The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Theodemir King of the Ostrogoths




Husband Theodemir King of the Ostrogoths

            AKA: Theodemer
           Born: Abt 430 - Hispaniae (Spain)
     Christened: 
           Died: 474
         Buried: 


         Father: Vandalarius of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0405-Abt 0459)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Erelieva Queen of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0434-      ) 1 2



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Theodoric King of Italy

           Born: Abt 467 - Pannonia (Hungary)
     Christened: 
           Died: 526 - Italy
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Theodora (Abt 0478-      ) 3




Research Notes: Husband - Theodemir King of the Ostrogoths

FamilySearch.org Compact Disc #94 Pin #308142 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer)

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875427 has b. abt 441, d. 475.


Research Notes: Child - Theodoric King of Italy

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875425 :
Became King of Italy when he conquered the Ostrogoths under Odacaer with the permission of Roman Emperor Zeno. The title was illegitemate but nonetheless recognised by his contemporaries. Taken as a youth (age 8) to Constantinople as a hostage.




Theodoric King of Italy and Theodora




Husband Theodoric King of Italy

           Born: Abt 467 - Pannonia (Hungary)
     Christened: 
           Died: 526 - Italy
         Buried: 


         Father: Theodemir King of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0430-0474)
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Theodora 3

           Born: Abt 478
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Theodora 4 5

            AKA: Theodora of the Visigoths
           Born: Abt 503 - Italy
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Severinus Count of Cartagena (Abt 0501-      ) 6 7




Research Notes: Husband - Theodoric King of Italy

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593875425 :
Became King of Italy when he conquered the Ostrogoths under Odacaer with the permission of Roman Emperor Zeno. The title was illegitemate but nonetheless recognised by his contemporaries. Taken as a youth (age 8) to Constantinople as a hostage.




Theodore Count of Chalons




Husband Theodore Count of Chalons 8

           Born: Abt 840 - France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Gueron Count of Chalons (Abt 0818-0856) 9
         Mother: Avane (Abt 0820-      ) 10


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Manasses Comté de Dijon, de Challons-sur-Seine 11 12

            AKA: Manassas Count of Chalons
           Born: Abt 866 - France
     Christened: 
           Died: 919
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ermengarde Princesse de Provence (0935-      ) 13





Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths and Audefleda Meroving Princess of the Franks




Husband Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths 14 15

            AKA: Theodoric "the Great" King of the Ostrogoths
           Born: Abt 454 - Pannonia (Hungary)
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Aug 526 - Ravenna, (Italy)


         Buried: 


         Father: Theodemir King of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0430-0474)
         Mother: Erelieva Queen of the Ostrogoths (Abt 0434-      ) 1 2


       Marriage: 493

   Other Spouse: < > of Moesia [Concubine of Theodoric] (      -      ) 15

Events

• King of the Ostrogoths: 471-526.

• Ruler of Italy: 493-526.

• Regent of the Visigoths: 511-526.

• Viceroy: of the (Eastern) Roman Empire.




Wife Audefleda Meroving Princess of the Franks 16

           Born: Abt 452 - Westphalia, Alemania (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Apr 535 - Ravenna, (Italy)
         Buried: 


         Father: Childeric I King of the Salian Franks (Between 0436/0437-0482) 17 18 19
         Mother: Basina Andovera of Thuringia (Abt 0438-Abt 0480) 20 21 22




Children
1 F Ostrogotha 15 23

            AKA: Arevagni Princess of the Ostrogoths
           Born: Abt 475
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sigismund of Burgundy (      -0524) 24
           Marr: 494 or 496




Research Notes: Husband - Theodoric King of the Ostrogoths

Raised as a hostage in Constantinople.

From Wikipedia - Theodoric the Great :
Theodoric the Great (Gothic : Þiudareiks; Latin : Fl Theodoricus; Greek : (Thev'ðerichos, ??v'ð?rixos ); Old English : Þ; German : Dietrich von Bern ; Old Norse : Þjóðrekr, Þiðrek; 454 - August 30 , 526 ), was king of the Ostrogoths (471-526),[1] ruler of Italy (493-526), regent of the Visigoths (511-526), and a viceroy of the (Eastern) Roman Empire. He became a hero of Germanic legend.

Youth

The man who ruled under the name of Theodoric was born in 454 on the banks of the Neusiedler See near Carnuntum , a year after the Ostrogoths had thrown off nearly a century of domination by the Huns . The son of the King Theodemir and Erelieva , Theodoric went to Constantinople as a young boy, as a hostage to secure the Ostrogoths' compliance with a treaty Theodemir had concluded with the Byzantine Emperor Leo .

He lived at the court of Constantinople for many years and learned a great deal about Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he became the Gothic ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized "barbarian people", as Oriental kingdoms used to call tribes living on the European continent, what is presently known as Western Europe [Armenian historian Movses Khorenatsi] . Treated with favor by the Emperors Leo I and Zeno , he became magister militum (Master of Soldiers) in 483, and one year later he became consul . Afterwards, he returned to live among the Ostrogoths when he was 31 years old and became their king in 488.

Reign

At the time, the Ostrogoths were settled in Byzantine territory as foederati (allies) of the Romans, but were becoming restless and increasingly difficult for Zeno to manage. Not long after Theodoric became king, the two men worked out an arrangement beneficial to both sides. The Ostrogoths needed a place to live, and Zeno was having serious problems with Odoacer , the King of Italy who had overthrown the Western Roman Empire in 476. Ostensibly a viceroy for Zeno, Odoacer was menacing Byzantine territory and not respecting the rights of Roman citizens in Italy. At Zeno's encouragement, Theodoric invaded Odoacer's kingdom.

Theodoric came with his army to Italy in 488, where he won the battles of Isonzo and Verona in 489 and at the Adda in 490. In 493 he took Ravenna . On February 2, 493, Theodoric and Odoacer signed a treaty that assured both parties would rule over Italy. A banquet was organised in order to celebrate this treaty. It was at this banquet that Theodoric, after making a toast, killed Odoacer with his own hands.

Like Odoacer, Theodoric was ostensibly only a viceroy for the emperor in Constantinople. In reality, he was able to avoid imperial supervision, and dealings between the emperor and Theodoric were as equals. Unlike Odoacer, however, Theodoric respected the agreement he had made and allowed Roman citizens within his kingdom to be subject to Roman law and the Roman judicial system. The Goths, meanwhile, lived under their own laws and customs. In 519, when a mob had burned down the synagogues of Ravenna, Theodoric ordered the town to rebuild them at its own expense.

Theodoric the Great sought alliances with, or hegemony over, the other Germanic kingdoms in the west. He allied with the Franks by his marriage to Audofleda , sister of Clovis I , and married his own female relatives to princes or kings of the Visigoths , Vandals and Burgundian . He stopped the Vandals from raiding his territories by threatening the weak Vandal king Thrasamund with invasion, and sent a guard of 5,000 troops with his sister Amalfrida when she married Thrasamund in 500. For much of his reign, Theodoric was the de facto king of the Visigoths as well, becoming regent for the infant Visigothic king, his grandson Amalric , following the defeat of Alaric II by the Franks under Clovis in 507. The Franks were able to wrest control of Aquitaine from the Visigoths, but otherwise, Theodoric was able to defeat their incursions.

Thedoric's achievements began to unravel even before his death. He had married his daughter Amalasuntha to the Visigoth Eutharic , but Eutharic died in 522 or 523, so no lasting dynastic connection of Ostrogoths and Visigoths was established. In 522, the Catholic Burgundian king Sigismund killed his own son, Theodoric's grandson, Sergeric. Theodoric retaliated by invading, probably in 523, annexing the southern part of the Burgundian kingdom. The rest was ruled Sigismund's Arian brother Godomar , under Gothic protection against the Franks who had captured Sigismund. This brought the territory ruled by Theodoric to its height (see map), but in 523 or 524 the new Catholic Vandal king Hilderic imprisoned Amalfrida, and killed her Gothic guard. Theodoric was planning an expedition to restore his power over the Vandal kingdom when he died in 526.

Family and Issue
Theodoric was married once.

He had a concubine in Moesia , name unknown, and had two daughters:
Theodegotha (ca. 473 - ?). In 494, she was married to Alaric II as a part of her father's alliance with the Visigoths.
Ostrogotha or Arevagni (ca. 475 - ?). In 494 or 496, she was married to the king Sigismund of Burgundy as a part of her father's alliance with the Burgundians.

Married to Audofleda in 493 and had one daughter:
Amalasuntha , Queen of the Goths. She was married to Eutharic and had two children: Athalaric and Matasuentha (the latter being married to Witiges first, then, after Witiges' death, married to Germanus Justinus , neither had children). Any hope for a reconciliation between the Goths and the Romans in the person of a Gotho-Roman Emperor from this family lineage was shattered.

After his death in Ravenna in 526, Theodoric was succeeded by his grandson Athalaric . Athalaric was at first represented by his mother Amalasuntha, who was a regent queen from 526 until 534. The kingdom of the Ostrogoths, however, began to wane and was conquered by Justinian I starting in 535 and finally ending in 553 with the Battle of Mons Lactarius ." 14 15


Birth Notes: Child - Ostrogotha

Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodoric_the_great


Research Notes: Child - Ostrogotha

From Wikipedia - Theodoric the Great :

Theodoric was married once.

He had a concubine in Moesia , name unknown, and had two daughters:
Theodegotha (ca. 473 - ?). In 494, she was married to Alaric II as a part of her father's alliance with the Visigoths.
Ostrogotha or Arevagni (ca. 475 - ?). In 494 or 496, she was married to the king Sigismund of Burgundy as a part of her father's alliance with the Burgundians.

Married to Audofleda in 493 and had one daughter:
Amalasuntha , Queen of the Goths. She was married to Eutharic and had two children: Athalaric and Matasuentha (the latter being married to Witiges first, then, after Witiges' death, married to Germanus Justinus , neither had children). Any hope for a reconciliation between the Goths and the Romans in the person of a Gotho-Roman Emperor from this family lineage was shattered. 15 23


Theodoric I of the Visigoths




Husband Theodoric I of the Visigoths 25

           Born: Abt 395 - Pannonia (Hungary)
     Christened: 
           Died: 451
         Buried: 


         Father: 
         Mother: < > Princess of the Visigoths (Abt 0375-      ) 26


       Marriage: 

Events

• Acceded: as King of the Visigoths, 419.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Thorismund 27

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 453
         Buried: 



2 M Theodoric II 27

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 466
         Buried: 



3 M Euric King of the Visigoths 28 29

            AKA: Erwig, Eurico, Evaric
           Born: Abt 415 - <Italy>
     Christened: 
           Died: 484
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Child - Thorismund

Murdered by his brother Theodoric II.


Death Notes: Child - Theodoric II

Murdered by his younger brother Euric.


Research Notes: Child - Theodoric II

From Wikipedia - Theodoric II :

Theodoric II (in Spanish and Portuguese Teodorico) murdered his elder brother Thorismund to become king of the Visigoths in 453. Edward Gibbon writes that "he justified this atrocious deed by the design which his predecessor had formed of violating his alliance with the empire." During Theodoric's reign the Kingdom of the Visigoths , centered in what is now Aquitaine , continued to be a federate of the Western Roman Empire . In 462 the empire ceded Septimania to Theodoric.

Theodoric was himself murdered in 466 by his younger brother Euric , who succeeded him to the throne.

The Gallo-Roman Sidonius Apollinaris wrote a famously vivid and gushing letter to his friend Agricola describing the king and his court.[1] 27


Research Notes: Child - Euric King of the Visigoths

Younger brother of Theodoric II.

From Wikipedia - Euric :

Euric, also known as Evaric, Erwig, or Eurico in Spanish and Portuguese (c. 415-484), was the younger brother of Theodoric II and ruled as king of the Visigoths , with his capital at Toulouse , from 466 until his death in 484 .

He inherited a large portion of the Visigothic possessions in the Aquitaine region of Gaul , an area that had been under Visigothic control since 415 . Over the decades the Visigoths had gradually expanded their holdings at the expense of the weak Roman government, advancing well into Hispania in the process.

Upon becoming king, Euric defeated several other Visigothic kings and chieftains in a series of civil wars and soon became the first ruler of a truly unified Visigothic nation. Taking advantage of the Romans' problems, he extended Visigothic power in Hispania, driving the Suevi into the northwest of Iberia. By the time the Western Roman Empire ended in 476 he controlled nearly the entire Iberian peninsula .

In 470 Euric defeated an attempted invasion of Gaul by the Celtic magnate Riothamus and expanded his kingdom even further north, possibly as far as the Somme River , the March of Frankish territory.

Previous Visigothic kings had officially ruled only as legates of the Roman Emperor but Euric was the first to declare his complete independence from the puppet emperors. In 475 he forced the western emperor Julius Nepos to recognize his full independence in exchange for the return of the Provence region of Gaul. The Roman citizens of Hispania then pledged their allegiance to Euric, recognizing him as their king. In the same year Clermont(-Ferrand) surrendered to him after a long siege, and its bishop, Sidonius Apollinaris , sued for peace. He divided the Western Roman Empire with Odoacer .


Euric was one of the more learned of the great Visigothic kings and was the first German to formally codify his people's laws. The Code of Euric of 471 codified the traditional laws that had been entrusted to the memory of designated specialists who had learned each article by heart.

At Euric's death in 484 the Kingdom of the Visigoths encompassed all of Iberia except for the region of Galicia (ruled by the Suebi ) and more than two-thirds of modern France . Edward Gibbon , in Chapter 38 of the History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire , remarks:
The fortune of nations has often depended on accidents; and France may ascribe her greatness to the premature death of the Gothic king, at a time when his son by his wife Ragnachildis Alaric was a helpless infant, and his adversary Clovis an ambitious and valiant youth. 28 29


Theudebald King of Austrasia and Waldrada of Lombardy




Husband Theudebald King of Austrasia 30 31

            AKA: Theobald King of Austrasia, Theodebald King of Austrasia, Thibaud King of Austrasia
           Born: Abt 535
     Christened: 
           Died: 555 - Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)
         Buried: 


         Father: Theudebert I King of Austrasia (Abt 0500-0548) 32 33
         Mother: Deuteria (      -      )


       Marriage: 



Wife Waldrada of Lombardy 34

           Born:  - <Lombardy (Italy)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Wacho King of the Lombards (      -0539) 35
         Mother: Ostrogotha (      -      )



   Other Spouse: Garibald I Duke of Bavaria (Abt 0540-Abt 0591) 36 37 - 556


Children
1 M Grimoalde Duke of Aquitaine 38

            AKA: Grimaud Duke of Aquitaine
           Born: Abt 555 - Aquitaine, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 599
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Theudebald King of Austrasia

From Wikipedia - Theudebald :

Theudebald or Theodebald (in modern English , Theobald; in French , Thibaud or Théodebald; in German , Theudowald) (c. 535 -555 ), son of Theudebert I and Deuteria, was the king of Metz , Rheims , or Austrasia -as it's variously called-from 547 or 548 to 555 .

He was only thirteen years of age when he succeeded and of ill health. However, the loyalty of the nobility to his father's memory preserved the peace during his minority. He married Waldrada , daughter of the Lombard king Wacho and his step-sister (a sister of his father's second wife). This marriage fortified the alliance betweent Austrasia and Lombardy.

Nevertheless, Theudebald could not hold on to the conquests of his father in the north of Italia . The Byzantine Emperor Justinian I sent an army under the command of Narses in 552 and, like his father before him, Theudebald avoided direct confrontation with it.

After a prolonged sickness and prostration, he died in 555. His realm passed finally outside of the family of Theuderic I and was united to the kingdoms of his great-uncle Clotaire I , who would soon become king of all the Franks . 30 31


Research Notes: Wife - Waldrada of Lombardy

From Wikipedia - Waldrada :

Waldrada, widow (firstly) of Theudebald , King of Austrasia (ruled 548-555), repudiated wife (secondly) of Chlothar I , King of the Franks (ruled c.558-561), was the daughter of Wacho , King of the Lombards (ruled c.510-539) and his second wife Ostrogotha, a Gepid . The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda …secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho and his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald ".[1] The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum".[2] Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald".[3] Gregory of Tours names Vuldetrada as the wife of King Theodebald.[4] Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus".[5] According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria",[6] which does not imply that King Clotaire married Waldrada. 34


Theudebert I King of Austrasia and Wisigarda




Husband Theudebert I King of Austrasia 32 33

           Born: Abt 500 - Reims, (Marne), (Champagne-Ardenne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 548 - Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)
         Buried: 


         Father: Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia) (Abt 0485-0534) 39
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Deuteria (      -      )

Events

• King of Austrasia: 533-548.




Wife Wisigarda

            AKA: Wisigard
           Born:  - <Lombardy (Italy)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Wacho King of the Lombards (      -0539) 35
         Mother: Ostrogotha (      -      )




Children

Research Notes: Husband - Theudebert I King of Austrasia

From Wikipedia - Theudebert I :

Theudebert I (French : Thibert or Théodebert) (c. 500 - 547 or 548 ) was the Merovingian king of Austrasia from 533 to his death in 548 . He was the son of Theuderic I and the father of Theudebald .

Most of what we know about Theudebert comes from the Histories or History of the Franks written by Gregory of Tours in the second half of the sixth century. In addition, we have diplomatic correspondence composed at the Austrasian court (known as the Austrasian Letters ), the poems of Venantius Fortunatus and a small number of other sources.

During his father's reign, the young Theudebert had shown himself to be an able warrior. In about 516 he defeated a Danish army under King Chlochilaich (Hygelac of Beowulf ) after it had raided northern Gaul. His reputation was further enhanced by a series of military campaigns in the south of Gaul against the Visigoths .

Upon his father's death, Theudebert had to fight both his uncles Childebert and Clotaire to inherit his father's kingdom. In the end, his military prowess persuaded Childebert to abandon the dispute and adopt Theudebert as his heir. Together they campaigned against Clotaire but sued for peace after their armies were hit by storm...

In common with other Frankish rulers at the time, Theudebert took several wives as and when he wanted. As heir to his father's kingdom, he was betrothed to Wisigard , daughter of Wacho , king of the Lombards . This sort of political match was rare for the Merovingian kings. Theudebert abandoned her for Deuteria, a Gallo-Roman he had met while on campaign in southern Gaul. However, his supporters were not best pleased by his treatment of Wisigard, perhaps because of the political dimension, and persuaded Theudebert to take her back. Wisigard, though, soon died, and Theudebert married again.

As well as being renowned for his military prowess, Theudebert was lauded by contemporaries for his patronage of the Gallic Church. Gregory of Tours reserves special praise for him in this regard, but his piety is also mentioned by Fortunatus.

Theudebert died in the 14th year of his reign (at the end of 547 or the beginning of 548) and Theudebald, his son by Deuteria, succeeded him. In contrast to that experienced by many Merovingian kings, Theudebald's accession was peaceful. 32 33


Research Notes: Wife - Wisigarda

Source: Wikipedia - Wacho and Theudebald


Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia)




Husband Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia) 39

           Born: Abt 485
     Christened: 
           Died: 534 - <Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)>
         Buried: 


         Father: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 40 41 42
         Mother: Clotilde Queen of the Franks (0475-0545) 43 44 45 46


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Suavegotha (Abt 0495-      ) 47



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Theudebert I King of Austrasia 32 33

           Born: Abt 500 - Reims, (Marne), (Champagne-Ardenne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 548 - Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Deuteria (      -      )
         Spouse: Wisigarda (      -      )




Research Notes: Husband - Theuderic I King of Rheims (Metz, Austrasia)

Merovingian king.

From Wikipedia - Theuderic I :

Theuderic I[1] (c.485 - 533/4) was the Merovingian king of Metz , Rheims , or Austrasia -as it is variously called-from 511 to 533 or 534.

He was the son of Clovis I and one of his earlier wives or concubines. He inherited Metz in 511 at his father's death. In accordance with Salian tradition, the kingdom was divided between Clovis' four surviving sons: Childebert I in Paris , Chlodomer in Orléans , and Clotaire I in Soissons . Early in his reign, he sent his son Theudebert to battle the Scandinavian King Chlochilaich (Hygelac of Beowulf fame) who had invaded his realm. Theudebert defeated and killed Chlochilaich.

Theuderic got involved in the war between the Thuringian King Hermanfrid and Hermanfrid's only living brother: Baderic . In exchange for his help, Theuderic would receive half of the kingdom. Baderic was defeated, but the land promised Theuderic was not given up.

The four sons of Clovis then all fought Sigismund of Burgundy and Godomar , kings of the Burgundians . Godomar fled and Sigismund was taken prisoner by Chlodomer . Theuderic married Sigismund's daughter. Godomar rallied the Burgundian army and won back his kingdom. Chlodomer, aided by Theuderic, defeated Godomar, but died in the fighting at Vézeronce .

Theuderic then, with his brother Clotaire and his son, attacked Thuringia to revenge himself on Hermanfrid. Thuringia was conquered, and Clotaire received Radegund , daughter of King Berthar (Hermanfrid's late brother). After making a treaty with his brother Childebert, Theuderic died in 534. Upon his death the throne of Metz, though seemingly up for grabs, passed unhindered to Theudebert. Theuderic also left a daughter, Theodechild, by his wife Suavegotha, daughter of Sigismund of Burgundy . 39


Research Notes: Child - Theudebert I King of Austrasia

From Wikipedia - Theudebert I :

Theudebert I (French : Thibert or Théodebert) (c. 500 - 547 or 548 ) was the Merovingian king of Austrasia from 533 to his death in 548 . He was the son of Theuderic I and the father of Theudebald .

Most of what we know about Theudebert comes from the Histories or History of the Franks written by Gregory of Tours in the second half of the sixth century. In addition, we have diplomatic correspondence composed at the Austrasian court (known as the Austrasian Letters ), the poems of Venantius Fortunatus and a small number of other sources.

During his father's reign, the young Theudebert had shown himself to be an able warrior. In about 516 he defeated a Danish army under King Chlochilaich (Hygelac of Beowulf ) after it had raided northern Gaul. His reputation was further enhanced by a series of military campaigns in the south of Gaul against the Visigoths .

Upon his father's death, Theudebert had to fight both his uncles Childebert and Clotaire to inherit his father's kingdom. In the end, his military prowess persuaded Childebert to abandon the dispute and adopt Theudebert as his heir. Together they campaigned against Clotaire but sued for peace after their armies were hit by storm...

In common with other Frankish rulers at the time, Theudebert took several wives as and when he wanted. As heir to his father's kingdom, he was betrothed to Wisigard , daughter of Wacho , king of the Lombards . This sort of political match was rare for the Merovingian kings. Theudebert abandoned her for Deuteria, a Gallo-Roman he had met while on campaign in southern Gaul. However, his supporters were not best pleased by his treatment of Wisigard, perhaps because of the political dimension, and persuaded Theudebert to take her back. Wisigard, though, soon died, and Theudebert married again.

As well as being renowned for his military prowess, Theudebert was lauded by contemporaries for his patronage of the Gallic Church. Gregory of Tours reserves special praise for him in this regard, but his piety is also mentioned by Fortunatus.

Theudebert died in the 14th year of his reign (at the end of 547 or the beginning of 548) and Theudebald, his son by Deuteria, succeeded him. In contrast to that experienced by many Merovingian kings, Theudebald's accession was peaceful. 32 33



Thibaud Seigneur de Dampierre and Isabel de Montlhéry Viscomtessa de Troyes




Husband Thibaud Seigneur de Dampierre 48

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1107
         Buried: 


         Father: Gautier de Moëlan (      -1080) 49
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Seigneur de St. Just:

• Seigneur de St. Dizier en Champagne:




Wife Isabel de Montlhéry Viscomtessa de Troyes 50

            AKA: Elizabeth de Montlhéry Viscomtessa de Troyes
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Milon I "le Grand" Seigneur Montlhéry and de Bray (      -      ) 50
         Mother: Lithuaise (      -      ) 50




Children
1 M Guy I Vicomte de Troyes 51

            AKA: Gautier I de Moëlan
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1151
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Helvide de Baudement (      -      ) 52
           Marr: Between 1120 and 1125





Thomas of Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales




Husband Thomas of Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk

           Born: 1 Jun 1300
     Christened: 
           Died: 1338
         Buried: 


         Father: King Edward I of England (1239-1307) 53 54
         Mother: Marguerite of France (Abt 1275-1317/1318) 55


       Marriage: After 1316



Wife Alice Hales

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 8 May 1316
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Roger Hales of Harwich (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Margaret Duchess of Norfolk

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Mar 1399
         Buried: 
         Spouse: John de Segrave 4th Lord Segrave (      -1353)
         Spouse: Walter Manny 1st Lord Manny (      -      )
           Marr: After 30 May 1354




Research Notes: Husband - Thomas of Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 16-29


Research Notes: Wife - Alice Hales

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 16-29 (Thomas of Brotherton)


Research Notes: Child - Margaret Duchess of Norfolk

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 16-30


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52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 264-27 (Guy I), Line 71A-28 (Geoffroi IV de Joinville).

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55 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-30.


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