The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Herbert I Count of Vermandois and Bertha de Morvois




Husband Herbert I Count of Vermandois 1 2 3

            AKA: Hubert I de Vermandois, Herbert I de Vermandois
           Born: Abt 850
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Nov 900-907
         Buried: 


         Father: Pepin Count of Senlis, Peronne, St. Quentin (Between 0817/0818-      ) 4 5
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Count of Soissons:

• Count of Méaux:

• Count of Vermandois: 877-900.




Wife Bertha de Morvois 6

            AKA: Beatrice of Morvois
           Born: Abt 844 - Namur, Namur, Belgium
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Guerri I Count of Morvois (      -      )
         Mother: Eve of Roussillon (      -      ) 7




Children
1 M Herbert II Count of Vermandois, Soissons and Troyes 8 9 10 11

            AKA: Herbert II de Vermandois
           Born: Between 880 and 890 - Vermandois, (Aisne), Picardy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Feb 943 - Saint-Quentin, Vermandois, (Aisne), Picardy, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Liegarde of France (Abt 0886-After 0931) 12 13
           Marr: by 907


2 F Beatrice de Vermandois 13 14

            AKA: Beatrix de Vermandois
           Born: 880 - <Vermandois, Neustria (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: After Mar 931
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Robert I Duke of France (0866-0923) 15
           Marr: After 893


3 F Cunigunde de Vermandois

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 943
         Buried: 



4 F Adele of Vermandois 2

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



5 M Berenger de Vermandois Count of Bayeaux

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Herbert I Count of Vermandois

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-17 has b. abt. 850, d. 6 Nov bet. 900/907. Count of Soissons, Count of Méaux, Count of Vermandois 877/900

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) has b. abt 840, d. abt 902. Has name as Hubert I.

From Wikipedia - Herbert I, Count of Vermandois :

Herbert I of Vermandois (c. 848 /850 - 907 ), Count of Vermandois , lord of Senlis , of Peronne and of Saint Quentin , was the son of Pepin of Vermandois .

Marriage and issue
He married Bertha de Morvois . They had the following:
Herbert II of Vermandois (c. 880 -943 )
Béatrice of Vermandois (c. 880-931 ), married King Robert I of France .
Cunigunde of Vermandois (d. 943)
Adele of Vermandois
Berenger of Vermandois, Count of Bayeaux whose grandson was Conan I of Rennes .


Research Notes: Wife - Bertha de Morvois


Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)


Research Notes: Child - Herbert II Count of Vermandois, Soissons and Troyes

From Wikipedia - Herbert II, Count of Vermandois :


Herbert II (884 - 23 February 943 ), Count of Vermandois and Count of Troyes , was the son of Herbert I of Vermandois .


Life
He inherited the domain of his father and in 907 , added to it the Saint de Soissons abbey . His marriage with Adela of France (also known as Liégarde) brought him the County of Meaux . In 918 , he was also named Count of Mézerais and of the Véxin . With his cousin Bernard , Count of Beauvais and Senlis , he constituted a powerful group in the west of France, to the north and east of Paris . In 923 , he imprisoned King Charles III in Chateau-Thierry , then in Péronne .

In 922 , the Archbishop of Rheims , Seulf , called on Herbert II to reduce some of his vassals who were in rebellion against him. On the death of Seulf, in 925 , with the help of King Rudolph , he acquired for his second son Hugh (then five years old) the archbishopric of Rheims, which had a large inheritance in France and Germany. In 926 , on the death of Count Roger of Laon , Herbert demanded this County for Eudes , his eldest son. He settled there, initially against the will of King Rudolph and constructed a fortress there. Rudolph yielded to pressure to free king Charles III, whom Herbert still held in prison. In 930 , Herbert took the castle of Vitry in Perthois at the expense of Boso, the brother of King Rudolph. Rudolph united his army with the army of Hugh, marquis of Neustria , and in 931 , they entered Rheims and defeated Hugh, the son of Herbert. Artaud became the new archbishop of Reims. Herbert II then lost, in three years, Vitry, Laon , Chateau-Thierry, and Soissons . The intervention of his ally, Henry the Fowler , allowed him to restore his domains (except Rheims and Laon) in exchange for his submission to King Rudolph.

Later Herbert allied with Hugh the Great and William Longsword , duke of Normandy against King Louis IV , who allocated the County of Laon to Roger II, the son of Roger I, in 941 . Herbert and Hugh the Great took back Rheims and captured Artaud. Hugh, the son of Herbert, was restored as archbishop. Again the mediation of the German King Otto I in Visé , near Liège , in 942 allowed for the normalization of the situation.

Death and legacy
Herbert II died on 23 February 943 without having succeeded in building the principality of which he dreamed. His succession was reconciled by Hugh the Great, maternal uncle of his children. It took place in 946 and led to an equitable distribution between the sons of Herbert II: Herbert III, Robert, Albert, and Hugh (his other son Eudes died before 946). As for his girls, Adela was married to Arnulf I , count of Flanders , Luitgarde (widow of William Longsword) was married to Theobald I , count of Blois , the first lieutenant of Hugh. She brought to Theobald Provins and domains in the Mézerais.

Family
...With Adela [daughter of Robert I of France], he had 7 children:
Adele of Vermandois (910 -960 ), married 934 Count Arnulf I of Flanders , also a descendant of Charlemagne
Eudes of Vermandois, Count of Amiens and of Vienne , (910 -946 )
Herbert "the Elder" , Count of Meaux and of Troyes (-993 )
Robert of Vermandois , Count of Meaux and Chalons (-968 )
Adalbert I, Count of Vermandois (915 -987 ), married Gerberga of Lorraine, also a descendant of Charlemagne
Luitgarde of Vermandois (ca 920 -978 ), married 943 Theobald I of Blois
Hugh of Vermandois (died 962 ), Archbishop of Reims


Research Notes: Child - Beatrice de Vermandois

Second wife of Robert I.

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)


Research Notes: Child - Cunigunde de Vermandois

Source: Wikipedia - Herbert I, Count of Vermandois


Research Notes: Child - Berenger de Vermandois Count of Bayeaux

Source: Wikipedia - Herbert I, Count of Vermandois


Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha of Savoy




Husband Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor 16 17




            AKA: Heinrich IV Holy Roman Emperor


           Born: 11 Nov 1050 - Goslar, Lower Saxony, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Aug 1106 - Liège, (Belgium)
         Buried: Aug 1111 - Speyer Cathedral, Speyer, [Rhineland-Palatinate, ] Germany


         Father: Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor (1017-1056) 18 19
         Mother: Agnes of Poitou (Abt 1025-1077) 19


       Marriage: 13 Jul 1066 - Trebur, (Groß-Gerau, Hesse, Germany)

Events

• Crowned: King of Germany, 1056.

• Crowned: Holy Roman Emperor, 31 Mar 1084, Rome, (Italy).

• Abdicated: as Holy Roman Emperor, 1105.




Wife Bertha of Savoy 20 21

            AKA: Bertha of Turin
           Born: 21 Sep 1051
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Dec 1087 - Mainz, Germany


         Buried:  - Speyer Cathedral, Speyer, [Rhineland-Palatinate, ] Germany


         Father: Eudes I Count of Maurienne and Savoy (Abt 1002-1060) 13 22
         Mother: Alix Duchess of Turin (Abt 1015-1091) 13 21 23


Events

• Betrothal: to Henry IV, 25 Dec 1055, Zürich, (Switzerland).

• Crowned: Holy Roman Empress, 31 Mar 1084, Rome, (Italy).


Children
1 F Adelheid 21

            AKA: Adelaide
           Born: 1070
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Jun 1079
         Buried: 



2 M Henry

           Born: 1071
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Aug 1071
         Buried: 



3 F Agnes of Germany 24




           Born: 1072
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Sep 1143
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Frederick I von Büren of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Alsace and Swabia (1050-1105)
           Marr: 1089
         Spouse: Leopold III Margrave of Austria (1073-1136) 25
           Marr: abt or aft 1105


4 M Conrad King of Italy

           Born: 12 Feb 1074
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Jul 1101
         Buried: 



5 M Henry V Holy Roman Emperor

           Born: 8 Jan 1086
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 May 1125
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Empress Matilda Countess of Anjou (Abt 1102-1167) 26 27
           Marr: 7 Jan 1114 - Worms, (Rhine-Palatinate, Germany)



Research Notes: Husband - Henry IV Holy Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia - Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor :

Henry IV (November 11 , 1050 -August 7 , 1106 ) was King of Germany from 1056 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1084 until his forced abdication in 1105 . He was the third emperor of the Salian dynasty and one of the most powerful and important figures of the 11th century. His reign was marked by the Investiture Controversy with the Papacy and several civil wars with pretenders to his throne in Italy and Germany.


Biography

Regency
Henry was the eldest son of the Emperor Henry III , by his second wife Agnes de Poitou , and was probably born at the royal palace at Goslar . His christening was delayed until the following Easter so that Abbot Hugh of Cluny could be one of his godparents. But even before that, at his Christmas court Henry III induced the attending nobles to promise fidelity to his son. Three years later, still anxious to ensure the succession, Henry III had a larger assembly of nobles elect the young Henry as his successor, and then, on July 17 , 1054 , had him elected as king by Herman II , Archbishop of Cologne at Trebur . The coronation was held in Aachen in 1054 . When Henry III unexpectedly died in 1056 , the accession of the six-year-old Henry IV was not opposed by his vassals. The dowager Empress Agnes acted as regent, and, according to the will of the dead emperor, the German pope Victor II was named as her counsellor. The latter's death in 1057 soon showed the political ineptitude of Agnes, and the powerful influence held over her by German magnates and Imperial functionaries.
Agnes assigned the Duchy of Bavaria , given by her husband to Henry IV, to Otto of Nordheim . This deprived the young king of a solid base of power. Likewise, her decision to assign the Duchies of Swabia and Carinthia to Rudolf of Rheinfelden (who married her daughter) and Berthold of Zähringen , respectively, would prove mistakes, as both later rebelled against the king. Unlike Henry III, Agnes proved incapable of influencing the election of the new popes, Stephen IX and Nicholas II . The Papal alliance with the Normans of southern Italy, formed to counter the communal resistance in Rome, resulted in the deterioration of relations with the German King, as well as Nicholas' interference in the election of German bishops. Agnes also granted local magnates extensive territorial privileges that eroded the King's material power.

In 1062 the young king was kidnapped during a conspiracy of German nobles led by archbishop Anno II of Cologne . Henry, who was at Kaiserwerth, was persuaded to board a boat lying in the Rhine; it was immediately unmoored and the king sprang into the stream, but was rescued by one of the conspirators and carried to Cologne. Agnes retired to a convent, the government subsequently placed in the hands of Anno. His first move was to recognize the Pope Alexander II in his conflict with the antipope Honorius II , who had been initially recognized by Agnes but was subsequently left without support.

Anno's rule proved unpopular. The education and training of Henry were supervised by Anno, who was called his magister, while Adalbert of Hamburg , archbishop of Bremen , was styled Henry's patronus. Henry's education seems to have been neglected, and his willful and headstrong nature developed under the conditions of these early years. The malleable Adalbert of Hamburg soon became the confidant of the ruthless Henry. Eventually, during an absence of Anno from Germany, Henry managed to obtain the control of his civil duties, leaving Anno only with the ecclesiastical ones.

First years of rule and Saxon War
In March 1065 Henry was declared of age. The whole of his future reign was apparently marked by efforts to consolidate Imperial power. In reality, however, it was a careful balancing act between maintaining the loyalty of the nobility and the support of the pope.

In 1066 , one year after his enthroning at the age of fifteen, he expelled Adalbert of Hamburg, who had profited off his position for personal enrichment, from the Crown Council. Henry also adopted urgent military measures against the Slav pagans, who had recently invaded Germany and besieged Hamburg.

In June 1066 Henry married Bertha of Maurienne , daughter of Count Otto of Savoy , to whom he had been betrothed in 1055 . In the same year he assembled an army to fight, at the request of the Pope, the Italo-Normans of southern Italy. Henry's troops had reached Augsburg when he received news that Godfrey of Tuscany , husband of the powerful Matilda of Canossa , marchioness of Tuscany , had already attacked the Normans. Therefore the expedition was halted.
In 1068 , driven by his impetuous character and his infidelities, Henry attempted to divorce Bertha[1]. His peroration at a council in Mainz was however rejected by the Papal legate Pier Damiani , who hinted that any further insistence towards divorce would lead the new pope, Alexander II , to deny his coronation. Henry obeyed and his wife returned to Court, but he was convinced that the Papal opposition aimed only at overthrowing lay power within the Empire, in favour of an ecclesiastical hierarchy.

In the late 1060s Henry set up with strong determination to reduce any opposition and to enlarge the national boundaries. He led expeditions against the Liutici and the margrave of a district east of Saxony; and soon afterwards he had to quench the rebellions with Rudolf of Swabia and Berthold of Carinthia. Much more serious was Henry's struggle with Otto of Nordheim, duke of Bavaria. This prince, who occupied an influential position in Germany and was one of the protagonists of Henry's early kidnapping, was accused in 1070 by a certain Egino of being privy to a plot to murder the king. It was decided that a trial by battle should take place at Goslar , but when the demand of Otto for a safe conduct for himself and his followers, to and from the place of meeting, was refused, he declined to appear. He was thereupon declared deposed in Bavaria, and his Saxon estates were plundered. He obtained sufficient support, however, to carry on a struggle with the king in Saxony and Thuringia until 1071 , when he submitted at Halberstadt . Henry aroused the hostility of the Thuringians by supporting Siegfried, archbishop of Mainz , in his efforts to exact tithes from them; but still more formidable was the enmity of the Saxons, who had several causes of complaint against the king. He was the son of one enemy, Henry III, and the friend of another, Adalbert of Bremen. He had ordered a restoration of all crown lands in Saxony and had built forts among this people, while the country was ravaged to supply the needs of his courtiers, and its duke Magnus was a prisoner in his hands. All classes were united against him, and when the struggle broke out in 1073 the Thuringians joined the Saxons. The war, which lasted with slight intermissions until 1088 , exercised a most potent influence upon Henry's fortunes elsewhere.

Investiture Controversy
Main article: Investiture Controversy
Initially in need of support for his expeditions in Saxony and Thuringia, Henry adhered to the Papal decrees in religious matters. His apparent weakness, however, had the side effect of spurring the ambitions of Gregory VII , a reformist monk elected as pontiff in 1073, for Papal hegemony.

The tension between Empire and Church culminated in the councils of 1074-1075, which constituted a substantial attempt to delegitimate Henry III's policy. Among other measures, they denied to secular rulers the right to place members of the clergy in office; this had dramatic effects in Germany, where bishops were often powerful feudatories who, in this way, were able to free themselves from imperial authority. Aside from the reacquisition of all lost privileges by the ecclesiasticals, the council's decision deprived the imperial crown of rights to almost half its lands, with grievous consequences for national unity, especially in peripheral areas like the Kingdom of Italy .

Suddenly hostile to Gregory, Henry did not relent from his positions: after his defeat of Otto of Nordheim, he continued to interfere in Italian and German episcopal life, naming bishops at his will and declaring papal provisions illegitimate. In 1075 Gregory excommunicated some members of the Imperial Court, and threatened to do the same with Henry himself. Further, in a synod held in February of that year, Gregory clearly established the supreme power of the Catholic Church, with the Empire subjected to it. Henry replied with a counter-synod of his own.

The beginning of the conflict known as the Investiture Controversy can be assigned to Christmas night of 1075: Gregory was kidnapped and imprisoned by Cencio I Frangipane , a Roman noble, while officiating at Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome. Later freed by Roman people, Gregory accused Henry of having been behind the attempt. In the same year, the emperor had defeated a rebellion of Saxons in the First Battle of Langensalza , and was therefore free to accept the challenge.

At Worms, on January 24 , 1076 , a synod of bishops and princes summoned by Henry declared Gregory VII deposed. Hildebrand replied by excommunicating the emperor and all the bishops named by him on February 22 , 1076 . In October of that year a diet of the German princes in Tribur attempted to find a settlement for the conflict, conceding Henry a year to repent from his actions, before the ratification of the excommunication that the pope was to sign in Swabia some months later. Henry did not repent, and, counting on the hostility showed by the Lombard clergy against Gregory, decided to move to Italy. He spent Christmas of that year in Besançon and, together with his wife and his son, he crossed the Alps with help of the Bishop of Turin and reached Pavia .

Gregory, on his way to the diet of Augsburg , and hearing that Henry was approaching, took refuge in the castle of Canossa (near Reggio Emilia ), belonging to Matilda. Henry's troops were nearby.

Henry's intent, however, was apparently to perform the penance required to lift his excommunication and ensure his continued rule. The choice of an Italian location for the act of repentance, instead of Augsburg, was not accidental: it aimed to consolidate the Imperial power in an area partly hostile to the Pope; to lead in person the prosecution of events; and to oppose the pact signed by German feudataries and the Pope in Tribur with the strong German party that had deposed Gregory at Worms, through the concrete presence of his army.


He stood in the snow outside the gates of the castle of Canossa for three days, from January 25 to January 27 , 1077 , begging the pope to rescind the sentence (popularly portrayed as without shoes, taking no food or shelter, and wearing a hairshirt - see Walk of Canossa ). The Pope lifted the excommunication, imposing a vow to comply with certain conditions, which Henry soon violated.

Civil war and recovery
Rudolf of Rheinfeld , a two-time brother-in-law of Henry, took advantage of the momentary weakness of the Emperor by having himself declared antiking by a council of Saxon, Bavarian, and Carinthian princes in March of 1077 in Forchheim . Rudolf promised to respect the electoral concept of the monarchy and declared his willingness to be subservient to the pope.

Despite these difficulties, Henry's situation in Germany improved in the following years. When Rudolf was crowned at Mainz in May 1077, the population revolted and forced him to flee to Saxony, where he was deprived of his territories (later he was also stripped of Swabia). After the inconclusive battle of Mellrichstadt (August 7 , 1077 ) and the defeat of Flarchheim (27 January 1080 ) Gregory instead launched a second anathema against Henry in March 1080 . However, the evidence that Gregory's hate had such a personal connotation led much of Germany to re-embrace Henry's cause.

On October 14 , 1080 the armies of the two rival kings met at the Elster River , in the plain of Leipzig . Rudolf was mortally wounded and died soon afterwards, and the rebellion against Henry lost momentum. Another antiking , Henry of Luxembourg , was fought successfully by Frederick of Swabia , Rudolf's successor in Swabia who had married Henry's daughter Agnes . Henry convoked a synod of the highest German clergy in Bamberg and Brixen (June, 1080). Here Henry had Gregory (dubbed "The False Monk") again deposed and replaced by the primate of Ravenna , Guibert (the antipope Clement III ).

Second voyage to Italy
Henry entered in Pavia and was crowned here as King of Italy, receiving the Iron Crown . He also assigned a series of privileges to the Italian cities who had supported him, and marched against the hated Matilda, declaring her deposed for lese majesty and confiscating her possessions. Then he moved to Rome, which he besieged first in 1081 : he was however compelled to retire to Tuscany, where he granted privileges to various cities, and obtained monetary assistance (360,000 gold pieces)[2] from a new ally, the eastern emperor, Alexios I Komnenos , who aimed to thwart the Norman's aims against his empire. A second and equally unsuccessful attack on Rome was followed by a war of devastation in northern Italy with the adherents of Matilda; and towards the end of 1082 the king made a third attack on Rome. After a siege of seven months the Leonine city fell into his hands. A treaty was concluded with the Romans, who agreed that the quarrel between king and pope should be decided by a synod, and secretly bound themselves to induce Gregory to crown Henry as emperor, or to choose another pope. Gregory, however, shut up in Castel Sant'Angelo , would hear of no compromise; the synod was a failure, as Henry prevented the attendance of many of the pope's supporters; and the king, in pursuance of his treaty with Alexios, marched against the Normans. The Romans soon fell away from their allegiance to the pope; and, recalled to the city, Henry entered Rome in March 1084, after which Gregory was declared deposed and Clement was recognized by the Romans. On 31 March 1084 Henry was crowned emperor by Clement, and received the patrician authority. His next step was to attack the fortresses still in the hands of Gregory. The pope was saved by the advance of Robert Guiscard , duke of Apulia, who left the siege of Durazzo and marched towards Rome: Henry left the city and Gregory could be freed. The latter however died soon later at Salerno (1085), not before a last letter in which he exhorted the whole Christianity to a crusade against the emperor.

Feeling secure of his success in Italy, Henry returned to Germany.

The Emperor spent 1084 in a show of power in Germany, where the reforming instances had still ground due to the predication of Otto of Ostia, advancing up to Magdeburg in Saxony . He also declared the Peace of God in all the Imperial territories to quench any sedition. On March 8 , 1088 Otto of Ostia was elected pope as Victor III : with the Norman support, he excommunicated Henry and Clement III, who was defined "a beast sprung out from the earth to wage war against the Saints of God". He also formed a large coalition against the Holy Roman Empire, including, aside from the Normans, the Rus of Kiev , the Lombard communes of Milan , Cremona , Lodi and Piacenza and Matilda of Canossa, who had she remarried to Welf II of Bavaria , therefore creating a concentration of power too formidable to be neglected by the emperor.

Internecine wars and death
In 1088 Henry of Luxembourg died and Egbert II, Margrave of Meissen , a longtime enemy of the emperor's, proclaimed himself the antiking's successor. Henry had him condemned by a Saxon diet and then a national one at Quedlinburg and Regensburg respectively, but was defeated by Egbert when a relief army came to the margrave's rescue during the siege of Gleichen . Egbert was murdered two years later (1090 ) and his ineffectual insurrection and royal pretensions fell apart.

Henry then launched his third punitive expedition in Italy. After some initial success against the lands of Canossa, his defeat in 1092 caused the rebellion of the Lombard communes. The insurrection extended when Matilda managed to turn against him his elder son, Conrad , who was crowned King of Italy at Monza in 1093 . The Emperor therefore found himself cut off from Germany. He could return there only in 1097 : in Germany his power wall still at its height, as Welf V of Bavaria separated from Matilda and Bavaria gave back to Welf IV .

Henry reacted by deposing Conrad at the diet of Mainz in April 1098, and designating his younger son Henry (future Henry V) as successor, under the oath sworn that he would never follow his brother's example.


The situation in the Empire remained chaotic, worsened by the further excommunication against Henry launched by the new pope Paschal II , a follower of Gregory VII's reformation ideals elected in the August of 1099. But this time the emperor, meeting with some success in his efforts to restore order, could afford to ignore the papal bana. A successful campaign in Flanders was followed in 1103 by a diet at Mainz, where serious efforts were made to restore peace, and Henry IV himself promised to go on crusade. But this plan was shattered by the revolt of his son Henry in 1104 , who, encouraged by the adherents of the pope, declared he owed no allegiance to an excommunicated father. Saxony and Thuringia were soon in arms, the bishops held mainly to the younger Henry, while the emperor was supported by the towns. A desultory warfare was unfavourable, however, to the emperor, who was taken as prisoner at an alleged reconciliation meeting at Koblenz . At a diet held in Mainz in December, Henry IV was forced to resign to his crown, being subsequently imprisoned in the castle of Böckelheim . Here he was also obliged that he had unjustly persecuted Gregory VII and to have illegally named Clement III.

When these conditions became known in Germany, a vivid movement of dissension spread. In 1106 the loyal party set up a large army to fight Henry V and Paschal. Henry IV managed to escape to Cologne from his jail, finding a considerable support in the lower Rhineland . He also entered into negotiations with England , France and Denmark .

Henry was also able to defeat his son's army near Visé, in Lorraine, on March 2 , 1106 . He however died soon afterwards after nine days of illness, while he was guest of his friend Othbert, Bishop of Liège . He was 56.
His body was buried by the bishop of Liege with suitable ceremony, but by command of the papal legate it was unearthed, taken to Speyer and placed in the at that time unconsecrated chapel of Saint Afra that was build on the side of the Imperial Cathedral . After being released from the sentence of excommunication, the remains were buried in the Speyer cathedral in August 1111 .

Evaluation
Henry IV was known for licentious behaviour in his early years, being described as careless and self-willed. In his later life, he displayed much diplomatic ability. His abasement at Canossa can be regarded as a move of policy to weaken the pope's position at the cost of a personal humiliation to himself. He was always regarded as a friend of the lower orders, was capable of generosity and gratitude, and showed considerable military skill.

Marriages
Henry's wife Bertha died on December 27 , 1087 . She was also buried at the Speyer Cathedral . Their children were:
Agnes of Germany (born 1072 ), married Frederick I von Staufen , Duke of Swabia .
Conrad (February 12 , 1074 -July 27 , 1101 )
Adelaide, died in infancy
Henry, died in infancy
Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor
In 1089 Henry married Eupraxia of Kiev , a daughter of Vsevolod I, Prince of Kiev , and sister to his son Vladimir II Monomakh , prince of Kievan Rus . She assumed the name "Adelaide" upon her coronation. In 1094 she joined the rebellion against Henry, accusing him of holding her prisoner, forcing her to participate in orgies, and attempting a black mass on her naked body.


Notes
^ Bertha in the meantime had retired to the Abbey of Lorscheim .
^ J. Norwich, Byzantium: The Decline and Fall, 21


Research Notes: Wife - Bertha of Savoy

From Wikipedia - Bertha of Savoy :

Bertha of Savoy, also called Bertha of Turin (21 September 1051 - 27 December 1087 in Mainz) was the first wife of Emperor Henry IV , and was German Queen and Holy Roman Empress. She is buried in the cathedral of Speyer.

Life
Bertha of Savoy was a daughter of Otto of Savoy (also called Eudes and Odo) and Adelaide of Susa . Her maternal grandparents were Ulric Manfred II of Turin and Bertha of the Obertenghi .
As children, during the lifetime of Emperor Henry III , Bertha and Henry IV were betrothed on 25 December 1055 in Zürich . The wedding took place on 13 July 1066 in Trebur . While Bertha was apparently in love with Henry from the outset, Henry initially viewed his wife with aversion. Although she was apparently a pretty young woman, the Saxon chronicler Bruno, an avowed opponent of Henry IV, reported on the Emperor's continual unfaithfulness: "He had two or three Kebsweiber (concubines ) at the same time, in addition [to his wife], yet he was not content. If he heard that someone had a young and pretty daughter or wife, he instructed that she be supplied to him by force. (...) His beautiful and noble wife Bertha (...) was in such a manner hated by him that he never saw her after the wedding any more than necessary, since he had not celebrated the wedding out of free will."
In 1069, Henry began procedures for a divorce, supplying what was for the time an unusually honest reason for the divorce: "The king explained publicly (before the princes), that his relationship with his wife was not good; for a long time he had deceived others, but now he did not want to do so any longer. He could not accuse her of anything that justified a divorce, but he was not capable of carrying out conjugal relations with her any longer. He asked them for the sake of God to remove him from the bonds of a marriage closed under bad signs ... so that the way to a luckier marriage might be opened. And nobody knowing any objection to raise, and his wife being an obstacle to a second marriage ceremony, he then swore that she was as he received her, unstained and her virginity intact." (Bruno of Merseburg)
The German episcopacy dared not submit to the King's demands, and called on Pope Alexander II for assistance. He sent Petrus Damiani as his Legate to the Synod in Frankfurt, and rejected the divorce. Henry then apparently submitted to his fate, his first daughter by Bertha being born in the year after the divorce attempt.
Bertha also accompanied her husband on his dangerous journey to Canossa , carrying her three-year-old son Conrad. She remained with her husband between 25-28 January 1077 in freezing cold weather before the walls of the castle, in order to reach the solution to Henry's dispute with the Pope. Together with Henry, Bertha later also journeyed to Rome , and on 31 March 1084 was crowned Empress.
On 27 December 1087, Bertha died in Mainz.

Children
From her marriage with Henry there were eventually five children:
Adelheid (1070-4 June 1079)
Henry (1071-2 August 1071)
Agnes of Germany (1072/73-24 September 1143 )
Conrad (12 February 1074 -27 July 1101 ), later Roman-German King and King of Italy
Henry V (8 January 1086 -23 May 1125 ), later Roman-German King and Holy Roman Emperor

Sources
Bruno von Merseburg: Brunonis Saxonicum bellum. Brunos Sachsenkrieg. - Übersetzt v. Franz-Josef Schmale. - In: Quellen zur Geschichte Kaiser Heinrichs IV. - Darmstadt, 1968. - (= Ausgewählte Quellen zur deutschen Geschichte des Mittelalters. Freiherr vom Stein-Gedächtnisausgabe ; 12). - S. 191-405.
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 45-23, 274-22, 274-23.


Research Notes: Child - Henry

Source: Wikipedia - Bertha of Savoy


Research Notes: Child - Agnes of Germany

From Wikipedia - Agnes of Germany :

Agnes of Germany (1072 - September 24 , 1143 ), was the daughter of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Bertha of Savoy . Her maternal grandparents were Otto, Count of Savoy, Aosta and Moriana and Adelaide, Marchioness of Turin and Susa.
Agnes married firstly, in 1089, Frederick I, Duke of Swabia . They had several children, amongst whom were Frederick II of Swabia (1090 - 1147) (the father of Frederick Barbarossa ) and Conrad III of Germany (1093 - 1152).

Following Frederick's death in 1105, Agnes married Leopold III (born 1073; died 15 Nov. 1136) and later Margrave of Austria (born 1095; died 1136). Leopold was the son of Margrave Leopold II and Ida of Formbach-Ratelnberg . According to legend, a veil lost by Agnes and found by Leopold years later while hunting instigated him to found the monastery of Klosterneuburg .

Their children were:
Leopold IV
Henry II Jasomirgott .
Berta, m. Henry III, Burggraf of Regensburg .
Agnes , m.1125 Wladyslaw II , High Duke of Poland from 1138 to 1146. Agnes is said to have been "one of the most famous beauties of her time".
Ernst.
Otto of Freising , bishop and biographer of his nephew Frederick I "Barbarossa".
Conrad , Bishop of Passau , and Archbishop of Salzburg .
Elizabeth, m. Hermann II of Winzenburg.
Judith , m. c. 1133 William V of Montferrat . Their children formed an important Crusading dynasty.
Gertrude, m. King Vladislaus II of Bohemia .

According to the Continuation of the Chronicles of Klosterneuburg, there may have been up to seven others (possibly from multiple births) stillborn or died in infancy.


Research Notes: Child - Conrad King of Italy

Source: Wikipedia - Bertha of Savoy


Research Notes: Child - Henry V Holy Roman Emperor

Source: Wikipedia - Bertha of Savoy


Eudes I Count of Blois and Bertha of Burgundy




Husband Eudes I Count of Blois 28

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Mar 996
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 963



Wife Bertha of Burgundy 29

           Born: Abt 964
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1010
         Buried: 


         Father: Conrad I King of Burgundy, King of West Franks (Abt 0925-0993) 30 31
         Mother: Mathilda of France, Queen of Burgundy (0943-0992) 32 33



   Other Spouse: Robert II "the Pious" King of France (0972-1031) 34 35 - 995

Events

• Repudiated: 998.


Children

Research Notes: Wife - Bertha of Burgundy

2nd wife of Robert II. Widow of Eudes I.


Robert II "the Pious" King of France and Bertha of Burgundy




Husband Robert II "the Pious" King of France 34 35




            AKA: Robert Sanctus King of France, Robert Capet Sanctus, King of France
           Born: 27 Mar 972 - Orléans, Orléanais, (Loiret), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Jul 1031 - Melun, (Seine-et-Marne), Île-de-France, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh Capet King of France (0941-0996) 36 37
         Mother: Adelaide de Poitou (Abt 0945-1006) 10 38


       Marriage: 995

   Other Spouse: Rosela of Ivrea (      -      ) 39 - Bef Apr 988

   Other Spouse: Constance of Provence (Abt 0986-1032) 40 41 - 998

Events

• King of France: 1 Jan 996-1031.




Wife Bertha of Burgundy 29

           Born: Abt 964
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1010
         Buried: 


         Father: Conrad I King of Burgundy, King of West Franks (Abt 0925-0993) 30 31
         Mother: Mathilda of France, Queen of Burgundy (0943-0992) 32 33



   Other Spouse: Eudes I Count of Blois (      -0996) 28 - Abt 963

Events

• Repudiated: 998.


Children

Death Notes: Husband - Robert II "the Pious" King of France

Melun, France?


Research Notes: Husband - Robert II "the Pious" King of France

Count of Paris, King of France

From Wikipedia - Robert II of France:

Robert II (27 March 972 - 20 July 1031 ), called the Pious or the Wise, was King of France from 996 until his death. The second reigning member of the House of Capet , he was born in Orléans to Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine .

Co-rule with father
Immediately after his own coronation, Robert's father Hugh began to push for the coronation of Robert. "The essential means by which the early Capetians were seen to have kept the throne in their family was through the association of the eldest surviving son in the royalty during the father's lifetime," Andrew W. Lewis has observed, in tracing the phenomenon in this line of kings who lacked dynastic legitimacy.[1] Hugh's claimed reason was that he was planning an expedition against the Moorish armies harassing Borrel II of Barcelona , an invasion which never occurred, and that the stability of the country necessitated a co-king, should he die while on expedition.[2] Ralph Glaber , however, attributes Hugh's request to his old age and inability to control the nobility.[3] Modern scholarship has largely imputed to Hugh the motive of establishing a dynasty against the claims of electoral power on the part of the aristocracy, but this is not the typical view of contemporaries and even some modern scholars have been less sceptical of Hugh's "plan" to campaign in Spain.[4] Robert was eventually crowned on 30 December 987. A measure of Hugh's success is that when Hugh died in 996, Robert continued to reign without any succession dispute, but during his long reign actual royal power dissipated into the hands of the great territorial magnates.
Robert had begun to take on active royal duties with his father in the early 990s. In 991, he helped his father prevent the French bishops from trekking to Mousson in the Kingdom of Germany for a synod called by Pope John XV , with whom Hugh was then in disagreement.

Marital problems

As early as 989, having been rebuffed in his search for a Byzantine princess,[5]Hugh Capet arranged for Robert to marry the recently-widowed daughter of Berengar II of Italy , Rozala , who took the name of Susannah upon becoming Queen.[6] She was many years his senior. She was the widow of Arnulf II of Flanders , with whom she had children, the oldest of whom was of age to assume the offices of count of Flanders. Robert divorced her within a year of his father's death. He tried instead to marry Bertha , daughter of Conrad of Burgundy , around the time of his father's death. She was a widow of Odo I of Blois , but was also Robert's cousin. For reasons of consanguinity , Pope Gregory V refused to sanction the marriage, and Robert was excommunicated. After long negotiations with Gregory's successor, Sylvester II , the marriage was annulled.
Finally, in 1001, Robert entered into his final and longest-lasting marriage: to Constance of Arles , the daughter of William I of Provence . She was an ambitious and scheming woman, who made life miserable for her husband by encouraging her sons to revolt against their father.

Piety
Robert, however, despite his marital problems, was a very devout Catholic, hence his sobriquet "the Pious." He was musically inclined, being a composer, chorister, and poet, and making his palace a place of religious seclusion, where he conducted the matins and vespers in his royal robes. However, to contemporaries, Robert's "piety", resulted from his lack of toleration for heretics: he harshly punished them.

Children
Robert had no children from his short-lived marriage to Susanna. His illegal marriage to Bertha gave him one stillborn son in 999, but only Constance gave him surviving children:[7]
Constance, married Manasses de Dammartin
Adele of France, married Renauld I, Count of Nevers on 25 January 1016 and had issue.
Hugh Magnus , co-king (1017-1025)
Henry I , successor
Robert , became Duke of Burgundy
Odo (1013-c.1056), who may have been mentally retarded and died after his brother's failed invasion of Normandy
Adela (d. 1079), married firstly Richard III of Normandy and secondly Baldwin V of Flanders .
Robert also left an illegitimate son: Rudolph, Bishop of Bourges

Sources
Lewis, Andrew W. "Anticipatory Association of the Heir in Early Capetian France. " The American Historical Review, Vol. 83, No. 4. (Oct., 1978), pp 906-927.
* Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 53-21, 101-21, 107-20, 107-21, 108-21, 128-21, 141-21, 141A-21, 146-19, 162-20, 185-2.
Jessee, W. Scott. A missing Capetian princess: Advisa, daughter of King Robert II of France (Medieval Prosopography), 1990


Research Notes: Wife - Bertha of Burgundy

2nd wife of Robert II. Widow of Eudes I.


Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy and Bertha




Husband Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy 42 43

           Born: Apr 773
     Christened: 12 Apr 781 - Rome, (Italy)
           Died: 8 Jul 810 - Milan, Italy
         Buried: 


         Father: Charlemagne King of France, Emperor of Rom (0747-0814) 44 45 46 47
         Mother: Hildegard of Vinzgouw (Abt 0758-0783) 10 48 49 50


       Marriage: Bef 800

   Other Spouse: < > [Daughter of Duke Bernard] (      -      ) 51

Events

• Baptized: by Pope Adrian I, 12 Apr 781, Rome, (Italy).

• King of Italy: 781-810.

• Consecrated: King of Lombardy, 15 Apr 781.




Wife Bertha

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children

Christening Notes: Husband - Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy

Baptized at Rome, 12 Apr. 781, by Pope Adrian I


Research Notes: Husband - Pepin King of Italy and Lombardy

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-14

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford) has b. Apr 777.

Wikipedia has b. April 773.

From Wikipedia - Pepin of Italy :

Pepin (April 773 - 8 July 810 ) was the son of Charlemagne and king of Italy (781 -810) under the authority of his father.

Pepin was the third son of Charlemagne , and the second with his wife Hildegard . He was born Carloman, but when his brother Pepin the Hunchback betrayed their father, the royal name Pepin passed to him. He was made king of Italy after his father's conquest of the Lombards , in 781, and crowned by Pope Hadrian I with the Iron Crown of Lombardy .

He was active as ruler of Italy and worked to expand the Frankish empire. In 791 , he marched a Lombard army into the Drava valley and ravaged Pannonia , while his father marched along the Danube into Avar territory. Charlemagne left the campaigning to deal with a Saxon revolt in 792 . Pepin and Duke Eric of Friuli continued, however, to assault the Avars' ring-shaped strongholds. The great Ring of the Avars, their capital fortress, was taken twice. The booty was sent to Charlemagne in Aachen and redistributed to all his followers and even to foreign rulers, including King Offa of Mercia .

His activities included a long, but unsuccessful siege of Venice in 810. The siege lasted six months and Pepin's army was ravaged by the diseases of the local swamps and was forced to withdraw. A few months later Pepin died.
He married Bertha, daughter of William of Gellone , count of Toulouse , and had five daughters with her (Adelaide , married Lambert I of Nantes ; Atala; Gundrada; Bertha; and Tetrada), all of whom but the eldest were born between 800 and Pepin's death and died before their grandfather's death in 814 . Pepin also had an illegitimate son Bernard . Pepin was expected to inherit a third of his father's empire, but he predeceased him. The Italian crown passed on to his son Bernard, but the empire went to Pepin's younger brother Louis the Pious .


Research Notes: Wife - Bertha

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-14 (Pepin)


Walter FitzRoger of Gloucester and Bertha




Husband Walter FitzRoger of Gloucester 13 52 53

            AKA: Walter of Gloucester, Walter de Gloucester, Walter de Pitres
           Born: Abt 1065 - <Gloucester, Gloucestershire, > England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1129 - England
         Buried: 


         Father: Roger de Pîtres (Abt 1035-      ) 13 52
         Mother: Eunice de Balun (Abt 1150-      ) 13 53


       Marriage: 

Events

• High Sheriff of Gloucestershire:




Wife Bertha 53

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Miles de Pitres of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford 13 54 55

            AKA: Miles de Gloucester 1st Earl of Hereford, Milo de Gloucester 1st Earl of Hereford
           Born: Abt 1100 - <Gloucester, Gloucestershire, > England
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Dec 1143
         Buried:  - Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire, Wales
         Spouse: Sibyl de Neufmarché (Abt 1096-After 1143) 13 56
           Marr: 1121



Research Notes: Husband - Walter FitzRoger of Gloucester

From Wikipedia - Walter de Gloucester :

Walter de Gloucester (also Walter FitzRoger or Walter de Pitres) (1065 - 1129) was an early Norman official of the King of England during the early years of the Norman conquest of the South Welsh Marches .

Lineage
He was the only son of Roger de Pitres and his wife, Eunice de Balun .

Titles
Walter de Gloucester was High Sheriff of Gloucestershire and lived in Gloucester Castle of which he was constable, making improvements to this early fortification.

Family
He was married to Bertha, a relative of Hamelin de Balun . They were the parents of Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford and a daughter, Maud, who married a Roger FitzPons .


Birth Notes: Child - Miles de Pitres of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford

FamilySearch has b. abt 1092


Research Notes: Child - Miles de Pitres of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford

From Wikipedia - Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford :

Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, Lord of Brecknock (1100-24 December 1143 ), was the son of Walter de Gloucester , who appears as sheriff of that county between 1104 and 1121.
Milo or Miles succeeded his father about the latter year.
He was high in the service of Henry I between 1130 and 1135, he was Constable of England and combined the hereditary office of Sheriff of Gloucester with that of local justiciar for Gloucestershire .

Civil war allegiances
After the death of King Henry he declared for Stephen , at whose court he appears as constable in 1136. King Stephen granted him the honour of Gloucester and Brecknock . However, in 1139, when the empress Matilda appeared in England, he declared for her, and placed the city of Gloucester at her disposal; he was further distinguished by sacking the nearby royalist city of Worcester , attacking Stephen's siege works at Wallingford Castle and reducing the county of Hereford . He was retained as her Constable.

Earldom
In 1141, he was rewarded with the earldom of Hereford when Matilda ruled the country. He remained loyal to the Empress after her defeat at Winchester the same year. John of Salisbury classes him with Geoffrey de Mandeville and others who were non tam comites regni quam hostes publici. The charge is justified by his public policy; but the materials for appraising his personal character do not exist.

Family and children
He married Sybil de Neufmarche , daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche , Lord of Brecon and Nest, granddaughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn , in 1121. Their children were:
Bertha of Hereford , married William de Braose before 1150, by whom she had issue.
Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford .
Walter de Hereford died after 1159 in the Holy Land. He was Sheriff of Gloucester in 1155-1157 and Sheriff of Hereford in 1155-1159.
Henry Fitzmiles Henry of Hereford, died 12 April 1165. He succeeded to the title of Baron Abergavenny in 1141/42.
William de Hereford . He died before 1160 without issue.
Mahel de Hereford , died October 1165 at Bronllys Castle , Breconshire , Wales, mortally hurt when a stone dropped from the tower during a fire; died without issue. Buried at Llanthony Priory .
Margaret de Gloucester , married Humphrey de Bohun , by whom she had issue.
Lucy of Gloucester , married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester , Lord Chamberlain , by whom she had issue. Buried at Llanthony Priory .


Hugh II Count of Pontieu and Bertha of Aumale




Husband Hugh II Count of Pontieu

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Nov 1052
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Bertha of Aumale

           Born:  - <Aumale, (Seine-Maritime), Normandy, France>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Enguerrand II Count of Ponthieu

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1053 - Arques, <(Pas-de-Calais)>, France
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adelaide of Normandy, Countess of Aumale (Abt 1030-Between 1081/1090) 57 58 59



Research Notes: Husband - Hugh II Count of Pontieu

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-24 (Adelaide)


Research Notes: Wife - Bertha of Aumale

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-24 (Adelaide)


Death Notes: Child - Enguerrand II Count of Ponthieu

Slain at Battle of Arques


Research Notes: Child - Enguerrand II Count of Ponthieu

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 130-24 (Adelaide)


Rudolph II of Burgundy and Bertha of Swabia




Husband Rudolph II of Burgundy 60

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jul 937
         Buried: 


         Father: Rudolph I King of Burgundy (0859-0912) 61
         Mother: Guilla of Provence (      -Bef 0924) 62


       Marriage: 922



Wife Bertha of Swabia 63

           Born: Abt 907
     Christened: 
           Died: After 2 Jan 966
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Conrad I King of Burgundy, King of West Franks 30 31

           Born: Abt 925
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Oct 993
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mathilda of France, Queen of Burgundy (0943-0992) 32 33
           Marr: 964




Berthar King of the Thuringians




Husband Berthar King of the Thuringians 64

           Born: Abt 470 - Thuringia, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 530
         Buried: 


         Father: Bisinus King of the Thuringii (Abt 0440-      ) 65 66
         Mother: Basina Andovera of Thuringia (Abt 0438-Abt 0480) 67 68 69


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F < > [Princess of the Thuringians] 70

           Born: Abt 520
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maurilion Gallo of Troyes (Abt 0520-      ) 71




Pepin III "the Short" King of the Franks and Berthe of Laon




Husband Pepin III "the Short" King of the Franks 10 72 73 74




            AKA: Pippin the Short King of the Franks
           Born: 714 - Austrasia, Frankish Empire, (France or Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 24 Sep 768 - Saint-Denis, (Paris, Île-de-France), Neustria (France)
         Buried:  - Basilica of St. Denis, Saint-Denis, (Paris, Île-de-France), Neustria (France)


         Father: Charles Martel King of the Franks (Abt 0676-0741) 10 75 76 77 78
         Mother: Rotrude of Treves (0690-0724) 79


       Marriage: 

Events

• Acceded: as Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia & Neustria, 714.

• King of the Franks: of the second race, 751-768.




Wife Berthe of Laon 80

            AKA: Bertha, Bertrada of Laon
           Born:  - <Laon, (Aisne), Picardy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 783
         Buried: 


         Father: Charibert Count of Laon (      -After 0747) 81
         Mother: Gisele (      -      ) 82




Children
1 M Charlemagne King of France, Emperor of Rom 44 45 46 47




            AKA: Carolus Magnus, Charles I Holy Roman Emperor, Charles the Great
           Born: 2 Apr 747 - Ingelheim, Rheinhessen (Rhineland-Palatinate), Hesse-Darmstadt, Austrasia (Germany)
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Jan 814 - Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen), Rhineland, Prussia (Germany)
         Buried:  - Notre-Dame d'Aix-la-Chapelle, Rhineland, Prussia (Germany)
         Spouse: Hildegard of Vinzgouw (Abt 0758-0783) 10 48 49 50
           Marr: Bef 30 Apr 771 - Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen), Rhineland, Prussia (Germany)
         Spouse: Himiltrude (      -      )
         Spouse: Desiderata (      -      )
           Marr: 770
         Spouse: Fastrade (      -0794)
           Marr: 784
         Spouse: Luitgard (      -      )
           Marr: 794


2 M Carloman

           Born: 751
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Dec 771
         Buried: 



3 F Gisela

           Born: 757
     Christened: 
           Died: 810
         Buried: 




Research Notes: Husband - Pepin III "the Short" King of the Franks

From Ancestral Roots, Line 190-12, "deposed the last of the Faineant (Merovingian) kings and became himself the first king of the Franks of the second race, 751-768, d. 768."

From Wikipedia - Pepin the Short :

Pepin or Pippin (714 - 24 September 768 ), called the Short, and often known as Pepin the Younger or Pepin III,[1] was the Mayor of the Palace and Duke of the Franks from 741 and King of the Franks from 751 to 768. He was the father of Charlemagne .

He was the son of Charles Martel , mayor of the palace and duke of the Franks, and of Rotrude of Trier (690 -724 ).

Assumption of power
Pepin's father, Charles Martel, died in 741 . He divided the rule of the Frankish kingdom between Pepin and his elder brother, Carloman , his surviving sons by his first wife: Carloman became Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, Pepin became Mayor of the Palace of Neustria. Grifo , Charles' son by his second wife, Swanahild (aka Swanhilde), may also have been intended to receive an inheritance, but he was imprisoned in a monastery by his two half-brothers. Carloman, who by all evidence was a deeply pious man, retired to a monastery in 747 . This left Francia in the hands of Pepin as sole mayor of the palace and dux et princeps Francorum, a title originated by his grandfather and namesake Pepin of Heristal ...

Legacy
Pepin died during a campaign and was brought to Saint Denis to be buried near the saint in 768 and is interred there in the basilica with his wife Bertrada . Pepin was buried "outside that entrance [of Saint Denis Basilica ] according to his wishes, face down, for the sins of his father Charles Martel".[1] Historical opinion often seems to regard him as the lesser son and lesser father of two greater men, though a great man in his own right. He continued to build up the heavy cavalry which his father had begun. He maintained the standing army that his father had found necessary to protect the realm and form the core of its full army in wartime. He not only maintained his father's policy of containing the Moors , he drove them over and across the Pyrenees with the capture of Narbonne. He continued his father's expansion of the Frankish church (missionary work in Germany and Scandinavia ) and the infrastructure (feudalism ) that would prove the backbone of medieval Europe. His rule, while not as great as either his father's or son's, was historically important and of great benefit to the Franks as a people. It can certainly be argued that Pepin's assumption of the crown, and the title of Patrician of Rome , were harbingers of his son's imperial coronation which is usually seen as the founding of the Holy Roman Empire . He certainly made the Carolingians de jure what his father had made them de facto-the ruling dynasty of the Franks and the foremost power of Europe. While not known as a great general, he was undefeated during his lifetime.

Family
In 740 , Pepin married Bertrada of Laon , his second cousin. Her father, Charibert , was the son of Pepin II's brother, Martin of Laon . They are known to have had four children:
Charles (April 2 , 742 - January 28 , 814 ), (Charles the Great)
Carloman (751 - December 4 , 771 )
Gisela (757 - 810 )
Pepin, who died in infancy.




Research Notes: Wife - Berthe of Laon

Probably the daughter of Charibert, Count of Laon. Possibly the daughter of Count Herbert.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-12 (Pepin III the Short).

Source: familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)


Research Notes: Child - Charlemagne King of France, Emperor of Rom

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-13 has b. 2 Apr 747, d. Aix la Chapelle, 28 Jan 813/4, King of France 768-814, crowned Holy Roman Emperor 25 Dec. 800.

From Wikipedia - Charlemagne :

Charlemagne (Latin : Carolus Magnus or Karolus Magnus, meaning Charles the Great) (742 /747 - 28 January 814 ) was King of the Franks from 768 to his death. He expanded the Frankish kingdoms into a Frankish Empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe. During his reign, he conquered Italy and was crowned Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III on 25 December 800 as a rival of the Byzantine Emperor in Constantinople . His rule is also associated with the Carolingian Renaissance , a revival of art, religion, and culture through the medium of the Catholic Church . Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne helped define both Western Europe and the Middle Ages . He is numbered as Charles I in the regnal lists of France , Germany , and the Holy Roman Empire .

The son of King Pippin the Short and Bertrada of Laon , he succeeded his father and co-ruled with his brother Carloman I . The latter got on badly with Charlemagne, but war was prevented by the sudden death of Carloman in 771. Charlemagne continued the policy of his father towards the papacy and became its protector, removing the Lombards from power in Italy, and waging war on the Saracens , who menaced his realm from Spain . It was during one of these campaigns that Charlemagne experienced the worst defeat of his life, at Roncesvalles (778). He also campaigned against the peoples to his east, especially the Saxons , and after a protracted war subjected them to his rule. By forcibly converting them to Christianity, he integrated them into his realm and thus paved the way for the later Ottonian dynasty .

Today he is not only regarded as the founding father of both French and German monarchies, but as the father of Europe: his empire united most of Western Europe for the first time since the Romans, and the Carolingian renaissance encouraged the formation of a common European identity..,

Date and place of birth
Charlemagne is traditionally believed to have been born on April 2 , 742; however, several factors have led to a reconsideration of this date. First, the year 742 was calculated from his age given at death, rather than from attestation in primary sources. Another date is given in the Annales Petarienses , April 1 , 747. In that year, April 1 was at Easter . The birth of an emperor at eastertime is a coincidence likely to provoke comment, but there was no such comment documented in 747, leading some to suspect that the Easter birthday was a pious fiction concocted as a way of honoring the Emperor. Other commentators weighing the primary records have suggested that his birth was one year later, in 748. At present, it is impossible to be certain of the date of the birth of Charlemagne. The best guesses include April 1 , 747, after April 15 , 747, or April 1 , 748, in Herstal (where his father was born, a city close to Liège in modern day Belgium ), the region from where both the Merovingian and Carolingian families originate. He went to live in his father's villa in Jupille when he was around seven, which caused Jupille to be listed as a possible place of birth in almost every history book. Other cities have been suggested, including, Prüm , Düren , Gauting and Aachen ...

Early life
Charlemagne was the eldest child of Pippin the Short (714 - 24 September 768, reigned from 751) and his wife Bertrada of Laon (720 - 12 July 783 ), daughter of Caribert of Laon and Bertrada of Cologne . Records name only Carloman , Gisela , and a short-lived child named Pippin as his younger siblings. The semi-mythical Redburga , wife of King Egbert of Wessex , is sometimes claimed to be his sister (or sister-in-law or niece), and the legendary material makes him Roland 's maternal uncle through a lady Bertha.

Much of what is known of Charlemagne's life comes from his biographer, Einhard , who wrote a Vita Caroli Magni (or Vita Karoli Magni), the Life of Charlemagne...

Charles and his children
During the first peace of any substantial length (780-782), Charles began to appoint his sons to positions of authority within the realm, in the tradition of the kings and mayors of the past. In 781 he made his two younger sons kings, having them crowned by the Pope. The elder of these two, Carloman , was made king of Italy , taking the Iron Crown which his father had first worn in 774, and in the same ceremony was renamed "Pippin". The younger of the two, Louis , became king of Aquitaine . He ordered Pippin and Louis to be raised in the customs of their kingdoms, and he gave their regents some control of their subkingdoms, but real power was always in his hands, though he intended each to inherit their realm some day. Nor did he tolerate insubordination in his sons: in 792, he banished his eldest, though illegitimate, son, Pippin the Hunchback , to the monastery of Prüm, because the young man had joined a rebellion against him.

The sons fought many wars on behalf of their father when they came of age. Charles was mostly preoccupied with the Bretons, whose border he shared and who insurrected on at least two occasions and were easily put down, but he was also sent against the Saxons on multiple occasions. In 805 and 806, he was sent into the Böhmerwald (modern Bohemia ) to deal with the Slavs living there (Czechs ). He subjected them to Frankish authority and devastated the valley of the Elbe, forcing a tribute on them. Pippin had to hold the Avar and Beneventan borders, but also fought the Slavs to his north. He was uniquely poised to fight the Byzantine Empire when finally that conflict arose after Charlemagne's imperial coronation and a Venetian rebellion. Finally, Louis was in charge of the Spanish March and also went to southern Italy to fight the duke of Benevento on at least one occasion. He took Barcelona in a great siege in the year 797 (see below).
Charlemagne's attitude toward his daughters has been the subject of much discussion. He kept them at home with him, and refused to allow them to contract sacramental marriages - possibly to prevent the creation of cadet branches of the family to challenge the main line, as had been the case with Tassilo of Bavaria - yet he tolerated their extramarital relationships, even rewarding their common-law husbands, and treasured the bastard grandchildren they produced for him. He also, apparently, refused to believe stories of their wild behaviour. After his death the surviving daughters were banished from the court by their brother, the pious Louis, to take up residence in the convents they had been bequeathed by their father. At least one of them, Bertha, had a recognised relationship, if not a marriage, with Angilbert , a member of Charlemagne's court circle...

Death
In 813, Charlemagne called Louis the Pious , king of Aquitaine , his only surviving legitimate son, to his court. There he crowned him with his own hands as co-emperor and sent him back to Aquitaine. He then spent the autumn hunting before returning to Aachen on 1 November . In January, he fell ill with pleurisy (Einhard 59). He took to his bed on 21 January and as Einhard tells it:
He died January twenty-eighth, the seventh day from the time that he took to his bed, at nine o'clock in the morning, after partaking of the Holy Communion , in the seventy-second year of his age and the forty-seventh of his reign.

He was buried on the day of his death, in Aachen Cathedral , although the cold weather and the nature of his illness made such a hurried burial unnecessary. A later story, told by Otho of Lomello, Count of the Palace at Aachen in the time of Otto III , would claim that he and Emperor Otto had discovered Charlemagne's tomb: the emperor, they claimed, was seated upon a throne, wearing a crown and holding a sceptre, his flesh almost entirely incorrupt. The story was proved false by Frederick I , who discovered the remains of the emperor in a sarcophagus beneath the floor of the chapel.[7]


Charlemagne's death greatly affected many of his subjects, particularly those of the literary clique who had surrounded him at Aachen...

Marriages and heirs
Charlemagne had seventeen children over the course of his life with eight of his ten known wives or concubinues.

His first relationship was with Himiltrude . The nature of this relationship is variously described as concubinage , a legal marriage or as a Friedelehe .[12] Charlemagne put her aside when he married Desiderata. The union produced two children:
Amaudru, a daughter[13]
Pippin the Hunchback (c. 769-811)
After her, his first wife was Desiderata , daughter of Desiderius , king of the Lombards , married in 770, annulled in 771

His second wife was Hildegard (757 or 758-783), married 771, died 783. By her he had nine children:
Charles the Younger (c.772-4 December 811 ), Duke of Maine, and crowned King of the Franks on 25 December 800
Carloman, renamed Pippin (April 773-8 July 810 ), King of Italy
Adalhaid (774), who was born whilst her parents were on campaign in Italy. She was sent back to Francia, but died before reaching Lyons
Rotrude (or Hruodrud) (775-6 June 810 )
Louis (778-20 June 840 ), twin of Lothair, King of Aquitaine since 781, crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 813, senior Emperor from 814
Lothair (778 -6 February 779 /780 ), twin of Louis, he died in infancy[14]
Bertha (779-826)
Gisela (781-808)
Hildegarde (782-783)

His third wife was Fastrada , married 784, died 794. By her he had:
Theodrada (b.784), abbess of Argenteuil
Hiltrude (b.787)
His fourth wife was Luitgard , married 794, died childless

Concubinages and illegitimate children
His first known concubine was Gersuinda . By her he had:
Adaltrude (b.774)
His second known concubine was Madelgard . By her he had:
Ruodhaid (775-810), abbess of Faremoutiers
His third known concubine was Amaltrud of Vienne . By her he had:
Alpaida (b.794)
His fourth known concubine was Regina . By her he had:
Drogo (801-855), Bishop of Metz from 823 and abbot of Luxeuil Abbey
Hugh (802-844), archchancellor of the Empire
His fifth known concubine was Ethelind . By her he had:
Richbod (805-844), Abbott of Saint-Riquier
Theodoric (b. 807)


Research Notes: Child - Carloman

Source: Wikipedia - Pepin the Short


Research Notes: Child - Gisela

Source: Wikipedia - Pepin the Short


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38 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-20, 141-20 (Hugh Capet).

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 145-19, 101-21 (Robert II).

40 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-21, 101-21 (Robert II).

41 Wikipedia.org, Constance of Arles.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-14.

43 Wikipedia.org, Pepin of Italy.

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), 50-13, 140-13, 190-13.

45 Wikipedia.org, Charlemagne.

46 Wikipedia.org, Rhenish Hesse.

47 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91438 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

48 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 182-5, 140-13 (Charlemagne), 148-13 (Charlemagne), 190-13 (Charlemagne).

49 Wikipedia.org, Hildegard of Vinzgouw.

50 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91440 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

51 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-14 (Pepin).

52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177-4 (Sibyl de Neufmarche).

53 Wikipedia.org, Walter de Gloucester.

54 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 193-4 (Sibyl de Neufmarche).

55 Wikipedia.org, Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford.

56 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 193-4, 177-4, 237-4.

57 Wikipedia.org, Herleva.

58 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-24.

59 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

60 Wikipedia.org, "Rudolph II of Burgundy."

61 Wikipedia.org, "Rudolph I of Burgundy."

62 Wikipedia.org, "Guilla of Provence."

63 Wikipedia.org, "Bertha of Swabia."

64 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #316385 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

65 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99024 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

66 Wikipedia.org, Wacho.

67 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105692 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

68 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873342.

69 Wikipedia.org, Basina, Queen of Thuringia.

70 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319823 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

71 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #319822 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

72 Wikipedia.org, Pepin the Short.

73 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-12.

74 http://www.familysearch.org, Disc #94 Pin #91489 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

75 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 190-11, 191-11, 50-11 (Rotrou).

76 Wikipedia.org, Charles Martel.

77 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #91488 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

78 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871722.

79 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 50-11.

80 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-12, 50-12 (Pepin III the Short).

81 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-11.

82 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-11 (Charibert).


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