The Johnson-Wallace & Fish-Kirk Families




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1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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2 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Gwendolen Queen of the Britons [Legendary] (      -      ) 1


3 M Albanactus King of Albania (Scotland) [Legendary] 2

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Research Notes: Husband - Brutus King of Britain [Legendary]

Exiled Trojan prince, the founder and first king of Britain. Reigned 24 years. Supposedly contemporary with Corineus of Cornwall, Eli and Aeneas Silvius.

From Wikipedia - Brutus of Troy :

Brutus (Welsh : Brutus) or Brute of Troy is a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas , was known in medieval British legend as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain . This legend first appears in the Historia Britonum , a 9th century historical compilation attributed to Nennius , but is best known from the account given by the 12th century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Historia Regum Britanniae . However, he is not mentioned in any classical text and is not considered to be historical.

Historia Britonum
The Historia Britonum states that "The island of Britain derives its name from Brutus, a Roman consul" who conquered both Spain and Britain. A more detailed story, set before the foundation of Rome, follows, in which Brutus is the grandson or great grandson of Aeneas.

Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil , the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War , and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa , one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father is Silvius , who is identified as either the second son of Aeneas, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius. A magician, asked to predict the child's future, said it would be a boy and that he would be the bravest and most beloved in Italy. Enraged, Ascanius had the magician put to death. The mother died in childbirth.

The boy, named Brutus, later accidentally killed his father with an arrow and was banished from Italy. After wandering among the islands of the Tyrrhenian Sea and through Gaul , where he founded the city of Tours , Brutus eventually came to Britain, named it after himself, and filled it with his descendants. His reign is synchronised to the time the High Priest Eli was judge in Israel , and the Ark of the Covenant was taken by the Philistines .[1]

A variant version of the Historia Britonum makes Brutus the son of Ascanius's son Silvius , and traces his genealogy back to Ham , son of Noah .[2] Another chapter traces Brutus's genealogy differently, making him the great-grandson of the legendary Roman king Numa Pompilius , who was himself a son of Ascanius, and tracing his descent from Noah's son Japheth .[3] These Christianising traditions conflict with the classical Trojan genealogies, relating the Trojan royal family to Greek gods .

Yet another Brutus, son of Hisicion, son of Alanus the first European, also traced back across many generations to Japheth, is referred to in the Historia Britonum. This Brutus's brothers were Francus, Alamanus and Romanus, also ancestors of significant European nations.[4]

Historia Regum Britanniae
Geoffrey of Monmouth's account tells much the same story, but in greater detail.[5] In this version, Brutus is explicitly the grandson, rather than son, of Ascanius; his father is Ascanius' son Silvius. The magician who predicts great things for the unborn Brutus also foretells he will kill both his parents. He does so, in the same manner described in the Historia Britonum, and is banished. Travelling to Greece, he discovers a group of Trojans enslaved there. He becomes their leader, and after a series of battles and some judicious hostage-taking, forces the Greek king Pandrasus to let his people go. He is given Pandrasus's daughter Ignoge in marriage, and ships and provisions for the voyage, and sets sail.

The Trojans land on a deserted island and discover an abandoned temple to Diana . After performing the appropriate ritual, Brutus falls asleep in front of the goddess's statue and is given a vision of the land where he is destined to settle, an island in the western ocean inhabited only by a few giants.

After some adventures in north Africa and a close encounter with the Sirens , Brutus discovers another group of exiled Trojans living on the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea, led by the prodigious warrior Corineus . In Gaul , Corineus provokes a war with Goffarius Pictus, king of Aquitaine , after hunting in the king's forests without permission. Brutus's nephew Turonus dies in the fighting, and the city of Tours is founded where he is buried. The Trojans win most of their battles but are conscious that the Gauls have the advantage of numbers, so go back to their ships and sail for Britain, then called Albion . They meet the giant descendants of Albion and defeat them.

Brutus renames the island after himself and becomes its first king. Corineus becomes ruler of Cornwall , which is named after him.[6] They are harassed by the giants, but kill all of them but their leader, Gogmagog , who is saved for a wrestling match against Corineus. Corineus throws him over a cliff to his death. Brutus then founds a city on the banks of the River Thames , which he calls Troia Nova, or New Troy, siting his palace where is now Guildhall and a temple to Diana on what is now St Paul's (with the London Stone being a part of the altar at the latter). The name is in time corrupted to Trinovantum , and is later called London .[7] He creates laws for his people and rules for twenty-four years. He is buried at a temple at Tower Hill . After his death the island is divided between his three sons, Locrinus (England ), Albanactus (Scotland ) and Kamber (Wales ).

Legacy
Early translations and adaptations of Geoffrey's Historia, such as Wace 's Norman French Roman de Brut , Layamon 's Middle English Brut , were named after Brutus, and the word "Brut" came to mean a chronicle of British history. One of several Middle Welsh adaptations was called the Brut y Brenhinedd ("Chronicle of the Kings"). Brut y Tywysogion ("Chronicle of the Princes"), a major chronicle for the Welsh rulers from the 7th century to loss of independence, is a purely historical work containing no legendary material but the title reflects the influence of Geoffrey's work and in one sense can be seen as a "sequel" to it.

Geoffrey's Historia says that Brutus and his followers landed at Totnes in Devon . A stone on Fore Street in Totnes, known as the "Brutus Stone", commemorates this.


Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Camber (legendary king) :

Camber, also Kamber, was the legendary first king of Cambria , according to the Geoffrey of Monmouth in the first part of his influential 12th-century pseudohistory Historia Regum Britanniae . According to Geoffrey, Cambria, the classical name for Wales , was named for him.

Camber was the son of Brutus , and a descendant of Aeneas of Troy . Upon his father's death he was given Cambria, while his younger brother Albanactus got Alba (the territory corresponding to modern Scotland ; from Welsh Yr Alban) and his older brother Locrinus received Logres (corresponding to England ; from Welsh Lloegr) and the title of King of the Britons . When Albanactus was murdered by Humber , King of the Huns , Camber joined Locrinus in attacking and defeating him.

Like many of the characters reported by Geoffrey, Camber has no historical basis but are the product of Geoffrey of Monmouth's imagination, invented largely for political ends within the contemporary Anglo-Norman world.[1] 3


Research Notes: Child - Private

King of the Britons in England. Reigned about 10 years.

From Wikipedia - Locrinus :

Locrinus was a legendary king of the Britons , as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth . He was the oldest son of Brutus and a descendant of the Trojans through Aeneas . Following Brutus's death, Britain was divided amongst the three sons, with Locrinus receiving the portion roughly equivalent to England, Albanactus receiving Scotland (Albany), and Kamber receiving Wales (Cymru). He ruled a portion of Britain called Loegria , named after him, which is roughly the boundaries of modern-day England . He reigned 10 years, most of which were peaceful.

He avenged his brother Albanactus 's death at the hands of Humber the Hun by allying with his other brother, Kamber , and fighting Humber to the banks of a river where he drowned. The river was named Humber after this battle. Locrinus divided up the spoils of war with his allies, only keeping gold and silver found on their ships for himself. He also took the daughter of the king of the Germans , Estrildis , whom the Huns had captured. This angered Corineus , an ally of his father Brutus, who had arranged a marriage between Locrinus and his own daughter, Queen Gwendolen . Locrinus submitted and married Gwendolen but still secretly loved Estrildis, whom he locked in a cave beneath Trinovantum (London ) for seven years.

Locrinus became the father of a girl, Habren, by Estrildis, and a boy, Maddan , by Gwendolen. Soon after Maddan's birth, Locrinus sent him off to Corineus, the child's grandfather. When Corineus finally died, Locrinus left Gwendolen and took Estrildis as his queen. Gwendolen went to Cornwall and assembled an army to harass Locrinus. The two armies met near the River Stour and there Locrinus was killed. His wife, Gwendolen, ruled after his death.


Research Notes: Child - Albanactus King of Albania (Scotland) [Legendary]

From Wikipedia - Albanactus :
According to Geoffrey of Monmouth , Albanactus was the founding king of Albania or Albany . He was the youngest of three sons of Brutus , a descendant of Aeneas of Troy . According to legend, upon their father's death, the eldest son Locrinus was given Loegria, Camber was given Cambria and Albanactus Albania. These names are merely reverse etymologies. Albanactus, for instance, is a reverse etymology of the Scottish word Albannach (Scotsman). Likewise, Locrinus represents the medieval Welsh word Loegria (England ) and Camber represents the Latin word Cambria or the Welsh word Cymru (Wales ).

It is recounted that Albanactus was killed shortly after he began his reign, by Humber , king of the Huns . Humber invaded Albany from Germany and met Albanactus's army in battle, where Humber killed Albanactus. This forced the people of Albany to flee south to Albanactus's brother, Locrinus .

All this was supposedly before the Picts and Scots had invaded. Later Kings of England - particularly Edward I - used the Brutus and Albanactus legend as an excuse to claim superiority over and to conquer Scotland, arguing that as Locrinus was the oldest brother, so he and hence England had superior status. The same argument, of course, extended over Wales, as Camber was also junior to Locrinus.

In Scottish origin myths, Albanactus had little place. The Scots instead stressed descent from Gaythelos (Gael ) or Gaidel Glas and his wife Scota .



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1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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Research Notes: Husband - Brutus Darianlas King of Britain [Legendary]

Reigned about 12 years.

From Wikipedia - Brutus Greenshield :

Brutus Greenshield (Welsh : Brutus Darian Las) was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth . He was the son of King Ebraucus .

Brutus, called Greenshield, was the eldest of twenty sons and the only remaining son of Ebraucus in Britain at the time of his death. All Ebraucus's other sons were in Germany establishing a new kingdom there. He reigned for twelve years after his father's death and was succeeded by his son, Leil .


Research Notes: Child - Private

King of the Britons, reigned about 25 years. Contemporary of Solomon.

From Wikipedia - Leil :

Leil was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth . He was the son of King Brutus Greenshield .

Leil was a peaceful and just king and took advantage of the prosperity afforded him by his ancestors. He built Caerleil (Fort of Leil) in the north as a tribute to this prosperity. He reigned for twenty-five years until he grew old and feeble. His inactivity sparked a civil war , during which he died. He was succeeded by his son Rud Hud Hudibras .

Geoffrey asserts that Leil reigned at the time when Solomon built the Temple in Jerusalem and Silvus Epitus was king of Alba Longa .


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1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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Buwin Comté d'Autun et Metz and Richilde d'Arles




Husband Buwin Comté d'Autun et Metz 4

           Born: Abt 790
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           Died: 864
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Wife Richilde d'Arles 4

           Born: Abt 825
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1 M Boso Roi de Provence 4

           Born: Abt 840
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           Died: Abt 887
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Cairbre King of Leinster




Husband Cairbre King of Leinster 5

           Born: Abt 500 - Ireland
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           Died: 567
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         Father: Cormac King of Leinster (Abt 0460-0546) 5
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1 M Colman King of Leinster 5

           Born: Abt 530 - Ireland
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           Died: 576
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Private




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1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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Research Notes: Husband - Camber King of Cambria (Wales) [Legendary]

From Wikipedia - Camber (legendary king) :

Camber, also Kamber, was the legendary first king of Cambria , according to the Geoffrey of Monmouth in the first part of his influential 12th-century pseudohistory Historia Regum Britanniae . According to Geoffrey, Cambria, the classical name for Wales , was named for him.

Camber was the son of Brutus , and a descendant of Aeneas of Troy . Upon his father's death he was given Cambria, while his younger brother Albanactus got Alba (the territory corresponding to modern Scotland ; from Welsh Yr Alban) and his older brother Locrinus received Logres (corresponding to England ; from Welsh Lloegr) and the title of King of the Britons . When Albanactus was murdered by Humber , King of the Huns , Camber joined Locrinus in attacking and defeating him.

Like many of the characters reported by Geoffrey, Camber has no historical basis but are the product of Geoffrey of Monmouth's imagination, invented largely for political ends within the contemporary Anglo-Norman world.[1] 3


Canute King of Denmark and England and Emma Princess of Normandy




Husband Canute King of Denmark and England

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       Marriage: 1017



Wife Emma Princess of Normandy 5 6

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         Father: Richard I Duke of Normandy (0933-0996) 5 7 8 9 10
         Mother: Gunnora de Crepon (Abt 0936-Abt 1031) 11 12 13 14



   Other Spouse: Æthelred II "the Redeless" King of England (Abt 0968-1016) 5 15 16 - Abt 1002


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Research Notes: Husband - Canute King of Denmark and England

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 1-18 (Aethelred II)


Research Notes: Wife - Emma Princess of Normandy

Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr, ed. by William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall (Baltimore, 2008), line 1-18 (Aethelred II)


Canute the Great King of Denmark, England and Norway and Emma of Normandy




Husband Canute the Great King of Denmark, England and Norway

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Wife Emma of Normandy

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1 F Gunhilda of Denmark

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           Died: 1038 - Adriatic coast
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         Spouse: Henry III "the Black" Holy Roman Emperor (1017-1056) 17 18
           Marr: Nijmegen, (Netherlands)



Research Notes: Husband - Canute the Great King of Denmark, England and Norway

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor


Research Notes: Wife - Emma of Normandy

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor


Research Notes: Child - Gunhilda of Denmark

Source: Wikipedia - Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor


Private and Private




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         Father: Private
         Mother: Eurydice of Troy [Mythological] (      -      )




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1 M Private (details suppressed for this person)

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Research Notes: Husband - Capys Prince of Troy [Mythological]



From Wikipedia - Capys :

In Greek mythology , Capys was a name attributed to three individuals:
A son of Assaracus and Aigesta or Themiste or Clytodora (daughter of Laomedon ) or Hieromneme , and father of Anchises and so grandfather of Aeneas . He, or a different Capys, founded the city of Capua .[1]
The Trojan who warned not to bring the Trojan horse into the city.
A descendant of Aeneas and king of Alba Longa .
According to Roman sources, in the Etruscan language the word "capys" meant 'hawk' or 'falcon' (or possibly 'eagle' or 'vulture').
----
From Wikipedia - Anchises :

In Greek mythology , Anchises (Ancient Greek : was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme , a naiad .


Research Notes: Wife - Themiste of Troy [Mythological]

From Wikipedia - Themiste :

In Greek mythology , Themiste was the daughter of Ilus and Eurydice , sister of Laomedon and mother of Anchises by her husband Capys , son of Assaracus .


Research Notes: Child - Private

From Wikipedia - Anchises :

In Greek mythology , Anchises (Ancient Greek : was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme , a naiad . His major claim to fame in Greek mythology is that he was a mortal lover of the goddess Aphrodite (and in Roman mythology, the lover of Venus ). One version is that Aphrodite pretended to be a Phrygian princess and seduced him for nearly two weeks of lovemaking. Anchises learned that his lover was a goddess only nine months later, when she revealed herself and presented him with the infant Aeneas . The principal early narrative of Aphrodite's seduction of Anchises and the birth of Aeneas is the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite.

Anchises was a prince from Dardania , a territory neighbouring Troy . He had a mortal wife named Eriopis, according to the scholiasts, and he is credited with other children beside Aeneas. Homer , in the Iliad , mentions a daughter named Hippodameia , their eldest ("the darling of her father and mother"), who married her cousin Alcathous .

Anchises bred his mares with the divine stallions owned by King Laomedon . However, he made the mistake of bragging about his liaison with Aphrodite, and as a result Zeus , the king of the gods, hit him with a thunderbolt which left him lame.

After the defeat of Troy in the Trojan War , the elderly Anchises was carried from the burning city by his son Aeneas, accompanied by Aeneas' wife Creusa , who died in the escape attempt, and small son Ascanius (the subject is depicted in several paintings, including a famous version by Federico Barocci in the Galleria Borghese in Rome ). Anchises himself died and was buried in Sicily many years later. Aeneas later visited Hades and saw his father again in the Elysian Fields . Homer's Iliad mentions another Anchises, a wealthy native of Sicyon in Greece and father of Echepolus.


Chilperic II King of the Burgundians and Caretena




Husband Chilperic II King of the Burgundians 19 20

            AKA: Chilperic King of Burgundy
           Born: Abt 450 - <Burgundy, (France)>
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           Died: 493
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         Father: Gondioc King of the Burgundians (Abt 0420-0473) 21 22
         Mother: < > [Sister of Ricimer] (      -      ) 23


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   Other Spouse: Agrippine de Bourgogne (      -      ) 24



Wife Caretena 20

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           Died: 493
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1 F Clotilde Queen of the Franks 25 26 27 28




            AKA: St. Clothilde, Clotild, Clotilda, Saint Clotilde, Evochilde de Cologne
           Born: 475 - Lyons, (Rhône), Burgundy (France)
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           Died: 545 - Tours, Touraine (Indre-et-Loire), France
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         Spouse: Clovis I King of the Franks (Abt 0466-0511) 29 30 31
           Marr: 493



Death Notes: Husband - Chilperic II King of the Burgundians

Assassinated by Gundobad


Research Notes: Husband - Chilperic II King of the Burgundians

From Wikipedia - Chilperic II of Burgundy :

Chilperic II (c. 450 - 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel , Godomar , and Gundobad ; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva , Vienne , and Lyon . They were all sons of Gundioch . Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus .

In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne . After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma and Clotilda . Chroma became a nun and Clotilda fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I , requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war.


Death Notes: Wife - Caretena

Drowned by Gundobad


Research Notes: Child - Clotilde Queen of the Franks

From Wikipedia - Clotilde :

Saint Clotilde (475 - 545 ), also known as Clotilda or simply Clotild, was the daughter of Chilperic II of Burgundy and Caretena, and wife of the Frankish king Clovis I . Venerated as a saint, she was instrumental to her husbands famous conversion to Catholic Christianity and, in her later years, was known for her almsgiving and penitential works of mercy.

On the death of Gundioc , king of the Burgundians, in 473, his sons Gundobad, Godegesil and Chilperic divided his heritage between them; Chilperic apparently reigning at Lyon, Gundobald at Vienne and Godegesil at Geneva.

According to Gregory of Tours , Chilperic was slain by Gundobad, his wife drowned, and of his two daughters, Chrona took the veil and Clotilde was exiled. This account, however, seems to have been a later invention, since an epitaph discovered at Lyons speaks of a Burgundian queen who died in 506. This was most probably the mother of Clotilde.

In 493 Clotilde married Clovis, King of the Franks , who had just conquered northern Gaul. She was brought up in the Catholic faith and did not rest until her husband had abjured paganism and embraced the Catholic faith in 496 . With him she built at Paris the church of the Holy Apostles, afterwards known as Sainte Geneviève. After the death of Clovis in 511 she retired to the abbey of St Martin at Tours.

In 523 she incited her sons against her cousin Sigismund , the son of Gundobad and provoked the Burgundian war. In the following year she tried in vain to protect the rights of her grandsons, the children of Clodomer , against the claims of her sons Childebert I and Clotaire I , and was equally unsuccessful in her efforts to prevent the civil discords between her children. She died in 544 or 545, and was buried at her husband's side in the church of the Holy Apostles.


Sources


1. Wikipedia.org, Queen Gwendolen; List of legendary kings of Britain.

2. Wikipedia.org, Albanactus.

3. Wikipedia.org, Camber (legendary king).

4. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/2937.htm.

5. http://www.familysearch.org.

6. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-18 (Aethelred II).

7. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177-3 (Nesta).

8. Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f87/a0018708.htm.

9. Wikipedia.org, Richard I, Duke of Normandy.

10. Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

11. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #875034 Maitland Dirk Brower.

12. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121E-20.

13. Wikipedia.org, Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy.

14. Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/442.htm.

15. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-18, 34-19.

16. Wikipedia.org, Ethelred "the Unready."

17. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-22.

18. Wikipedia.org, Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor.

19. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #154209 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

20. Wikipedia.org, Chilperic II of Burgundy.

21. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99217 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

22. Wikipedia.org, Gongioc.

23. Wikipedia.org, Gondioc.

24. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317962 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

25. Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-3 (Clovis I).

26. Wikipedia.org, Clotilde.

27. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105696 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873340.

29. http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99017 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

30. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873339.

31. Wikipedia.org, Clovis I; List of Frankish kings.


Sources


1 Wikipedia.org, Queen Gwendolen; List of legendary kings of Britain.

2 Wikipedia.org, Albanactus.

3 Wikipedia.org, Camber (legendary king).

4 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/2937.htm.

5 http://www.familysearch.org.

6 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-18 (Aethelred II).

7 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 177-3 (Nesta).

8 Website - Genealogy, http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f001/f87/a0018708.htm.

9 Wikipedia.org, Richard I, Duke of Normandy.

10 Website - Genealogy, thepeerage.com.

11 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #125 Pin #875034 Maitland Dirk Brower.

12 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 121E-20.

13 Wikipedia.org, Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy.

14 Website:, http://cybergata.com/roots/442.htm.

15 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 1-18, 34-19.

16 Wikipedia.org, Ethelred "the Unready."

17 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 45-22.

18 Wikipedia.org, Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor.

19 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #154209 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

20 Wikipedia.org, Chilperic II of Burgundy.

21 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99217 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

22 Wikipedia.org, Gongioc.

23 Wikipedia.org, Gondioc.

24 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #317962 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

25 Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (8th ed. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2008.), Line 240A-3 (Clovis I).

26 Wikipedia.org, Clotilde.

27 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #105696 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

28 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873340.

29 http://www.familysearch.org, Compact Disc #94 Pin #99017 (submitted by Samuel Taylor "Sam" Geer).

30 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3174654&id=I593873339.

31 Wikipedia.org, Clovis I; List of Frankish kings.


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