The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Conrad II "the Salic" of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor and Gisele of Swabia




Husband Conrad II "the Salic" of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Jun 1039 - Utrecht, (Netherlands)
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry Count in Wormsgau (      -1000) 2
         Mother: Adelaide (      -1039/1046) 3


       Marriage: 

Events

• Crowned: Holy Roman Emperor, 1028.

• King of Germany: 1024-1039.




Wife Gisele of Swabia 4

            AKA: Gisela of Swabia, Gisele de Suabe
           Born: 11 Nov 995
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Feb 1043
         Buried: 


         Father: Herman II Duke of Swabia (      -1003) 5
         Mother: Gerberga of Burgundy (0965-1016) 6




Children
1 M Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor 7 8




            AKA: Heinrich III Holy Roman Emperor, Henry III "the Pious" Holy Roman Emperor
           Born: 29 Oct 1017
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Oct 1056 - Bodfeld [Königspfalz], Harz, Saxony (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany)


         Buried: 
         Spouse: Gunhilda of Denmark (      -1038)
           Marr: Nijmegen, (Netherlands)
         Spouse: Agnes of Poitou (Abt 1025-1077) 8
           Marr: 21 Nov 1043 - Ingelheim, Besançon



Research Notes: Husband - Conrad II "the Salic" of Germany, Holy Roman Emperor

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor


Research Notes: Wife - Gisele of Swabia

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor


Research Notes: Child - Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor

From Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor :

Henry III (29 October 1017 - 5 October 1056 ), called the Black or the Pious, was a member of the Salian Dynasty of Holy Roman Emperors . He was the eldest son of Conrad II of Germany and Gisela of Swabia and his father made him duke of Bavaria (as Henry VI) in 1026, after the death of Duke Henry V . Then, on Easter Day 1028, his father having been crowned Holy Roman Emperor, Henry was elected and crowned King of Germany in the cathedral of Aachen by Pilgrim, Archbishop of Cologne . After the death of Herman IV, Duke of Swabia in 1038, his father gave him that duchy (as Henry I) as well as the kingdom of Burgundy , which Conrad had inherited in 1033. Upon the death of his father on June 4 , 1039 , he became sole ruler of the kingdom and was crowned emperor by Pope Clement II in Rome (1046).

Early life and reign
Henry's first tutor was Bruno , Bishop of Augsburg . On Bruno's death in 1029, Egilbert, Bishop of Freising , was appointed to take his place. In 1033, at the age of sixteen, Henry came of age and Egilbert was compensated for his services. In 1035, Adalbero , Duke of Carinthia , was deposed by Conrad, but Egilbert convinced Henry to refuse this injustice and the princes of Germany, having legally elected Henry, would not recognise the deposition unless their king did also. Henry, in accordance with his promise to Egilbert, did not consent to his father's act and Conrad, stupefied, fell unconscious after many attempts to turn Henry. Upon recovering, Conrad knelt before his son and exacted the desired consent. Egilbert was penalised dearly by the emperor.
In 1036, Henry was married to Gunhilda of Denmark . She was a daughter of Canute the Great , King of Denmark , England , and Norway , by his wife Emma of Normandy . Early on, Henry's father had arranged with Canute to have him rule over some parts of northern Germany (the Kiel ) and in turn to have their children married. The marriage took place in Nijmegen at the earliest legal age.
In 1038, Henry was called to aid his father in Italy (1038) and Gunhilda died on the Adriatic Coast , during the return trip (during the same epidemic in which Herman IV of Swabia died). In 1039, his father, too, died and Henry became sole ruler and imperator in spe. pcnr...

Children
By his first wife, Gunhilda of Denmark , he had:
Beatrice (1037 - 13 July 1061 ), abbess of Quedlinburg and Gandersheim
By his second wife, Agnes , he had:
Adelaide (1045, Goslar - 11 January 1096 ), abbess of Gandersheim from 1061 and Quedlinburg from 1063
Gisela (1047, Ravenna - 6 May 1053 )
Matilda (October 1048 - 12 May 1060 , Pöhlde ), married 1059 Rudolf of Rheinfelden , duke of Swabia and antiking (1077)
Henry , his successor
Conrad (1052, Regensburg - 10 April 1055 ), duke of Bavaria (from 1054)
Judith (1054, Goslar - 14 March 1092 or 1096 ), married firstly 1063 Solomon of Hungary and secondly 1089 Ladislaus I Herman , duke of Poland

Sources
Gwatkin, H. M. , Whitney, J. P. (ed) et al. The Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1926.
Norwich, John Julius . The Normans in the South 1016-1130. Longmans: London, 1967.



Conrad II "the Younger" Duke of Transjurane Burgundy and Waldrada of Worms




Husband Conrad II "the Younger" Duke of Transjurane Burgundy 9

            AKA: Conrad "the Younger" Count of Auxerre, Duke of Burgundy
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Conrad I Count of Paris, Count of Auxerre (      -0876) 10
         Mother: Adelaide of Tours and Alsace (Abt 0819-After 0866) 11 12 13


       Marriage: 



Wife Waldrada of Worms 14

            AKA: Waldraith of Toulouse
           Born: Abt 801
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Rudolph I King of Burgundy 15

            AKA: Rudolf I of Burgundy, Rudolph I of Burgundy
           Born: 859
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Oct 912
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Guilla of Provence (      -Bef 0924) 16



Research Notes: Wife - Waldrada of Worms

From Wikipedia, "Waldrada of Worms":
Waldrada of Worms (aka, Waldraith of Toulouse (born 801, date of death unknown) was the second wife of Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy. They had two known children, Adelaide of Auxerre and Rudolph I of Burgundy.
She was first married to Robert III of Worms, in 819 in Wormgau, Germany. This marriage brought in 820 a son, Robert IV the Strong. The marriage ended when Robert III died in 822.

Some say her father was Saint William of Gellone. However, this may be unlikely. It is also unlikely that she is the wife of Conrad. While having been born supposedly between 790 and 801, she certainly could have been William's daughter, these dates are likely not accurate if she was also Conrad's wife. This is because her progeny with Conrad were born ca. 849 and 859, respectively. If these dates are accurate, then Waldrada had these children between the ages of 49 and 59 years old, at best. Given that menopause occurs in modern times between ages 45\endash 55, it is possible that she was Adelaide's mother. Her being Rudolph's mother is more problematic.

What is more likely is that she and the wife of Conrad are two different people. One possible solution is that the Waldrada who married Conrad II and Robert III is the daughter of Waldrada, wife of Adrian, Count of Orléans (767-824), who may (key word) be the daughter of William of Gelone. This is all conjecture, however.


Research Notes: Child - Rudolph I King of Burgundy

Source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593874484


Robert II "the Pious" King of France and Constance of Provence




Husband Robert II "the Pious" King of France 17 18




            AKA: Robert Sanctus King of France, Robert Capet Sanctus, King of France
           Born: 27 Mar 972 - Orléans, Orléanais, (Loiret), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Jul 1031 - Melun, (Seine-et-Marne), Île-de-France, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Hugh Capet King of France (0941-0996) 19 20
         Mother: Adelaide de Poitou (Abt 0945-1006) 21 22


       Marriage: 998

   Other Spouse: Rosela of Ivrea (      -      ) 23 - Bef Apr 988

   Other Spouse: Bertha of Burgundy (Abt 0964-After 1010) 24 - 995

Events

• King of France: 1 Jan 996-1031.




Wife Constance of Provence 25 26

            AKA: Constance of Arles, Gisant of Arles
           Born: Abt 986
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Jul 1032 - Melun, (Seine-et-Marne), Île-de-France, France
         Buried:  - St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France


         Father: William II Count of Arles and Provence (Abt 0950-After 0993) 27 28
         Mother: Adelaide "la Blanche" of Anjou (Abt 0947-1026) 29 30




Children
1 F Adèle of France, Countess of Auxerre 31

           Born: Abt 1003
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1063
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Renaud I Count of Nevers (      -1040) 32
           Marr: Abt 1015


2 M Hugh Magnus of France

           Born: 1007
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Sep 1025
         Buried: 



3 M Henry I of France 33 34




           Born: 4 May 1008 - Reims, (Marne), (Champagne-Ardenne), France
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Aug 1060 - Vitry-en-Brie, France
         Buried:  - St. Denis Basilica, Paris, (Île-de-France), France
         Spouse: Anne of Kiev (Between 1024/1032-1075) 35 36
           Marr: 19 May 1051 - Cathédral de Rheims, Rheims, (Marne), Champagne, France


4 F Adele Capet Princess of France 37 38

            AKA: Adèle of France, Countess of Contentin, Adele "the Holy" of Messines, Aelis of France, Countess of Contentin
           Born: Abt 1009
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 8 Jan 1079 - Messines Monastery, Messines (Mesen), West Flanders, (Belgium)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Baldwin V de Lille, Count of Flanders (1012-1067) 22 39 40
           Marr: 1028 - Amiens, (Somme), Picardy, France
         Spouse: Richard III Duke of Normandy (Abt 0997-1028) 41
           Marr: 10 Jan 1027


5 M Robert "the Old" Duke of Burgundy 42 43

            AKA: Robert I Duke of Burgundy, Robert Capet Duke of Burgundy
           Born: Abt 1011
     Christened: 
           Died: 21 Mar 1076 - <Burgundy, (France)>
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hélie (1016-1055) 44
           Marr: Abt 1033
         Spouse: Ermengarde of Anjou (Abt 0952-0992) 45 46
           Marr: Abt 1048
         Spouse: Hildegarde of Metz (      -      ) 47


6 M Odo

           Born: 1013
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1056
         Buried: 



7 F Constance Capet 12 48

            AKA: Constance Princess of France
           Born: Abt 1014 - France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Manasses Calva Asina de Rameru (Abt 1010-1057) 12
           Marr: Abt 1032 - Orléans, Orléanais, (Loiret), France



Death Notes: Husband - Robert II "the Pious" King of France

Melun, France?


Research Notes: Husband - Robert II "the Pious" King of France

Count of Paris, King of France

From Wikipedia - Robert II of France:

Robert II (27 March 972 - 20 July 1031 ), called the Pious or the Wise, was King of France from 996 until his death. The second reigning member of the House of Capet , he was born in Orléans to Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine .

Co-rule with father
Immediately after his own coronation, Robert's father Hugh began to push for the coronation of Robert. "The essential means by which the early Capetians were seen to have kept the throne in their family was through the association of the eldest surviving son in the royalty during the father's lifetime," Andrew W. Lewis has observed, in tracing the phenomenon in this line of kings who lacked dynastic legitimacy.[1] Hugh's claimed reason was that he was planning an expedition against the Moorish armies harassing Borrel II of Barcelona , an invasion which never occurred, and that the stability of the country necessitated a co-king, should he die while on expedition.[2] Ralph Glaber , however, attributes Hugh's request to his old age and inability to control the nobility.[3] Modern scholarship has largely imputed to Hugh the motive of establishing a dynasty against the claims of electoral power on the part of the aristocracy, but this is not the typical view of contemporaries and even some modern scholars have been less sceptical of Hugh's "plan" to campaign in Spain.[4] Robert was eventually crowned on 30 December 987. A measure of Hugh's success is that when Hugh died in 996, Robert continued to reign without any succession dispute, but during his long reign actual royal power dissipated into the hands of the great territorial magnates.
Robert had begun to take on active royal duties with his father in the early 990s. In 991, he helped his father prevent the French bishops from trekking to Mousson in the Kingdom of Germany for a synod called by Pope John XV , with whom Hugh was then in disagreement.

Marital problems

As early as 989, having been rebuffed in his search for a Byzantine princess,[5]Hugh Capet arranged for Robert to marry the recently-widowed daughter of Berengar II of Italy , Rozala , who took the name of Susannah upon becoming Queen.[6] She was many years his senior. She was the widow of Arnulf II of Flanders , with whom she had children, the oldest of whom was of age to assume the offices of count of Flanders. Robert divorced her within a year of his father's death. He tried instead to marry Bertha , daughter of Conrad of Burgundy , around the time of his father's death. She was a widow of Odo I of Blois , but was also Robert's cousin. For reasons of consanguinity , Pope Gregory V refused to sanction the marriage, and Robert was excommunicated. After long negotiations with Gregory's successor, Sylvester II , the marriage was annulled.
Finally, in 1001, Robert entered into his final and longest-lasting marriage: to Constance of Arles , the daughter of William I of Provence . She was an ambitious and scheming woman, who made life miserable for her husband by encouraging her sons to revolt against their father.

Piety
Robert, however, despite his marital problems, was a very devout Catholic, hence his sobriquet "the Pious." He was musically inclined, being a composer, chorister, and poet, and making his palace a place of religious seclusion, where he conducted the matins and vespers in his royal robes. However, to contemporaries, Robert's "piety", resulted from his lack of toleration for heretics: he harshly punished them.

Children
Robert had no children from his short-lived marriage to Susanna. His illegal marriage to Bertha gave him one stillborn son in 999, but only Constance gave him surviving children:[7]
Constance, married Manasses de Dammartin
Adele of France, married Renauld I, Count of Nevers on 25 January 1016 and had issue.
Hugh Magnus , co-king (1017-1025)
Henry I , successor
Robert , became Duke of Burgundy
Odo (1013-c.1056), who may have been mentally retarded and died after his brother's failed invasion of Normandy
Adela (d. 1079), married firstly Richard III of Normandy and secondly Baldwin V of Flanders .
Robert also left an illegitimate son: Rudolph, Bishop of Bourges

Sources
Lewis, Andrew W. "Anticipatory Association of the Heir in Early Capetian France. " The American Historical Review, Vol. 83, No. 4. (Oct., 1978), pp 906-927.
* Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 53-21, 101-21, 107-20, 107-21, 108-21, 128-21, 141-21, 141A-21, 146-19, 162-20, 185-2.
Jessee, W. Scott. A missing Capetian princess: Advisa, daughter of King Robert II of France (Medieval Prosopography), 1990


Research Notes: Wife - Constance of Provence

Third wife of Robert II of France.

From Wikipedia - Constance of Arles :

Constance of Arles (also known as Constance of Provence) (986 - July 25 , 1034 ) was the third wife and queen of King Robert II of France . She was the daughter of William I , count of Provence and great-grandson of Charles-Constantine ; and Adelais of Anjou , daughter of Fulk II of Anjou . She was the sister of Count William II of Provence .

In 1003 , she was married to King Robert, after his divorce from his second wife, Bertha of Burgundy . The marriage was stormy; Bertha's family opposed her, and Constance was despised for importing her Provençal kinfolk. Robert's friend, Hugh of Beauvais, tried to convince the king to repudiate her in 1007 . Constance's response was to have Beauvais murdered by the knights of her kinsman, Fulk Nerra . In 1010 Robert even went to Rome, accompanied by his former wife Bertha, to seek permission to divorce Constance and remarry Bertha. Constance encouraged her sons to revolt against their father, and then favored her younger son, Robert, over her elder son, Henri.

During the famous trial of Herefast de Crepon (who was alleged to be involved with a heretical sect of canons, nuns, and clergy in 1022 [1]), the crowd outside the church in Orleans became so unruly that, according to Moore:
At the king's command, Queen Constance stood before the doors of the Church, to prevent the common people from killing them inside the Church, and they were expelled from the bosom of the Church. As they were being driven out, the queen struck out the eye of Stephen, who had once been her confessor, with the staff which she carried in her hand.

The symbolism, or reality, of putting an eye out is used often in medieval accounts to show the ultimate sin of breaking of one's oath, whether it be heresy, or treason to ones lordship, or in this case both. Stephen's eye was put out by the hand of a Queen wielding a staff (royal scepters were usually tipped with a cross) thus symbolically providing justice for the treasoned lord on earth and in heaven.

Constance and Robert had seven children:
Advisa, Countess of Auxerre, (c.1003-after 1063), married Count Renaud I of Nevers
Hugh Magnus, co-king (1007 -September 17 , 1025 )
Henri (May 4 , 1008 -August 4 , 1060 )
Adela, Countess of Contenance (1009 -June 5 , 1063 ), married (1) Duke Richard III of Normandy (2) Count Baldwin V of Flanders
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011 -March 21 , 1076 )
Eudes (1013 -1056 )
Constance (1014 -unknown), married Manasses de Dammartin

At Constance's urging, her eldest son Hugh Magnus was crowned co-king alongside his father in 1017 . Hugh Magnus demanded his parents share power with him, and rebelled against his father in 1025 . He died suddenly later that year, an exile and a fugitive. Robert and Constance quarrelled over which of their surviving sons should inherit the throne; Robert favored their second son Henri , while Constance favored their third son, Robert . Despite his mother's protests, Henry was crowned in 1027 . Fulbert, bishop of Chartres wrote a letter claiming that he was "frightened away" from the consecration of Henry "by the savagery of his mother, who is quite trustworthy when she promises evil."

Constance encouraged her sons to rebel, and Henri and Robert began attacking and pillaging the towns and castles belonging to their father. Robert attacked Burgundy , the duchy he had been promised but had never received, and Henry seized Dreux . At last King Robert agreed to their demands and peace was made which lasted until the king's death.

King Robert died in 1031 , and soon Constance was at odds with both her elder son, Henri , and her younger son Robert . Constance seized her dower lands and refused to surrender them. Henri fled to Normandy, where he received aid, weapons, and soldiers from his brother Robert. He returned to besiege his mother at Poissy , but Constance escaped to Pontoise . She only surrendered when Henri began the siege of Le Puiset and swore to slaughter all the inhabitants.

Constance died in 1034 , and was buried beside her husband Robert at Saint-Denis Basilica .


Research Notes: Child - Hugh Magnus of France

From Wikipedia - Hugh Magnus of France :

Hugh (II) Magnus of France (French : Hugues le Grand) (1007 - 17 September 1025 ) was co-King of France under his father, Robert II , from 1017 until his death in 1025 . He was a member of the House of Capet , a son of Robert II by his third wife, Constance of Arles .
The first Capetian King of France, Hugh Capet , had ensured his family's succession to the throne by having his son, Robert II, crowned and accepted as King during his own lifetime; father and son had ruled together as King thenceforth until Hugh Capet's death. Robert II, when his son was old enough, determined to do the same. Hugh Magnus was thus crowned King of France on /19 June 1017 ,[1] and thenceforth ruled beside his father. However, when older, he rebelled against Robert.
Hugh is said to have been married (or betrothed) before his death to Halwisa (Hawisa?) or Elisabeth d'Avoye (the daughter of Henri l'Oiseteur), who later married Hamon Dapifer Crevecouer, Count of Corbeil.
Hugh died, perhaps of a fall from his horse,[2] at Compiègne in 1025/1026 while preparing a rebellion against his father, aged around 18 years old.[1]
Rodulfus Glaber was fulsome in his praise of the young king, writing: "My pen cannot express all of the great and good qualities that he showed...in all things he was better than the best. No elegy can ever equal his merits."
As a King of France, he would technically be Hugh II of France; however, he is rarely referred to as such.

References
^ a b Thys, Laurent, Histoire du Moyen Âge français, p. 88.
^ New Cambridge Medieval History, IV:124.
The Origins of Some Angelo-Norman Families by Lewis C. Loyd, Page 50.
The Doomesday Monachorum of Christ Church Canterbury, Page 55-6.

Sources
Heraldica


Research Notes: Child - Henry I of France

From Wikipedia - Henry I of France :

Henry I (4 May 1008 - 4 August 1060 ) was King of France from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its lowest point in terms of size during his reign and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians . This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

A member of the House of Capet , Henry was born in Reims , the son of King Robert II (972-1031) and Constance of Arles (986-1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on May 14 , 1027 , in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert , with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025 ). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032 , he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016 .

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror ), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047 , Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen .

A few years later, when William, who was cousin to King Edward the Confessor of England (1042-66), married Matilda , the daughter of the count of Flanders , Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054 , and again in 1057 , Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor -all at Ivois . In early 1043 , he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou , the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048 , the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056 . It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night. But Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on August 4 , 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie , France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica . He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France , who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev , ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032 , when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet .

Marriages and family
Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of the Emperor Conrad II (1024-39), but she died prematurely in 1034 . Henry I then married Matilda , daughter of Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia, but she died in 1044 , following a Caesarean section. Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry I married Anne of Kiev on May 19 , 1051 . They had four children:
Philip I (May 23, 1052 - July 30, 1108)
Emma (1054-?)
Robert (c. 1055-c. 1060)
Hugh the Great (1057-1102)


Research Notes: Child - Adele Capet Princess of France

Second daughter of Robert the Pious and Constance of Arles.

From Wikipedia - Adela of France, Countess of Flanders :

Adela Capet, Adèle of France or Adela of Flanders[1], known also as Adela the Holy or Adela of Messines; (1009 - 8 January 1079 , Messines ) was the second daughter of Robert II (the Pious), and Constance of Arles . As dowry to her future husband, she received from her father the title of Countess of Corbie.

Her family
She was a member of the House of Capet , the rulers of France. As the wife of Baldwin V , she was Countess of Flanders from 1036 to 1067.

She married first 1027 Richard III Duke of Normandy (997 † 1027). They never had children.

As a widow, she remarried in 1028 in Paris to Baldwin V of Flanders (1012 † 1067). Their children were:
Baldwin VI of Flanders , (1030 † 1070)
Matilda of Flanders (1032 † 1083). In 1053 she married William Duke of Normandy , the future king of England
Robert I of Flanders , (1033-1093)
Henry of Flanders (c. 1035)
Sir Richard of Flanders (c. 1050-1105)

Political influence
Adèle's influence lay mainly in her family connections. On the death of her brother, Henry I of France, the guardianship of his seven-year-old son Philip I fell jointly on his widow, Ann of Kiev , and on his brother-in-law, Adela's husband, so that from 1060 to 1067, they were Regents of France.

Church influence
Adèle had an especially great interest in Baldwin V's church-reform politics and was behind her husband's founding of several collegiate churches . Directly or indirectly, she was responsible for establishing the Colleges of Aire (1049), Lille (1050) and Harelbeke (1064) as well as the abbeys of Messines (1057) and Ename (1063). After Baldwin's death in 1067, she went to Rome, took the nun's veil from the hands of Pope Alexander II and retreated to the Benedictine convent of Messines, near Ypres . There she died, being buried at the same monastery. Her commemoration day is 8 September.


Research Notes: Child - Robert "the Old" Duke of Burgundy

Duke of Burgundy from 1032 to his death in 1076.

From Wikipedia - Robert I, Duke of Burgundy :

Robert I Capet (1011 - March 21 , 1076 ) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. Robert was son of King Robert II of France and brother of Henry I .
In 1025 , with the death of his eldest brother Hugh Magnus, he and Henry rebelled against their father and defeated him, forcing him back to Paris . In 1031 , after the death of his father the king, Robert participated in a rebellion against his brother, in which he was supported by his mother, Queen Constance d'Arles . Peace was only achieved when Robert was given Burgundy (1032 ).

Throughout his reign, he was little more than a robber baron who had no control over his own vassals, whose estates he often plundered, especially those of the Church. He seized the income of the diocese of Autun and the wine of the canons of Dijon . He burgled the abbey of St-Germain at Auxerre . In 1055 , he repudiated his wife, Helie of Semur, and assassinated her brother Joceran and murdered her father, his father-in-law, Lord Dalmace I of Semur , with his own hands. In that same year, the bishop of Langres , Harduoin, refused to dedicate the church of Sennecy so as not "to be exposed to the violence of the duke."
His first son, Hugh, died in battle at a young age and his second son, Henry , also predeceased him. He was succeeded by Henry's eldest son, his grandson, Hugh I .

Family
He married his first wife, Helie of Semur , about 1033 , and repudiated her in 1055. Robert and Helie had five children:
Hugh (1034-1059), killed in battle
Henry (1035-ca.1074)
Robert (1040-1113), poisoned; married Violante of Sicily, daughter of Roger I of Sicily
Simon (1045-1087)
Constance (1046-1093), married Alfonso VI of Castile
From his second wife, Ermengarde of Anjou, daughter of Fulk III of Anjou , he had one daughter:
Hildegard (c.1056-1104), married Duke William VIII of Aquitaine

Sources
Gwatking, H. M. , Whitney, J. P. , et al. Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III-Germany and the Western Empire. Cambridge University Press : London , 1930 .


Research Notes: Child - Odo

May have been mentally retarded.

Source: Wikipedia - Robert II of France


Research Notes: Child - Constance Capet

Married Manasses de Dammartin per Wikipedia.

Source: Wikipedia - Robert II of France and Constance of Arles


Alan La Zouche and Constance Princess of Bretagne




Husband Alan La Zouche 12

           Born: Abt 1093 - <Rohan, (Morbihan), Brittany, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 1123



Wife Constance Princess of Bretagne 12

           Born: Abt 1118 - <Bretagne, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Conan III "le Gros" Duke of Bretagne (Abt 1096-1148) 12
         Mother: Maud Princess of England (Abt 1091-      ) 12




Children
1 M Geoffrey I de Porhoët 12 49

            AKA: Geoffrey La Zouche, Geoffrey la Zouche
           Born: Abt 1126 - <Rohan, (Morbihan), Brittany, (France)>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hawise Fergan (Abt 1130-      ) 12
           Marr: Abt 1156



Research Notes: Child - Geoffrey I de Porhoët

From Wikipedia - Baron Zouche :

Baron Zouche is a title that has thrice been created in the Peerage of England . The de la Zouche family descended from Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby , sometimes called Alan de Porhoët and Alan la Coche (c. 1136-1190), a Breton who settled in England during the reign of Henry II . He was the son of Vicomte Geoffrey I de Porhoët and Hawisa of Brittany.


Edmund Holland 4th Earl of Kent and Constance of York




Husband Edmund Holland 4th Earl of Kent

           Born: 6 Jan 1383
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Sep 1407
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Constance of York 50

           Born: Abt 1374
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Nov 1416
         Buried:  - Reading Abbey, Reading, Berkshire, England


         Father: Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York (1341-1402) 50
         Mother: Isabella of Castile, Duchess of York (Abt 1355-1392) 50




Children
1 F Eleanor de Holland 50 51

            AKA: Alianore de Holand
           Born: Abt 1406
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: James Touchet 5th Baron Audley (Abt 1398-1459) 50 52 53



Birth Notes: Husband - Edmund Holland 4th Earl of Kent

Uncertain of birth year.


Death Notes: Husband - Edmund Holland 4th Earl of Kent

Uncertain of death year


Research Notes: Husband - Edmund Holland 4th Earl of Kent

Wikipedia. Had an affair with Constance of York and fathered illegitimately Eleanor de Holland.


Research Notes: Wife - Constance of York

Married 1st husband, Thomas le Despenser (22 Sep 1373-16 Jan 1400) about 7 Nov 1379. He would eventually be beheaded at Bristol.

She was involved in an affair with Edmund Holland and had a daughter by him, Eleanor de Holand.

Her daughter Isabel le Despenser (by first husband) married Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick. They were parents to Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick, and Anne Beauchamp.;


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor de Holland

From Wikipedia - Eleanor de Holland :

Eleanor de Holland (b. c. 1406 ) was the illegitimate daughter of Constance of York and Edmund Holland, 4th Earl of Kent (Rixford, 2002).
She married (unknown date) James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley , son of John Tuchet, 4th Baron Audley and his wife Isabel.
Her children were as follows:
Sir Humphrey Audley, 5th Baron Audley , born After 1430, died May 6 1471
Edmund Touchett, Bishop of Salisbury , born c. 1432 - died Aug. 23 1524
Thomas Touchett , born c. 1435, died June 1507
Henry Touchett , born c. 1437, died unknown
Margaret Touchett , born c. 1438, died before Feb. 2 1481
Anne Touchett , born c. 1440, died unknown
Constance Touchett , born 1443, died unknown

References
Rixford, Elizabeth M. Leach, (2002) All the Royal Families in Europe (495 to 1932) and Mayflower Descendants. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, MD.


Ferdinand IV of Castile and Constance of Portugal




Husband Ferdinand IV of Castile

           Born: 6 Dec 1285
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Sep 1312 - Jaén, Andalusia, Spain
         Buried: 


         Father: Sancho IV "El Bravo" of Castile (1258-1295) 54
         Mother: María de Molina (Abt 1265-1321) 55


       Marriage: 1302



Wife Constance of Portugal

           Born: 3 Jan 1290
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Nov 1313
         Buried: 


         Father: Dinis King of Portugal and the Algarve (1261-1325)
         Mother: St. Elizabeth of Aragon (      -      )




Children
1 M Alfonso XI of Castile, King of Castile and Leon

           Born: 13 Aug 1311
     Christened: 
           Died: 26-27 Mar 1350
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Maria of Portugal (1313-1357) 50 56



Research Notes: Husband - Ferdinand IV of Castile

Wikipedia (Ferdinand IV of Castile)


Research Notes: Wife - Constance of Portugal

From Wikipedia - Constance of Portugal :

Infanta Constança of Portugal (English : Constance, pron. IPA: [kõ?'t?~s?] ) was a Portuguese infanta , daughter of King Denis of Portugal . She was born on January 3 , 1290 and became Queen consort of Castile when she married Castilian King Ferdinand IV .
From Ferdinand IV she had three children:
Leonor (1307 -1359 ), married King Alfonso IV of Aragon
Constanza (1308 -1310 )
Alfonso XI of Castile (1311 -1350 )
Constance of Portugal died November 18 , 1313 .


Research Notes: Child - Alfonso XI of Castile, King of Castile and Leon

Wikipedia (Alfonso XI of Castile)


Constantine I King of the Picts




Husband Constantine I King of the Picts 12 57 58

            AKA: Causantín King of Scots, Constantine I King of Scotland, Constantín mac Cináeda King of the Picts
           Born: Abt 836 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 877 - <Atholl>
         Buried:  - Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland


         Father: Cináed King of the Picts (Abt 0810-0858) 12 59 60
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 

Events

• Crowned: King of Scots, 862.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Donald II of Scotland 12 61 62

            AKA: Domnall King of Scots, Donald II Dasachtach King of Scotland, Domnall mac Causantín
           Born: Abt 862 - Scotland
     Christened: 
           Died: 900 - <Forres, Morayshire>, Scotland
         Buried:  - Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland




Death Notes: Husband - Constantine I King of the Picts

Slain in battle by the Norse. FamilySearch has d. 877 in Inverdovat, Forgan, Fifeshire, Scotland


Research Notes: Husband - Constantine I King of the Picts

From Wikipedia - Constantín mac Cináeda :

Causantín or Constantín mac Cináeda (Modern Gaelic Còiseam mac Choinnich) (died 877) was a king of the Picts . A son of Cináed mac Ailpín ("Kenneth MacAlpin"), he succeeded his uncle Domnall mac Ailpín as Pictish king following the latter's death on 13 April 862. Reckoned Constantine I in 20th century lists of kings of Scots , near-contemporary sources described Constantín as a Pictish king. Constantín's reign witnessed increased activity by Vikings , based in Ireland and Northumbria , in northern Britain and he died fighting one such invasion.

Amlaíb and Ímar
Viking activity in northern Britain appears to have reached a peak during Constantín's reign. Viking armies were led by a small group of men who may have been kinsmen. Among those noted by the Irish annals, the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle are Ívarr -Ímar in Irish sources-who was active from East Anglia to Ireland, Halfdán-Albdann in Irish, Healfdene in Old English- and Amlaíb or Óláfr. As well as these leaders, various others related to them appear in the surviving record.[7]

Viking activity in Britain increased in 865 when the Great Heathen Army , probably a part of the forces which had been active in Francia , landed in East Anglia.[8] The following year, having obtained tribute from the East Anglian King Edmund , the Great Army moved north, seizing York , chief city of the Northumbrians.[9] The Great Army defeated an attack on York by the two rivals for the Northumbrian throne, Osberht and Ælla , who had put aside their differences in the face of a common enemy. Both would-be kings were killed in the failed assault, probably on 21 March 867. Following this, the leaders of the Great Army are said to have installed one Ecgberht as king of the Northumbrians.[10] Their next target was Mercia where King Burgred , aided by his brother-in-law King Æthelred of Wessex , drove them off.[11]

While the kingdoms of East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria were under attack, other Viking armies were active in the far north. Amlaíb and Auisle (Ásl or Auðgísl), said to be his brother, brought an army to Fortriu and obtained tribute and hostages in 866. Historians disagree as to whether the army returned to Ireland in 866, 867 or even in 869.[12] Late sources of uncertain reliability state that Auisle was killed by Amlaíb in 867 in a dispute over Amlaíb's wife, the daughter of Cináed. It is unclear whether, if accurate, this woman should be identified as a daughter of Cináed mac Ailpín, and thus Constantín's sister, or as a daughter of Cináed mac Conaing , king of Brega .[13] While Amlaíb and Auisle were in north Britain, the Annals of Ulster record that Áed Findliath , High King of Ireland , took advantage of their absence to destroy the longphorts along the northern coasts of Ireland.[14] Áed Findliath was married to Constantín's sister Máel Muire. She later married Áed's successor Flann Sinna . Her death is recorded in 913.[15]

In 870, Amlaíb and Ívarr attacked Dumbarton Rock , where the River Leven meets the River Clyde , the chief place of the kingdom of Alt Clut , south-western neighbour of Pictland. The siege lasted four months before the fortress fell to the Vikings who returned to Ireland with many prisoners, "Angles, Britons and Picts", in 871. Archaeological evidence suggests that Dumbarton Rock was largely abandoned and that Govan replaced it as the chief place of the kingdom of Strathclyde, as Alt Clut was later known.[16] King Artgal of Alt Clut did not long survive these events, being killed "at the instigation" of Constantín son of Cináed two years later. Artgal's son and successor Run was married to a sister of Constantín.[17]

Amlaíb disappears from Irish annals after his return to Ireland in 871. According to the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba he was killed by Constantín either in 871 or 872 when he returned to Pictland to collect further tribute.[18] His ally Ívarr died in 873.[19]

Last days of the Pictish kingdom
In 875, the Chronicle and the Annals of Ulster again report a Viking army in Pictland. A battle, fought near Dollar , was a heavy defeat for the Picts; the Annals of Ulster say that "a great slaughter of the Picts resulted". Although there is agreement that Constantín was killed fighting Vikings in 877, it is not clear where this happened. Some believe he was beheaded on a Fife beach, following a battle at Fife Ness, near Crail. William Forbes Skene read the Chronicle as placing Constantín's death at Inverdovat (by Newport-on-Tay ), which appears to match the Prophecy of Berchán . The account in the Chronicle of Melrose names the place as the "Black Cave" and John of Fordun calls it the "Black Den". Constantín was buried on Iona .

Aftermath
Constantín's son Domnall and his descendants represented the main line of the kings of Alba and later Scotland .


Death Notes: Child - Donald II of Scotland

Killed. Possibly in Dunnotar.


Research Notes: Child - Donald II of Scotland

King of the Picts or King of Alba

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-15.

From Wikipedia - Donald II of Scotland :

Domnall mac Causantín (Modern Gaelic : Dòmhnall mac Chòiseim), [1], anglicised as Donald II (d.900) was King of the Picts or King of Scotland (Alba) in the late 9th century. He was the son of Constantine I (Causantín mac Cináeda). Donald is given the epithet Dásachtach, "the Madman", by the Prophecy of Berchán .

Donald became king on the death or deposition of Giric (Giric mac Dúngail), the date of which is not certainly known but usually placed in 889. The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba reports:
" Doniualdus son of Constantini held the kingdom for 11 years [889-900]. The Northmen wasted Pictland at this time. In his reign a battle occurred between Danes and Scots at Innisibsolian where the Scots had victory. He was killed at Opidum Fother [modern Dunnottar ] by the Gentiles.[3] " It has been suggested that the attack on Dunnottar, rather than being a small raid by a handful of pirates, may be associated with the ravaging of Scotland attributed to Harald Fairhair in the Heimskringla .[4] The Prophecy of Berchán places Donald's death at Dunnottar, but appears to attribute it to Gaels rather than Norsemen; other sources report he died at Forres .[5] Donald's death is dated to 900 by the Annals of Ulster and the Chronicon Scotorum , where he is called king of Alba, rather that king of the Picts. He was buried on Iona .

The change from king of the Picts to king of Alba is seen as indicating a step towards the kingdom of the Scots, but historians, while divided as to when this change should be placed, do not generally attribute it to Donald in view of his epithet.[6] The consensus view is that the key changes occurred in the reign of Constantine II (Causantín mac Áeda),[7] but the reign of Giric has also been proposed.[8]

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba has Donald succeeded by his cousin Constantine II. Donald's son Malcolm (Máel Coluim mac Domnall) was later king as Malcolm I. The Prophecy of Berchán appears to suggest that another king reigned for a short while between Donald II and Constantine II, saying "half a day will he take sovereignty". Possible confirmation of this exists in the Chronicon Scotorum, where the death of "Ead, king of the Picts" in battle against the Uí Ímair is reported in 904. This, however, is thought to be an error, referring perhaps to Ædwulf , the ruler of Bernicia , whose death is reported in 913 by the other Irish annals .[


Constantinus Angelus and Theodora Comnena




Husband Constantinus Angelus 63

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Theodora Comnena 64

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Alexius I Comnenus Byzantine Emperor (1048-1118) 63
         Mother: Irene (      -      )




Children
1 M Andronicus Angelus 63

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Euphrosyne Castamonitia (      -      )




Corineus Duke of Cornwall [Legendary]




Husband Corineus Duke of Cornwall [Legendary] 65

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 

Events

• Reigned: Abt 1100 B.C.




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Gwendolen Queen of the Britons [Legendary] 66

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Private



Research Notes: Husband - Corineus Duke of Cornwall [Legendary]

From Wikipedia - Corineus :

Corineus, in medieval British legend , was a prodigious warrior, a fighter of giants, and the eponymous founder of Cornwall .

According to Geoffrey of Monmouth 's History of the Kings of Britain (1136), he led the descendants of the Trojans who fled with Antenor after the Trojan War and settled on the coasts of the Tyrrhenian Sea . After Brutus , a descendant of the Trojan prince Aeneas , had been exiled from Italy and liberated the enslaved Trojans in Greece, he encountered Corineus and his people, who joined him in his travels. In Gaul , Corineus provoked a war with Goffarius Pictus, king of Aquitania , by hunting in his forests without permission, and killed thousands single-handedly with his battle-axe. After defeating Goffarius, the Trojans crossed to the island of Albion , which Brutus renamed Britain after himself. Corineus settled in Cornwall, which was then inhabited by giants. Brutus and his army killed most of them, but their leader, Gogmagog , was kept alive for a wrestling match with Corineus. The fight took place near Plymouth , and Corineus killed him by throwing him over a cliff.[1]

Corineus was the first of the Legendary Dukes of Cornwall . After Brutus died the rest of Britain was divided between his three sons, Locrinus (England), Kamber (Wales) and Albanactus (Scotland). Locrinus agreed to marry Corineus's daughter Gwendolen , but fell in love instead with Estrildis , a captured German princess. Corineus threatened war in response to this affront, and to pacify him Locrinus married Gwendolen, but kept Estrildis as his secret mistress. After Corineus died Locrinus divorced Gwendolen and married Estrildis, and Gwendolen responded by raising an army in Cornwall and making war against her ex-husband. Locrinus was killed in battle, and Gwendolen threw Estrildis and her daughter, Habren, into the River Severn .[2]

The tale is preserved in the works of later writers, including Michael Drayton and John Milton .


Research Notes: Child - Gwendolen Queen of the Britons [Legendary]

Legendary queen of the Britons, reigned about 15 years.

From Wikipedia - Queen Gwendolen :

Queen Gwendolen was a legendary ruler of Britain , whose life is described in Geoffrey of Monmouth 's Historia Regum Britanniae . According to Geoffrey, she was the wife of King Locrinus of the Britons until she defeated him in battle and took on the leadership of Britain herself.

Gwendolen was the daughter of Corineus of Cornwall and was married to Locrinus , with whom she had one son, Maddan ; however, Locrinus was in love with Estrildis , the daughter of the king of Germany whom he rescued from Humber the Hun . When Corineus finally died, Locrinus left Gwendolen and married Estrildis . Gwendolen fled to Cornwall and built up an army. She met Locrinus in battle and defeated him.

Following Locrinus's death, Gwendolen took the throne and led in the manner her father had in Cornwall. She ordered the murder of Estrildis and her daughter Habren and named the river they were thrown into Severn (Habren). She reigned peacefully for fifteen years after Locrinus's death until she abdicated in favor of her son, Maddan. She lived the remainder of her life in Cornwall.

The Historia Regum Britanniae says that at the time of her death Samuel was judge in Judea , Aeneas Silvius was ruling Alba Longa , and Homer was gaining fame in Greece .


Cormac King of Leinster




Husband Cormac King of Leinster 12

           Born: Abt 460 - Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 546
         Buried: 


         Father: Lillial King of Leinster (Abt 0435-      ) 12
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Cairbre King of Leinster 12

           Born: Abt 500 - Ireland
     Christened: 
           Died: 567
         Buried: 





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1. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-21.

2. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-20.

3. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-20 (Henry).

4. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 157-21.

5. Wikipedia.org, "Herman II, Duke of Swabia."

6. Wikipedia.org, "Gerberga of Burgundy."

7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-22.

8. Wikipedia.org, Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor.

9. Wikipedia.org, "Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy."

10. Wikipedia.org, "Conrad I, Count of Auxerre."

11. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 181-6.

12. http://www.familysearch.org.

13. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593872395.

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15. Wikipedia.org, "Rudolph I of Burgundy."

16. Wikipedia.org, "Guilla of Provence."

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19. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 53-20, 101-20, 106-20, 141-20.

20. Wikipedia.org, Hugh Capet.

21. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-20, 141-20 (Hugh Capet).

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23. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 145-19, 101-21 (Robert II).

24. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 159-20, 101-21 (Robert II).

25. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-21, 101-21 (Robert II).

26. Wikipedia.org, Constance of Arles.

27. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-20.

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29. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 141A-20 (William II).

30. Wikipedia.org, Adelaide of Anjou.

31. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 107-21.

32. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 107-21 (Adèle of France).

33. Wikipedia.org, Henry I of France; Elizabeth of Vermandois.

34. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 53-22, 101-22.

35. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 241-6.

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37. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 128-22, 162-22 (Baldwin V).

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44. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-22 (Robert the Old), 113-22 (Robert the Old).

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46. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #874597 Maitland Dirk Brower.

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56. Wikipedia.org, Maria of Portugal.

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63. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27 (Philip II).

64. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-27.

65. Wikipedia.org, Corineus; Legendary Dukes of Cornwall.

66. Wikipedia.org, Queen Gwendolen; List of legendary kings of Britain.


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66 Wikipedia.org, Queen Gwendolen; List of legendary kings of Britain.


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