The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




Henry Count of Verdun




Husband Henry Count of Verdun

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


Children
1 F Judith 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 991
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Otto Duke of Carinthia (      -1004) 1




Research Notes: Husband - Henry Count of Verdun

May not have been the father of Judith, wife of Otto, Duke of Carinthia.


Research Notes: Child - Judith

Ancestral Roots says "prob. dau. of Henry, Count of Verdun." 1


Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne




Husband Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon 2 3

            AKA: Henry Prince of Scotland
           Born: 1114
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Jun 1152
         Buried: 


         Father: David I "The Saint" King of Scots (Abt 1083-1153) 4 5
         Mother: Maud of Huntingdon (Abt 1074-1131) 3 6 7


       Marriage: 1139



Wife Ada de Warenne 3 8 9

            AKA: Adeline de Warren
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1178
         Buried: 


         Father: William II de Warenne 2nd Earl of Surrey (Abt 1065-1138) 3 10 11
         Mother: Isabel de Vermandois Countess of Leicester (Abt 1081-1131) 8 12




Children
1 F Margaret of Huntingdon 13

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1201
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Humphrey IV de Bohun Baron de Bohun, Lord of Hereford (      -Abt 1182) 14 15
           Marr: 1175
         Spouse: Alan Lord of Galloway (Abt 1186-1234) 11
           Marr: 1209




Research Notes: Husband - Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon

Eldest son of David I, King of Scots.

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, Baltimore, 2008, Line 170-23 2 3


Research Notes: Wife - Ada de Warenne

Widow of Conale Petit, Earl of Brittany and Richmond. Sister of William the Lion, King of Scots.

From Wikipedia - Elizabeth of Vermandois :

Ada de Warenne (d. ca. 1178 ), who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon , younger son of King David I of Scotland , Earl of Huntingdon by his marriage to the heiress Matilda or Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon (herself great-niece of William I of England ) and had issue. They were parents to Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland and their youngest son became David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon . All Kings of Scotland since 1292 were the descendants of Huntingdon. 3 8 9


Research Notes: Child - Margaret of Huntingdon

Second wife of Alan, Lord of Galloway. 13


Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal and Theresa of Leon and Castile




Husband Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal 11 16 17




            AKA: Henri of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henrique of Burgundy, Count of Portugal, Henry I de Bourgogne, Henry I Count of Portugal
           Born: 1069 - <Bourgogne, Champagne>, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Nov 1112
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry of Burgundy (Abt 1035-Abt 1071) 11 18 19
         Mother: < > [Not Sibylle of Barcelona] (      -      )


       Marriage: 1093



Wife Theresa of Leon and Castile 11

            AKA: Teresa Alfonsez of Léon and Castile
           Born: Abt 1070 - <Toledo, Castile>, Spain
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Nov 1130
         Buried: 


         Father: Alfonso VI "the Brave" of Castile, King of Castile and Leon (Bef 1040-1109) 11 20 21
         Mother: Ximena Nunia de Guzman (Abt 1048-1128) 11 22




Children
1 M Afonso I King of Portugal 23 24




            AKA: Affonso I "the Conqueror" King of Portugal and the Algarves, Afonso Henriques King of Portugal, Alfonso I King of Portugal, Henriquez I King of Portugal
           Born: 25 Jul 1109 - Viseu, Viseu, Portugal
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Dec 1185 - Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
         Buried:  - Santa Cruz Monastery, Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
         Spouse: Maud of Savoy (1125-1158) 11 25 26
           Marr: Bef Jun 1146 - Chambéry, Savoie, France




Research Notes: Husband - Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal

From Wikipedia - Henry, Count of Portugal :

Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal (1066 -1112 ) was Count of Portugal from 1093 to his death. He was the son of Henry of Burgundy , heir of Robert I, Duke of Burgundy , and brother of Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy and Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy . His name is Henri in modern French , Henricus in Latin , Enrique in modern Spanish and Henrique in modern Portuguese . He was a distant cousin of Raymond of Burgundy and Pope Callistus II .
As a younger son, Henry had little chances of acquiring fortune and titles by inheritance, thus he joined the Reconquista against the Moors in the Iberian Peninsula . He helped king Alfonso VI of Castile and León conquer modern Galicia and the north of Portugal and in reward he married Alfonso's daughter Theresa, Countess of Portugal in 1093 , receiving the County of Portugal , then a fiefdom of the Kingdom of León , as a dowry .

From Teresa, Henry had three sons and three daughters. The only son to survive childhood was Afonso Henriques , who became the second Count of Portugal in 1112. However, the young man Afonso was energetic and expanded his dominions at the expense of Muslims . In 1139 , he declared himself King of Portugal after reneging the subjugation to León, in open confrontation with his mother. Two daughters also survived childhood, Urraca and Sancha. Urraca Henriques married a Bermudo Peres de Trava, Count of Trastamara. Sancha Henriques married a nobleman, Sancho Nunes de Celanova. 11 16 17


Research Notes: Wife - Theresa of Leon and Castile

Natural daughter of Alkfonso VI by his mistress Ximena Nunia de Guzman. 11


Research Notes: Child - Afonso I King of Portugal

First king of Portugal.

From Wikipedia - Afonso I of Portugal :

Afonso I (English Alphonzo or Alphonse), more commonly known as Afonso Henriques (pronounced [?'fõsu ?'?ik??] ), or also Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician ) or Alphonsus (Latin version), (Viseu , 1109 , traditionally July 25 - Coimbra , 1185 December 6 ), also known as the Conqueror (Port. o Conquistador), was the first King of Portugal , declaring his independence from León .


Life
Afonso I was the son of Henry of Burgundy, Count of Portugal and Teresa of León , the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of Castile and León . He was proclaimed King on July 26 , 1139 , immediately after the Battle of Ourique , and died on December 6 , 1185 in Coimbra .

At the end of the 11th century , the Iberian Peninsula political agenda was mostly concerned with the Reconquista , the driving out of the Muslim successor-states to the Caliphate of Cordoba after its collapse. With European military aristocracies focused on the Crusades , Alfonso VI called for the help of the French nobility to deal with the Moors . In exchange, he was to give the hands of his daughters in wedlock to the leaders of the expedition and bestow royal privileges to the others. Thus, the royal heiress Urraca of Castile wedded Raymond of Burgundy , younger son of the Count of Burgundy , and her half-sister, princess Teresa of León , wedded his cousin, another French crusader, Henry of Burgundy , younger brother of the Duke of Burgundy . Henry was made Count of Portugal, a burdensome county south of Galicia , where Moorish incursions and attacks were to be expected. With his wife Teresa as co-ruler of Portugal, Henry withstood the ordeal and held the lands for his father-in-law.

From this wedlock several sons were born, but only one, Afonso Henriques (meaning "Afonso son of Henry") thrived. The boy, probably born around 1109, followed his father as Count of Portugal in 1112 , under the tutelage of his mother. The relations between Teresa and her son Afonso proved difficult. Only eleven years old, Afonso already had his own political ideas, greatly different from his mother's. In 1120 , the young prince took the side of the archbishop of Braga , a political foe of Teresa, and both were exiled by her orders. Afonso spent the next years away from his own county , under the watch of the bishop. In 1122 Afonso became fourteen, the adult age in the 12th century . He made himself a knight on his own account in the Cathedral of Zamora , raised an army , and proceeded to take control of his lands. Near Guimarães , at the Battle of São Mamede (1128 ) he overcame the troops under his mother's lover and ally Count Fernando Peres de Trava of Galicia , making her his prisoner and exiling her forever to a monastery in León . Thus the possibility of incorporating Portugal into a Kingdom of Galicia was eliminated and Afonso become sole ruler (Duke of Portugal) after demands for independence from the county's people, church and nobles. He also vanquished Alfonso VII of Castile and León , another of his mother's allies, and thus freed the county from political dependence on the crown of León and Castile . On April 6 , 1129 , Afonso Henriques dictated the writ in which he proclaimed himself Prince of Portugal.

...In 1169 , Afonso was disabled in an engagement near Badajoz by a fall from his horse , and made prisoner by the soldiers of the king of León. Portugal was obliged to surrender as his ransom almost all the conquests Afonso had made in Galicia in the previous years.

In 1179 the privileges and favours given to the Roman Catholic Church were compensated. In the papal bull Manifestis Probatum , Pope Alexander III acknowledged Afonso as King and Portugal as an independent land with the right to conquer lands from the Moors. With this papal blessing, Portugal was at last secured as a country and safe from any Castilian attempts at annexation.

In 1184 , in spite of his great age, he still had sufficient energy to relieve his son Sancho, who was besieged in Santarém by the Moors. He died shortly after, on December 6 , 1185 .

The Portuguese revere him as a hero, both on account of his personal character and as the founder of their nation . There are stories that it would take 10 men to carry his sword, and that Afonso would want to engage other monarchs in personal combat, but no one would dare accept his challenge. 23 24


Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester and Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester




Husband Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester 27 28

            AKA: Henry of Lancaster, Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester, Henry Plantagenet Earl of Leicester, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Henry "Tortcol" Plantagenet


           Born: Abt 1281 - Grosmont Castle, Monmouthshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Mar 1345 - Canons Monastery, England
         Buried:  - Newark Abbey, Leicestershire, England


         Father: Edmund "Crouchback" 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester (1245-1296) 29
         Mother: Blanche of Artois (Between 1245/1250-1302) 30


       Marriage: Bef 2 Mar 1297 - Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales

   Other Spouse: Alix de Geneville (      -1336) 31



Wife Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester 32 33 34

            AKA: Matilda de Chaworth, Maud Chaworth
           Born: 2 Feb 1282 - <Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire>, Wales
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 3 Dec 1322
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Patrick de Chaworth 5th Baron of Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly (Abt 1260-1283) 33 35
         Mother: Isabella de Beauchamp (Abt 1252-Bef 1306) 11 36 37




Children
1 F Blanche of Lancaster 33

           Born: Abt 1305
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 12 Jul 1380
         Buried: 



2 M Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster 38

            AKA: Henry of Grosmont 1st Duke of Lancaster
           Born: Abt 1310
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Mar 1361
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Isabel de Beaumont (Abt 1320-1361) 39
           Marr: 1337 39



3 F Maud of Lancaster 33

           Born: Abt 1310
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1377
         Buried: 



4 F Joan of Lancaster 40

            AKA: Joan Plantagenet
           Born: Abt 1312
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Jul 1345 - Yorkshire, England
         Buried: 



5 F Isabel of Lancaster, Abess of Ambresbury

           Born: Abt 1317
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1347
         Buried: 



6 F Eleanor of Lancaster 41 42

            AKA: Eleanor Plantagenet
           Born: Abt 1318 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jan 1372 - Arundel Castle, West Sussex, England
         Buried:  - Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England
         Spouse: John de Beaumont Earl of Buchan, 2nd Lord Beaumont (1318-1342) 43 44
           Marr: 6 Nov 1330 39
         Spouse: Sir Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan 10th Earl of Arundel and Warenne (Abt 1313-1376) 45 46 47
           Marr: 5 Feb 1345 - Ditton Church, Stokes Poges, Buckinghamshire, England



7 F Mary of Lancaster 33

           Born: Abt 1320
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Sep 1362
         Buried: 




Death Notes: Husband - Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester

Ancestral Roots, line 17-29, has d. 22 Sept. 1345, bur. Neward Abbey, co. Leics.
Wikipedia has d. 25 March 1345.


Research Notes: Husband - Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester

One of the principals behind the deposition of King Edward II.

Some data from Albert Doublass Hart, Jr ("Our Folk" - de Chaworth Family Genealogy). Albert has death date as 22 Sep 1345 in Cannons Monastery, England.
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From Wikipedia - Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster :

Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster (1281 - March 25 , 1345 ) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II.

Lineage
He was the younger son of Blanche of Artois and Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster , Earl of Leicester , who was a son of Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence .

Henry's elder brother Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster succeeded their father in 1296 , but Henry was summoned to Parliament on February 6 , 1298 /99 by writ directed Henrico de Lancastre nepoti Regis, by which he is held to have become Lord Lancaster. He took part in the siege of Carlaverock in July 1300 .

Petition for succession and inheritance
Thomas was convicted of treason, executed and his lands and titles forfeited in 1322 . But Henry, who had not participated in his brother's rebellion, petitioned for his brother's lands and titles, and on March 29 , 1324 he was invested as Earl of Leicester , and a few years later the earldom of Lancaster was also restored to him.

Revenge
On the Queen's return to England with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March in September 1326 , Henry joined her party against King Edward II, which led to a general desertion of the King's cause and overturned the power of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester and his namesake son Hugh the younger Despenser .

He was sent in pursuit and captured the king at Neath in South Wales. He was appointed to take charge of the King, and was responsible for his custody at Kenilworth Castle .

Full restoration and reward
After Edward II's death Henry was appointed guardian of the new king Edward III of England , and was also appointed captain-general of all the King's forces in the Scottish Marches .

Loss of sight
In about the year 1330 , he became blind .

Succession
He was succeeded as Earl of Lancaster and Leicester by his eldest son, Henry of Grosmont , who subsequently became Duke of Lancaster.

Family

He married Maud Chaworth , before 2 March 1296 /1297 .
Henry and Maud had seven children:
Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster , (about 1300 -1360 /61 )
Blanche of Lancaster, (about 1305 - 1380 ) married Thomas Wake, 2nd Baron Wake of Liddell
Maud of Lancaster, (about 1310 -1377 ); married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster
Joan of Lancaster , (about 1312 -1345 ); married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray
Isabel of Lancaster, Abbess of Ambresbury, (about 1317 -after 1347 )
Eleanor of Lancaster , (about 1318 -1371 /72 ) married (1) John De Beaumont and (2) 5 Feb. 1344/5, Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel ;
Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320 -1362 ), who married Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy , and was the mother of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland . 27 28


Research Notes: Wife - Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester

From Wikipedia - Maud Chaworth :

Maud de Chaworth (2 February 1282 - 1322), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child of Patrick de Chaworth . Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster , by whom she had seven children. Although the exact date of her death is unknown, it is estimated that she must have died sometime before 3 December 1322.

Parents
Maud was the daughter and only child of Sir Patrick de Chaworth ,Lord of Kidwelly, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and Isabella de Beauchamp . Her maternal grandfather was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick . Her father, Patrick de Chaworth died on 7 July 1283. He was thought to be 30 years old. Approximately, three years later, in 1286, Isabella de Beauchamp married Hugh Despenser the Elder and had two sons and four daughters by him. This made Maud the half-sister of Hugh the younger Despenser . Her mother, Isabella de Beauchamp, died in 1306.

Childhood
When her father died, Maud was only a year old and his death left her a wealthy heiress. However, because she was an infant, she became a ward of Eleanor of Castile , Queen consort of King Edward I of England . Upon Queen Eleanor's death in 1290, her husband, King Edward I, granted Maud's marriage to his brother Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster on 30 December 1292.
Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster , Earl of Leicester was the son of Eleanor of Provence and Henry III of England . He first married Aveline de Forz, Countess of Albemarle, in 1269. Later, in Paris on 3 February 1276, he married Blanche of Artois who is niece of Louis IX and Queen of Navarre by association with her first marriage. Blanche and Edmund had four children together, one of whom was Henry Plantagenet, who would later become 3rd Earl of Leicester and Maud Chaworth's husband.

[edit ] Marriage and Children
Although sources say that Edmund was married to Maud, it has been suggested that Maud was betrothed to Edmund and his son Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster [1] together, to ensure that she married into the family even if Edmund were to die. Therefore, when Edmund did pass away, Henry and Maud were bonded in holy matrimony sometime before 2 March 1297. Henry was supposedly born between the years 1280 and 1281, making him somewhat older than Maud, but not by much since they were either fourteen or fifteen-years-old.
Since Maud inherited her father's property, Henry also acquired this property through the rights of marriage. Some of that property was of the following: Hampshire, Glamorgan, Wiltshire, and Carmarthenshire. Henry was the nephew to the King of England, as well as being closely associated with the French royal family line. Henry's half-sister Jeanne (or Juana) was given the title Queen of Navarre in her own right, and married Philip IV of France. Not only that, but Henry was the uncle of King Edward II 's Queen Isabella and of three Kings of France. He was also the younger brother of Thomas (Earl of Lancaster) and first cousin of Edward II.
Maud is very often described as the "Countess of Leicester" or "Countess of Lancaster" but she never bore the titles as she died before her husband received them. Henry was only named "Earl of Leicester" in 1324 and "Earl of Lancaster" in 1327, both after her death. Henry never remarried and died on 22 September 1345 when he would have been in his mid-sixties. All but one of his seven children with Maud outlived him.
Maud and Henry had seven children:
Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster , (about 1310-1361); Maud's only son Henry was usually called Henry of Grosmont to distinguish him from his father. He was one of the great, well known and respected men of the fourteenth century. He took after his father and was well educated, literate, pious, a soldier and a diplomat. Henry produced his own memoir "Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines" which was completed in 1354. At one point, Henry of Grosmont was considered to be the richest man in England aside from the Prince of Wales. He was emerging as a political figure in his own right within England: he was knighted and represented his father in parliament. It was in the same year that he married his wife, Isabella, daughter of Henry, Lord Beaumont. His daughter Blanche was betrothed and eventually married to the son of Edward III, John of Gaunt. In 1361, Henry was killed by a new outbreak of the Black Death, leaving John of Gaunt his inheritance and eventually his title through his daughter Blanche.[2]
Blanche of Lancaster , (about 1302/05-1380); Maud's eldest daughter was probably born between 1302 and 1305, and was named after her father's mother Blanche of Artois . Around 9 October 1316, she married Thomas Wake , the second baron of Liddell. Blanch was about forty-five when Thomas died and lived as a widow for more than thirty years. She was one of the executers of her brother Henry's will when he died in 1361. Blanche outlived all her siblings, dying shortly before 12 July 1380 in her mid to late seventies. Born in the reign of Edward I, she survived all the way into the reign of his great grandson Richard II.
Maud of Lancaster, (about 1310-1345)There is some discrepancy as to when Maud died. Another possible date of her death is 1377[3]
married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster in 1327. They bore one child, Elizabeth de Burgh who was born 6 July 1332. Eleven months after the birth of their child, Earl William was murdered at "Le Ford" in Belfast, apparently by some of his own men. The countess Maud fled to England with her baby and stayed with the royal family. In 1337, Maud of Lancaster managed to ensure that the Justiciar of Ireland was forbidden to pardon her husband's killers. She fought for her dower rights and exerted some influence there. She remarried in 1344 to Ralph Ufford and returned to Ireland where she had another daughter, Maud. After her second husband fell ill in 1346, she again returned to England. Maud of Lancaster died on May 5, 1345/77.
Joan of Lancaster , (about 1312-1345); married between February 28 and June 4, 1327 to John, Lord Mowbray . John's father was horribly executed for reasons unknown and young John was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with his mother Alice de Braose, until late 1326. A large part of his inheritance was granted to Hugh Despenser the Younger, who was his future wife's uncle; however he was set free in 1327 before the marriage. Joan of Lancaster probably died in her early thirties, sometime before August 1344.
Isabel of Lancaster, Prioress of Ambresbury, (about 1317-after 1347); often said to be born in 1317 as one of the youngest daughters of Maud and Henry. Her life is somewhat obscure, going on pilgrimages and spending a lot of time alone. She spent a great deal of time outside the cloister on non-spiritual matters. Her father had given her quite a bit of property which she administered herself. She owned hunting dogs and had personal servants. She used her family connections to secure privileges and concessions.[4]
Eleanor of Lancaster , (1318- Sept. 1372); married John Beaumont between September and November 1330. Eleanor bore John a son, Henry, who married Margaret de Vere, a sister of Elizabeth and Thomas de Vere, Earl of Oxford. John Beaumont was killed in a jousting tournament in Northampton on 14 April 1342. Eleanor then became mistress of the Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel , who happened to be married to her first cousin Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger. Richard obtained a divorce from the Pope and married Eleanor on 5 February 1345 in the presence of Edward III. They had five children together, three sons and two daughters. Eleanor died on 11 January 1372.
Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320-1362); married Henry, Lord Percy before September 4, 1334 who fought at the battle of Crecy in 1346, and served in Gascony under the command of his brother in law Henry of Grosmont. Their son was Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland . Mary of Lancaster died on 1 September 1362, the year after her brother Henry. 32 33 34


Notes: Marriage

Marriage year could be 1296


Research Notes: Child - Blanche of Lancaster

From Wikipedia - Maud Chaworth :

Blanche of Lancaster , (about 1302/05-1380); Maud's eldest daughter was probably born between 1302 and 1305, and was named after her father's mother Blanche of Artois . Around 9 October 1316, she married Thomas Wake , the second baron of Liddell. Blanch was about forty-five when Thomas died and lived as a widow for more than thirty years. She was one of the executers of her brother Henry's will when he died in 1361. Blanche outlived all her siblings, dying shortly before 12 July 1380 in her mid to late seventies. Born in the reign of Edward I, she survived all the way into the reign of his great grandson Richard II. 33


Research Notes: Child - Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster

From Wikipedia - Alice Comyn :

Isabel de Beaumont (c.1320- 1361), married in 1337 Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster , by whom she had two daughters, Maud, Countess of Leicester and Blanche of Lancaster .
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From Wikipedia - Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster :

Henry of Grosmont, Duke of Lancaster[a] (c.1310 - 23 March 1361), also Earl of Derby and Leicester, was a member of the English nobility in the 14th century, and a prominent English diplomat , politician , and soldier . The son and heir of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth , he became one of Edward III 's most trusted Captains in the early phases of the Hundred Years' War , and distinguished himself with victory in the Battle of Auberoche . He was a founding member of the Order of the Garter , and in 1351 was promoted to the title of duke. Grosmont was also the author of the book Livre de seyntz medicines; a highly personal devotional treatise. He is remembered as one of the founders and early patrons of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge , which was established by two of the guilds of the town in 1352.

Family background and early life
Grosmont's uncle, Thomas of Lancaster , was the son and heir of Edward I 's brother Edmund Crouchback . Through his inheritance and a fortunate marriage, Thomas became the wealthiest peer in England, but constant quarrels with King Edward II led to his execution in 1322.[1] Having no heir, Thomas's possessions and titles went to his younger brother Henry - Grosmont's father. Earl Henry of Lancaster assented to the deposition of Edward II in 1327, but did not long stay in favour with the regency of Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer . When Edward III took personal control of the government in 1330, relations with the Crown got better, but by this time the older Henry was already struggling with poor health and blindness.[2]

Little is known of Grosmont's early years, but it seems clear that he was born at the castle of Grosmont in Monmouthshire , and that he was born c.1310, not around the turn of the century as previously held.[3] According to his own memoirs he was better at the martial arts than at academic subjects, and did not learn to read until later in life.[4] In 1330 he was knighted, and represented his father in parliament . The next year he is recorded as participating in a Royal tournament , at Cheapside .[3]

In 1333 he took part in Edward's Scottish campaign, though it is unclear whether he was present at the great English victory at the Battle of Halidon Hill .[5] After further service in the north , he was appointed the King's lieutenant in Scotland in 1336.[3] The next year he was one of the six men Edward III promoted to the higher levels of the peerage. One of his father's lesser titles, that of Earl of Derby , was bestowed upon Grosmont.[6]


Service in France
With the outbreak of the Hundred Years' War in 1337, Grosmont's attention was turned towards France . He took part in several diplomatic missions and minor campaigns, and was present at the great English victory in the naval battle of Sluys in 1340.[7] Later the same year, he was required to commit himself as hostage in the Low Countries for the king's considerable debts. He remained hostage until the next year, and had to pay a large ransom for his own release.[8] On his return he was made the king's lieutenant in the north, and stayed at Roxburgh until 1342. The next years he spent in diplomatic negotiations in the Low Countries, Castile and Avignon .[3]

In 1345 Edward III was planning a major assault on France. A three-pronged attack would have the Earl of Northampton attacking from Brittany , the King himself from Flanders , while Grosmont was dispatched to Aquitaine to prepare a campaign in the south.[3] Moving rapidly through the country he confronted the comte d'Isle at Auberoche on 21 October , and here achieved a victory described as 'the greatest single achievement of Lancaster's entire military career'.[9] The ransom from the prisoners has been estimated at £50,000.[10] The next year, while Edward was carrying out his Crécy campaign, Grosmont laid siege to, and captured, Poitiers , before returning home to England in 1347.[3]


Duke of Lancaster
In 1345, while Grosmont was in France, his father died. The younger Henry was now Earl of Lancaster - the wealthiest and most powerful peer of the realm. After participating in the siege of Calais in 1347, the king honoured Lancaster by including him as a founding knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348.[11] A few years later, in 1351, Edward bestowed an even greater honour on Lancaster, when he created him Duke of Lancaster . The title of duke was of relatively new origin in England; only one other ducal title existed prior.[b] In addition to this, Lancaster was given palatinate status for the county of Lancashire , which entailed a separate administration independent of the crown.[12] This grant was quite exceptional in English history; only two other counties palatine existed: Durham , which was an ancient ecclesiastical palatinate, and Chester , which was crown property. It is a sign of Edward's high regard for Lancaster that he would bestow such extensive privileges on him. The two men were also second cousins, through their great-grandfather Henry III , and practically coeval (Edward was born in 1312), so it is natural to assume that a strong sense of camaraderie existed between them. Another factor that might have influenced the king's decision was the fact that Henry had no male heir, so the grant was made for the Earl's lifetime only, and not intended to be hereditary.[3]

Further prestige
Lancaster spent the 1350s intermittently campaigning and negotiating peace treaties with the French. In 1350 he was present at the naval victory at Winchelsea , where he allegedly saved the lives of the Black Prince and John of Gaunt .[13] The years 1351-2 he spent on crusade in Prussia . It was here that a quarrel with Otto, Duke of Brunswick , almost led to a duel between the two men, narrowly averted by the intervention of the French King, Jean II .[14] In the later half of the decade campaigning in France resumed. After a chevauchée in Normandy in 1356 and the siege of Rennes in 1358, Lancaster participated in the last great offensive of the first phase of the Hundred Years' War: the Rheims campaign of 1359-60. Then he was appointed principal negotiator for the treaty of Brétigny , where the English achieved very favourable terms.[3]

Returning to England in November 1360 he fell ill early the next year, and died at Leicester Castle on 23 March . It is likely that the cause of death was the plague , which that year was making a second visitation of England.[15]

Private life
Lancaster was married to Isabella, daughter of Henry, Lord Beaumont , in 1330. The two had no sons, but two daughters: Maude and Blanche . While Maude was married to the Duke of Bavaria , Blanche married Edward III's younger son, John of Gaunt . Gaunt ended up inheriting Lancaster's possessions and ducal title, but it was not until 1377, when the dying King Edward III was largely incapacitated, that he was able to restore the palatinate rights for the county of Lancaster. When Gaunt's son Henry of Bolingbroke usurped the crown in 1399 and became Henry IV, the vast Lancaster inheritance was merged with the crown as the Duchy of Lancaster .[16]

We know more of Lancaster's character than of most of his contemporaries, through his memoirs the Livre de seyntz medicines (Book of the Holy Doctors). This book is a highly personal treatise on matters of religion and piety, but it also contains details of historical interest. It is, among other things, revealed that Lancaster, at the age of 44 when he wrote the book in 1354, suffered from gout .[3] The book is primarily a devotional work though; it is organized around seven wounds which Henry claims to have, representing the seven sins. Lancaster confesses to his sins, explains various real and mythical medical remedies in terms of their theological symbolism, and exhorts the reader to greater morality.[17] 38



Research Notes: Child - Maud of Lancaster

From Wikipedia - Maud Chaworth :

Maud of Lancaster, (about 1310-1345)There is some discrepancy as to when Maud died. Another possible date of her death is 1377[3]

married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster in 1327. They bore one child, Elizabeth de Burgh who was born 6 July 1332. Eleven months after the birth of their child, Earl William was murdered at "Le Ford" in Belfast, apparently by some of his own men. The countess Maud fled to England with her baby and stayed with the royal family. In 1337, Maud of Lancaster managed to ensure that the Justiciar of Ireland was forbidden to pardon her husband's killers. She fought for her dower rights and exerted some influence there. She remarried in 1344 to Ralph Ufford and returned to Ireland where she had another daughter, Maud. After her second husband fell ill in 1346, she again returned to England. Maud of Lancaster died on May 5, 1345/77. 33


Death Notes: Child - Joan of Lancaster

Died of the plague


Research Notes: Child - Joan of Lancaster

From Wikipedia - Joan of Lancaster :

Joan of Lancaster (c. 1310 - 7 July 1345) is also called Joan Plantagenet after her family's name. She married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray on 28 February 1326 or 1327, then died in Yorkshire , England, of the plague.[1]

-------
From Wikipedia - Maud Chaworth :
Joan of Lancaster , (about 1312-1345); married between February 28 and June 4, 1327 to John, Lord Mowbray . John's father was horribly executed for reasons unknown and young John was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with his mother Alice de Braose, until late 1326. A large part of his inheritance was granted to Hugh Despenser the Younger, who was his future wife's uncle; however he was set free in 1327 before the marriage. Joan of Lancaster probably died in her early thirties, sometime before August 1344. 40


Research Notes: Child - Eleanor of Lancaster

Second wife of Richard (FitzAlan) d'Arundel.

From Wikipedia - Eleanor of Lancaster :

Eleanor of Lancaster (sometimes called Eleanor Plantagenet 1) (about 1315 - 11 January 1372 ) was born as the fifth daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancaster (c. 1281-1345) and his wife Maud Chaworth (1282-1322).


First marriage and offspring
Sometime between September 1 and November 6 , 1330 , she married John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont , son of Henry Beaumont, 4th Earl of Buchan (c. 1288 - 1340) and his wife Alice Comyn (c. 1291-1349). They had two children:
Henry Beaumont, 3rd Lord Beaumont , born 1340
Matilda Beaumont (died July 1467), married Hugh de Courtenay
Eleanor was a lady-in-waiting to Queen Philippa , and was in service to her in Ghent when her son Henry was born. John de Beaumont died in a tournament on 14 April 1342 .

Second marriage
On 5 February 1344 at Ditton Church , Stoke Poges , Buckinghamshire , she married Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel (9th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots), 4th Earl of Surrey, known by the soubriquet of "Copped Hat", Justiciar of North Wales, Governor of Carnarvon Castle, Admiral of the West.2

His previous marriage, to Isabel le Despenser , had taken place when they were children. It was annulled by Papal mandate as she, since her father's attainder and execution, had ceased to be of any importance to him. Pope Clement VI obligingly annulled the marriage, bastardized the issue, and provided a dispensation for his second marriage to the woman with whom he had been living in adultery (the dispensation, dated 4 March 1344 /1345 , was required because his first and second wives were first cousins).
The children of Eleanor's second marriage were:
Richard (1346-1397), who succeeded as Earl of Arundel
John Fitzalan (bef 1349-1379)
Thomas Arundel , Archbishop of York (c. 1345-February 19 , 1413 )
Joan Fitzalan (bef. 1351-April 17 , 1419 ), married Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford
Alice Fitzalan (1352 -March 17 , 1416 ), married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (Thomas Holand)

Eleanor died at Arundel and was buried at Lewes Priory in Lewes , Sussex , England. Her husband was buried beside her; in his will Richard requests to be buried "near to the tomb of Eleanor de Lancaster, my wife; and I desire that my tomb be no higher than hers, that no men at arms, horses, hearse, or other pomp, be used at my funeral, but only five torches...as was about the corpse of my wife, be allowed."

Sources
Fowler, Kenneth. The King's Lieutenant, 1969
Nicolas, Nicholas Harris. Testamenta Vetusta, 1826.
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 17-30, 21-30, 28-33, 97-33, 114-31

Notes
1The surname "Plantagenet" has been retrospectively applied to the descendants of Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou and Empress Matilda without historical justification: it is simply a convenient, if deceptive, method of referring to people who had, in fact, no surname. The first descendant of Geoffrey to use the surname was Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (father of both Edward IV of England and Richard III of England ) who apparently assumed it about 1448.
2also called Richard de Arundel. 41 42


Research Notes: Child - Mary of Lancaster

From Wikipedia - Maud Chaworth :

Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320-1362); married Henry, Lord Percy before September 4, 1334 who fought at the battle of Crecy in 1346, and served in Gascony under the command of his brother in law Henry of Grosmont. Their son was Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland . Mary of Lancaster died on 1 September 1362, the year after her brother Henry. 33


Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester and Alix de Geneville




Husband Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester 27 28

            AKA: Henry of Lancaster, Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester, Henry Plantagenet Earl of Leicester, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Henry "Tortcol" Plantagenet


           Born: Abt 1281 - Grosmont Castle, Monmouthshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Mar 1345 - Canons Monastery, England
         Buried:  - Newark Abbey, Leicestershire, England


         Father: Edmund "Crouchback" 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester (1245-1296) 29
         Mother: Blanche of Artois (Between 1245/1250-1302) 30


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Maud de Chaworth Countess of Lancaster & Countess of Leicester (1282-Bef 1322) 32 33 34 - Bef 2 Mar 1297 - Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales



Wife Alix de Geneville 31

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 19 Apr 1336
         Buried: 


Children

Death Notes: Husband - Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester

Ancestral Roots, line 17-29, has d. 22 Sept. 1345, bur. Neward Abbey, co. Leics.
Wikipedia has d. 25 March 1345.


Research Notes: Husband - Henry 3rd Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester

One of the principals behind the deposition of King Edward II.

Some data from Albert Doublass Hart, Jr ("Our Folk" - de Chaworth Family Genealogy). Albert has death date as 22 Sep 1345 in Cannons Monastery, England.
------
From Wikipedia - Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster :

Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster (1281 - March 25 , 1345 ) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II.

Lineage
He was the younger son of Blanche of Artois and Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster , Earl of Leicester , who was a son of Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence .

Henry's elder brother Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster succeeded their father in 1296 , but Henry was summoned to Parliament on February 6 , 1298 /99 by writ directed Henrico de Lancastre nepoti Regis, by which he is held to have become Lord Lancaster. He took part in the siege of Carlaverock in July 1300 .

Petition for succession and inheritance
Thomas was convicted of treason, executed and his lands and titles forfeited in 1322 . But Henry, who had not participated in his brother's rebellion, petitioned for his brother's lands and titles, and on March 29 , 1324 he was invested as Earl of Leicester , and a few years later the earldom of Lancaster was also restored to him.

Revenge
On the Queen's return to England with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March in September 1326 , Henry joined her party against King Edward II, which led to a general desertion of the King's cause and overturned the power of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester and his namesake son Hugh the younger Despenser .

He was sent in pursuit and captured the king at Neath in South Wales. He was appointed to take charge of the King, and was responsible for his custody at Kenilworth Castle .

Full restoration and reward
After Edward II's death Henry was appointed guardian of the new king Edward III of England , and was also appointed captain-general of all the King's forces in the Scottish Marches .

Loss of sight
In about the year 1330 , he became blind .

Succession
He was succeeded as Earl of Lancaster and Leicester by his eldest son, Henry of Grosmont , who subsequently became Duke of Lancaster.

Family

He married Maud Chaworth , before 2 March 1296 /1297 .
Henry and Maud had seven children:
Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster , (about 1300 -1360 /61 )
Blanche of Lancaster, (about 1305 - 1380 ) married Thomas Wake, 2nd Baron Wake of Liddell
Maud of Lancaster, (about 1310 -1377 ); married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster
Joan of Lancaster , (about 1312 -1345 ); married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray
Isabel of Lancaster, Abbess of Ambresbury, (about 1317 -after 1347 )
Eleanor of Lancaster , (about 1318 -1371 /72 ) married (1) John De Beaumont and (2) 5 Feb. 1344/5, Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel ;
Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320 -1362 ), who married Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy , and was the mother of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland . 27 28


Research Notes: Wife - Alix de Geneville

Widow of Jean d'Arcis, d. 1307. 31


Henry Count of Séez and Isabella de Conteville




Husband Henry Count of Séez 48

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Isabella de Conteville 48

            AKA: Isabella de Burgo
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Herluin de Conteville Viscount of Conteville, Count of Crespon (Abt 1001-Abt 1066) 49 50 51
         Mother: Harlette de Falaise (Abt 1003-Bef 1050) 52 53 54




Children

Research Notes: Wife - Isabella de Conteville

Per Wikipedia (Herluin de Conteville) could have been married to William, lord of La Ferte -Mace instead of Muriel. 48


Henry I Duke of Bavaria and Wulfhilda of Saxony




Husband Henry I Duke of Bavaria 55

           Born: 1074
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Dec 1126
         Buried: 


         Father: Welf IV Duke of Bavaria (      -1101) 56
         Mother: Judith of Normandy (1028-1094) 57


       Marriage: Between 1095 and 1100



Wife Wulfhilda of Saxony 58

           Born: Abt 1075
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Dec 1126
         Buried: 


         Father: Magnus Duke of Saxony (Bef 1045-1106) 59
         Mother: Sophia (      -1095) 60




Children
1 F Judith of Bavaria

           Born: 1100
     Christened: 
           Died: 1130
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, Duke of Swabia (1090-1147) 61 62
           Marr: 1121




Research Notes: Child - Judith of Bavaria

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 166-25.


Henry I Count of Nevers, Duke of Lower Burgundy and Mathilda de Châlon




Husband Henry I Count of Nevers, Duke of Lower Burgundy 63

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died:  - <Burgundy, (France)>
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 



Wife Mathilda de Châlon 63

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Count Lambert of Châlon (      -      )
         Mother: 




Children
1 F Aremburge 63

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dalmas I Sire of Semur-en-Brionnais (      -      ) 63




Research Notes: Wife - Mathilda de Châlon

Third wife of Henry I, Count of Nevers. 63


Henry I Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant and Mathilde of Flanders




Husband Henry I Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant 64 65

           Born: Abt 1165 - Leuven, Brabant, (Flemish Brabant), Flanders, (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Sep 1235 - Cologne, (North Rhine-Westphalia), Prussia, (Germany)
         Buried: 


         Father: Godfrey III Count of Louvain, Duke of Lorraine (1142-1190) 66 67
         Mother: Margaret of Limbourg (      -1173) 68


       Marriage: 1179

   Other Spouse: Marie of France (      -      ) 69 - 1213

Events

• Duke of Brabant: 1184.

• Duke of Lower Lotharingia: 1190.




Wife Mathilde of Flanders 70

            AKA: Maud of Flanders, Maud of Boulogne and Alsace
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1210 and 1211
         Buried: 


         Father: Matthew of Alsace, Count of Boulogne (      -      ) 71
         Mother: Marie of Blois, Countess of Boulogne (1136-1182) 72




Children
1 M Henry II Duke of Brabant 73

            AKA: Hendrik II van Brabant, Henri II de Brabant
           Born: 1207
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Feb 1248 - Leuven, Brabant, (Flemish Brabant), Flanders, (Belgium)
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Marie of Hohenstaufen (1201-1235) 74 75
           Marr: Bef 22 Aug 1215




Research Notes: Husband - Henry I Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant

From Wikipedia - Henry I, Duke of Brabant :

Henry I of Brabant (French: Henri I de Brabant, Dutch: Hendrik I van Brabant), named "The Courageous", was (probably) born in 1165 in Leuven and died in the German city of Cologne on September 5 , 1235 . He became Duke of Brabant in 1183/1184 and succeeded his father as Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1190. He was the son of Godfrey III of Leuven , Duke of Lower Lotharingia and landgrave of Brabant , and Margaret of Limburg .
He married Mathilde of Boulogne (Mathilde of Flanders), daughter of Marie of Boulogne and Matthew of Alsace 1179.

He had six children by his first marriage:
Marie (c. 1190 - May 1260), married in Maastricht after May 19 , 1214 Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor , married July 1220 Count William I of Holland
Adelaide (b. c. 1190), married 1206 Arnulf, Count of Loos , married February 3 , 1225 William X of Auvergne (c. 1195-1247), married before April 21 , 1251 Arnold van Wesemaele (d. aft. 1288)
Margaret (1192-1231), married January 1206 Gerhard III, Count of Guelders (d. October 22 , 1229 )
Mathilde (c. 1200 - December 22 , 1267 ), married in Aachen in 1212 Henry II, Count Palatine of the Rhine (d. 1214), married on December 6 , 1214 Floris IV, Count of Holland
Henry II of Brabant (1207-1248)
Godfrey (1209 - January 21 , 1254 ), Lord of Gaesbeek, married Marie van Oudenaarde

His second marriage was at April 22 , 1213 in Soissons to Marie, princess of France , daughter of King Philip II of France . They had two children:
Elizabeth (d. October 23 , 1272 ), married in Leuven March 19 , 1233 Count Dietrich of Cleves , Lord of Dinslaken (c. 1214-1244), married 1246 Gerhard II, Count of Wassenberg (d. 1255)
Marie, died young

Under Henry I, there was a town policy and town planning. Henry's attention went out to those regions that lent themselves to the extension of his sovereignty and in some locations he used the creation of a new town as an instrument in the political organisation of the area. Among the towns to which the Duke gave city rights and trade privileges was 's-Hertogenbosch .
He was buried in St. Peter's chapter church at Leuven where you can still see his late romanesque effigy. 64 65


Research Notes: Child - Henry II Duke of Brabant

Duke of Brabant and Lothier.

From Wikipedia - Henry II, Duke of Brabant :

Henry II of Brabant (French: Henri II de Brabant, Dutch: Hendrik II van Brabant, 1207 - February 1 , 1248 in Leuven ) was Duke of Brabant and Lothier after the death of his father Henry I in 1235. His mother was Mathilde of Flanders
Henry II supported his sister Mathilde's son, William II, Count of Holland , in the latter's bid for election as German King.

Family and children
His first marriage was to Marie of Hohenstaufen (April 3 , 1201 -1235, Leuven), daughter of Philip of Swabia and Irene Angelina . They had six children:
Henry III, Duke of Brabant (d. 1261)
Philip, died young
Matilda of Brabant (1224 - September 29 , 1288 ), married:
in Compiègne June 14 , 1237 to Robert I of Artois ;
before May 31 , 1254 to Guy II of Châtillon , Count of Saint Pol .
Beatrix (1225 - November 11 , 1288 ), married:
at Kreuzburg March 10 , 1241 Heinrich Raspe Landgrave of Thuringia ;
in Leuven November 1247 to William III of Dampierre, Count of Flanders (1224 - June 6 , 1251 ).
Marie of Brabant (c. 1226 - January 18 , 1256 , Donauwörth ), married Louis II, Duke of Upper Bavaria . She was beheaded by her husband on suspicion of infidelity.
Margaret (d. March 14 , 1277 ), Abbess of Herzogenthal .
His second marriage was to Sophie of Thuringia (March 20 , 1224 - May 29 , 1275 ), daughter of Ludwig IV of Thuringia and Elisabeth of Hungary by whom he had two children:
Henry (1244-1308, created Landgrave of Hesse in 1263.
Elizabeth (1243 - October 9 , 1261 ), married in Braunschweig July 13 , 1254 to Albert I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg 73


Henry I Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant and Marie of France




Husband Henry I Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant 64 65

           Born: Abt 1165 - Leuven, Brabant, (Flemish Brabant), Flanders, (Belgium)
     Christened: 
           Died: 5 Sep 1235 - Cologne, (North Rhine-Westphalia), Prussia, (Germany)
         Buried: 


         Father: Godfrey III Count of Louvain, Duke of Lorraine (1142-1190) 66 67
         Mother: Margaret of Limbourg (      -1173) 68


       Marriage: 1213

   Other Spouse: Mathilde of Flanders (      -Between 1210/1211) 70 - 1179

Events

• Duke of Brabant: 1184.

• Duke of Lower Lotharingia: 1190.




Wife Marie of France 69

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Philip II King of France (      -      ) 76
         Mother: 




Children

Research Notes: Husband - Henry I Duke of Lorraine, Louvain and Brabant

From Wikipedia - Henry I, Duke of Brabant :

Henry I of Brabant (French: Henri I de Brabant, Dutch: Hendrik I van Brabant), named "The Courageous", was (probably) born in 1165 in Leuven and died in the German city of Cologne on September 5 , 1235 . He became Duke of Brabant in 1183/1184 and succeeded his father as Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1190. He was the son of Godfrey III of Leuven , Duke of Lower Lotharingia and landgrave of Brabant , and Margaret of Limburg .
He married Mathilde of Boulogne (Mathilde of Flanders), daughter of Marie of Boulogne and Matthew of Alsace 1179.

He had six children by his first marriage:
Marie (c. 1190 - May 1260), married in Maastricht after May 19 , 1214 Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor , married July 1220 Count William I of Holland
Adelaide (b. c. 1190), married 1206 Arnulf, Count of Loos , married February 3 , 1225 William X of Auvergne (c. 1195-1247), married before April 21 , 1251 Arnold van Wesemaele (d. aft. 1288)
Margaret (1192-1231), married January 1206 Gerhard III, Count of Guelders (d. October 22 , 1229 )
Mathilde (c. 1200 - December 22 , 1267 ), married in Aachen in 1212 Henry II, Count Palatine of the Rhine (d. 1214), married on December 6 , 1214 Floris IV, Count of Holland
Henry II of Brabant (1207-1248)
Godfrey (1209 - January 21 , 1254 ), Lord of Gaesbeek, married Marie van Oudenaarde

His second marriage was at April 22 , 1213 in Soissons to Marie, princess of France , daughter of King Philip II of France . They had two children:
Elizabeth (d. October 23 , 1272 ), married in Leuven March 19 , 1233 Count Dietrich of Cleves , Lord of Dinslaken (c. 1214-1244), married 1246 Gerhard II, Count of Wassenberg (d. 1255)
Marie, died young

Under Henry I, there was a town policy and town planning. Henry's attention went out to those regions that lent themselves to the extension of his sovereignty and in some locations he used the creation of a new town as an instrument in the political organisation of the area. Among the towns to which the Duke gave city rights and trade privileges was 's-Hertogenbosch .
He was buried in St. Peter's chapter church at Leuven where you can still see his late romanesque effigy. 64 65


Sources


1 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-19.

2 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-23.

3 Lloyd, Jacob Youde William, The History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher, and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog, and the Ancient Lords of Arwystli, Cedewen, and Meirionydd. (Vol. 5. London: Whiting & Co., 1885.), p. 413.

4 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 170-22.

5 Wikipedia.org, David I of Scotland.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 130-26.

7 Wikipedia.org, Maud, Countess of Huntingdon.

8 Wikipedia.org, Elizabeth of Vermandois.

9 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 89-25.

10 Wikipedia.org, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey.

11 http://www.familysearch.org.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Lines 50-24, 53-24, 83-24, 84-24, 88-25, 89-25, 140-24, 170-23 184-4, 215-24.

13 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 97-26, 38-26 (Alan).

14 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 193-6.

15 Browning, Charles Henry, The Magna Charta Barons and their American Descendants (Philadelphia, 1898.), p. 81.

16 Wikipedia.org, Henry, Count of Portugal.

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-24.

18 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-23, 108-23.

19 Wikipedia.org, Henry of Burgundy.

20 Wikipedia.org, Alfonso VI of León and Castile.

21 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 113-23 (Constance of Burgundy).

22 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-24 (Henry I).

23 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-25.

24 Wikipedia.org, Afonso I of Portugal.

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 112-25 (Alfonso I).

26 Wikipedia.org, Maud of Savoy.

27 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 17-29.

28 Wikipedia.org, Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.

29 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 17-28, 45-30 (Blanche of Artois).

30 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-30.

31 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 71A-31, 17-29 (Henry "of Lancaster").

32 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 72-32, 17-29 (Henry "of Lancaster").

33 Wikipedia.org, Maud Chaworth.

34 Website:, Chaworth Family Genealogy by Albert Douglass Hart, Jr ("Our Folk").

35 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 72-31 (Isabel de Beauchamp).

36 Wikipedia.org, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester & William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

37 Wikipedia.org, Isabella de Beauchamp.

38 Wikipedia.org, Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster; Alice Comyn; Maud Chaworth.

39 Wikipedia.org, Alice Comyn.

40 Wikipedia.org, Joan of Lancaster; Maud Chaworth.

41 Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of Lancaster.

42 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 17-30.

43 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 17-30 (Eleanor of Lancaster).

44 Wikipedia.org, Eleanor of Lancaster, Alice Comyn.

45 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 60-32, 28-33.

46 Wikipedia.org, Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel.

47 Cambrian Archæological Association, Archæologia Cambrensis, the Journal of the Cambrian Archæological Association. (Vol. 7, 6th series. London: Chas. J. Clark, 1907.), pp. 11-12.

48 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

49 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #103114 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

50 Wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herluin_de_Conteville.

51 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com (Herluin de Conteville).

52 Wikipedia.org, Herleva (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herleva).

53 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593882938.

54 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com (Herleva de Falaise).

55 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 166-24.

56 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 166-23 (Judith of Normandy).

57 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 166-23.

58 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 248-8, 166-24 (Henry I).

59 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243A-23, 166-24 (Henry I).

60 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 243-7. 166-24 (Henry I).

61 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-25, 166-25 (Judith of Bavaria).

62 Wikipedia.org, Frederick II, Duke of Swabia.

63 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 108-22 (Robert the Old).

64 Wikipedia.org, Henry I, Duke of Brabant.

65 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-26.

66 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-25.

67 Wikipedia.org, Godfrey III, Count of Leuven.

68 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 155-25 (Godfrey III).

69 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 165-27 (Mathilde of Flanders).

70 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 165-27, 155-26 (Henry I).

71 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 165-26, 169-26 (Mary of Blois), 155-26 (Henry I).

72 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 169-26.

73 Wikipedia.org, Henry II, Duke of Brabant.

74 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-28.

75 Wikipedia.org, Marie of Hohenstaufen.

76 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 101-26).


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