The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Martin of Laon and Berthe




Husband Martin of Laon

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Berthe 1

            AKA: Bertrée
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: After 720
         Buried: 


         Father: Thierry III (0654-0691) 2
         Mother: Clotilde (0650-0699) 2


Events

• Living: 720.


Children
1 M Charibert Count of Laon 3

            AKA: Herbert Count of Laon
           Born:  - <Laon, (Aisne), Picardy>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: After 747
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Gisele (      -      ) 4



Research Notes: Husband - Martin of Laon

Source: Wikipedia - Pepin the Short


Research Notes: Child - Charibert Count of Laon

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 50-12 (Pepin III the Short)


Bertherus King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional]




Husband Bertherus King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 5 6

            AKA: Bartherus King of the Franks
           Born: Abt 180
     Christened: 
           Died: 272
         Buried: 


         Father: Hilderic King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] (Abt 0160-0253) 7 8
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Clodius III King of the Franks [Legendary or Fictional] 9 10

           Born: Abt 200
     Christened: 
           Died: 298
         Buried: 





Berthold I von Babenberg




Husband Berthold I von Babenberg

           Born: Abt 915
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 M Arnulf de Beaumont 11

            AKA: Rodulf de Beaumont Vicomte de Beaumont
           Born: Abt 950
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 





Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks and Bertrade




Husband Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks 12 13 14

            AKA: Chlothar "le Jeune" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Chlothar II "le Grand" King of Neustria, King of the Franks, Lothair II King of Neustria, King of the Franks
           Born: 584 - <Neustria>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 629 - Paris, (Île-de-France), Neustria, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Chilpéric I King of Soissons and King of Neustria (Abt 0539-0584) 15 16
         Mother: Fredegund (0543-0597) 13 17


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Haldertrude (0575-0604) 13

   Other Spouse: Sichilde (      -      )

Events

• King of Neustria: 584-629.

• King of the Franks: 613-629.




Wife Bertrade 18

           Born: 582
     Christened: 
           Died: 618
         Buried: 


Children

Research Notes: Husband - Clotaire II King of Neustria, King of the Franks

King of Neustria (584-629) and King of all the Franks (613-629)

---------
From Wikipedia - List of Frankish kings :
Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons:

Soissons (eventually Neustria) - Chilperic I, 561-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Paris - Charibert I, 561-567 then Chilperic I, 567-584 then Chlothar II, 584-629

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) - Guntram, 561-592 then Childebert II, 592-595 then Theuderic II, 595-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-629

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) - Sigebert I, 561-575 then Childebert II, 575-595 then Theudebert II, 595-612 then Theuderic II, 612-613 then Sigebert II, 613 then Chlothar II, 613-623

Chlothar II defeated Brunhilda and her grandson, reunifying the kingdom. However, in 623, in order to appease particularistic forces and also to secure the borders, he gave the Austrasians his young son as their own king. His son and successor, Dagobert I , emulated this move by appointing a sub-king for Aquitaine, with a seat at Toulouse , in 629 and Austrasia in 634.


-------
From Wikipedia - Chlothar II :

Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair ; 584 - 629 ), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria , and, from 613 to 629 , King of all the Franks , was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in 584. His mother, Fredegund , was regent until her death in 597 , at which time the thirteen-year old Clotaire began to rule for himself. As king, he continued his mother's feud with Brunhilda , queen of Austrasia , with equal viciousness and bloodshed.

In 599 , he made war with his cousins, Theuderic II of Burgundy and Theudebert II of Austrasia, who defeated him at Dormelles (near Montereau ). At this point, however, the two brothers took up arms against each other. In 605 , he invaded Theuderic's kingdom, but did not subdue it. He remained often at war with Theuderic and the latter died in Metz in late 613 while preparing a campaign against him. At that time, Warnachar , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, and Rado , mayor of the palace of Burgundy, abandoned the cause of Brunhilda and her great-grandson, Sigebert II , and the entire realm was delivered into Clotaire's hands. Brunhilda and Sigebert met Clotaire's army on the Aisne , but the Patrician Aletheus, Duke Rocco, and Duke Sigvald deserted the host and the grand old woman and her king had to flee. They got as far as the Orbe , but Clotaire's minions caught up with them by the lake Neuchâtel . Both of them and Sigebert's younger brother Corbo were executed by Clotaire's orders.
In that year, Clotaire II became the first king of all the Franks since his grandfather Clotaire I died in 561 by ordering the murder of the infant Sigebert II (son of Theuderic), whom the aging Brunhilda had attempted to set on the thrones of Austrasia and Burgundy , causing a rebellion among the nobility. This led to the delivery of Brunhilda into Clotaire's hands, his thirst for vengeance leading to his formidable old aunt enduring the agony of the rack for three whole days, before suffering a horrific death, chained between four horses that were goaded in separate directions, eventually tearing her apart.

In 615 , Clotaire II promulgated the Edict of Paris , a sort of Frankish Magna Carta that reserved many rights to the Frankish nobles while it excluded Jews from all civil employment for the Crown. The ban effectively placed all literacy in the Merovingian monarchy squarely under ecclesiastical control and also greatly pleased the nobles, from whose ranks the bishops were ordinarily exclusively drawn. Clotaire was induced by Warnachar and Rado to make the mayoralty of the palace a lifetime appointment at Bonneuil-sur-Marne , near Paris , in 617 . By these actions, Clotaire lost his own legislative abilities and the great number of laws enacted in his reign are probably the result of the nobles' petitions, which the king had no authority not to heed.
In 623 , he gave the kingdom of Austrasia to his young son Dagobert I . This was a political move as repayment for the support of Bishop Arnulf of Metz and Pepin I , mayor of the palace of Austrasia, the two leading Austrasian nobles, who were effectively granted semi-autonomy.
Clotaire II died in 629 after 45 years on the throne, longer than any other Merovingian dynast. He left the crown greatly reduced in power and prepared the way for the rise of the mayors and the rois fainéants.

Marriage and issue
First wife of Chlothar II was Haldertude (575-604). They had the following son:
Dagobert I
Second wife of Chlothar II was Bertrade.
Third wife of Chlothar II was Sichilde (Brynhilde). They had the following children:
Charibert_II
Oda


Research Notes: Wife - Bertrade

2nd wife of Clotaire II. Possibly the mother of Dagobert I, according to Wikipedia.


Fulk IV "le Réchin" Count of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort




Husband Fulk IV "le Réchin" Count of Anjou 19 20 21

           Born: 1043 - Anjou, (France)
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Apr 1109
         Buried: 


         Father: Aubri-Geoffrey Count of the Gâtinais (Abt 1013-1046) 22 23
         Mother: Ermengarde of Anjou (Abt 1018-1076) 24


       Marriage: 1089

   Other Spouse: Hildegarde of Baugency (      -Bef 1070) 25

Events

• Count of Anjou: 1068-1109.




Wife Bertrade de Montfort 26

            AKA: Beatrice de Montfort
           Born: Abt 1070
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Feb 1117 - <Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, Anjou>, (France)
         Buried: 


         Father: Simon I de Montfort (Abt 1025-1087) 27 28 29
         Mother: Agnes d'Évreux (Abt 1030-      ) 27 29




Children
1 M Fulk V "the Young" Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem 30 31 32

            AKA: Fulk of Jerusalem, Fulk V Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem
           Born: 1092 - Angers, (Maine-et-Loire), Anjou, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Nov 1144 - Acre, Palestine (Israel)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Erembourg Countess of Maine (      -1126) 33 34
           Marr: 1110
         Spouse: Melisende de Rethel (      -1161) 35
           Marr: 2 Jun 1129



Research Notes: Husband - Fulk IV "le Réchin" Count of Anjou

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871918 :

Count of Anjou and chronicler. Having inhereted the right to Touraine and Chateau-Landon, half of the Angevin inheritance, from his uncle, Geoffrey Martel I, Fulk went to war against his brother Geoffrey, captured and imprisoned him in 1066 and took Anjou and Saintonge, Geoffrey's half of the inheritance, into his domains. The Chronicle of the Counts of Anjou tells that his wife eloped with Philip I of France (RIN # 1332) in 1107. Fulk himself was the initiator of this work in the 1090's, chronicling his forbearers. (This reference is not to his first wife Hildegard, RIN #1763)
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 20,30,33-7

---
From Wikipedia - Fulk IV, Count of Anjou :

Fulk IV (1043-1109), called le Réchin, was the Count of Anjou from 1068 until his death. The nickname by which he is usually referred has no certain translation. Philologists have made numerous very different suggestions, including "quarreler", "sullen", and "heroic".

Biography
He was the younger son of Geoffrey, Count of Gâtinais (sometimes known as Aubri), and Ermengarde of Anjou , a daughter of Fulk the Black , count of Anjou, and sister of Geoffrey Martel , also count of Anjou.

When Geoffrey Martel died without direct heirs he left Anjou to his nephew Geoffrey III of Anjou , Fulk le Réchin's older brother.

Fulk fought with his brother, whose rule was deemed incompetent, and captured him in 1067. Under pressure from the Church he released Geoffrey. The two brothers soon fell to fighting again, and the next year Geoffrey was again imprisoned by Fulk, this time for good.

Substantial territory was lost to Angevin control due to the difficulties resulting from Geoffrey's poor rule and the subsequent civil war. Saintonge was lost, and Fulk had to give the Gâtinais to Philip I of France to placate the king.

Much of Fulk's rule was devoted to regaining control over the Angevin baronage, and to a complex struggle with Normandy for influence in Maine and Brittany .

In 1096 Fulk wrote an incomplete history of Anjou and its rulers titled Fragmentum historiae Andegavensis or "History of Anjou", though the authorship and authenticity of this work is disputed. Only the first part of the history, describing Fulk's ancestry, is extant. The second part, supposedly describing Fulk's own rule, has not been recovered. If he did write it, it is one of the first medieval works of history written by a layman.[1]

Fulk may have married as many as five times; there is some doubt regarding two of the marriages.
His first wife was Hildegarde of Baugency . After her death, before 1070, he married Ermengarde de Borbon , and then possibly Orengarde de Châtellailon . Both these were repudiated (Ermengarde de Borbon in 1075 and Orengarde de Chatellailon in 1080), possibly on grounds of consanguinity.

By 1080 he may have married Mantie , daughter of Walter I of Brienne . This marriage also ended in divorce, in 1087. Finally, he married Bertrade de Montfort , who was apparently "abducted" by King Philip I of France in 1092.

He had two sons. The eldest (a son of Ermengarde de Borbon), Geoffrey IV Martel , ruled jointly with him for some time, but died in 1106. The younger (a son of Bertrade de Montfort) succeeded him as Fulk V .

He also had a daughter by Hildegarde of Baugency, Ermengarde , who married firstly with William IX , count of Poitou and duke of Aquitaine and secondly with Alan IV, Duke of Brittany .


Research Notes: Wife - Bertrade de Montfort

5th wife of Fulk IV. "Abducted" by King Philip I of France in 1092.

From Wikipedia - Bertrade de Montfort :

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070-14 February 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux . Her brother was Amauri de Montfort .


Marriages
The oft-married Fulk IV, Count of Anjou was married to the mother of his son in 1089, when the lovely Bertrade caught his eye. According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier :
The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury of Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty. For her sake, he divorced the mother of Geoffrey II Martel…

Bertrade and Fulk were married, and they became the parents of a son, Fulk , but in 1092 Bertrade left her husband and took up with King Philip I of France . Philip married her on 15 May 1092, despite the fact that they both had spouses living. He was so enamoured of Bertrade that he refused to leave her even when threatened with excommunication . Pope Urban II did excommunicate him in 1095, and Philip was prevented from taking part in the First Crusade . Astonishingly, Bertrade persuaded Philip and Fulk to be friends.

Children
With Fulk IV, Count of Anjou :
Fulk of Jerusalem , Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem (1089/92 - 1143)

With Philip I of France :
Philippe de France, Count of Mantes (living in 1123)
Fleury de France, seigneur of Nangis (living in 1118)
Cecile of France (died 1145), married (1) Tancred, Prince of Galilee ; married (2) Pons of Tripoli

Later life
According to Orderic Vitalis , Bertrade was anxious that one of her sons succeed Philip, and sent a letter to King Henry I of England asking him to arrest her stepson Louis . Orderic also claims she sought to kill Louis first through the arts of sorcery, and then through poison. Whatever the truth of these allegations, Louis succeeded Philip in 1108. Bertrade lived on until 1117; William of Malmesbury says: "Bertrade, still young and beautiful, took the veil at Fontevraud Abbey , always charming to men, pleasing to God, and like an angel." Her son from her first marriage was Fulk V of Anjou who later became King of Jerusalem iure uxoris . The dynasties founded by Fulk's sons ruled for centuries, one of them in England (Plantagenet ), the other in Jerusalem .


Birth Notes: Child - Fulk V "the Young" Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem

May have been born in Anjou.


Death Notes: Child - Fulk V "the Young" Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem

May have died in Jerusalem.


Research Notes: Child - Fulk V "the Young" Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem

From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871915 :

Count of Anjou; King of Jerusalem (1131-1143). Fulk married the only daughter of Helias, Count of Maine, thereby uniting Anjou and Maine. In 1120 he went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. In 1128 a delegation from Baldwin II, King of Jerusalem (RIN # 4676), arrived in France, asking Louis VII to choose one of the French nobility to marry his daughter Melisande and become heir to the throne of Jerusalem. Fulk, by then a widower, was chosen. He married Melisande in 1129 and succeeded as King of Jerusalem in 1131. To defend the holy city from the Muslim champion, Zengi, Fulk allied with the emir of Damascus and the emperor of Constantinople during the early 1130's. Turkish raiders took him prisoner in 1137, but then freed him.
!The Plantagenet Chronicles: 19,37-9,46-8,60-1

----
From Wikipedia - Fulk of Jerusalem :

Fulk (1089/1092 in Angers - November 13, 1143 in Acre ), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England .

Count of Anjou
Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort . In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France .

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine , cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine .

He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France , but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou . Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar . After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

Crusader and King
By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem . Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem , where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III , born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch , exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset , count of Jaffa , who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon . He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

Securing the borders
Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch , daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch , and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul .

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur , the vizier of Damascus . Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias , to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea , and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea , Fulk had Blanche Garde , Ibelin , and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states . John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

Death
In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre , Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa ).

Family
In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine . Their four children were:
Geoffrey V of Anjou , father of Henry II of England .
Sibylla of Anjou (1112-1165, Bethlehem ), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders .
Alice (or Isabella ) (1107-1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin ; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault .
Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende , Queen of Jerusalem
Baldwin III of Jerusalem
Amalric I of Jerusalem


Bertrand Count of Toulouse and Hélie of Burgundy




Husband Bertrand Count of Toulouse 36

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1112
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 1095



Wife Hélie of Burgundy 37 38

            AKA: Alix of Burgundy, Ela of Burgundy, Alix de Bourgogne, Helia Countess Burgundy
           Born: Abt 1080
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Feb 1141 - Abbey of Perseigne, (Neufchâtel-en-Saosnois), Maine, France
         Buried: 


         Father: Eudes I Duke of Burgundy (Abt 1058-1103) 39 40
         Mother: Sibylle of Burgundy-Ivrea (      -After 1103) 41



   Other Spouse: William III Talvas Count of Alençon & Ponthieu (Abt 1095-1172) 36 42 - Abt 1115


Children

Death Notes: Wife - Hélie of Burgundy

May have died on 28 Feb 1142.


Research Notes: Wife - Hélie of Burgundy

From Wikipedia - Helie of Burgundy :

Helie of Burgundy (c.1080 - 28 February 1141 ) was the daughter of Eudes I and Sibylla of Burgundy.

In June 1095, she married Bertrand of Toulouse , as his second wife. The two had one son, Pons of Tripoli (c.1098-1137).
Bertrand succeeded his father as Count of Toulouse in 1105, and in 1108, he set out for Outremer to claim his father's rights as Count of Tripoli . Helie accompanied him on this expedition, which resulted in the capture of Tripoli in 1109; shortly after, their nephew, William-Jordan died of wounds, giving Bertrand an undisputed claim to Tripoli.

Bertrand died in 1112, and Pons succeeded him in Tripoli. Helie returned to France, where she married William III of Ponthieu in 1115. They had twelve children, including two named Robert, two named William, and two named Enguerrand:
Guy II of Ponthieu (d. 1147)
William (d. aft. 1166)
Robert
Robert de Garennes (d. aft. 1171), a monk
William
Enguerrand
Enguerrand
Mabile
John I, Count of Alençon (d. 1191)
Clemence (d. bef. 1189), married Juhel, Sire de Mayenne
Philippa (d. bef. 1149)
Ela (d. 10 October 1174 ), married first William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey , and second Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury

Helie died on 28 February 1141 , in the Abbey de Perseigne.


Ranulf of Moray and Bethoc




Husband Ranulf of Moray 29

            AKA: Ranulph of Moray
           Born: Abt 1120 - <Moray, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1165
         Buried: 


         Father: Dunegal of Moray (Abt 1090-      ) 29
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 



Wife Bethoc 29

           Born: Abt 1124 - <Row Castle, Bedrule Parish, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Fonia of Moray 29

           Born: Abt 1145 - <Moray, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Reginald Lord of the Isles (Abt 1148-1207) 29 43
           Marr: 1185




Crinan "the Thane" Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Governor of Scots Islands and Bethóc




Husband Crinan "the Thane" Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Governor of Scots Islands 29 44 45

            AKA: Albanach Governor of the Scots Islands, Crínáin of Dunkeld, Grimus Governor of the Scots Islands, Crinan de Mormaer
           Born: Abt 978 - <Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1045 - Dunkeld, Strathtay, (Perth and Kinross), Scotland
         Buried: 


         Father: Duncan Lord of Mormaer (Abt 0949-      ) 29
         Mother: 


       Marriage: Abt 1000



Wife Bethóc 29 46 47

            AKA: Beatrix Princess of Scotland, Bethóc ingen Maíl Coluim meic Cináeda
           Born: Abt 984 - <Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Malcolm II King of Scots (Abt 0970-1034) 29 48 49
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots 50

            AKA: Donnchad mac Crínáin
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Aug 1040 - [near Elgin]
         Buried: 
         Spouse: < > [Daughter of Siward, Danish Earl of Northumbria] (      -      ) 51


2 M Maldred Lord of Carlisle and Allerdale 29 52

            AKA: Maldred Earl of Dunbar
           Born: Abt 1015 - <Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland>
     Christened: 
           Died: 1045
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ealdgyth Princess of Northumbria (Abt 1020-      ) 29 53



Death Notes: Husband - Crinan "the Thane" Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Governor of Scots Islands

Killed in battle


Research Notes: Husband - Crinan "the Thane" Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Governor of Scots Islands

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-19 (Bethoc), quotes "1045. A battle between the Scots themselves, where fell Crinan abot of Duncaillen."

From Wikipedia - Crínán of Dunkeld:
Crínán of Dunkeld (died 1045) was the lay abbot of the diocese of Dunkeld , and perhaps the Mormaer of Atholl . Crínán was progenitor of the House of Dunkeld , the dynasty who would rule Scotland until the later 13th century.

Crinán was married to Bethoc , daughter of King Malcolm II of Scotland (reigned 1005-1034). As Malcolm II had no son, the strongest hereditary claim to the Scottish throne descended through Bethóc, and Crinán's eldest son Donnchad I (reigned 1034-1040), became King of Scots. Some sources indicate that Malcolm II designated Duncan as his successor under the rules of tanistry because there were other possible claimants to the throne.

Crinán's second son, Maldred of Allerdale, held the title of Lord of Cumbria. It is said that from him, the Earls of Dunbar , for example Patrick Dunbar, 9th Earl of Dunbar , descend in unbroken male line.

Crinán was killed in battle in 1045 at Dunkeld.



Research Notes: Wife - Bethóc

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-19

From Wikipedia - Bethóc :
Bethóc ingen Maíl Coluim meic Cináeda was the eldest daughter of King Máel Coluim mac Cináeda , King of Scots , who had no known sons.

The strongest hereditary claim of succession to the Scottish throne therefore passed through Bethóc. Approximately 1000, Princess Bethóc married Crínán , Abbot of Dunkeld. The first son of this marriage was Donnchad I , who ascended to the throne of Scotland in 1034. Early writers have asserted that Máel Coluim also designated Donnchad as his successor under the rules of tanistry because there were other possible claimants to the throne.

It is possible that Bethóc had previously been married to Jarl Sigurd the Stout of Orkney , and to Findláech , the Mormaer of Moireabh .


Death Notes: Child - Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots

Murdered by Macbeth near Elgin, 14 Aug. 1040.


Research Notes: Child - Duncan I MacCrinan King of Scots

Source: Also familysearch.org (Kevin Bradford)

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, line 170-20.
"He besieged Durham, 1035. '1034. Duncan, the son of Crinan, abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethoc, daughter of Malcolm, the son of Kenneth, reigned six years.' This source believes the unbroken succession of the kings of the Scots from Fergus to Malcolm II is "soundly and convincingly authenticated."


Death Notes: Child - Maldred Lord of Carlisle and Allerdale

Slain in battle


Bias of Argos [Mythological] and Pero [Mythological]




Husband Bias of Argos [Mythological] 54

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Pero [Mythological] 55

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Neleus [Mythological] (      -      ) 56
         Mother: Chloris [Mythological] (      -      ) 57




Children
1 M Talaus King of Argos [Mythological] 58

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Lysimache [Mythological] (      -      ) 59



Research Notes: Husband - Bias of Argos [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Bias (mythology) :

In Greek mythology , Bias (Greek : was a brother of Melampus who received one third of Argos (see Melampus for more information). Bias married his cousin Pero and had one child, Talaus , with her. When Pero died he remarried Iphianassa, daughter of Proetus, after Melampus had cured her from madness. He received one third of Proetus's kingdom. Bias and Iphianassa had a daughter Anaxibia who married Pelias , to whom she bore Acastus and several daughters. According to Pausanias , Amythaon is the father of Bias and Melampus .


Research Notes: Wife - Pero [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Pero :

In Greek mythology , Pero was a daughter of Neleus and Chloris , and the wife of her cousin Bias . Her sons included Areius , Leodocus , and Talaus . The story of Pero is mentioned in Book XI of Homer's Odyssey . Pero's beauty attracted many suitors, but Neleus, her father, refused to give his daughter to any man unless he could raid the cattle of Iphicles from Phylace . In this version of the story, an unnamed seer volunteers to undertake the task. The cowherds capture him and keep him for a year, until he makes a prophesy.

In the Odyssey [1], the story is told by the seer Theoklymenos about his ancestor Melampous . Melampous was a wealthy man from Pylos , but he left Pylos fleeing Neleus who held his possessions by force for a year. During that year, Melampous was held prisoner in the house of Phylakos because of the daughter of Neleus, Pero, and an ate sent by the Erinys. Melampous escaped death and drove the cattle back to Pylos. He took Pero home as a wife for his brother.

According to Pherecydes Melampous overhears two woodworms saying that a beam in the ceiling of his prison is about to collapse. He asks the guards to carry him out, and as they step outside, the ceiling collapses, killing another female guard who treated Melampous badly. One of the surviving guards informs Phylakos and Phylakos tells Iphiklos. The two agree to give Melampous the sought after cattle if Melampous can cure Iphiklos' inability to beget children. Melampous makes the appropriate sacrifices to Zeus and asks the birds to whom he distributes portions of the sacrifice for help. The birds bring Melampous a vulture who tells him that Phylakos chased Iphiklos with a knife, presumably because Iphiklos had seen Phylakos do something mischievous. Phylakos, upon failing to catch Iphiklos, planted the knife in a wild pear tree and the bark grew over it. Melampous retrieved the knife and mixed the rust from the knife with wine. Iphiklos drank the wine for 10 days. Eventually a child, Podarkes, is born and the cattle are given to Melampous, who takes the cattle to Neleus as the bride price for Pero. He gives Pero to Bias to wed.

Apollodoros also tells the same story but with some additions. According to Apollodoros, Amythaon is married to his brother Pheres' daughter, Eidomene. Melampous and Bias are their sons. Melampous comes to have the ability to understand the speech of animals through saving the young of some snakes a servant killed. The snake licked his ear giving him the ability to understand animals. In Pero's story, the cattle belong to the father Phylakos and not Iphiklos. The incident that disallows Iphiklos from having children resulted from Iphiklos seeing Phylakos gelding rams and so Phylakos chases Iphiklos with a knife.[2][3]


Research Notes: Child - Talaus King of Argos [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Talaus

In Greek mythology , Talaus (Ancient Greek : was the king of Argos and one of the Argonauts . He was the son of Bias and Pero . His wife was Lysimache , daughter of Abas. He was the father of Adrastus , Astynome, Eriphyle , Mecisteus , Mythidice, and Pronax .[1]


Ranulf I Duke of Aquitaine and Bilichilde of Maine




Husband Ranulf I Duke of Aquitaine 60

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 866 - Aquitaine, (France) 61
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 845



Wife Bilichilde of Maine 60

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Rorick Count of Maine (      -      ) 62
         Mother: 




Children
1 M Ranulf II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine

            AKA: Rannoux II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine
           Born: Abt 855
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Aug 890
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Ranulf I Duke of Aquitaine

"Few details are known about Ranulf I, except that he died in 866 in Aquitaine from wounds received in the Battle of Brissarthe against the Vikings (in which Robert the Strong also died)."


Research Notes: Child - Ranulf II Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine

According to Ancestral Roots, Line 144A-17, Ada was not the mother of Ebles Mancer.


Sources


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2. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-9.

3. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-11.

4. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-11 (Charibert).

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18. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6 (Clotaire II).

19. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-23.

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25. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 119-23 (Fulk IV).

26. Wikipedia.org, Bertrade de Montfort.

27. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-23 (Fulk IV).

28. Wikipedia.org, Simon I de Montfort; Épernon.

29. http://www.familysearch.org.

30. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-24.

31. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593871915.

32. Wikipedia.org, Fulk of Jerusalem.

33. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 129-24 (Fulk V).

34. Wikipedia.org, Ermengarde of Maine.

35. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-24 (Fulk V).

36. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-25 (Hélie of Burgundy).

37. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-25.

38. Wikipedia.org, Helie of Burgundy.

39. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-24.

40. Wikipedia.org, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy.

41. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-24 (Eudes I).

42. Wikipedia.org, William III, Count of Ponthieu.

43. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-26 (Alan).

44. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-19.

45. Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%ADn%C3%A1n_of_Dunkeld.

46. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-19, 172-19.

47. Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethoc.

48. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-18.

49. Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_II_of_Scotland.

50. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-20.

51. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), ine 170-20 (Duncan I MacCrinan).

52. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 172-20.

53. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 34-21.

54. Wikipedia.org, Bias (mythology).

55. Wikipedia.org, Pero.

56. Wikipedia.org, Neleus.

57. Wikipedia.org, Chloris; Pero.

58. Wikipedia.org, Talaus.

59. Wikipedia.org, Lysimache.

60. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-16.

61. Wikipedia.org, "Ranulf I of Aquitaine."

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Sources


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2 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-9.

3 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-11.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-11 (Charibert).

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18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-6 (Clotaire II).

19 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-23.

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22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-22 (Ermengarde of Anjou).

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25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 119-23 (Fulk IV).

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27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-23 (Fulk IV).

28 Wikipedia.org, Simon I de Montfort; Épernon.

29 http://www.familysearch.org.

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-24.

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33 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 129-24 (Fulk V).

34 Wikipedia.org, Ermengarde of Maine.

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 118-24 (Fulk V).

36 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-25 (Hélie of Burgundy).

37 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-25.

38 Wikipedia.org, Helie of Burgundy.

39 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-24.

40 Wikipedia.org, Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy.

41 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-24 (Eudes I).

42 Wikipedia.org, William III, Count of Ponthieu.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 38-26 (Alan).

44 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-19.

45 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%ADn%C3%A1n_of_Dunkeld.

46 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-19, 172-19.

47 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethoc.

48 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-18.

49 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_II_of_Scotland.

50 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-20.

51 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), ine 170-20 (Duncan I MacCrinan).

52 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 172-20.

53 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 34-21.

54 Wikipedia.org, Bias (mythology).

55 Wikipedia.org, Pero.

56 Wikipedia.org, Neleus.

57 Wikipedia.org, Chloris; Pero.

58 Wikipedia.org, Talaus.

59 Wikipedia.org, Lysimache.

60 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-16.

61 Wikipedia.org, "Ranulf I of Aquitaine."

62 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 144A-16 (Ranulf I).


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