The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor and Agnes of Poitou




Husband Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor 1 2




            AKA: Heinrich III Holy Roman Emperor, Henry III "the Pious" Holy Roman Emperor
           Born: 29 Oct 1017
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Oct 1056 - Bodfeld [Königspfalz], Harz, Saxony (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany)


         Buried: 


         Father: Conrad II "the Salic" of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor (      -1039) 3
         Mother: Gisele of Swabia (0995-1043) 4


       Marriage: 21 Nov 1043 - Ingelheim, Besançon

   Other Spouse: Gunhilda of Denmark (      -1038) - Nijmegen, (Netherlands)

Events

• Made: Duke of Bavaria as Henry VI, 1026.

• Crowned: King of Germany, Easter Day 1028, Cathedra of Aachen.

• Crowned: Holy Roman Emperor, 1046, Rome, (Italy).




Wife Agnes of Poitou 2

            AKA: Empress Agnes
           Born: Abt 1025
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Dec 1077
         Buried: 


         Father: William III Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine (      -      ) 5
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Adelaide Abbess of Gandersheim and Quedlinburg 6

           Born: 1045 - Goslar, Lower Saxony, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jan 1096
         Buried: 



2 F Judith Sophia of Swabia

           Born: 1047 - Goslar, Lower Saxony, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Mar 1092 or 1096
         Buried: 



3 F Gisela

           Born: 1047 - Ravenna, Italy
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 May 1053
         Buried: 



4 F Matilda of Swabia

           Born: Oct 1048
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 May 1060 - Pöhlde, (Lower Saxony, Germany)
         Buried: 



5 M Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor 7 8




            AKA: Heinrich IV Holy Roman Emperor


           Born: 11 Nov 1050 - Goslar, Lower Saxony, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Aug 1106 - Liège, (Belgium)
         Buried: Aug 1111 - Speyer Cathedral, Speyer, [Rhineland-Palatinate, ] Germany
         Spouse: Bertha of Savoy (1051-1087) 9 10
           Marr: 13 Jul 1066 - Trebur, (Groß-Gerau, Hesse, Germany)



6 M Conrad Duke of Bavaria

            AKA: Conrad II Duke of Bavaria
           Born: 1052 - Regensburg, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Apr 1055
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor :

Henry III (29 October 1017 - 5 October 1056 ), called the Black or the Pious, was a member of the Salian Dynasty of Holy Roman Emperors . He was the eldest son of Conrad II of Germany and Gisela of Swabia and his father made him duke of Bavaria (as Henry VI) in 1026, after the death of Duke Henry V . Then, on Easter Day 1028, his father having been crowned Holy Roman Emperor, Henry was elected and crowned King of Germany in the cathedral of Aachen by Pilgrim, Archbishop of Cologne . After the death of Herman IV, Duke of Swabia in 1038, his father gave him that duchy (as Henry I) as well as the kingdom of Burgundy , which Conrad had inherited in 1033. Upon the death of his father on June 4 , 1039 , he became sole ruler of the kingdom and was crowned emperor by Pope Clement II in Rome (1046).

Early life and reign
Henry's first tutor was Bruno , Bishop of Augsburg . On Bruno's death in 1029, Egilbert, Bishop of Freising , was appointed to take his place. In 1033, at the age of sixteen, Henry came of age and Egilbert was compensated for his services. In 1035, Adalbero , Duke of Carinthia , was deposed by Conrad, but Egilbert convinced Henry to refuse this injustice and the princes of Germany, having legally elected Henry, would not recognise the deposition unless their king did also. Henry, in accordance with his promise to Egilbert, did not consent to his father's act and Conrad, stupefied, fell unconscious after many attempts to turn Henry. Upon recovering, Conrad knelt before his son and exacted the desired consent. Egilbert was penalised dearly by the emperor.
In 1036, Henry was married to Gunhilda of Denmark . She was a daughter of Canute the Great , King of Denmark , England , and Norway , by his wife Emma of Normandy . Early on, Henry's father had arranged with Canute to have him rule over some parts of northern Germany (the Kiel ) and in turn to have their children married. The marriage took place in Nijmegen at the earliest legal age.
In 1038, Henry was called to aid his father in Italy (1038) and Gunhilda died on the Adriatic Coast , during the return trip (during the same epidemic in which Herman IV of Swabia died). In 1039, his father, too, died and Henry became sole ruler and imperator in spe. pcnr...

Children
By his first wife, Gunhilda of Denmark , he had:
Beatrice (1037 - 13 July 1061 ), abbess of Quedlinburg and Gandersheim
By his second wife, Agnes , he had:
Adelaide (1045, Goslar - 11 January 1096 ), abbess of Gandersheim from 1061 and Quedlinburg from 1063
Gisela (1047, Ravenna - 6 May 1053 )
Matilda (October 1048 - 12 May 1060 , Pöhlde ), married 1059 Rudolf of Rheinfelden , duke of Swabia and antiking (1077)
Henry , his successor
Conrad (1052, Regensburg - 10 April 1055 ), duke of Bavaria (from 1054)
Judith (1054, Goslar - 14 March 1092 or 1096 ), married firstly 1063 Solomon of Hungary and secondly 1089 Ladislaus I Herman , duke of Poland

Sources
Gwatkin, H. M. , Whitney, J. P. (ed) et al. The Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1926.
Norwich, John Julius . The Normans in the South 1016-1130. Longmans: London, 1967. 1 2


Notes: Marriage

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnes of Poitou


Research Notes: Child - Judith Sophia of Swabia

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnes of Poitou. These articles disagree about her birthdate (1054 vs. 1047, respectively). Since her first marriage was in 1063, 1047 seems more likely.


Research Notes: Child - Gisela

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor


Research Notes: Child - Matilda of Swabia

Sources: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnes of Poitou. These disagree on her birthdate (either 1045 or 1048, respectively).


Research Notes: Child - Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia - Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor :

Henry IV (November 11 , 1050 -August 7 , 1106 ) was King of Germany from 1056 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1084 until his forced abdication in 1105 . He was the third emperor of the Salian dynasty and one of the most powerful and important figures of the 11th century. His reign was marked by the Investiture Controversy with the Papacy and several civil wars with pretenders to his throne in Italy and Germany.


Biography

Regency
Henry was the eldest son of the Emperor Henry III , by his second wife Agnes de Poitou , and was probably born at the royal palace at Goslar . His christening was delayed until the following Easter so that Abbot Hugh of Cluny could be one of his godparents. But even before that, at his Christmas court Henry III induced the attending nobles to promise fidelity to his son. Three years later, still anxious to ensure the succession, Henry III had a larger assembly of nobles elect the young Henry as his successor, and then, on July 17 , 1054 , had him elected as king by Herman II , Archbishop of Cologne at Trebur . The coronation was held in Aachen in 1054 . When Henry III unexpectedly died in 1056 , the accession of the six-year-old Henry IV was not opposed by his vassals. The dowager Empress Agnes acted as regent, and, according to the will of the dead emperor, the German pope Victor II was named as her counsellor. The latter's death in 1057 soon showed the political ineptitude of Agnes, and the powerful influence held over her by German magnates and Imperial functionaries.
Agnes assigned the Duchy of Bavaria , given by her husband to Henry IV, to Otto of Nordheim . This deprived the young king of a solid base of power. Likewise, her decision to assign the Duchies of Swabia and Carinthia to Rudolf of Rheinfelden (who married her daughter) and Berthold of Zähringen , respectively, would prove mistakes, as both later rebelled against the king. Unlike Henry III, Agnes proved incapable of influencing the election of the new popes, Stephen IX and Nicholas II . The Papal alliance with the Normans of southern Italy, formed to counter the communal resistance in Rome, resulted in the deterioration of relations with the German King, as well as Nicholas' interference in the election of German bishops. Agnes also granted local magnates extensive territorial privileges that eroded the King's material power.

In 1062 the young king was kidnapped during a conspiracy of German nobles led by archbishop Anno II of Cologne . Henry, who was at Kaiserwerth, was persuaded to board a boat lying in the Rhine; it was immediately unmoored and the king sprang into the stream, but was rescued by one of the conspirators and carried to Cologne. Agnes retired to a convent, the government subsequently placed in the hands of Anno. His first move was to recognize the Pope Alexander II in his conflict with the antipope Honorius II , who had been initially recognized by Agnes but was subsequently left without support.

Anno's rule proved unpopular. The education and training of Henry were supervised by Anno, who was called his magister, while Adalbert of Hamburg , archbishop of Bremen , was styled Henry's patronus. Henry's education seems to have been neglected, and his willful and headstrong nature developed under the conditions of these early years. The malleable Adalbert of Hamburg soon became the confidant of the ruthless Henry. Eventually, during an absence of Anno from Germany, Henry managed to obtain the control of his civil duties, leaving Anno only with the ecclesiastical ones.

First years of rule and Saxon War
In March 1065 Henry was declared of age. The whole of his future reign was apparently marked by efforts to consolidate Imperial power. In reality, however, it was a careful balancing act between maintaining the loyalty of the nobility and the support of the pope.

In 1066 , one year after his enthroning at the age of fifteen, he expelled Adalbert of Hamburg, who had profited off his position for personal enrichment, from the Crown Council. Henry also adopted urgent military measures against the Slav pagans, who had recently invaded Germany and besieged Hamburg.

In June 1066 Henry married Bertha of Maurienne , daughter of Count Otto of Savoy , to whom he had been betrothed in 1055 . In the same year he assembled an army to fight, at the request of the Pope, the Italo-Normans of southern Italy. Henry's troops had reached Augsburg when he received news that Godfrey of Tuscany , husband of the powerful Matilda of Canossa , marchioness of Tuscany , had already attacked the Normans. Therefore the expedition was halted.
In 1068 , driven by his impetuous character and his infidelities, Henry attempted to divorce Bertha[1]. His peroration at a council in Mainz was however rejected by the Papal legate Pier Damiani , who hinted that any further insistence towards divorce would lead the new pope, Alexander II , to deny his coronation. Henry obeyed and his wife returned to Court, but he was convinced that the Papal opposition aimed only at overthrowing lay power within the Empire, in favour of an ecclesiastical hierarchy.

In the late 1060s Henry set up with strong determination to reduce any opposition and to enlarge the national boundaries. He led expeditions against the Liutici and the margrave of a district east of Saxony; and soon afterwards he had to quench the rebellions with Rudolf of Swabia and Berthold of Carinthia. Much more serious was Henry's struggle with Otto of Nordheim, duke of Bavaria. This prince, who occupied an influential position in Germany and was one of the protagonists of Henry's early kidnapping, was accused in 1070 by a certain Egino of being privy to a plot to murder the king. It was decided that a trial by battle should take place at Goslar , but when the demand of Otto for a safe conduct for himself and his followers, to and from the place of meeting, was refused, he declined to appear. He was thereupon declared deposed in Bavaria, and his Saxon estates were plundered. He obtained sufficient support, however, to carry on a struggle with the king in Saxony and Thuringia until 1071 , when he submitted at Halberstadt . Henry aroused the hostility of the Thuringians by supporting Siegfried, archbishop of Mainz , in his efforts to exact tithes from them; but still more formidable was the enmity of the Saxons, who had several causes of complaint against the king. He was the son of one enemy, Henry III, and the friend of another, Adalbert of Bremen. He had ordered a restoration of all crown lands in Saxony and had built forts among this people, while the country was ravaged to supply the needs of his courtiers, and its duke Magnus was a prisoner in his hands. All classes were united against him, and when the struggle broke out in 1073 the Thuringians joined the Saxons. The war, which lasted with slight intermissions until 1088 , exercised a most potent influence upon Henry's fortunes elsewhere.

Investiture Controversy
Main article: Investiture Controversy
Initially in need of support for his expeditions in Saxony and Thuringia, Henry adhered to the Papal decrees in religious matters. His apparent weakness, however, had the side effect of spurring the ambitions of Gregory VII , a reformist monk elected as pontiff in 1073, for Papal hegemony.

The tension between Empire and Church culminated in the councils of 1074-1075, which constituted a substantial attempt to delegitimate Henry III's policy. Among other measures, they denied to secular rulers the right to place members of the clergy in office; this had dramatic effects in Germany, where bishops were often powerful feudatories who, in this way, were able to free themselves from imperial authority. Aside from the reacquisition of all lost privileges by the ecclesiasticals, the council's decision deprived the imperial crown of rights to almost half its lands, with grievous consequences for national unity, especially in peripheral areas like the Kingdom of Italy .

Suddenly hostile to Gregory, Henry did not relent from his positions: after his defeat of Otto of Nordheim, he continued to interfere in Italian and German episcopal life, naming bishops at his will and declaring papal provisions illegitimate. In 1075 Gregory excommunicated some members of the Imperial Court, and threatened to do the same with Henry himself. Further, in a synod held in February of that year, Gregory clearly established the supreme power of the Catholic Church, with the Empire subjected to it. Henry replied with a counter-synod of his own.

The beginning of the conflict known as the Investiture Controversy can be assigned to Christmas night of 1075: Gregory was kidnapped and imprisoned by Cencio I Frangipane , a Roman noble, while officiating at Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome. Later freed by Roman people, Gregory accused Henry of having been behind the attempt. In the same year, the emperor had defeated a rebellion of Saxons in the First Battle of Langensalza , and was therefore free to accept the challenge.

At Worms, on January 24 , 1076 , a synod of bishops and princes summoned by Henry declared Gregory VII deposed. Hildebrand replied by excommunicating the emperor and all the bishops named by him on February 22 , 1076 . In October of that year a diet of the German princes in Tribur attempted to find a settlement for the conflict, conceding Henry a year to repent from his actions, before the ratification of the excommunication that the pope was to sign in Swabia some months later. Henry did not repent, and, counting on the hostility showed by the Lombard clergy against Gregory, decided to move to Italy. He spent Christmas of that year in Besançon and, together with his wife and his son, he crossed the Alps with help of the Bishop of Turin and reached Pavia .

Gregory, on his way to the diet of Augsburg , and hearing that Henry was approaching, took refuge in the castle of Canossa (near Reggio Emilia ), belonging to Matilda. Henry's troops were nearby.

Henry's intent, however, was apparently to perform the penance required to lift his excommunication and ensure his continued rule. The choice of an Italian location for the act of repentance, instead of Augsburg, was not accidental: it aimed to consolidate the Imperial power in an area partly hostile to the Pope; to lead in person the prosecution of events; and to oppose the pact signed by German feudataries and the Pope in Tribur with the strong German party that had deposed Gregory at Worms, through the concrete presence of his army.


He stood in the snow outside the gates of the castle of Canossa for three days, from January 25 to January 27 , 1077 , begging the pope to rescind the sentence (popularly portrayed as without shoes, taking no food or shelter, and wearing a hairshirt - see Walk of Canossa ). The Pope lifted the excommunication, imposing a vow to comply with certain conditions, which Henry soon violated.

Civil war and recovery
Rudolf of Rheinfeld , a two-time brother-in-law of Henry, took advantage of the momentary weakness of the Emperor by having himself declared antiking by a council of Saxon, Bavarian, and Carinthian princes in March of 1077 in Forchheim . Rudolf promised to respect the electoral concept of the monarchy and declared his willingness to be subservient to the pope.

Despite these difficulties, Henry's situation in Germany improved in the following years. When Rudolf was crowned at Mainz in May 1077, the population revolted and forced him to flee to Saxony, where he was deprived of his territories (later he was also stripped of Swabia). After the inconclusive battle of Mellrichstadt (August 7 , 1077 ) and the defeat of Flarchheim (27 January 1080 ) Gregory instead launched a second anathema against Henry in March 1080 . However, the evidence that Gregory's hate had such a personal connotation led much of Germany to re-embrace Henry's cause.

On October 14 , 1080 the armies of the two rival kings met at the Elster River , in the plain of Leipzig . Rudolf was mortally wounded and died soon afterwards, and the rebellion against Henry lost momentum. Another antiking , Henry of Luxembourg , was fought successfully by Frederick of Swabia , Rudolf's successor in Swabia who had married Henry's daughter Agnes . Henry convoked a synod of the highest German clergy in Bamberg and Brixen (June, 1080). Here Henry had Gregory (dubbed "The False Monk") again deposed and replaced by the primate of Ravenna , Guibert (the antipope Clement III ).

Second voyage to Italy
Henry entered in Pavia and was crowned here as King of Italy, receiving the Iron Crown . He also assigned a series of privileges to the Italian cities who had supported him, and marched against the hated Matilda, declaring her deposed for lese majesty and confiscating her possessions. Then he moved to Rome, which he besieged first in 1081 : he was however compelled to retire to Tuscany, where he granted privileges to various cities, and obtained monetary assistance (360,000 gold pieces)[2] from a new ally, the eastern emperor, Alexios I Komnenos , who aimed to thwart the Norman's aims against his empire. A second and equally unsuccessful attack on Rome was followed by a war of devastation in northern Italy with the adherents of Matilda; and towards the end of 1082 the king made a third attack on Rome. After a siege of seven months the Leonine city fell into his hands. A treaty was concluded with the Romans, who agreed that the quarrel between king and pope should be decided by a synod, and secretly bound themselves to induce Gregory to crown Henry as emperor, or to choose another pope. Gregory, however, shut up in Castel Sant'Angelo , would hear of no compromise; the synod was a failure, as Henry prevented the attendance of many of the pope's supporters; and the king, in pursuance of his treaty with Alexios, marched against the Normans. The Romans soon fell away from their allegiance to the pope; and, recalled to the city, Henry entered Rome in March 1084, after which Gregory was declared deposed and Clement was recognized by the Romans. On 31 March 1084 Henry was crowned emperor by Clement, and received the patrician authority. His next step was to attack the fortresses still in the hands of Gregory. The pope was saved by the advance of Robert Guiscard , duke of Apulia, who left the siege of Durazzo and marched towards Rome: Henry left the city and Gregory could be freed. The latter however died soon later at Salerno (1085), not before a last letter in which he exhorted the whole Christianity to a crusade against the emperor.

Feeling secure of his success in Italy, Henry returned to Germany.

The Emperor spent 1084 in a show of power in Germany, where the reforming instances had still ground due to the predication of Otto of Ostia, advancing up to Magdeburg in Saxony . He also declared the Peace of God in all the Imperial territories to quench any sedition. On March 8 , 1088 Otto of Ostia was elected pope as Victor III : with the Norman support, he excommunicated Henry and Clement III, who was defined "a beast sprung out from the earth to wage war against the Saints of God". He also formed a large coalition against the Holy Roman Empire, including, aside from the Normans, the Rus of Kiev , the Lombard communes of Milan , Cremona , Lodi and Piacenza and Matilda of Canossa, who had she remarried to Welf II of Bavaria , therefore creating a concentration of power too formidable to be neglected by the emperor.

Internecine wars and death
In 1088 Henry of Luxembourg died and Egbert II, Margrave of Meissen , a longtime enemy of the emperor's, proclaimed himself the antiking's successor. Henry had him condemned by a Saxon diet and then a national one at Quedlinburg and Regensburg respectively, but was defeated by Egbert when a relief army came to the margrave's rescue during the siege of Gleichen . Egbert was murdered two years later (1090 ) and his ineffectual insurrection and royal pretensions fell apart.

Henry then launched his third punitive expedition in Italy. After some initial success against the lands of Canossa, his defeat in 1092 caused the rebellion of the Lombard communes. The insurrection extended when Matilda managed to turn against him his elder son, Conrad , who was crowned King of Italy at Monza in 1093 . The Emperor therefore found himself cut off from Germany. He could return there only in 1097 : in Germany his power wall still at its height, as Welf V of Bavaria separated from Matilda and Bavaria gave back to Welf IV .

Henry reacted by deposing Conrad at the diet of Mainz in April 1098, and designating his younger son Henry (future Henry V) as successor, under the oath sworn that he would never follow his brother's example.


The situation in the Empire remained chaotic, worsened by the further excommunication against Henry launched by the new pope Paschal II , a follower of Gregory VII's reformation ideals elected in the August of 1099. But this time the emperor, meeting with some success in his efforts to restore order, could afford to ignore the papal bana. A successful campaign in Flanders was followed in 1103 by a diet at Mainz, where serious efforts were made to restore peace, and Henry IV himself promised to go on crusade. But this plan was shattered by the revolt of his son Henry in 1104 , who, encouraged by the adherents of the pope, declared he owed no allegiance to an excommunicated father. Saxony and Thuringia were soon in arms, the bishops held mainly to the younger Henry, while the emperor was supported by the towns. A desultory warfare was unfavourable, however, to the emperor, who was taken as prisoner at an alleged reconciliation meeting at Koblenz . At a diet held in Mainz in December, Henry IV was forced to resign to his crown, being subsequently imprisoned in the castle of Böckelheim . Here he was also obliged that he had unjustly persecuted Gregory VII and to have illegally named Clement III.

When these conditions became known in Germany, a vivid movement of dissension spread. In 1106 the loyal party set up a large army to fight Henry V and Paschal. Henry IV managed to escape to Cologne from his jail, finding a considerable support in the lower Rhineland . He also entered into negotiations with England , France and Denmark .

Henry was also able to defeat his son's army near Visé, in Lorraine, on March 2 , 1106 . He however died soon afterwards after nine days of illness, while he was guest of his friend Othbert, Bishop of Liège . He was 56.
His body was buried by the bishop of Liege with suitable ceremony, but by command of the papal legate it was unearthed, taken to Speyer and placed in the at that time unconsecrated chapel of Saint Afra that was build on the side of the Imperial Cathedral . After being released from the sentence of excommunication, the remains were buried in the Speyer cathedral in August 1111 .

Evaluation
Henry IV was known for licentious behaviour in his early years, being described as careless and self-willed. In his later life, he displayed much diplomatic ability. His abasement at Canossa can be regarded as a move of policy to weaken the pope's position at the cost of a personal humiliation to himself. He was always regarded as a friend of the lower orders, was capable of generosity and gratitude, and showed considerable military skill.

Marriages
Henry's wife Bertha died on December 27 , 1087 . She was also buried at the Speyer Cathedral . Their children were:
Agnes of Germany (born 1072 ), married Frederick I von Staufen , Duke of Swabia .
Conrad (February 12 , 1074 -July 27 , 1101 )
Adelaide, died in infancy
Henry, died in infancy
Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor
In 1089 Henry married Eupraxia of Kiev , a daughter of Vsevolod I, Prince of Kiev , and sister to his son Vladimir II Monomakh , prince of Kievan Rus . She assumed the name "Adelaide" upon her coronation. In 1094 she joined the rebellion against Henry, accusing him of holding her prisoner, forcing her to participate in orgies, and attempting a black mass on her naked body.


Notes
^ Bertha in the meantime had retired to the Abbey of Lorscheim .
^ J. Norwich, Byzantium: The Decline and Fall, 21 7 8


Research Notes: Child - Conrad Duke of Bavaria

Duke of Bavaria from 1054, as "Conrad II"

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor and Agnes of Poitou. These two sources disagree on Conrad's death date (10 April 1055 vs. 1056, respectively).


David de Horton and Agnes




Husband David de Horton 11

            AKA: David De Horton
           Born: Abt 1351 - Chattenhall, Cheshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Maddock de Horton (Abt 1300-      ) 12
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Agnes 11

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M John Horton 13

           Born: Abt 1397 - Cheshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





William de Ferrers 4th Earl of Derby and Agnes of Chester, Lady of Chartley




Husband William de Ferrers 4th Earl of Derby 14 15

           Born: Abt 1162 - Ferrers, Derbyshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Sep 1247
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Ferrers 3rd Earl of Derby (Abt 1140-Bef 1190) 15 16 17 18
         Mother: Sibyl de Braose (Abt 1157-After 1228) 15 19


       Marriage: 1192 - Cheshire, England



Wife Agnes of Chester, Lady of Chartley 20

            AKA: Alice of Chester
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Nov 1247
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh of Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147-1181) 21 22 23
         Mother: Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux (      -      ) 21




Children
1 M Sir William de Ferrers 5th Earl of Derby 15 24 25

           Born: Abt 1193 - <Derbyshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Mar 1254 - Evington, Leicestershire, England
         Buried: 31 Mar 1254 - Merevale Abbey, Merevale, Warwickshire, England
         Spouse: Margaret de Quincy (1218-1280) 15 25 26
           Marr: Abt 1238
         Spouse: Sibyl Marshal (1209-1245) 15 27
           Marr: by 14 may 1219 - <Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales>




Birth Notes: Child - Sir William de Ferrers 5th Earl of Derby

FamilySearch has b. abt 1200


Death Notes: Child - Sir William de Ferrers 5th Earl of Derby

FamilySearch has d. 24 Mar 1254


Research Notes: Child - Sir William de Ferrers 5th Earl of Derby

From Wikipedia - William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby :

William III de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby (1193 - 28 March 1254), was an English nobleman and head of a family which controlled a large part of Derbyshire including an area known as Duffield Frith .
He was born in Derbyshire , England, the son of William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby and Agnes of Chester , a daughter of Hugh of Kevelioc , Earl of Chester and Bertrada de Montfort. He succeeded to the title in 1247, on the death of his father and, after doing homage to King Henry III , he had livery of Chartley Castle and other lands of his mother's inheritance. He had accompanied King Henry to France in 1230 and sat in parliament in London in the same year.
He had many favours granted to him by the king, among them the right of free warren in Beaurepair (Belper ), Makeney , Winleigh (Windley ), Holbrooke , Siward (Southwood near Coxbench), Heyhegh (Heage ) Cortelegh (Corkley, in the parish of Muggington ), Ravensdale , Holland (Hulland ), and many other places,[1]
Like his father, he suffered from gout from youth, and always traveled in a litter. He was accidentally thrown from his litter into water, while crossing a bridge, at St Neots , in Huntingdon and although he escaped immediate death, yet he never recovered from the effects of the accident. He died on 28 March 1254, after only seven years, and was succeeded by his son Robert de Ferrers, 6th Earl of Derby .

Earl William Ferrers' effigy in Merevale Abbey
William de Ferrers is buried at Merevere Abbey , Warwickshire , England. His widow died on 12 March 1280.
Family and Children

William Ferrers married Sibyl Marshal , one of the daughters and co-heirs of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke . They had seven daughters:
Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.
Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260), married (1) Gilbert Basset, of Wycombe, and (2) Reginald de Mohun
Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia, and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun, an ancestor of Daniel Boone. (it is her aunt Sibyl, sister of William, who married John de Vipont , Lord of Appleby)
Joan Ferrers (died 1267), married to:
John de Mohun;
Robert Aguillon
Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh .
Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:
William de Vaux;
Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester ;
Roger de Leybourne, but had no issue
In 1238, he married Margaret de Quincy (born 1218), daughter of Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester and Helen of Galloway . Bizarrely, Margaret was both the stepmother and stepdaughter of William's daughter, Eleanor. The earl and Margaret had the following children:
Robert de Ferrers, 6th Earl of Derby , his successor. He married:
Mary de Lusignan, daughter of Hugh XI of Lusignan , Count of Angoulême , and niece of King Henry III , by whom he had no issue;
Alianore de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey VI de Bohun , per Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 57-30 & 68-29.
William Ferrers obtained, by gift of Margaret, his mother, the manor of Groby in Leicestershire , assuming the arms of the family of De Quincy. He married:
Anne Durward , daughter of Alan Durward [2]; their son was William de Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Groby .
Eleanor, daughter of Matthew Lovaine.
Joan Ferrers (died 19 March 1309) married Thomas de Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley .
Agnes Ferrers married Sir Robert de Muscegros (aka Robert de Musgrove ), Lord of Kemerton , Boddington & Deerhurst .
Elizabeth Ferrers , married to:
William Marshal , 2nd Baron Marshal;
Prince Dafydd ap Gruffydd 15 24 25


Louis de Brienne Viscount of Beaumont and Agnes




Husband Louis de Brienne Viscount of Beaumont 28

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Agnes 28

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Henry Beaumont 4th Earl of Buchan

           Born: Abt 1288
     Christened: 
           Died: 1340
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Alice Comyn (1289-1349) 28
           Marr: Bef 14 Jul 1310




Research Notes: Child - Henry Beaumont 4th Earl of Buchan

Source: Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster


Frederick I von Büren of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Alsace and Swabia and Agnes of Germany




Husband Frederick I von Büren of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Alsace and Swabia

           Born: 1050
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Jul 1105
         Buried: 


         Father: Frederick of Büren (      -      ) 29
         Mother: Hildegarde (      -      ) 29


       Marriage: 1089



Wife Agnes of Germany 30




           Born: 1072
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Sep 1143
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor (1050-1106) 7 8
         Mother: Bertha of Savoy (1051-1087) 9 10



   Other Spouse: Leopold III Margrave of Austria (1073-1136) 29 - abt or aft 1105


Children
1 M Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia 31 32

            AKA: Frederick II Duke of Swabia
           Born: 1090
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Apr 1147
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Judith of Bavaria (1100-1130)
           Marr: 1121



2 M Conrad III King of Germany 33




           Born: 1093
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Feb 1152
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Frederick I von Büren of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Alsace and Swabia

From Wikipedia - Frederick I, Duke of Swabia :

Frederick I von Büren (1050 -July 21 , 1105 ) was Duke of Swabia from 1079 to his death. He was the first ruler of Swabia of the House of Hohenstaufen . He was the son of Friedrich von Büren and Hildegard.
In 1089, Frederick married Agnes of Germany , daughter of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor . They had several sons and daughters, amongst whom were:
Frederick II of Swabia (1090-1147), the father of Frederick Barbarossa
Conrad III, king of Germany (1093-1152)

See also
Dukes of Swabia family tree

Source
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Line 45-24


Research Notes: Wife - Agnes of Germany

From Wikipedia - Agnes of Germany :

Agnes of Germany (1072 - September 24 , 1143 ), was the daughter of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha of Savoy . Her maternal grandparents were Otto, Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana and Adelaide, Marchioness of Turin and Susa.
Agnes married firstly, in 1089, Frederick I, Duke of Swabia . They had several children, amongst whom were Frederick II of Swabia (1090 - 1147) (the father of Frederick Barbarossa ) and Conrad III of Germany (1093 - 1152).

Following Frederick's death in 1105, Agnes married Leopold III (born 1073; died 15 Nov. 1136) and later Margrave of Austria (born 1095; died 1136). Leopold was the son of Margrave Leopold II and Ida of Formbach-Ratelnberg . According to legend, a veil lost by Agnes and found by Leopold years later while hunting instigated him to found the monastery of Klosterneuburg .

Their children were:
Leopold IV
Henry II Jasomirgott .
Berta, m. Henry III, Burggraf of Regensburg .
Agnes , m.1125 Wladyslaw II , High Duke of Poland from 1138 to 1146. Agnes is said to have been "one of the most famous beauties of her time".
Ernst.
Otto of Freising , bishop and biographer of his nephew Frederick I "Barbarossa".
Conrad , Bishop of Passau , and Archbishop of Salzburg .
Elizabeth, m. Hermann II of Winzenburg.
Judith , m. c. 1133 William V of Montferrat . Their children formed an important Crusading dynasty.
Gertrude, m. King Vladislaus II of Bohemia .

According to the Continuation of the Chronicles of Klosterneuburg, there may have been up to seven others (possibly from multiple births) stillborn or died in infancy. 30


Notes: Marriage

Ancestral Roots has m. 1086/7 (engaged 24 Mar 1079).
Wikipedia has m. 1089


Research Notes: Child - Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 45-25.

From Wikipedia - Frederick II, Duke of Swabia :

Frederick II (1090 - 6 April 1147 ), called the One-Eyed, was the second Hohenstaufen duke of Swabia from 1105. He was the eldest son of Frederick I and Agnes .

He succeeded his father in 1105. In 1121 he married Judith of Bavaria, a member of the powerful House of Guelph . On the death of Emperor Henry V , his uncle, Frederick stood for election as King of the Romans with the support of his younger brother Conrad , duke of Franconia and several houses. However, he lost this election of 1125 to Lothar III , crowned Emperor later in 1133.

A conflict erupted between Frederick and his supporters, and Lothar. Encouraged by Albert, Archbishop of Mainz , who loathed the supporters of the late Emperor Henry V, Lothar besieged Nuremberg in 1127. Frederick relieved the siege of Nuremberg in 1127 and occupied Speyer in 1128. The attempt of Henry the Proud , duke of Bavaria, to capture Frederick during negotiations failed (1129). However, afterwards supporters of Lothar won a number of victories both in Germany and in Italy. Speyer (1129), Nuremberg (1130) and Ulm (1134) were captured and in October 1134 Frederick submitted to the emperor. In 1135 both Frederick and Conrad were finally reconciled with Lothar. After Lothar's death (1137) and election of Conrad as King of the Romans (1138) Frederick supported his brother in the struggle with Guelphs . According to Otto of Freising , Frederick was "so faithful a knight to his sovereign and so helpful a friend to his uncle that by valor he supported the tottering honor of the realm, fighting manfully against its foes..."

Frederick's second wife, Agnes, was the niece of his old enemy Albert of Mainz.

Children
With Judith of Bavaria (d. 1130 or 1131), daughter of Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria :
Frederick III Barbarossa (1122-1190), duke of Swabia and Holy Roman Emperor as Frederick I
Bertha (1123-1195), married Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine
With Agnes of Saarbrücken (d.~1147):
Conrad of Hohenstaufen (also called Konrad) (1134/1136-1195), Count Palatine of the Rhine
Judith (1135-1191), married Louis II, Landgrave of Thuringia 31 32


Research Notes: Child - Conrad III King of Germany

First King of Germany of the Hohenstaufen dynasty

From Wikipedia - Conrad III of Germany :

Conrad III (1093 - 15 February 1152 ) was the first King of Germany of the Hohenstaufen dynasty. He was the son of Frederick I , Duke of Swabia , and Agnes , a daughter of the Salian Emperor Henry IV .
Conrad was appointed Duke of Franconia by his uncle, Henry V , in 1115. One year later he acted as regent for Germany, together with his elder brother, Frederick II of Swabia . At the death of Henry (1125), Conrad unsuccessfully supported Frederick for the kingship of Germany. Frederick was placed under a ban and Conrad was deprived of Franconia and the Kingdom of Burgundy , of which he was rector . With the support of the imperial cities , Swabia, and the Duchy of Austria , Conrad was elected antiking at Nuremberg in December 1127.
Conrad quickly crossed the Alps to be crowned King of Italy by Anselm V, Archbishop of Milan . Over the next two years, he failed to achieve anything in Italy, however, and returned to Germany in 1130, after Nürnberg and Speyer , two strong cities in his support, fell to Lothair in 1129. Conrad continued in his opposition, but he and Frederick were forced to acknowledged Lothair as emperor in 1135. After this they were pardoned and could take again possession of their lands.


After Lothair's death (December 1137), Conrad was elected king at Coblenz on 7 March 1138 , in the presence of the papal legate Theodwin . Conrad was crowned at Aachen six days later (13 March ) and was acknowledged in Bamberg by several princes of southern Germany. As Henry the Proud , son-in-law and heir of Lothair and the most powerful prince in Germany, who had been passed over in the election, refused to do the same, Conrad deprived him of all his territories, giving the Duchy of Saxony to Albert the Bear and that of Bavaria to Leopold III, Margrave of Austria . Henry, however, retained the loyalty of his subjects. The civil war that broke out is considered the first act of the struggle between Guelphs and Ghibellines , which later extended southwards to Italy. After Henry's death (October 1139), the war was continued by his son Henry the Lion , supported by the Saxons, and by his brother Welf VI . Conrad, after a long siege, defeated the latter at Weinsberg in December 1140, and in May 1142 a peace agreement was reached in Frankfurt .
In the same year, Conrad entered Bohemia to reinstate his brother-in-law Vladislav II as prince. The attempt to do the same with another brother-in-law, the Polish prince Ladislaus the Exile , failed. Bavaria, Saxony, and the other regions of Germany were in revolt.

In 1146, Conrad heard Bernard of Clairvaux preach the Second Crusade at Speyer , and he agreed to join Louis VII in a great expedition to the Holy Land . Before leaving, he had the nobles elect and crown his son Henry Berengar king. The succession secured in the event of his death, Conrad set out. His army of 20,000 men went overland, via Hungary , causing disruptions in the Byzantine territories through which they passed. They arrived at Constantinople by December 1146, ahead of the French army.
Rather than taking the coastal road around Anatolia through Christian-held territory, by which he sent most of his noncombatants, Conrad took his army across Anatolia. On 25 October 1147 , they were defeated by the Seljuk Turks at the Battle of Dorylaeum . Conrad and most of the mounted knights escaped, but most of the foot soldiers were killed or captured. The remaining 2,000 men of the German army limped on to Nicaea , where many of the survivors deserted and tried to return home. Conrad and his adherents had to be escorted to Lopadium by the French, where they joined the main French army of under Louis. Conrad fell seriously ill at Ephesus and was sent to recuperate in Constantinople, where his host the Emperor Manuel I acted as his personal physician. After recovering, Conrad sailed to Acre , and from there reached Jerusalem . He participated in the ill-fated Siege of Damascus and after that failure, grew disaffected with his allies. Another attempt to attack Ascalon failed when Conrad's allies did not appear as promised, and Conrad returned to Germany.
In 1150, Conrad and Henry Berengar defeated the Welf VI and his son Welf VII at the Battle of Flochberg . Henry Berengar died later that year and the succession was thrown open. The Welfs and Hohenstaufen made peace in 1152 and the peaceful succession of one of Conrad's family was secured.
Conrad was never crowned emperor and continued to style himself "King of the Romans " until his death. On his deathbed, in the presence of only two witnesses, his nephew Frederick Barbarossa and the Bishop of Bamberg , he allegedly designated Frederick his successor, rather than his own surviving six-year-old son Frederick . Frederick Barbarossa, who had accompanied his uncle on the unfortunate crusade, forcefully pursued his advantage and was duly elected king in Cologne a few weeks later. The young son of the late king was given the Duchy of Swabia.
Conrad left no children by his first wife, Gertrude von Komburg . In 1136, he married Gertrude von Sulzbach , daughter of Berengar II of Sulzbach , and whose sister Bertha was married to Emperor Manuel. Gertrude was the mother of Conrad's children and the link which cemented his alliance with Byzantium.

Sources
Baldwin, M. W. A History of the Crusades: the first hundred years. 1969. 33







Leopold III Margrave of Austria and Agnes of Germany




Husband Leopold III Margrave of Austria 29

           Born: 1073
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Nov 1136
         Buried: 


         Father: Leopold II Margrave of Austria (      -      )
         Mother: Ida of Formbach-Ratelnberg (      -      )


       Marriage: abt or aft 1105



Wife Agnes of Germany 30




           Born: 1072
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Sep 1143
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor (1050-1106) 7 8
         Mother: Bertha of Savoy (1051-1087) 9 10



   Other Spouse: Frederick I von Büren of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Alsace and Swabia (1050-1105) - 1089


Children
1 M Leopold IV (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Leopold III Margrave of Austria

Source: Wikipedia - Agnes of Germany 29


Research Notes: Wife - Agnes of Germany

From Wikipedia - Agnes of Germany :

Agnes of Germany (1072 - September 24 , 1143 ), was the daughter of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha of Savoy . Her maternal grandparents were Otto, Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana and Adelaide, Marchioness of Turin and Susa.
Agnes married firstly, in 1089, Frederick I, Duke of Swabia . They had several children, amongst whom were Frederick II of Swabia (1090 - 1147) (the father of Frederick Barbarossa ) and Conrad III of Germany (1093 - 1152).

Following Frederick's death in 1105, Agnes married Leopold III (born 1073; died 15 Nov. 1136) and later Margrave of Austria (born 1095; died 1136). Leopold was the son of Margrave Leopold II and Ida of Formbach-Ratelnberg . According to legend, a veil lost by Agnes and found by Leopold years later while hunting instigated him to found the monastery of Klosterneuburg .

Their children were:
Leopold IV
Henry II Jasomirgott .
Berta, m. Henry III, Burggraf of Regensburg .
Agnes , m.1125 Wladyslaw II , High Duke of Poland from 1138 to 1146. Agnes is said to have been "one of the most famous beauties of her time".
Ernst.
Otto of Freising , bishop and biographer of his nephew Frederick I "Barbarossa".
Conrad , Bishop of Passau , and Archbishop of Salzburg .
Elizabeth, m. Hermann II of Winzenburg.
Judith , m. c. 1133 William V of Montferrat . Their children formed an important Crusading dynasty.
Gertrude, m. King Vladislaus II of Bohemia .

According to the Continuation of the Chronicles of Klosterneuburg, there may have been up to seven others (possibly from multiple births) stillborn or died in infancy. 30


Research Notes: Child - Leopold IV

Source: Wikipedia - Agnes of Germany


Aubrey III de Vere 1st Earl of Oxford and Count of Guînes and Agnes of Essex




Husband Aubrey III de Vere 1st Earl of Oxford and Count of Guînes 34

           Born: Abt 1115
     Christened: 
           Died: 26 Dec 1194
         Buried: 


         Father: Aubrey II de Vere of Great Addington & Drayton (Abt 1080-1141) 15 35 36 37
         Mother: Adeliza de Clare (Between 1066/1080-Abt 1163) 38 39 40


       Marriage: 1162 or 1163

   Other Spouse: Beatrice of Guînes (      -      ) - betw 1137 and 1146



Wife Agnes of Essex

           Born: Abt 1151
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1206
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry of Essex, Lord of Rayleigh and Haughley (      -      )
         Mother: Cicely (      -      )




Children
1 M Aubrey IV de Vere 2nd Earl of Oxford

           Born: Bef 1164
     Christened: 
           Died: Oct 1214
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isabel de Bolebec [the younger] (      -Abt 1207)
           Marr: Bef 1207



2 M Robert de Vere 3rd Earl of Oxford 41 42 43

           Born: 1164 - Essex, England
     Christened: 1164
           Died: Bef 25 Oct 1221 - England
         Buried:  - Hatfield Regis Priory
         Spouse: Isabella de Bolebec (Abt 1165-1245) 44 45
           Marr: 1207



3 F Alice de Vere

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ernulf de Kemesech (      -      )
         Spouse: John Constable of Chester (      -      )




Research Notes: Husband - Aubrey III de Vere 1st Earl of Oxford and Count of Guînes

From Wikipedia - Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford

Aubrey de Vere III (c. 1115-Dec. 1194) was created Earl of Oxford by the empress Matilda in July 1141. He had inherited the barony of Hedingham on the death of his father Aubrey de Vere II in May 1141, when he was already Count of Guînes by right of his wife Beatrice. In July 1141 he was granted an earldom by the Empress Matilda , and was confirmed as the first earl of Oxford by her son King Henry II of England . On the annulment of his first marriage, between 1144-46, he lost Guînes. Earl Aubrey was little involved in national political affairs after this period. His attempt to divorce his third wife, Agnes of Essex , was a celebrated marriage case that Agnes appealed successfully to Pope Alexander III . In 1153 he was present with King Stephen 's army at the siege of Wallingford and attested at the Treaty of Wallingford , finally signed at Westminster . Two of his sons by Agnes, Aubrey IV and Robert, became earls of Oxford. Robert, the third earl, was one of the 25 rebel barons who were to hold King John to the terms of Magna Carta . 34


Research Notes: Wife - Agnes of Essex

3rd wife of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford.

From Wikipedia - Aubrey de Vere III :

[Earl Aubrey's] attempt to divorce his third wife, Agnes of Essex , was a celebrated marriage case that Agnes appealed successfully to Pope Alexander III . In 1153 he was present with King Stephen 's army at the siege of Wallingford and attested at the Treaty of Wallingford , finally signed at Westminster . Two of his sons by Agnes, Aubrey IV and Robert, became earls of Oxford. Robert, the third earl, was one of the 25 rebel barons who were to hold King John to the terms of Magna Carta .
----------
From Wikipedia - Agnes of Essex :

Agnes of Essex, countess of Oxford (c. 1151 - c. 1206 ) was the daughter of Henry of Essex and his second wife. She was betrothed at age three to Geoffrey de Vere, brother of the first earl of Oxford . Raised by the Veres, she later rejected the match with Geoffrey and by 1163 had married his brother Aubrey de Vere III , the earl, as his third wife. After her father's disgrace and forfeiture of lands and offices in that year, the earl sought to have his marriage annulled. Agnes fought the action. On May 9 , 1166 , she appealed her case from the court of the bishop of London to the pope (the archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket , being in exile at the time). While the case was pending in Rome, the earl kept Agnes confined, for which the bishop of London reprimanded Aubrey. Pope Alexander III ruled in her favor, thus establishing the right and requirement of consent by females in betrothal and the sacrament of marriage. The couple may have co-operated in the founding of a Benedictine nunnery near their castle at Hedingham, Essex . Having survived her husband, Countess Agnes paid the crown for the right to remain unmarried and died sometime in or after 1206.

Many have followed the mistake of antiquarians in believing the third wife of earl Aubrey to have been named Lucia. A woman of this name was prioress of the nunnery at Castle Hedingham . On Lucia's death, a mortuary or roll was carried to many religious houses in the region requesting prayers, and in the preface of that document Lucia is called the foundress of the priory. As the countess presumably cooperated with her husband in the founding of the house, the erroneous assumption was made that the prioress was in fact the earl's widow.

Children
Agnes bore her husband four sons and a daughter, including two future earls of Oxford: Aubrey IV and Robert I . Her daughter Alice married 1) Ernulf de Kemesech, 2) John, constable of Chester.


Notes: Marriage

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 246-26


Research Notes: Child - Aubrey IV de Vere 2nd Earl of Oxford

Sources: Wikipedia - Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford and Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford.


Research Notes: Child - Robert de Vere 3rd Earl of Oxford

Hereditary Master Chamberlain of England, Magna Charta Surety, 1215.

From Wikipedia - Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford

Robert de Vere (d. 1221) was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere III , first earl of Oxford , and Agnes of Essex. Nothing of his life is known until he married the widowed aunt and co-heiress of his deceased sister-in-law, Isabel de Bolebec , in 1207. They had a son, Hugh, later 4th earl of Oxford. When his brother Aubrey de Vere IV , 2nd earl of Oxford died in Oct. 1214, Robert succeeded to the title and hereditary office of master chamberlain of England (later Lord Great Chamberlain ). Yet he quickly joined the disaffected barons in opposition to King John . Many were his kinsmen. He was elected one of the twenty-five who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of Magna Carta, and as such was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1215.

King John besieged and took Castle Hedingham , Essex, from Robert in March 1216 and gave his lands to a loyal baron. While this prompted Robert to swear loyalty to the king soon thereafter, he nonetheless did homage to Prince Louis when the French prince arrived in Rochester later that year. He remained in the rebel camp until Oct. 1217, when he did homage to the boy-king Henry III , but he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until Feb. 1218.[1]

Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died in Oct. 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory , where his son Earl Hugh later had an effigy erected of his father.[2] 41 42 43


Research Notes: Child - Alice de Vere

Source: Wikipedia - Agnes of Essex


Captain Peter McMicking U.E.L. and Agnes




Husband Captain Peter McMicking U.E.L. 46 47

           Born: 21 Feb 1731 - New Luce, Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Apr 1823 - Stamford, Lincoln (Niagara Region), Eastern District (Ontario), Upper Canada (Canada)
         Buried: 


         Father: Thomas Third McMicking (      -1754) 48
         Mother: Janet Mulwain (      -      ) 47 48


       Marriage: 



Wife Agnes 46

            AKA: Agness
           Born: Abt 1750
     Christened: 
           Died: 3 Jan 1827 - Stamford, Lincoln (Niagara Region), Eastern District (Ontario), Upper Canada (Canada)
         Buried: 


Children
1 M John McMicking 49

           Born: Abt 1774
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 F Elizabeth McMicking 50 51 52

           Born: Abt 1776
     Christened: 
           Died: 1871 47
         Buried: 
         Spouse: David Tice Bastedo Captain (1769-1854) 50 51 52
           Marr: 1796



3 M Gilbert McMicking 47 53

           Born: Abt 1778
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



4 F Catherine McMicking 54

           Born: Abt 1780
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Captain Peter McMicking U.E.L.

Died at age 93.


Research Notes: Husband - Captain Peter McMicking U.E.L.

From Brent Burnham 29 Apr 2002:
"Elizabeth's father, Peter McMicking is also listed on the Old United Empire Loyalist List Appendix B, Page 228-as a Captain in Butler's Rangers."
--------
From Reg McMicking 2 Nov 2010:
"My records on Peter McMicking include a possible birth date of 1730. Death date is confirmed at 1823. He immigrated to Delaware with his brother Thomas and eventually fled to Upper Canada in 1797 during the American Revolutionary War.

Peter fled to Upper Canada with his brother Thomas, his brother's wife (Isabella), his brother's children, his own wife (Agnes), his children and his mother Janet Mulwain.
It is rumored that Thomas also had a slave named Robo.

Both he and his brother Thomas were granted 200 acres in the town of Clifton (now part of Niagara Falls) as a reward for their loyalty to the Crown.

Peter's wife was Agnes (1750-1827) and they had 3 known children. I believe they may have had 6 children but can find no records of more than 3. Their children include John (b. 1774), Elizabeth (b.1776,d1871) and Gilbert (b.aprox 1800)." 46 47


Death Notes: Wife - Agnes

Died at age 77


Research Notes: Child - Gilbert McMicking

From Reg McMicking 2 Nov 2010:
"Gilbert served as a member of the last legislature of Upper Canada prior to the creation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867. He was know to be a friend of John A. MacDonald." 47 53


Robert de Alfreton of Alfreton and Norton and Agnes




Husband Robert de Alfreton of Alfreton and Norton 55 56

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: William de Alfreton of Alfreton and Norton (      -After 1316) 55 57
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Agnes

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Amicia de Alfreton 55 58

           Born: Abt 1208
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir Robert de Lathom Sheriff of Lancashire (Abt 1215-After 1287) 59
           Marr: Bef 16 Jul 1252



2 M Thomas de Alfreton of Alfreton 55 56

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 16 Jul 1252
         Buried: 



3 F Alice de Alfreton

            AKA: Alicia de Alfreton
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William de Chaworth (      -      )
           Marr: Bef 16 Jul 1252



4 F Letitia de Alfreton 55

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Robert de Alfreton of Alfreton and Norton

From http://cybergata.com/roots/2081.htm :

~The Courcher Book, Or Chartulary, of Whalley Abbey, Vol. II, p. 551, Sir Robert de Lathom married Amicia, sister and coheiress of Thomas de Alfreton. 160

~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Chaurces), Vol. III, p. 153, footnote (a), William de Chaurces, married Alice, eldest daughter of Robert Alfreton, of Norton, Derby, and Alice was the coheir of her brother Thomas Alfreton. 141

~Parentalia, Genealogical Memoirs, p. 66-67, Sir Robert's wife was Amicia, daughter and coheir of Robert de Alfreton. 863 55 56


Research Notes: Child - Amicia de Alfreton

From http://cybergata.com/roots/1382.htm:
~The Courcher Book, Or Chartulary, of Whalley Abbey, Vol. II, p. 551, Sir Robert de Lathom married Amicia, sister and coheiress of Thomas de Alfreton. 824

~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Chaurces), Vol. III, p. 153, footnote (a), William de Chaurces, married Alice, eldest daughter of Robert Alfreton, of Norton, Derby, and Alice was the coheir of her brother Thomas Alfreton. 141

~Parentalia, Genealogical Memoirs, p. 66-67, Sir Robert's wife was Amicia, daughter and coheir of Robert de Alfreton. Their son and heir was Sir Robert de Lathom. 863

---

Source http://cybergata.com/roots/1382.htm cites the detailed lineage
From Gen-Medieval Archives: Lathom and Chaworth: descents from Robert de Alfreton <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2005-01/1106320406>. 193 <sources.htm>
From: Therav3ATaol.com
Subject: Lathom and Chaworth: descents from Robert de Alfreton
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 10:13:26 EST 55 58



Research Notes: Child - Thomas de Alfreton of Alfreton

Coheir of his sister Alicia and possibly also his sister Amicia. 55 56


Research Notes: Child - Alice de Alfreton

Coheir of her brother Thomas.


Sir Gilbert De Barton and Agnes




Husband Sir Gilbert De Barton 60 61

            AKA: Sir Gilbert De Barton
           Born: Abt 1235 - <Notton, Yorkshire>, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1277 - Barton, Praeston (Preston), Lancashire, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage:  - Pilkington Manor, Oldham, Lancaster, England



Wife Agnes 62

           Born: Abt 1250 - Barton, Praeston (Preston), Lancashire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Gilbert Barton 63 64

           Born: Abt 1271 - Preston, Lancashire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1321 - Eccles, Lancashire, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Bettye Cervenka (1279-1307) 60 65




Birth Notes: Husband - Sir Gilbert De Barton

May have been born in Barton, Praeston, Lancashire, England.


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-22.

2 Wikipedia.org, Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-21.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 157-21.

5 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 109-23.

6 Wikipedia.org, Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor; Agnes of Poitou.

7 Wikipedia.org, Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

8 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-23.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 274-23.

10 Wikipedia.org, Bertha of Savoy.

11 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I653268822.

12 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I653268824.

13 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3143362&id=I653268820.

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 194-7, 127-29 (Agnes of Chester).

15 http://www.familysearch.org.

16 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 132C-28 (Roger de Mortimer), Line 194-6 (Sibyl de Braose).

17 Wikipedia.org, William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby.

18 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/3349.htm.

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 194-6.

20 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 127-29.

21 Wikipedia.org, Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester.

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 125-28, 126-28, 127-28.

23 http://www.familysearch.org, (Kevin Bradford).

24 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 127-30, 189-4 (Sir Robert de Muscegros).

25 Wikipedia.org, William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby.

26 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 57-29, 127-30 (William de Ferrers).

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 127-30 (William de Ferrers).

28 Wikipedia.org, Alice Comyn.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-24.

30 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_of_Germany.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-25, 166-25 (Judith of Bavaria).

32 Wikipedia.org, Frederick II, Duke of Swabia.

33 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_III_of_Germany.

34 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872200.

35 Wikipedia.org, Aubrey de Vere II.

36 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019514.htm.

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-25 (Adeliza de Clare).

38 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f95/a0019515.htm.

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-25; 246D-25.

40 Wikipedia.org, Aubrey de Vere II; Gilbert Fitz Richard.

41 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 246-27, 60-28 (Hawise de Quincy).

42 Wikipedia.org, Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford.

43 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871756.

44 Wikipedia.org, Isabel de Bolebec.

45 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 267-27, 60-28 (Hawise de Quincy).

46 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc06/wc06_446.htm.

47 Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, genforum.genealogy.com - Bastedo Family Genealogy Forum - "Peter McMicking" discussion - Reg McMicking 2 Nov 2010.

48 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc06/wc06_447.htm.

49 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc06/wc06_450.htm.

50 Website:, http://bousfield.itgo.com/bastedooutline.htm.

51 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc02/wc02_061.htm.

52 Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, genforum.genealogy.com - Bastedo Family Genealogy Forum - "David Tice Bastedo" discussion - Brent Burnham 29 Apr 2002.

53 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc06/wc06_451.htm.

54 Website:, http://www.ponderroses.com/SteveJohnsonFamily/wc06/wc06_452.htm.

55 Web - Message Boards, Discussion Groups, Email, http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2005-01/1106320406.

56 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/2081.htm.

57 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/2140.htm.

58 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1382.htm.

59 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/1350.htm.

60 Ancestry.com, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/29106850/family?cfpid=13888535299.

61 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mjr6387&id=I184856.

62 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mjr6387&id=I487019.

63 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mjr6387&id=I487017.

64 FamilySearch Ancestral File (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3SHK-D9J.

65 FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File (www.familysearch.org), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3986-DQ5.


Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 27 Sep 2016 with Legacy 8.0 from Millennia