hleithra, Denmark>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Skjöldr King of Denmark [Legendary]

First legendary Danish king, supposedly the son of Odin and Friege.

From Wikipedia - Skjöldr :

Skjöldr (Latinized as Skioldus, sometimes Anglicized as Skjold or Skiold) was among the first legendary Danish kings . He is mentioned in the Prose Edda , in Ynglinga saga , in Chronicon Lethrense , in Sven Aggesen 's history, in Arngrímur Jónsson 's Latin abstract of the lost Skjöldunga saga and in Saxo Grammaticus ' Gesta Danorum . Under the name Scyld he also appears in the Old English poem Beowulf . The various accounts have little in common.
In the Skjöldunga and the Ynglinga sagas , Odin came from Asia and conquered Northern Europe. He gave Sweden to his son Yngvi and Denmark to his son Skjöldr. Since then the kings of Sweden were called Ynglings and those of Denmark Skjöldungs (Scyldings ). 37 38


Research Notes: Child - Fridleif Skjoldsson

Supposed the grandson of Odin, but I doubt it. Either it's mythical or Odin was not a god. 44


Genebald Duke of the East Franks [Legendary or Fictional]




Husband Genebald Duke of the East Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 45 46

            AKA: Genbald I King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 262
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 358
         Buried: 


         Father: Dagobert I King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] (Abt 0264-0317) 47 48
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Dagobert II Duke of the East Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 49 50

           Born: Abt 300 - <Gallia Belgica (France or Belgium)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 379
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Child - Dagobert II Duke of the East Franks [Legendary or Fictional]

May be spurious altogether.

From Wikipedia - Springer Hoax
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Dagobert (4th century) )


The Springer Hoax was a scam starting in the mid 19th century, often using a phony genealogy in various ways to collect money based on the supposed multi-million dollar estate of prominent colonialist Carl Christopher/Christoffersson Springer and debts said to be owed to him by various government agencies of Wilmington, Delaware , USA and Stockholm , Sweden .[1] It is notable today primarily as the result of amateur genealogists' (and others'[2]) mistaken reliance on the various Springer genealogies going back to Adam and Eve via Emperor Charlemagne .

Wilmington's supposed debt was related to land purportedly owned by Springer. The land actually had belonged to Old Swede's Church, Springer was merely a life trustee for the land. The tie to Sweden was based on a phony genealogy used to claim that Springer was part of the Swedish Aristocracy.[3]

In one version of the scam from the 1850s, people claiming to be Springer heirs sold stock in the "Springer Heirs Corporation", supposedly to file court cases to prove their alleged ownership of large sections of real estate in the downtown area of Wilmington, Delaware or the royal jewels of Sweden. The corporation folded after a few minor court cases for several small, unclaimed estates.[4]

A later version of the scam was started in 1913, targeting actual and possible descendants of Springer. Again, the estate was said to hold legitimate title to large sections of land in Wilmington. Victims were enticed into buying shares in the "Springer Heirs Corporation 1913 U.S. American and Canada".[5]

When indicted for charges of larceny, several perpetrators of the scam claimed that their story was essentially true and the truth was being hidden by a conspiracy involving the courts, the government of Wilmington, and the Old Swede's Church.[6] 49 50


Genebald II Duke of the Salian Franks




Husband Genebald II Duke of the Salian Franks 50 51 52

            AKA: Genobaud Dux of the Franks
           Born: Abt 345 - <Germania Inferior (Netherlands)>
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 419
         Buried: 


         Father: Dagobert II Duke of the East Franks [Legendary or Fictional] (Abt 0300-Abt 0379) 49 50
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Invaded: the Roman Empire, 388.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Argotta Princess of the Salian Franks 53 54

           Born: Abt 376 - <Gallia Lugdunensis (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Pharamond King of the Franks [Legendary] (Abt 0369-Abt 0428) 55 56 57
           Marr: Abt 394




Research Notes: Husband - Genebald II Duke of the Salian Franks

His parents are likely unknown. Generations from this part back in time were inventions as part of a mid-19th-century hoax. See Wikipedia - Springer Hoax (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_(4th_century)).

From Wikipedia - Genobaud :

Genobaud was a leader (dux) of the Franks . He invaded the Roman Empire in the year 388 .

This invasion is documented by Gregory of Tours , who cited the now lost work of Sulpicius Alexander . According to this account Genobaud invaded the Roman provinces Germania and Belgia together with Marcomer and Sunno . They broke through the limes , killed many people, destroyed the most fruitful lands and made the city of Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, now Cologne , panic. After this raid the main body of the Franks moved back over the Rhine with their booty. Some of the Franks remained in the Belgian woods. When the Roman generals Nanninus and Quintinus heard the news in Trier , they attacked those remaining Frankish forces and killed many of them. After this engagement Quintinus crossed the Rhine to punish the Franks in their own country; however, his army was surrounded and beaten. Some Roman soldiers drowned in the marshes, others were killed by Franks, and but few made it back to their Empire. 50 51 52


Charles Creswell Klinge and Genevieve




Husband Charles Creswell Klinge

            AKA: Creswell Klinge
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Fred E. Klinge (Abt 1878-1923) 58
         Mother: Caroline Katherine Johnson (1884-After 1974) 58


       Marriage: 



Wife Genevieve (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240-14 (Theidlindis).

2 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240-14.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240-13.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240-15.

5 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140408 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

6 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140407 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

7 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140402 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

8 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140409 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

9 Wikipedia.org, Galla Placidia.

10 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #140414 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

11 Wikipedia.org, García Ramírez of Navarre.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-25.

13 Wikipedia.org, Marguerite de l'Aigle.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-25 (Garcia VII).

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-25 (Garcia VII), 18A-23 (Nele d'Aubigny).

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113A-26, 113-26 (Sancho III).

17 Wikipedia.org, Blanca Garcés of Navarre.

18 Wikipedia.org, Sancho III of Castile.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-26.

20 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105706.

21 Wikipedia.org, Garibald I of Bavaria.

22 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105709.

23 Wikipedia.org, Waldrada; Theudebald.

24 Wikipedia.org, Wacho; Theudebald.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Compact Disc #94 Pin #105702.

26 Wikipedia.org, Theudebald.

27 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105707.

28 Wikipedia.org, Theodelinda.

29 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105714.

30 Wikipedia.org, Agilulf.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-18 (Charles Constantine).

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A (Charles Constantine).

33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-18.

34 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 264-25.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 264-26.

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 264-26 (Thibaud).

37 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f53/a0025398.htm.

38 Wikipedia.org, Skjöldr.

39 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f53/a0025396.htm.

40 Wikipedia.org, Odin.

41 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f53/a0025397.htm.

42 Wikipedia.org, Freyja.

43 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f54/a0025406.htm.

44 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f61/a0026171.htm.

45 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99025 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

46 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873349.

47 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873350.

48 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99087 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

49 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873348.

50 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316370 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

51 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875191.

52 Wikipedia.org, Genobaud.

53 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875190.

54 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105872 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

55 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99021 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

56 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873345.

57 Wikipedia.org, Pharamond.

58 Personal Documents, DeWayne B. Johnson family documents and photographs.


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